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Encyclopedia > Magnolia (film)
Magnolia

Movie poster
Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
Produced by Paul Thomas Anderson
Joanne Sellar
Written by Paul Thomas Anderson
Narrated by Ricky Jay
Starring Jeremy Blackman
Tom Cruise
Melinda Dillon
April Grace
Luis Guzmán
Philip Baker Hall
Philip Seymour Hoffman
Ricky Jay
William H. Macy
Alfred Molina
Julianne Moore
John C. Reilly
Jason Robards
Melora Walters
Music by Jon Brion
Cinematography Robert Elswit
Editing by Dylan Tichenor
Distributed by New Line Cinema
Release date(s) Flag of the United States December 8, 1999
Running time 188 minutes
Country USA
Language English
French
German
Budget $37,000,000
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Magnolia is a 1999 American drama film, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. It interweaves nine separate yet connected storylines, about the interactions among several people during one day in the San Fernando Valley, in Los Angeles, California. The film was distributed by New Line Cinema. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1148x1500, 128 KB) Summary A promotional film poster for Magnolia. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Melinda Dillon (born October 13, 1939 in Hope, Arkansas), is an American actress and comedienne. ... April Grace (born May 12, 1962 in Lakeland, Florida, USA) is an American actress. ... Luis Guzmán (born August 28, 1956[1]) is a Puerto Rican actor. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... Not to be confused with Bill Macy. ... Alfred Molina (born May 24, 1953) is an English actor of both the stage and screen. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Melora Walters (born October 21, 1968) is an American actress born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ... Jon Brion at The Sunset Tavern in Seattle (photo by Nadja Dee Tanaka) Jon Brion (born 1962) is an American rock and pop multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter, composer and record producer. ... Robert Elswit is an American cinematographer. ... New Line redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... A drama film is a film that depends mostly on in-depth character development, interaction, and highly emotional themes. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... New Line redirects here. ...


Magnolia was a critical and commercial success in 1999. Of the ensemble cast, Tom Cruise was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the Academy Awards, and won the award in the same category at the Golden Globes of 2000. An ensemble cast is a cast in which the principal performers are assigned roughly equal amounts of importance in a dramatic production. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...

Contents

Overview

Magnolia starts with an introduction (narrated by an uncredited Ricky Jay) describing three events that set the mood for the movie by urging the audience to think about supposed coincidences which occur "all the time." The events, which are well-known urban legends in the universe of the film, are as follows: Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ...

  1. Sir Edmund William Godfrey, a resident of Greenberry Hill, London, is murdered outside his pharmacy by three vagrants by the names Joseph Green, Stanley Berry, and Daniel Hill. This was based on the murder of Edmund Berry Godfrey.
  2. A blackjack dealer, Delmer Darion, while scuba diving is accidentally picked up by a fire fighting airplane scooping water to put out a forest fire, however he dies of a heart attack during the flight. The pilot of the plane, Craig Hansen, had met Darion a few days prior at Darion's casino, starting a fight with him after losing a hand of blackjack. The guilt and the measure of coincidence provokes the pilot to commit suicide.
  3. A 17-year-old boy, Sydney Barringer, attempts suicide by jumping off the roof of his apartment building; this attempt became a "successful homicide" when he was accidentally shot by his mother as he fell past his own apartment window. His parents regularly argued and threatened each other with a shotgun that was not normally kept loaded. Unbeknown to them, Sydney had loaded the gun a few days earlier hoping they would make good on their threats to kill one another. As a result, he unwittingly became an accomplice in his own murder. The irony here is that a newly installed protective netting for window washers on the building's exterior below their apartment, would have saved his life if he had not been hit by the shotgun blast that he himself had loaded.

The movie then goes on to introduce the main characters while Aimee Mann's version of "One" plays in the background: This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey (23 December 1621 - 12 October 1678) was an English magistrate whose mysterious death caused anti-Catholic uproar in England. ... This article is about the gambling game. ... A scuba diver in usual sport diving gear SCUBA is an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. ... A repair locker hose team aboard USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) combats a controlled fire on the mobile aircraft firefighting training device May 2, 2006. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Ronald Opus suicide case is believed to be one of the most bizarre hypothetical suicide and an urban legend. ... Homicide (Latin homicidium, homo human being + caedere to cut, kill) refers to the act of killing another human being. ... Ironic redirects here. ... Aimee Mann (born September 8, 1960) is an American rock guitarist, bassist, singer, and noted songwriter. ...

  • Frank T.J. Mackey (Tom Cruise), author of Seduce and Destroy, a self-help book for men to get women to sleep with them. Mackey's character may have been inspired by Ross Jeffries, according to Paul Thomas Anderson in the magazine Creative Screenwriting. This claim was refuted in Neil Strauss (Style's) book The Game. Others claim the character is a parody or radio personality Tom Leykis.
  • Linda Partridge (Julianne Moore), a woman dealing with her much older husband's terminal illness and feelings of guilt for her infidelity. She is Frank T.J. Mackey's stepmother.
  • "Quiz Kid" Donnie Smith (William H. Macy), who won a large sum of money on the television game show What Do Kids Know? in the 1960s, but whose adult life has gone downhill after appearing as a celebrity spokesperson.
  • Stanley Spector (Jeremy Blackman), a current contestant on What Do Kids Know?. His greedy father, an aspiring actor, capitalizes off of his son's success and constantly pressures him to win.
  • Phil Parma (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a kind, sympathetic and lonely nurse working for the terminally ill Earl Partridge.
  • Claudia Wilson Gator (Melora Walters), a young woman plagued by psychological problems and a cocaine addiction; daughter of Jimmy Gator.
  • Jimmy Gator (Philip Baker Hall), host of What Do Kids Know?, who is dying of bone cancer. He seeks reconciliation with his daughter, Claudia.
  • Earl Partridge (Jason Robards), a wealthy television producer with terminal lung cancer. He is the estranged father of Frank T.J. Mackey and husband to Linda Partridge.
  • Officer Jim Kurring (John C. Reilly), a divorced, religious, and forthright police officer. While on patrol, Kurring often speaks to an imaginary camera, as if he were appearing on a reality TV series such as COPS.

The movie ends with the narrator urging the audience to think again about the coincidences mentioned in the intro, implying that the unlikely connections between the characters in the movie are similar. Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Though the term self-help can refer to any case whereby an individual or a group betters themselves economically, intellectually or emotionally, the connotations of the phrase have come to apply particularly to psychological or psychotherapeutic nostrums, often purveyed through the popular genre of the self-help book. ... Ross Jeffries is a former comedy writer and the creator of Speed Seduction, a set of teachings that draws from Neuro Linguistic Programming and other hypnotic techniques. ... Neil Strauss is a Los Angeles-based author and journalist who writes for The New York Times and Rolling Stone, where he is a contributing editor. ... Tom Leykis Thomas Joseph Leykis (born August 1, 1956 in New York, New York) is the host of a radio talk show syndicated in the United States of America by CBS Radio. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... This article is about incurable disease. ... Not to be confused with Bill Macy. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Melora Walters (born October 21, 1968) is an American actress born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... A sarcoma is a cancer of the bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ... John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ... Not to be confused with C.O.P.S. (TV series). ...


Character relationships


Many of the characters have thematically similar stories:

Jim Kurring (John C. Reilly) Earl (Jason Robards) Jimmy (Philip Baker Hall) Claudia (Melora Walters) Stanley (Jeremy Blackman) Donnie (William H. Macy)
Linda (Julianne Moore) Both have been unfaithful (Linda to Earl and Earl to his first wife) Both make admissions of infidelity, and both unsuccessfully attempt suicide. Both abuse drugs and suffer from psychological problems Both suffer emotional outbursts
Donnie (William H. Macy) Both are lonely and desperately seeking love Both have a persecution complex Both are "quiz kids" who feel unappreciated by their parents
Frank (Tom Cruise) Both mistreat women Both engage in self-destructive behaviors as a result of childhood trauma, as well as living under pseudonyms
Stanley (Jeremy Blackman) Both feel like outcasts, Stanley from his teammates and Jim from his co-workers Both suffer breakdowns on Jimmy's show (Jimmy physically, Stanley emotionally) Both abused by their fathers, Stanley verbally and emotionally, Claudia sexually
Jimmy (Philip Baker Hall) Both are dying of cancer and both cheated on their wives
Earl (Jason Robards) Both had a troubled first marriage

The plot reveals all these relationships over a number of interlocking events, including: John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... Melora Walters (born October 21, 1968) is an American actress born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Not to be confused with Bill Macy. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Comparison of the perceived harm for various psychoactive drugs from a poll among medical psychiatrists specialized in addiction treatment[1] This article is an overview of the nontherapeutic use of alcohol and drugs of abuse. ... Not to be confused with Bill Macy. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result of a traumatic event. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sexual abuse is physical or psychological abuse that involves crimes in most countries. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

  • A crime that investigators think was committed by the Worm (played by Orlando Jones in scenes that were deleted).
  • The broadcasting of a live episode of What Do Kids Know?, a quiz show that pits children against adults.
  • A noise complaint that leads to an awkward conversation, and eventually a date between Jim and Claudia.
  • Donnie's barroom conversation with an enigmatic and eccentric barfly, and his misguided attempts to woo the braces-wearing bartender, Brad. His love for him results in an attempt to steal money from the employer who fired him to pay for braces that he does not need.
  • An interview in which a reporter attempts to penetrate the emotional wall that Frank hides behind.
  • The last hours of Earl, which complicate Linda's life with a number of vital decisions and in which a desperate Phil attempts to fulfill Earl's wish to see Frank, the son who despises him.

Orlando Jones (born April 10, 1968) is an American comedian and film and television actor. ... Look up barfly in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Raining frogs and Exodus 8:2

At the end of the movie, a rare but precedented event occurs: frogs rain from the sky. While the plague of frogs is unexpected, there have been real-life reports of frogs being sucked into waterspouts and raining to the ground miles inland; see raining animals.[1] Distribution of frogs (in black) Suborders Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia - List of Anuran families The frogness babe is an amphibian in the order Anura (meaning tail-less from Greek an-, without + oura, tail), formerly referred to as Salientia (Latin saltare, to jump). ... The Plagues of Egypt (Hebrew: ), the Biblical Plagues or the Ten Plagues (Hebrew: ) are the ten calamities inflicted upon Egypt by God in the Bible (as recounted in the book of Exodus, chapters 7 - 12), in order to convince Pharaoh[1] to let the Israelite slaves leave. ... A waterspout off the Florida Keys A waterspout is most frequent in tropical regions. ... Rain of fishes in Singapore, as described by local inhabitants Raining animals is a relatively rare meteorological phenomenon, although occurrences have been reported from many countries throughout history. ...


The movie has an underlying theme of unexplained events, taken from the 1920s and 1930s works of American intellectual Charles Fort. Fortean author Loren Coleman has written a chapter about this motion picture, entitled "The Teleporting Animals and Magnolia," in one of his recent books.[2] The film has many hidden Fortean themes. The fall of frogs is merely one of them. One of Charles Fort's books is visible on the table in the library and there is an end credit thanking Charles Fort.[3] This article is not about Charles Forte. ... Charles Fort, 1920 Charles Hoy Fort (August 6, 1874 - May 3, 1932), writer and researcher into anomalous phenomena, was the son of an Albany grocer of Dutch ancestry. ... Loren Coleman in a photograph featured in his profile on Cryptomundo. ...


Another explanation could be the scene in which a boy named Dixon tells Jim that "when the sunshine don't work, the good Lord bring the rain in." A Bible verse frequently referenced and alluded to in the film, Exodus 8:2 (NIV), states that "If you refuse to let them go, I will plague your whole country with frogs," (In Exodus the frogs are described as simply crawling out of the "waters of Egypt"). Many of the film's other strange occurrences, such as quotes that seem odd or out of place, can be similarly explained (see the link to Cigarettes and Red Vines' Magnolia page below for more information). Lordship redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


There are various references to Exodus 8:2, like when the humidity is recorded to be 82 percent. At the very beginning, the man being hanged bears a sign reading "82". The plane that kills Darion has "82" painted on the side, and at the poker table, the man asks for a two and gets an 8. In the "Jumping scene" of Sydney Barringer, to the left of Sydney along the roof border, "82" appears to be spelled out in some type of wire formation on the wall, his parents were arguing in room #682, and the forensics meeting is at 8:20. The phone number for "Seduce and Destroy" has 82 in it. At the beginning scene of the show "What Do Kids Know" a fan is seen carrying a sign reading "Exodus 8:2" before an usher {a cameo appearance of the director Paul Thomas Anderson) removes the sign; one of the most concrete references towards that verse in the Bible. During the rain of frogs, a sign reading "Exodus 8:2" can be seen on the side of the street. Also, the Officer Jim's voice mailbox says that his automated answering machine number is "82." Anderson did not originally include these allusions in his screenplay; after Henry Gibson brought the passage to his attention, he worked it into the script.[4] The term humidity is usually taken in daily language to refer to relative humidity. ... The word forensic (from Latin: forensis - forum) refers to something of, pertaining to, or used in a court of law. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ...


Other repeated references to animal rain in the story include at least four different characters in different scenes using the cliché, "It's raining cats and dogs". The only character in the story who seems to be unsurprised by the unusual meteorological event is the child prodigy, Stanley. He calmly observes the falling frog silhouettes, saying “This happens”. This has led to the speculation that Stanley is seen as a prophet, allegorically akin to Moses, and that the "slavery" the movie conveys alludes to the exploitation of children by adults.[5] These "father issues" persist throughout the movie, as seen with the abuse and neglect of Claudia, Frank and Donnie (as children), Stanley and Dixon (from the deleted scene).[6] Wunderkind redirects here. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Slave redirects here. ...


Featured cast

Actor Role
Jeremy Blackman Stanley Spector
Michael Bowen Rick Spector
Tom Cruise Frank T.J. Mackey
Melinda Dillon Rose Gator
Henry Gibson Thurston Howell
April Grace Gwenovier
Luis Guzmán Luis
Philip Baker Hall Jimmy Gator
Philip Seymour Hoffman Phil Parma
Felicity Huffman Cynthia
Thomas Jane Young Jimmy Gator
Ricky Jay Burt Ramsey/Narrator
Orlando Jones Worm
William H. Macy Quiz Kid Donnie Smith
Alfred Molina Solomon Solomon
Julianne Moore Linda Partridge
Michael Murphy Alan Kligman, Esq.
John C. Reilly Jim Kurring
Jason Robards Earl Partridge
Melora Walters Claudia Wilson Gator

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Michael Bowen (born June 21, 1953 in Texas) is an American actor. ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Melinda Dillon (born October 13, 1939 in Hope, Arkansas), is an American actress and comedienne. ... Henry Gibson (born September 21, 1935 in Germantown, Pennsylvania) is an American actor who was famous as a cast member of Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. ... April Grace (born May 12, 1962 in Lakeland, Florida, USA) is an American actress. ... Luis Guzmán (born August 28, 1956[1]) is a Puerto Rican actor. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ... Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Felicity Huffman (born December 9, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning American film and television actress. ... For the 15th century English Bishop of Norwich, see Thomas Jane (Bishop of Norwich). ... Ricky Jay Ricky Jay (b. ... Orlando Jones (born April 10, 1968) is an American comedian and film and television actor. ... Not to be confused with Bill Macy. ... Alfred Molina (born May 24, 1953) is an English actor of both the stage and screen. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Michael Murphy may refer to: Michael Murphy (actor), an American actor Michael Murphy (author), an Integral Movement author and a co-founder of the Esalen Institute Michael Murphy (diver), an Australian Olympic diver. ... John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Melora Walters (born October 21, 1968) is an American actress born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ...

Development

Paul Thomas Anderson started to get ideas for Magnolia during the long editing period of Boogie Nights (1997). As he got closer to finishing the film, he started writing down material for his new project.[7] After the critical and financial success of Boogie Nights, New Line Cinema, who backed that film, told Anderson that he could do whatever he wanted and the filmmaker realized that, "I was in a position I will never ever be in again".[8] Michael De Luca, then Head of Production at New Line, made the deal for Magnolia, granting Anderson final cut without hearing an idea for the film.[9][8] Originally, Anderson had wanted to make a film that was "intimate and small-scale",[10] something that he could shoot in 30 days.[11] He had the title of "Magnolia" in his head before he wrote the script.[12] As he started writing, the script "kept blossoming" and he realized that there were many actors he wanted to write for and then decided to put "an epic spin on topics that don't necessarily get the epic treatment".[10] He wanted to "make the epic, the all-time great San Fernando Valley movie".[12] Anderson started with lists of images, words and ideas that "start resolving themselves into sequences and shots and dialogue",[10] actors, and music. The first image he had for the film was the smiling of face of actress Melora Walters.[10] The next image that came to him was of Philip Baker Hall as her father. Anderson imagined Hall walked up the steps of Walters' apartment and had an intense confrontation with her.[13] Anderson also did research on the magnolia tree and discovered a concept that eating the tree's bark helped cure cancer.[12] Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... This article is about the 1997 film. ... New Line redirects here. ... Melora Walters (born October 21, 1968) is an American actress born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ... Philip Baker Hall (born September 10, 1931) is an American actor. ...


Screenplay

By the time he started writing the script he was listening to Aimee Mann's music.[10] Anderson used her two solo albums and some demo tracks from a new album that Mann was working on as a basis and inspiration for the film.[14] In particular, Mann's song "Deathly", on her album Bachelor No. 2, features the lyric "Now that I've met you/Would you object to/Never seeing each other again", which was used as line of dialogue in the film.[10] In addition, "Deathly" also inspired the character of Claudia.[14] Aimee Mann (born September 8, 1960) is an American rock guitarist, bassist, singer, and noted songwriter. ... Bachelor No. ...


The character of Jim Kurring originated in the summer of 1998 when actor John C. Reilly grew a mustache out of interest and started putting together an unintelligent cop character. He and Anderson did a few parodies of COPS with the director chasing Reilly around the streets with a video camera. Actress Jennifer Jason Leigh made an appearance in one of these videos. Some of Kurring's dialogue came from these sessions.[10] This time around, Reilly wanted to do something different and told Anderson that he was "always cast as these heavies or these semi-retarded child men. Can't you give me something I can relate to, like falling in love with a girl?"[15] Anderson also wanted to make Reilly a romantic lead because it was something different that the actor had not done before.[10] John Christopher Reilly (born May 24, 1965) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ...


For Philip Seymour Hoffman, Anderson wanted him to play a "really simple, uncomplicated, caring character".[10] The actor described his character as someone who "really takes pride in the fact that every day he's dealing with life and death circumstances".[11] With Julianne Moore in mind, the director wrote a role for her to play a crazed character using many pharmaceuticals. According to the actress, "Linda doesn't know who she is or what she's feeling and can only try to explain it in the most vulgar terms possible".[16] For William H. Macy, Anderson felt that the actor was scared of big, emotional parts and wrote for him, "a big tearful, emotional part".[10] Philip Seymour Hoffman (born July 23, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ...


While convincing Philip Baker Hall to do the film by explaining the significance of the rain of frogs, the actor told him a story about when he was in Italy, in the mountains, and got caught in bad weather - a mix of rain, snow and tiny frogs. Hall had to pull off the road until the storm passed.[17] According to an interview, Hall said that he based the character of Jimmy Gator on real-life TV personalities such as Bob Barker, Alistair Beck, and Arthur Godfrey.[18] The rain of frogs was inspired by the works of Charles Fort and Anderson claims that he was unaware that it was also a reference in The Bible when he first wrote the sequence. At the time the filmmaker came across the notion of a rain of frogs, he was "going through a weird, personal time", and he started to understand "why people turn to religion in times of trouble, and maybe my form of finding religion was reading about rains of frogs and realizing that makes sense to me somehow".[7] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In this CBS publicity photo of Arthur Godfrey Time, vocalist Patti Clayton is seen at the far right and Godfrey sits in the foreground. ...


Casting

Tom Cruise was a fan of Anderson's previous film, Boogie Nights, and contacted the filmmaker while he was working on Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut (1999).[19] Anderson met with Cruise on the set of Kubrick's film and the actor told him to keep him in mind for his next film. After Anderson finished the script, he sent Cruise a copy and the next day, the actor called him. The actor was interested but nervous about the role. They met with Cruise along with De Luca who helped convince the actor to do the film.[8] Frank T.J. Mackey, the character that Cruise would play in the film, was based in part on an audio-recording done in an engineering class taught by a friend that was given to Anderson.[7] It consisted of two men, "talking all this trash" about women and quoting a man named Ross Jeffries, who was teaching a new version of the Eric Weber course, "How to Pick Up Women," but utilizing hypnotism and subliminal language techniques.[7] Anderson transcribed the tape and did a reading with Reilly and Chris Penn.[8] The director then incorporated this dialogue and his research on Jeffries, and other men like him, into Mackey and his sex seminar.[7] Anderson felt that Cruise was drawn to the role because he had just finished making Eyes Wide Shut, playing a repressed character, and was able to then play a character that was "outlandish and bigger-than-life".[12] Kubrick redirects here. ... Eyes Wide Shut is a 1999 film directed and co-written by Stanley Kubrick, based on the novella Traumnovelle (in English Dream Story) by Arthur Schnitzler. ... Ross Jeffries is a former comedy writer and the creator of Speed Seduction, a set of teachings that draws from Neuro Linguistic Programming and other hypnotic techniques. ... Christopher Shannon Penn (October 10, 1965 – January 24, 2006) was an American film actor. ...


Anderson wrote the role of Earl Partridge for Jason Robards but he was initially unable to do it because of a serious staph infection and the filmmaker approached George C. Scott who turned him down. Eventually, Robards was able to do the film.[20] Robards has said of his character, "It was sort of prophetic that I be asked to play a guy going out in life. It was just so right for me to do this and bring what I know to it".[11] According to Hall, much of the material with Partridge was based on Anderson watching his father die of cancer.[18] Binomial name Staphylococcus aureus Rosenbach, 1884 Staphylococcus aureus (which is occasionally given the nickname golden staph) is a bacterium, frequently living on the skin or in the nose of a healthy person, that can cause illnesses ranging from minor skin infections (such as pimples, boils, and cellulitis) and abscesses, to... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ...


Production

Before Anderson became a filmmaker, one of the jobs he had was as an assistant for a television game show, Quiz Kid Challenge, an experience he incorporated into the script for Magnolia.[9] He also claimed in interviews that the film is structured somewhat like "A Day in the Life" by The Beatles, and "it kind of builds up, note by note, then drops or recedes, then builds again".[12] The production designers looked at films with close, tight color palettes, films that were warm and analyzed why they did that and then applied it to Magnolia.[11] They also wanted to evoke the colors of the magnolia flower: greens, browns and off-whites. For the section of the prologue that is set in 1911, Anderson used a hand-cranked pathe camera that would have been used at the time.[11] Some of the actors were nervous about singing the lyrics to Mann's "Wise Up" in the film's climactic scene and so Anderson had Moore do it first and she set the pace and everyone else followed.[10] For other uses, see A Day in the Life (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Pathé or Pathé Frères is the name of various businesses founded and originally run by the Pathé Brothers of France. ...


Anderson and New Line reportedly had intense arguments about how to market Magnolia.[8] He felt that the studio did not do a decent enough job on Boogie Nights and did not like the studio's poster or trailer for Magnolia. Anderson ended up designing his own poster, cut together a trailer himself,[8] wrote the liner notes for the soundtrack album, and pushed to avoid hyping Cruise's presence in the film in favor of the ensemble cast.[20] Even though Anderson ultimately got his way, he realized that he had to "learn to fight without being a jerk. I was a bit of a baby. At the first moment of conflict, I behaved in a slightly adolescent knee-jerk way. I just screamed."[8] In a Rolling Stone article, published around the time of Magnolia's release, Anderson said that he walked out of Fight Club after the first half hour and criticized its director, David Fincher, for making jokes about cancer, saying that he should get it as punishment. Afterwards, Anderson wrote Fincher a note apologizing and explained that he had lost his sense of humor about cancer.[21] This article is about the magazine. ... Fight Club is a 1999 feature film adaptation of the 1996 novel Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk, adapted by Jim Uhls and directed by David Fincher. ... David Leo Fincher (born August 28, 1962) is an American film director and music video director known for his dark and stylish films, particularly Fight Club and Se7en. ...


Music and soundtracks

See also: Magnolia (album)
See also: Magnolia (score)

Anderson met Aimee Mann in 1996 when he asked her husband, Michael Penn, to write songs for his film, Hard Eight. Mann had songs on soundtracks before but never "utilized in such an integral way" she said in an interview.[19] She gave Anderson rough mixes of songs and found that they both wrote about the same kinds of characters.[19] He encouraged her to write songs for the film by sending her a copy of the script.[11] This article is about the soundtrack by Aimee Mann. ... Magnolia is the score soundtrack to the Paul Thomas Anderson film of the same name. ... Michael Penn (born August 1, 1958, in Greenwich Village, New York City) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Hard Eight is a 1996 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and Samuel L. Jackson. ...


Two songs were written expressly for the film: "You Do," which was based on a character later cut from the film, and "Save Me," which closes the film;[14] the latter was nominated in the 2000 Academy Awards and Golden Globes and in the 2001 Grammys. Most of the remaining seven Mann songs were demos and works in progress; "Wise Up," which is at the center of a sequence in which all of the characters sing the song,[10] was originally written for the 1996 film Jerry Maguire. At the time Mann's record label had refused to release her songs on an album.[14] The song that plays at the opening of the film is a cover version of "One" by Harry Nilsson. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Jerry Maguire is a 1996 American comedy-drama film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Anderson produced a music video for "Save Me" that featured Mann in the background of what appeared to be scenes from the film, singing to characters. Unlike in many such music videos, there was no digital manipulation involved; the video was shot at the end of filming days with Mann and actors who were asked to stay in place. The video, which contains exactly seven cuts, won the Best Editing award at the 2000 MTV Video Music Awards and was nominated for Best Music Video from a Film. A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ...


The soundtrack album, released in December 1999 on Reprise Records, features the Mann songs, as well as a section of Jon Brion's score and tracks by Supertramp and Gabrielle that were used in the film. Reprise released a full score album in March 2000. This article is about the soundtrack by Aimee Mann. ... Reprise Records is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group, operated through Warner Bros. ... Jon Brion at The Sunset Tavern in Seattle (photo by Nadja Dee Tanaka) Jon Brion (born 1962) is an American rock and pop multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter, composer and record producer. ... This article is about the band. ... Louise Gabrielle Bobb (born April 16, 1970, London) is an English singer who records under the name Gabrielle. ... Magnolia is the score soundtrack to the Paul Thomas Anderson film of the same name. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ...


Reception

Magnolia initially opened in a limited release on December 17, 1999 in seven theaters grossing USD $193,604. The film was given a wide release on January 7, 2000 in 1,034 theaters grossing $5.6 million on its opening weekend. It ended up making $22.4 million in North America and $25.9 million in the rest of the world with a worldwide tally of $48.4 million, above its budget of $37 million.[22] December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


While Magnolia struggled at the box office, it was well-received critically. It currently has an 85% rating (with an 82% "Cream of the Crop designation) on Rotten Tomatoes. The USA Today gave the film three-and-a-half stars out of four and called it, "the most imperfect of the year's best movies".[23] In the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert praised the film, saying: "Magnolia is the kind of film I instinctively respond to. Leave logic at the door. Do not expect subdued taste and restraint, but instead a kind of operatic ecstasy".[24] Entertainment Weekly gave the film a "B+" rating, praising Cruise's performance: "It's with Cruise as Frank T.J. Mackey, a slick televangelist of penis power, that the filmmaker scores his biggest success, as the actor exorcises the uptight fastidiousness of Eyes Wide Shut . . . Like John Travolta in Pulp Fiction, this cautiously packaged movie star is liberated by risky business".[25] The Independent said that the film was "limitless. And yet some things do feel incomplete, brushed-upon, tangential. Magnolia does not have the last word on anything. But is superb".[26] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


In her review for the New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote, "But when that group sing-along arrives, Magnolia begins to self-destruct spectacularly. It's astonishing to see a film begin this brilliantly only to torpedo itself in its final hour," but went on to say that the film "was saved from its worst, most reductive ideas by the intimacy of the performances and the deeply felt distress signals given off by the cast".[27] Philip French, in his review for The Observer, wrote, "But is the joyless universe he (Anderson) presents any more convincing than the Pollyanna optimism of traditional sitcoms? These lives are somehow too stunted and pathetic to achieve the level of tragedy".[28] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Awards

Magnolia was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards in 2000, Tom Cruise for Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture and Aimee Mann for Best Original Song for "Save Me". Cruise won.[29] The film was also nominated for three Academy Awards, including Cruise for Best Supporting Actor, Anderson for Best Original Screenplay, and Aimee Mann's "Save Me" for Best Original Song. Magnolia failed to win in any categories it was nominated for.[30] Anderson's film won the Golden Bear at the 50th Berlin International Film Festival.[31] The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association in 1944 for a performance in a motion picture released in the previous year. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... // The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). ... One of the A festivals in Europe. ...


The Toronto Film Critics Association Awards named Magnolia the Best Film of 1999 and gave Anderson Best Director honors. His screenplay also tied with the ones for Being John Malkovich and American Beauty as the best of the year.[32] Philip Seymour Hoffman and Julianne Moore won Supporting Actor and Actress awards from the National Board of Review.[12] The Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA) is an organization of film reviewers from Toronto-based publications. ... Being John Malkovich is a 1999 film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Spike Jonze. ... American Beauty can refer to: A variety of rose: American Beauty rose American Beauty, a film starring Kevin Spacey, Annette Bening, Mena Suvari, and Thora Birch American Beauty, an album by the Grateful Dead American Beauty Rag, a classic ragtime composition by Joseph Lamb, published in 1913. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures was founded in 1909 in New York City, just 13 years after the birth of cinema, to protest New York City Mayor George McClennans revocation of moving-picture exhibition licenses on Christmas Eve 1908. ...



2000 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards The Broadcast Film Critics Association (BFCA) is the largest film critics organization in the U.S. and Canada, representing 199 television, radio and online critics. ...

  • Nominated, Best Picture

2001 Grammy Awards This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • Nominated, Best Compilation Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media
  • Nominated, Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media
  • Nominated, Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media: Aimee Mann, for the song "Save Me

2000 Screen Actors Guild Awards The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ...

  • Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Theatrical Motion Picture
  • Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role: Julianne Moore
  • Nominated, Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role: Tom Cruise

Themes

Many essays and other writings have been composed on the themes in Magnolia. Some themes that are often associated with the film include regret, loneliness,[19] the cost of failed relationships as a result of fathers that have failed their children, [33] not all events and their results can be controlled, but an individual can control his or her own actions, mistakes of the past cannot simply be erased (We might be through with the past, but the past ain't through with us), exploitation, and the limits of forgiveness. For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... Look up Theme in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


DVD

The Magnolia DVD includes a lengthy behind-the-scenes documentary, That Moment. It uses a fly-on-the-wall approach to cover nearly every aspect of production, from production management and scheduling to music direction to special effects. The behind-the-scenes documentary is an in-depth look into Anderson's motivation and directing style. Pre-production included a screening of the film Network, as well as Ordinary People. Several scenes showed Anderson at odds with the child actors and labor laws that restrict their work time. The character of Dixon has further scenes filmed but, from Anderson's reactions, appear not to be working. These scenes were cut completely and have never been shown on DVD. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Theatrical production management is a sub-division of stagecraft. ... Special effects (also called SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to realize scenes that cannot be achieved by live action or normal means. ... Network is a 1976 satirical New Hollywood film about a fictional television network, Union Broadcasting System (UBS), and its struggle with poor ratings. ... This article is about the film. ... Child labour is the employment of children under an age determined by law or custom. ...


References

  1. ^ Adams, Cecil. "Is it possible to rain frogs, cats, dogs, etc.?", Straight Dope, December 7, 1990. Retrieved on 2008-01-23. 
  2. ^ Coleman writes that falls of frogs are more commonplace than often realized. One of the reasons that the skeptical answer (saying all are scooped up in a watersprout) does not hold water is because the falls of frogs or fish are routinely all of one species, instead of a variety of species as would be expected if it was a random sucking up of the contents of a river or lake. Also, watersprouts are rare over the locations of freshwater frogs.
  3. ^ Coleman, Loren. "Mysterious America: The Ultimate Guide to the Nation's Weirdest Wonders, Strangest Spots, and Creepiest Creatures", Simon and Schuster, 2007. 
  4. ^ Magnolia (1999) - Trivia
  5. ^ Hipps, Shane. "Magnolia: The Exodus for Kids", Metaphilm, May 9, 2003. Retrieved on 2008-01-23. 
  6. ^ Anderson, Paul Thomas. "The Paul Thomas Anderson Shooting Script Set: Magnolia and Punch-Drunk Love", Newmarket Press, January 26, 2004. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Konow, David. "PTA Meeting: An Interview with Paul Thomas Anderson", Creative Screenwriting, January/February 2000. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Hirschberg, Lynn. "His Way", New York Times, December 19, 1999. 
  9. ^ a b Goldstein, Patrick. "Heading in a New Direction", Toronto Star, December 24, 1999. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Patterson, John. "Magnolia Maniac", The Guardian, March 10, 2000. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Magnolia Production Notes", New Line Cinema, 1999. Retrieved on 2008-02-04. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f Strauss, Bob. "Magnolia Springs from Valley Roots", The Montreal Gazette, December 19, 1999. 
  13. ^ Portman, Jamie. "How Magnolia Grew and Grew", Ottawa Citizen, December 30, 1999. 
  14. ^ a b c d Bessman, Jim. "Music Blossomed into Film", Toronto Star, December 16, 1999. 
  15. ^ Braun, Liz. "He Finally Gets the Girl", Toronto Sun, January 11, 2000. 
  16. ^ Strauss, Bob. "Everything's Coming Up Magnolias for Actress", Globe and Mail, December 23, 1999. 
  17. ^ Pevere, Geoff. "Director Can Do Both Riveting and Ribbiting", Toronto Star, January 23, 2000. 
  18. ^ a b Dawson, Tom. "I went from being anonymous to: 'Who is this guy we've got to have him'", Scotland on Sunday, March 5, 2000. 
  19. ^ a b c d Weinraub, Bernard. "Boogie Writer Back in the Valley", New York Times, October 8, 1999. 
  20. ^ a b Puig, Claudia. "Dangerous Ground is Paul Thomas Anderson's Turf", USA Today, January 7, 2000. 
  21. ^ Lacey, Liam. "The Lion and the Young Cub", Globe and Mail, January 22, 2000. 
  22. ^ "Magnolia", Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2008-01-24. 
  23. ^ Clark, Mike. "Magnolia Unfolds with Epic Boldness", USA Today, December 17, 1999. 
  24. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Magnolia", Chicago Sun-Times, January 7, 2000. Retrieved on 2008-01-24. 
  25. ^ Schwarzbaum, Lisa. "Magnolia", Entertainment Weekly, December 29, 1999. Retrieved on 2008-01-24. 
  26. ^ Quirke, Antonia. "I left with that strange feeling you get when you've witnessed a genuine act of courage", The Independent, March 19, 2000. 
  27. ^ Maslin, Janet. "Entangled Lives on the Cusp of the Millennium", New York Times, December 17, 1999. Retrieved on 2008-01-24. 
  28. ^ French, Philip. "Went the Day Well?", The Observer, March 19, 2000. 
  29. ^ Lyman, Rick. "American Beauty wins 3 Golden Globe Awards", New York Times, January 24, 2000. 
  30. ^ "The 72nd Annual Academy Award Nominees", Variety, February 16, 2000. 
  31. ^ Malcolm, Derek. "Magnolia Blossoms", The Guardian, February 21, 2000. 
  32. ^ "Toronto Critics Pick Magnolia as Best Film of 1999", Globe and Mail, December 17, 1999. 
  33. ^ Field, Syd. "Magnolia: An Appreciation", SydField.com. Retrieved on 2008-01-22. 

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
The Thin Red Line
Golden Bear winner
2000
Succeeded by
Intimacy
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Hard Eight is a 1996 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, starring Philip Baker Hall, John C. Reilly, Gwyneth Paltrow and Samuel L. Jackson. ... This article is about the 1997 film. ... Punch-Drunk Love is a 2002 film written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... There Will Be Blood is a film adaptation of Upton Sinclairs novel Oil! It stars Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Dano, and is screenwritten, produced and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson. ... The Thin Red Line is an Academy Award nominated 1998 film which tells the story of United States forces during the Battle of Guadalcanal in World War II. It marked director Terrence Malicks return to filmmaking after a twenty year absence. ... One of the A festivals in Europe. ... Intimacy is a 2001 France/United Kingdom/Germany/Spain drama film by Patrice Chéreau and written by Patrice Chéreau, Anne-Louise Trividic and Hanif Kureishi. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Magnolia (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2204 words)
Magnolia is a 1999 motion picture, written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, which tells the story of a peculiar interaction among several individuals during one apparently normal day in the San Fernando Valley, California.
Two songs were written expressly for the film: "You Do," which was based on a character later cut from the film, and "Save Me," which closes the film; the latter was nominated in the 2000 Academy Awards and Golden Globes and in the 2001 Grammys.
This is used as line of dialogue in Magnolia, and the song was a major inspiration for the film.
Show Boat (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2149 words)
This was the only film version of Show Boat to be given a road show presentation, and the only one of the three film versions to run over two hours (the stage version ran three hours originally, and was filmed in 1936 and 1951 at a length of slightly less than two hours).
Magnolia is forced to bring up her young daughter alone, but is reunited with the repentant Ravenal after twenty-three years.
Filmed in MGM 's typical, lavish style, this version is the most financially successful of the film adaptations of the play, and is one of MGM's most popular musicals, though arguably one of the studio's less inventive ones.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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