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Encyclopedia > Magnetic ink character recognition

Bold text'Bold text'Bold text'Bold text'Magnetic Ink Character Recognition, or MICR, colloquially pronounced /ˈmɪkɚ/ or sometimes /ˈmaɪkɚ/, is a character recognition technology adopted mainly by the banking industry to facilitate the processing of checks. The process was demonstrated to the American Bankers Association in July 1956, and it was almost universally employed by 1963[1]. Example of a Canadian cheque. ... The American Bankers Association (ABA) is a free-trade and professional association that promotes and advocates issues important to the banking industry in the United States. ...


Almost all US and UK checks now include MICR characters at the bottom of the paper in a font known as E-13B. The major fonts used around the world are E-13B and CMC-7. For the origin and evolution of fonts, see History of western typography. ...

MICR numerals and control characters
MICR numerals and control characters

In addition to their unique fonts, MICR characters are printed with a magnetic ink or toner. Subscript textMagnetic printing is used so that the characters can be reliably read into a system, even when they have been overprinted with other marks such as cancellation stamps. The characters are read with a device similar in nature to the head of an audio tape recorder, and the letterforms' bulbous shapes ensure that each letter produces a unique waveform for the read head. The error rate for scanning the numbers at the bottom of a typical cheque is smaller than with usual optical character recognition systems. Image File history File links MICR.png Summary conversion of Image:MICR.jpg to 2-color PNG Licensing Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to OCR, is a type of computer software designed to translate images of handwritten or typewritten text (usually captured by a scanner) into machine-editable text, or to translate pictures of characters into a standard encoding scheme representing them (e. ...


See also

Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to OCR, is a type of computer software designed to translate images of handwritten or typewritten text (usually captured by a scanner) into machine-editable text, or to translate pictures of characters into a standard encoding scheme representing them (e. ...

External links

  • GNU General Public Licensed MICR font
  • MICR Repository
  • Java Glossary (defines the routing number and account number)
  • MICR

Bold text'Bold text'Bold text'Bold text'Magnetic Ink Character Recognition, or MICR, colloquially pronounced /ˈmɪkɚ/ or sometimes /ˈmaɪkɚ/, is a character recognition technology adopted mainly by the banking industry to facilitate the processing of checks. The process was demonstrated to the American Bankers Association in July 1956, and it was almost universally employed by 1963[1].


Almost all US and UK checks now include MICR characters at the bottom of the paper in a font known as E-13B. The major fonts used around the world are E-13B and CMC-7.



MICR numerals and control charactersIn addition to their unique fonts, MICR characters are printed with a magnetic ink or toner. Subscript textMagnetic printing is used so that the characters can be reliably read into a system, even when they have been overprinted with other marks such as cancellation stamps. The characters are read with a device similar in nature to the head of an audio tape recorder, and the letterforms' bulbous shapes ensure that each letter produces a unique waveform for the read head. The error rate for scanning the numbers at the bottom of a typical cheque is smaller than with usual optical character recognition systems.



[edit] See also Optical Character Recognition


[edit] External links GNU General Public Licensed MICR font MICR Repository Java Glossary (defines the routing number and account number) MICR


[edit] Notes ^ Mandell, Lewis. "Diffusion of EFTS among National Banks: Note", Journal of Money, Credit and Banking Vol. 9, No. 2. (May, 1977), p. 341.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Magnetic ink character recognition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (418 words)
Magnetic Ink Character Recognition, or MICR, colloquially pronounced /ˈmɪkɚ/ or sometimes /ˈmaɪkɚ/, is a special kind of character recognition technology that was adopted mainly by the U.S. banking industry to facilitate the processing of cheques.
The general problem of character recognition is limited in its usefulness to the degree of the accuracy of the recognition.
MICR was developed by the Bank of America, leading to the development of one of the earliest commercial computer systems, ERMA.
Optical character recognition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1523 words)
Recognition of hand printing, cursive handwriting, and even the printed typewritten versions of some other scripts (especially those with a very large number of characters), are still the subject of active research.
Recognition of cursive text is an active area of research, with recognition rates even lower than that of hand-printed text.
One area where accuracy and speed of computer input of character information exceeds that of humans is in the area of magnetic ink character recognition, where the error rates range around one read error for every 20,000 to 30,000 checks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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