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Encyclopedia > Magnolia Plantation and Gardens
Plantation home at Magnolia Plantation
Plantation home at Magnolia Plantation
Horticulture maze on the plantation
Horticulture maze on the plantation

Magnolia Plantation and Gardens (70 acres, 28 hectares) is historic house with gardens located on the Ashley River at 3550 Ashley River Road, Charleston, South Carolina, United States. It is one of the oldest plantations in the south, and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house and gardens are open daily; an admission fee is charged. The Ashley River is a river in South Carolina which meets with the Cooper River in Charleston before discharging into the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... // This article is about crop plantations. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The plantation dates to 1676 when Thomas and Ann Drayton built a house and small formal garden on the site. (Incredibly, the plantation is still under the control of the Drayton family after 15 generations.) The historic Drayton Hall was built in 1738 by John Drayton on an adjoining property. The village name Drayton is Anglo Saxon in origin and means farm where sledges are used. It is a common place name in England, and refers to places that were perched on the hillside, thus requiring the use of a sledge rather than a cart to pull heavy loads. ... Drayton Hall, in the Carolina Low Country near Charleston, South Carolina, is one of the handsomest examples of Palladian architecture in North America. ...


Originally a rice plantation, Magnolia became known for its gardens after the Reverend John Grimke Drayton inherited the property in the 1840s and began to rework its gardens in an English style. According to legend, he built the gardens to lure his bride south from her native Philadelphia. He was among the first to utilize Camellia japonica in an outdoor setting (1820s), and is said to have introduced the first azaleas to America. Dripping with pink and red azalea flowers and framed by live oak trees, the gardens of Magnolia on the Ashley were quite well known in the Antebellum period, and were photographed by Mathew Brady, who would later become famous for his photographs of the American Civil War. Another visitor to Magnolia in this period was John James Audubon for whom Magnolia's Audubon Swamp Garden is named. Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa The planting of rice is often a labour-intensive process Terrace of paddy fields in Yunnan Province, southern China. ... For the chosen plaintext attack used by the British during World War II, see gardening (cryptanalysis). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Species About 100–250, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia honkongensis Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia kissii Camellia lutchuensis Camellia miyagii Camellia... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ... Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Image:Matthew Brady 1875 cropped. ... This article is becoming very long. ... John James Audubon John James Audubon[1] (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was a Franco-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. ... Audubon Swamp Garden is a 60-acre cypress and tupelo swamp on the grounds of Magnolia Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina. ...


(Magnolia plantation owner Rev. John Grimke Drayton--who was obliged to adopt the Drayton surname--was a nephew of Sarah Grimke and Angelina Emily Grimke. During the Civil War, Percival Drayton achieved fame as an officer of the United States Navy, at one point involved in an engagement against Port Royal, South Carolina, whose troops were commanded by his brother, Thomas.) Sarah Moore Grimké (November 26, 1792 - December 23, 1873) was born in South Carolina, the daughter of a plantation owner who was a firm believer in both slavery and the subordinate status of women. ... Angelina Emily Grimk (1805–1879) was an abolitionist and suffragette. ... Percival Drayton (25 August 1812 - 4 August 1865) was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ... Port Royal is a town located in Beaufort County, South Carolina. ... Thomas Fenwick Drayton (August 24, 1809 – February 18, 1891) was a plantation owner, politician, railroad president, and military officer, serving in the United States Army and then as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. ...


The Union troops of General Sherman burned the plantation house in 1864 during their march to Charleston and Savannah. In the aftermath of the Civil War, Reverend Drayton was forced to open the gardens as a tourist attraction. So, in 1870, Magnolia Plantation became the first man-made tourist attraction in the United States. As such, some of the notable visitors to Magnolia included Henry Ford, George Gershwin, Eleanor Roosevelt and Orson Welles. “General Sherman” redirects here. ... A tourist attraction is a place of interest where tourists visit. ... Henry Ford (1919) Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as civil rights. ... George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American screenwriter, a film and theatre director, a film producer and a actor in film, theatre and radio. ...


Today, Magnolia Plantation is a thriving tourist attraction with a restored plantation house, slave cabins and a slavery history tour, a nature train, a marsh boat tour, a wildlife area, a petting zoo and, of course, gardens. Many of today's attractions were built starting in 1975 during the garden's renewal. Major garden features include many azalea plantings, as well as: Slave redirects here. ... A petting zoo (often called, and/or part of, a childrens zoo) features a combination of domestic animals and some wild species that are docile enough to touch and feed. ... Species see text Source: The Rhododendron page, and some research. ...

  • Barbados Tropical Garden - indoor tropical garden.
  • Biblical Garden - plants mentioned in the Bible, with an Old Testament area commemorating the twelve tribes of Israel, and New Testament area representing the twelve disciples.
  • Camellia Collection - First Camellia japonica plantings date from the 1820s, with current plantings containing nearly 900 varieties, of which almost 150 originated from the gardens' own nursery.
  • Cattail Wildlife Refuge - approximately 500 acres, with tower for bird observation.
  • Cypress Lake - Bald cypress trees, up to 100 years old, along riverbanks and wetlands.
  • Flowerdale (50 acres) - Oldest sections established 1680. Formal plantings of annuals set within triangular beds enclosed by boxwood hedges. Two large camellias date from the 1840s.
  • Long Bridge - Built in the 1840s, one of seven bridges on the grounds.
  • Maze - replica of England's famous Hampton Court maze, but planted with from some 500 Camellia sasanqua interspersed with Burford holly. Nearly 14 miles of pathways.
  • Nature Center and Zoo - domesticated animals typical to Southern plantations, injured or orphaned native animals, and exotic birds including Malayan jungle fowl, guinea hens, and peacocks.
  • Plantatation House - Oldest section built prior to the Revolutionary War near Summerville, South Carolina, and transported down the Ashley River after the Civil War.

This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... John 21:1 Jesus Appears to His Disciples--Alessandro Mantovani: the Vatican, Rome. ... Species About 100–250, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia honkongensis Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia kissii Camellia lutchuensis Camellia miyagii Camellia... Binomial name Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. ... This article is about the box tree. ... Species About 100–250 species, including: Camellia assimilis Camellia brevistyla Camellia caudata Camellia chekiangoleosa Camellia chrysantha – Golden Camellia Camellia connata Camellia crapnelliana Camellia cuspidata Camellia euphlebia Camellia euryoides Camellia forrestii Camellia fraterna Camellia furfuracea Camellia granthamiana Camellia grijsii Camellia hongkongensis - Hong Kong Camellia Camellia irrawadiensis Camellia japonica – Japanese Camellia Camellia... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to... Binomial name Camellia sasanqua Thunb. ... Species Ilex ambigua - Sand Holly Ilex amelanchier - Swamp Holly Ilex aquifolium - European Holly Ilex bioritsensis Ilex buergeri Ilex canariensis - Small-leaved Holly Ilex cassine - Dahoon Holly Ilex centrochinensis Ilex ciliospinosa Ilex colchica Ilex collina Ilex corallina Ilex coriacea Ilex cornuta - Chinese Holly Ilex crenata - Japanese Holly Ilex cyrtura Ilex decidua... Genera  Agelastes  Numida  Guttera  Acryllium The guineafowl are a family of birds in the same order as the pheasants, turkeys and other game birds. ... Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ... Summerville is a city, technically, but calls itself a town and is in Dorchester County, South Carolina, United States. ...

See also

Drayton Hall, in the Carolina Low Country near Charleston, South Carolina, is one of the handsomest examples of Palladian architecture in North America. ... This list of botanical gardens in the United States is intended to include all significant botanical gardens and arboretums in the United States of America. ...

External links

Coordinates: 32°52′29″N, 80°5′21″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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