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Encyclopedia > Mahmoud Darwish
Mahmoud Darwish

Mahmoud Darwish (Arabic: محمود درويش; born 1941 in Al-Birwah, British Mandate of Palestine) is a contemporary Palestinian poet and writer of prose. He has published over thirty volumes of poetry, eight books of prose and has served as the editor of several publications, including: Al-jadid, Al-fajr, Shu'un filistiniyya and Al-Karmel. He is recognized internationally for his poetry, which focuses on his strong affection for his lost homeland. His work has won numerous awards, and has been published in at least twenty-two languages. The majority of his work has not been translated into English.[1] Image File history File links Mahmood_darwish. ... Image File history File links Mahmood_darwish. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... al-Birwa was a Palestinian village that was captured by Israel during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... Flag Britain unilaterally closed the territory east of the Jordan River (Transjordan) to Jewish settlement and organized Transjordan as an autonomous state in 1923. ... Palestinians are people with family origins mainly in Palestine. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday [[speech. ...


In the 1960s, Darwish joined the official Communist Party of Israel, the Rakah, but he is better known for his active work within the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). Once a member of PLO Executive Committee, he resigned from the Committee and broke with the PLO in 1993 to protest the continuation of the Oslo Accords. The Communist Party of Israel (known as Maki, an acronym for Miflaga Komunistit Yisraelit) was formed in 1948 by the remnant of the Communist Party of Palestine within the borders of the new state of Israel. ... The Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) (Arabic: ;   or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah) is a political and paramilitary organization regarded by the Arab League since October 1974 as the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people. ... The Executive Committee (PLO EC) is the highest executive body of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ...

Contents

Early Life and Education

Palestinians
Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Balfour Declaration
1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine
Partition · British Mandate
1947-48 Palestinian Civil War
1948 Arab-Israeli War
Transjordan · Israel
Palestinian exodus
Jordanian control (West Bank)
Egyptian control (Gaza Strip)
1st Intifada · Oslo Accords
· Hafrada (Separation) · Israeli Gaza Strip barrier
2nd Intifada · Israeli West Bank barrier ·
Israel's unilateral disengagement plan
Timeline
See also Template:Arab citizens of Israel
The term Palestine and the related term Palestinian have several overlapping (and occasionally contradictory) definitions. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which is often claimed to be at the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between two peoples, Jewish Israelis and Arab Palestinians, who both claim the right to sovereignty over the Land... The Balfour Declaration was a letter dated November 2, 1917 from the British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, to Lord Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation, a private Zionist organization. ... The 1936-1939 Arab revolt in Palestine was an uprising during the British mandate by Palestinian Arabs in Palestine which lasted from 1936 to 1939. ... On 29 November 1947 the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181, a plan to resolve the Arab-Israeli conflict in the British Mandate of Palestine, was approved by the United Nations General Assembly. ... Flag Palestine and Transjordan were incorporated (under different legal and administrative arrangements) into the British Mandate of Palestine, issued by the League of Nations to Great Britain on 29 September, 1923 Capital Not specified Organizational structure League of Nations Mandate High Commissioner  - 1920 — 1925 Sir Herbert Louis Samuel  - 1945 — 1948... Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel and the United... Combatants  Israel Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin Glubb Pasha, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising to 115,000 by March 1949 Egypt: 10,000 initially rising... Map of the territory of the British Mandate of Palestine The Emirate of Transjordan was an autonomous political division of the British Mandate of Palestine, created as an administrative entity in April 1921 before the Mandate came into effect. ... Palestinian refugees in 1948 The Palestinian exodus (Arabic: الهجرة الفلسطينية al-Hijra al-Filasteeniya) refers to the refugee flight of Palestinian Arabs during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... Map of the West Bank today Rule of the West Bank and East Jerusalem by Jordan. ... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... The First Intifada, or Palestinian uprising refers to a series of violent incidents between Palestinians and Israelis between 1987 and approximately 1990. ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... Hafrada (Hebrew: ) is the English transliteration of the Hebrew word for separation. ... Gaza Strip Barrier near the Karni Crossing The Israeli Gaza Strip barrier is a separation barrier along the armistice line of the 1948 Arab-Israeli War between the Gaza Strip and Israel. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... The barrier route as of May 2005. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (Hebrew: תוכנית ההתנתקות Tokhnit HaHitnatkut or תכנית ההינתקות Tokhnit HaHinatkut in the Disengagement Plan Implementation Law), also known as the Disengagement plan, Gaza Pull-Out plan, and Hitnatkut) was a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, adopted by the government and enacted in August 2005, to remove all... This is an incomplete timeline of events in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ...

Palestinian National Authority

Geography of the West Bank · Geography of the Gaza Strip
Palestinian territories
List of Arab localities in Palestine 1948
West Bank · Gaza Strip
Districts · Cities · East Jerusalem
Refugee camps
Biodiversity Anthem: Biladi Capital Ramallah and Gaza de facto, as the current location of government institutions. ... Geography of the West Bank Location: Middle East, west of Jordan Geographic coordinates: 32 00 N, 35 15 E Map references: Middle East Area: total: 5,860 km² land: 5,640 km² water: 220 km² note: includes West Bank, Latrun Salient, and the northwest quarter of the Dead Sea, but... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... District of Acre Acre Amqa Arab al-Samniyya al-Bassa al-Birwa al-Damun Dayr al-Qassi al-Ghabisiyya Iqrit Iribbin, Khirbat Jiddin, Khirbat al-Kabri Kafr Inan Kuwaykat al-Manshiyya al-Mansura Miar al-Nabi Rubin Nahf al-Nahr al-Ruways Sakhnin Shaab Suhmata al-Sumayriyya Suruh... The 16 Governorates of the West Bank and Gaza Strip are divided into 16 districts (Aqdya, singular - qadaa). ... Map of the West Bank Map of Gaza Strip This is a list of cities and towns in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, the two territories that make up the Palestinian territories. ... East Jerusalem is that part of Jerusalem which was held by Jordan from the 1948 Arab-Israeli War until the Six-Day War in 1967. ... List of Palestinian refugee camps with current population and year they were established: Gaza, 8 camps, 478,854 refugees 1948, Beach camp (Shati), 76,109 1949, Bureij, 30,059 1948, Deir el-Balah, 20,188 1948, Jabalia (Jabalyia, Abalyia), 103,646 1949, Khan Yunis, 60,662 1949, Maghazi, 22,536... This article is about the fauna and flora in the geographical region of Israel and the Disputed Territories (the West Bank and Gaza Strip). ...

Politics

PLO · PNA · PNC · PLO EC · PLC
Political Parties
Hamas · Fatah
National Covenant · Foreign Relations
Palestinian Civil War
... The Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) (Arabic: ;   or Munazzamat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyyah) is a political and paramilitary organization regarded by the Arab League since October 1974 as the sole legitimate representative of the Palestinian people. ... Anthem: Biladi Capital Ramallah and Gaza de facto, as the current location of government institutions. ... The Palestinian National Council (PNC) is the parliament in exile of the Palestinian people. ... The Executive Committee (PLO EC) is the highest executive body of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). ... The Palestinian Legislative Council, (sometimes referred to to as the Palestinan Parliament) the legislature of the Palestinian Authority, is a unicameral body with 88 members, elected from 16 electoral districts in the West Bank and Gaza. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues with the aim to participate in power, usually by participating in elections. ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Islamist organization. ... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ... The Palestinian National Covenant or Palestinian National Charter (Arabic: al-Mithaq al-Watani al-Filastini) is the charter or constitution of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). ... The Palestinian Declaration of Independence, led to Palestines recognition by 93 countries and to the renaming of the PLO mission in the UN to Palestine. After the formation of the Palestinian Authority, many countries exchanged embassies and delegations with it. ... The term Palestinian Civil War can either refer to: The 1947-48 Palestinian Civil War The 2006-2007 Fatah-Hamas conflict Category: ...

Demographics

Demographics of the West Bank
People
The Palestinian territories, occupied — according to the United Nations terminology — since the 1967 Six-Day War, include the West Bank and the Gaza strip. ... See also: Demographics of Israel, demographics section in Gaza strip Population: 2,020,298 note: in addition, there are some 171,000 Israeli settlers in the West Bank and about 172,000 in East Jerusalem (July 2000 est. ...

Economy

Economy of the West Bank
Economy - overview: Economic conditions in the West Bank - where economic activity is governed by the Paris Economic Protocol of April 1994 between Israel and the Palestinian Authority - have deteriorated since the early 1990s. ...

Religion & religious sites

Palestinian Jew · Palestinian Christian
Druze · Sunni Muslim
Al-Aqsa Mosque · Dome of the Rock
Church of the Nativity · Rachel's Tomb
Church of the Holy Sepulchre
See also Template:History of the Levant
Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... A Palestinian Jew is a Jewish inhabitant of Palestine throughout certain periods of Middle East history. ... The Palestinian Christians are Palestinians who follow Christianity. ... Religions Druzism Scriptures Languages Arabic, Hebrew The Druze (Arabic: درزي, derzÄ« or durzÄ«, plural دروز, durÅ«z; Hebrew: , Druzim; also transliterated Druz or Druse) are a Middle Eastern religious community whose traditional religion began as an offshoot of the Ismaili sect of Islam, but is unique in its incorporation of Gnostic, neo... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... For other uses, see Al-aqsa (disambiguation). ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... View of The Church of the Nativity from Manger Square The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest continuously operating churches in the world. ... Rachels Tomb is a holy site of high significance to Judaism and is located in Northern Judea (Southern West Bank) just outside of the Jerusalem neighborhood of Gilo at the northern entrance to Bethlehem along what was once the Biblical Bethlehem-Ephrath road. ... The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, called the Church of the Resurrection (Greek: Ναός της Αναστάσεως, Naos tis Anastaseos; Georgian: აგდგომის ტადზარი Agdgomis Tadzari; Armenian: Surp Harutyun) by Eastern Christians, is a Christian church within the walled Old City of Jerusalem. ...

Culture

Music · Dance · Palestinian cuisine
Palestinian Arabic
Palestinian flag Palestinian culture is most closely related to the cultures of the nearby Levantine countries such as Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan and of the Arab World. ... In the areas now controlled by Israel and Palestinian National Authority, multiple ethnic groups, races and religions have long held on to a diverse culture. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Palestinian cuisine or foods from or commonly eaten in the Palestinian territories and the Arab population of Israel. ... Palestinian Arabic is a Levantine Arabic dialect subgroup. ...

Notable personalities

Rashid Khalidi · Rim Banna
Edward Said · Emile Habibi · Hanan Ashrawi
Ghassan Kanafani · Qustandi Shomali
Ghada Karmi· Mahmoud Darwish ·
Samih al-Qasim · Nathalie Handal ·
Khalil al-Sakakini · Elia Suleiman ·
Hany Abu-Assad · May Ziade ·
Mohammad Amin al-Husayni · Walid Khalidi
The following is a list of prominent Palestinians, both from Palestine and from the Palestinian diaspora. ... Rashid Khalidi (1950 - ) is the Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University, and the head of Columbias Middle East Institute. ... Rim Banna is a Palestinian singer, composer and arranger, well-known for her modern interpretations of traditional folk songs. ... Edward Wadie Said (Arabic: , transliteration: ) (1 November 1935 – 25 September 2003) was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and outspoken Palestinian activist. ... Emile Habibi (August, 1921 - May 3, 1996) was a Palestinian-Israeli writer and politician. ... Hanan Ashrawi Dr. Hanan Daoud Khalil Ashrawi (born 8 October 1946 in Ramallah, Palestine) is a Palestinian Anglican scholar and political activist. ... Ghassan Kanafani Ghassan Kanafani (غسان كنفاني, born April 9, 1936 in Acre, Palestine - died July 8, 1972 in Beirut, Lebanon) was a Palestinian writer and a spokesman for the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. ... Qustandi Shomali Born in Beit Sahour on 8 July 1946, worked as an Arabic teacher in Algeria from 1965-72; received a B.A in Arabic Literature from Oran University in Algeria in 1971, worked as editor of the Arab World Review in Canada from 1972 to 1975 and as... —Ghada Karmi (1939- ) (Arabic: ‎) is a Palestinian doctor of medicine, author and academic. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Nathalie Handal (born July 29, 1969) is a Palestinian poet, writer and playwright and a literary researcher. ... Khalil Sakakini Khalil al-Sakakini (خليل السكاكيني) (January 23, 1878 - August 13, 1953) was a distinguished Palestinian Jerusalemite educator, scholar, and poet. ... Elia Suleiman (born July 28, 1960 in Nazareth) is a Palestinian film director and actor. ... Hany Abu-Assad (Arabic: ‎, born 11 October 1961) is a Dutch-Palestinian film director. ... May Ziade (1886 - 1941) was born in Palestine (of the Ottoman Empire) in 1886. ... Mohammad Amin al-Husayni Mohammad Amin al-Husayni (ca. ... Walid Khalidi (1925- ) is a Palestinian historian who had written extensively on the Palestinian exodus and the 1948 Israeli-Arab War. ...

Portal:Palestine

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In 1941, Darwish was born in the village of al-Birwa, in the Galilee, east of Akko in Palestine, now Israel. He was the second child of a landowning Sunni Muslim family of five boys and three girls. After the establishment of Israel, he left to Lebanon with his family and stayed there for a year, before re-entering Israel and settling down in Deir al-Asad. For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... al-Birwa was a Palestinian village that was captured by Israel during the 1948 Arab-Israeli war. ... Galilee (Arabic al-jaleel الجليل, Hebrew hagalil הגליל), meaning circuit, is a large area overlapping with much of the North District of Israel. ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old Kingdoms of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Deir al-Asad is a local council in the North District of Israel, 49 kilometers from Haifa. ...


Darwish continued his primary education in Deir al-Asad. Later on, he obtained his secondary education in Kafr Yasif, two kilometers north of Jadeidi. Eventually, Darwish moved to Haifa. His first book of poetry was published when he was only nineteen (Asafir bila ajniha, Wingless birds, 1960). In 1964, he emerged as a major voice of the Palestinian resistance with Awraq Al-zaytun (Leaves of olives). His poetry became extremely popular, especially Identity Card written in 1964 : Kfar Yasif or Kafr Yasif (Arabic:كفر ياسيف) is an Israeli-Arab town in the North District of Israel. ... Judeide-Makr or Makr-Jadeidi is an Israeli Arab local council formed by the merger of the two Arab towns of Makr and Jadeidi in 1990. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...

"Record!

I am an Arab

And my identity card is number fifty thousand

I have eight children

And the ninth is coming after a summer

Will you be angry?

Record!

I am an Arab

I have a name without a title

Patient in a country

Where people are enraged . . ."

Later life

After completing his secondary education, Darwish began publishing poetry and articles for newspapers and magazines such as Al-Itihad and Al-Jadid, where he later became the editor. In 1961, he joined secretly the Communist Party of Israel, the Rakah, and began working as a co-editor of Alfajr. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... The Communist Party of Israel (known as Maki, an acronym for Miflaga Komunistit Yisraelit) was formed in 1948 by the remnant of the Communist Party of Palestine within the borders of the new state of Israel. ...


He was repeatedly arrested and imprisoned since for his writing and political activities, and in 1970 he left for Moscow. Later, he moved to Cairo in 1971 where he worked for AL-Ahram daily newspaper. In Beirut, in 1973, he edited the monthly Shu'un Filistiniyya (Palestinian Affairs) and worked as a director in the Palestinian Research Center of the PLO and joined the organisation. In 1981, he founded and became editor of the literary journal Al-Karmel. 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Position of Moscow in Europe Coordinates: , Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Government  - Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Area  - City 1,081 km²  (417. ... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


During the summer of 1982, Beirut was under siege by the Israeli army and was bombed from 13 June to 12 August to drive the PLO out of the city. Darwish related the Palestinian resistance to the Israeli siege in Qasidat Bayrut (1982) and Madih al-zill al'ali(1983), later in the English version in Memory for Forgetfulness (1995). It led the poet to another exile to Cairo, Tunis and Paris. Darwish was elected to the PLO Executive Committee in 1987. Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Beirut (disambiguation). ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the... Nickname: Egypt: Site of Cairo (top center) Coordinates: Government  - Governor Dr. Abdul Azim Wazir Area  - City 214 km²  (82. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Executive Committee (PLO EC) is the highest executive body of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1988, one of his poems, Passers Between the Passing Words was discussed in the Knesset, he was accused of demanding that the Jews leave Israel, although he claimed he meant they should leave the West Bank and Gaza. The poet wrote : Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The modern Knesset building, Israels parliament, in Jerusalem Though similar-sounding, Beit Knesset (בית כנסת) literally means House of Assembly, and refers to a synagogue. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ...

"So leave our land

Our shore, our sea

Our wheat, our salt, our wound."

In 1993, after the Oslo accords, Mahmoud Darwish resigned from the PLO Executive Committee. Darwish has consistently demanded a tougher stand in negotiations with Israel for peace but a fair one.[2] Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... The Executive Committee (PLO EC) is the highest executive body of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO). ...


He continued as an editor for the Al-Karmel magazine, and lived in Paris before coming back to Palestine in 1995, entering on a visa to see his mother. He had the permission to return for the funeral of his friend Emile Habibi (a writer) and to visit his hometown but for only a few days. While in Palestine, he was issued a permit to stay in the country by the Israeli authorities. He lived in a central West Bank Palestinian town, Ramallah, where Yasser Arafat had his headquarters. This article is about the capital of France. ... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Emile Habibi (August, 1921 - May 3, 1996) was a Palestinian-Israeli writer and politician. ... Ramallah (Arabic:  ) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ... Not to be confused with Yasir Arafat (cricketer). ...


Yossi Sarid, who was Israel's education minister, suggested in March 2000 that some of Darwish's poems should be included in the Israeli high school curriculum. But Prime Minister Ehud Barak declared, "Israel is not ready." Yossi Sarid (born October 24, 1940) is an Israeli left wing politician. ... Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אֵהוּד בָּרָק) (born Ehud Brog on February 12, 1942) is an Israeli politician. ...


He currently resides between Ramallah and Amman. Ramallah (Arabic:  ) is a Palestinian city in the West Bank of approximately 57,000 residents. ... For other meanings, see Amman (disambiguation) and Ammann. ...


Audio releases

Many of his poems have been set to music by artists such as Marcel Khalife, Majida El Roumi, and Ahmad Qa'abour. In 1996, 1999 and 2003, the well-known musician Marcel Khalife faced a trial for blasphemy and insulting religious values because of the song entitled I am Yusuf, oh my father which was based on Darwish's poem and cited a verse from the Qur'an. In this poem, Darwish shared the pain of Yusuf (Joseph) who was rejected by his brothers. "Oh my father, I am Yusuf / Oh father, my brothers neither love me nor want me in their midst". Marcel Khalife Marcel Khalife (b. ... Majida El Roumi (born in Kfarshima in 13 December 1951, is a Lebanese singer. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marcel Khalife Marcel Khalife (b. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Films

In 1997 a documentary entitled Mahmoud Darwish was produced by French TV directed by noted French-Israeli director Simone Bitton. 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Simone Bitton (born in 1955 in Morocco) is a documentary filmmaker. ...


In 2004, Mahmoud Darwish asked a delegation of internationally-renowned writers and intellectuals to travel to the Occupied Palestinian Territories, in part to participate in a cultural event in honour of the poet, but also to see first-hand life under Israeli military occupation. The delegation includes Russell Banks (U.S., author of The Sweet Hereafter and Affliction), Bei Dao (China, famous exiled poet), José Saramago (Portugal, winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize for Literature), and Wole Soyinka (Nigeria, winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Literature). The documentary is entitled Writers on the Borders, directed by Samir Abdallah and José Reynes, the narration is in many language, among them : English, French, Italian, Chinese, etc. shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Palestinian territories is used by mainstream Western journalists as a collective name for the West Bank and the Gaza Strip - two disputed territories in Palestine. ... Russell Banks (born March 28, 1940) is an American writer of fiction and poetry. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Bei Dao (Northern Island) is another name for Zhifu Island. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... Akinwande Oluwole Wole Soyinka (born 13 July 1934) is a Nigerian writer, poet and playwright. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes...


Quotations

"I thought poetry could change everything, could change history and could humanize, and I think that the illusion is very necessary to push poets to be involved and to believe, but now I think that poetry changes only the poet."

"We should not justify suicide bombers. We are against the suicide bombers, but we must understand what drives these young people to such actions. They want to liberate themselves from such a dark life. It is not ideological, it is despair."

Prizes

  • The Lotus Prize (1969; from the Union of Afro-Asian Writers)
  • Lenin Peace Prize (1983; from the USSR)
  • The Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters (1993; from France)
  • The Lannan Foundation Prize for Cultural Freedom (2001)
  • Prince Claus Prize (2004)

The International Stalin Prize or the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples (renamed Russian: , the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples as a result of destalinization) was the Soviet Unions equivalent to the Nobel Peace Prize. ...

Bibliography

Poetry

  • Asafir bila ajniha (Wingless birds), 1960
  • Awraq Al-Zaytun (Leaves of olives), 1964
  • Ashiq min filastin (A Lover from Palestine), 1966
  • Akhir al-layl (the end of the night), 1967
  • Yawmiyyat jurh filastini (Diary of a Palestinian wound), 1969
  • Habibati tanhad min nawmiha (My beloved awakens), 1969
  • al-Kitabah 'ala dhaw'e al-bonduqiyah (Writing in the light of the gun), 1970
  • al-'Asafir tamut fi al-jalil (Birds are Dying in Galilee), 1970
  • Mahmoud Darwish works, 1971. Two volumes
  • Mattar na'em fi kharif ba'eed (Light rain in a distant autumn) 1971
  • Uhibbuki aw la uhibbuki (I love you, I love you not), 1972
  • Jondiyyun yahlum bi-al-zanabiq al-baidaa' (a soldier dreaming of white lilies), 1973
  • Complete Works, 1973. Printed on a regular basis ever since, with a new introduction, new additions, and sometimes elimination of some parts. Now substituted with al-A'amal al-jadida (2004) and al-A'amal al-oula (2005).
  • Muhawalah raqm 7 (Attempt number 7), 1974
  • Tilka suratuha wa-hadha intihar al-ashiq (That's Her Image, And That's The Suicide Of Her Lover), 1975
  • Ahmad al-za'tar, 1976
  • A'ras (Weddings), 1977
  • al-Nasheed al-jasadi (The Music of Human Flesh), 1980. Joint work
  • Qasidat Bayrut (Ode to Beirut), 1982
  • Madih al-zill al-'ali (A eulogy for the tall shadow), 1983
  • Hissar li-mada'eh al-bahr, 1984
  • Victims of a Map, 1984. Joint work with Samih al-Qasim and Adonis in English.
  • Sand and Other Poems, 1986
  • Hiya ughniyah, hiya ughniyah (It's a song, it's a song), 1985
  • Ward aqal (Fewer roses), 1985
  • Ma'asat al-narjis, malhat al-fidda (Tragedy of daffodils, comedy of silver), 1989
  • Ara ma oreed (I see what I want), 1990
  • Ahad 'asher kaukaban (Eleven planets), 1992
  • Limaza tarakt al-hissan wahidan (Why did you leave the horse alone?), 1995. English translation 2006 by Jeffrey Sacks
  • Psalms, 1995. A selection from Uhibbuki aw la uhibbuki, translation by Ben Bennani
  • Sareer El-Ghariba (Bed of a stranger), 1998
  • Then Palestine, 1999 (with Larry Towell, photographer, and Rene Backmann)
  • Jidariyya (Mural), 2000
  • The Adam of Two Edens: Selected Poems, 2001
  • Halat Hissar (State of siege), 2002
  • La ta'tazer 'amma fa'alt (Don't apologize for what you did), 2003
  • Unfortunately, It Was Paradise: Selected Poems, 2003. Translations by Munir Akash, Caroyln Forché and others
  • al-A'amal al-jadida (The new works), 2004. A selection of Darwish's recent works
  • al-A'amal al-oula (The early works), 2005. Three volumes, a selection of Darwish's early works
  • Ka-zahr el-lawz aw ab'ad (Same as almond flowers or farther), 2005

This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Ali Ahmad Said Asbar (alî ahmadi s-sacîdi l-asbar or Ali Ahmad Said) (born 1930), also known by the pseudonym Adonis or Adunis, is a Syrian-born poet and essayist who has made his career largely in Lebanon and France. ...

Prose

  • Shai'on 'an al-wattan (Something about the homeland), 1971
  • Wada'an ayatuha al-harb, wada'an ayuha al-salaam (Farwell, war, farwell, peace), 1974
  • Yawmiyyat al-hozn al-'aadi (Diary of the usual sadness), 1973
  • Fi wasf halatina (Describing our condition), 1987
  • al-Rasa'il (The Letters), 1990. Joint work with Samih al-Qasim
  • 'Aabiroon fi kalamen 'aaber (Bypassers in bypassing words), 1991
  • Fi hadrat al-ghiyab (in the presence of absence), 2006

Memory for Forgetfulness is one of Mahmoud Darwishs greatest works. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...

External links

References and notes

  1. ^ fencemag.com/v5n1/text/darwish
  2. ^ kirjasto.sci.fi/darwish

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mahmoud Darwish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1438 words)
Mahmoud Darwish (born 1941 in Al-Birwah, British mandate of Palestine) is a contemporary Palestinian poet and writer of prose.
In 1941, Darwish was born in the demolished village of Al-Birwah, in the Galilee, east of Akko in Palestine, now Israel.
Darwish was elected to the PLO Executive Committee in 1987.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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