FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Magnentius" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Magnentius
Magnentius
Emperor of the Roman Empire
Although Magnentius restored certain rights to the Pagans, the reverse of this coin leaves little doubt as to his religious beliefs, bearing the chi-rho.
Reign January 18, 350
August 11, 353
Born 303
Samarobriva, Gaul
Died August 11, 353
Mons Seleucus
Predecessor Constans
Successor Constantius II

Magnentius (303August 11, 353) was a Roman usurper (January 18, 350August 11, 353). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Image File history File links Double_Centenionalis_Magnentius-XR-s4017. ... The Labarum An image of the labarum, with the Greek letters Alpha and Omega inscribed. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Magnentius proclaimed Emperor by the army in Autun. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Battle of Mons Seleucus - Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius. ... Events Diocletian launched the last major persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire; Hierocles was said to have been the instigator of the fierce persecution of the Christians under February 24 - Galerius, Roman Emperor, publishes his edict that begins the persecution of Christians in his portion of the Empire. ... Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Battle of Mons Seleucus - Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius. ... The Battle of Mons Seleucus was fought in 353 between the forces of Constantius II and the forces of the usurper Magnentius. ... Flavius Julius Constans (320 - 350), was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 337 to 350. ... Flavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... Events Diocletian launched the last major persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire; Hierocles was said to have been the instigator of the fierce persecution of the Christians under February 24 - Galerius, Roman Emperor, publishes his edict that begins the persecution of Christians in his portion of the Empire. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Battle of Mons Seleucus - Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius. ... Usurpers were a common feature of the late Roman Empire, especially from the so-called crisis of the third century onwards, when political instability became the rule. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Magnentius proclaimed Emperor by the army in Autun. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Born in Samarobriva (Amiens), Gaul, Magnentius was the commander of the Herculians and Iovians, the imperial guard units (Zosimus, ii.58). When the army grew dissatisfied with the behaviour of Roman Emperor Constans, it elevated Magnentius at Autun on January 18, 350. Constans was abandoned by all except a handful of retainers, and he was slain shortly afterwards by a troop of light cavalry near the Pyrenees. Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Imperial guard of the Emperors of the Roman Empire from 284 until 988 The Praetorian Guard were based at Castra Praetoria just outside Rome, and during the reign of the Emperor Diocletian were in league with the Roman Senate. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Flavius Julius Constans (320 - 350), was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 337 to 350. ... Autun is a town in the Saône-et-Loire département in Burgundy, France, and has a history which dates back to Roman times. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Magnentius proclaimed Emperor by the army in Autun. ... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... Pic de Bugatetin the Néouvielle Natural Reserve Central Pyrenees For the mountains in Victoria, Australia, see Pyrenees (Victoria). ...


Magnentius quickly attracted the loyalty of the provinces in Britannia, Gaul, and Hispania, in part because he proved to be far more tolerant towards both Christians and Pagans. His control on Italia and Africa was applied through the election of his men to the most important offices. However, the short-lived revolt of Nepotianus, a member of the Constantinian dynasty, showed Magnentius that his status of Emperor was to be consolidated against the members of that dynasty. Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Look up pagan, heathen in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces ... Nepotianus Flavius Iulius Popilius Nepotianus Constantinus was the son of Eutropia, the half-sister of emperor Constantine I, and grandson of emperor Constantius Chlorus and Flavia Maximiana Theodora. ... Category: ...


The self-proclaimed emperor tried to strengthen his grasp on the territories previously controlled by Constans, moving towards the Danube. Vetranio, commander of the Pannonian army, had been elected Augustus by his troops in Mursa on 1 March. This revolt had a loyalist mark, since Vetranio was supported by Constantina, and Constantius II himself recognized Vetranio, sending him the imperial diadem. The Danube (ancient Danuvius, Iranian *dānu, meaning river or stream, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river in the European Union and Europes second longest river. ... Vetranio (d. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... Augustus (plural augusti) is Latin for majestic or venerable. The feminine form is Augusta. ... Osijek (pronounced: []) is the fourth largest city in Croatia with a population of 114,616 in 2001. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Constantina Augusta was the eldest daughter of Constantine the Great, Roman Emperor. ... Flavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty. ...


The remaining emperor of the family of Constantine I, Constantius II broke off his war in Syria with Persia, and marched west. Despite Magnentius effort to gain Vetranio to his cause, the old general reached Constantius with his army, and deposed the crown. Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February ca. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of...


After electing Magnus Decentius (probably his brother) to Caesar and gathering as many troops as possible, the armies of Magnentius and Constantius met in the Battle of Mursa Major in 351; Magnentius led his troops into battle, while Constantius spent the day of battle praying in a nearby church. Despite Magnentius' heroism, his troops were defeated and forced to retreat back to Gaul. Bronze coin of Decentius. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ... The Battle of Mursa Major was fought in 351 between a Roman army led by Constantius II and the forces of the usurper Magnentius. ... Events March 15 - Constantius II elevates his cousin Gallus to Caesar, or assistant emperor, and is put in charge of the Western Roman Empire. ...


As a result of Magnentius' defeat, Italy ejected his garrisons and rejoined the loyalist cause. Magnentius made a final stand in 353 in the Battle of Mons Seleucus, after which he committed suicide by falling on his sword. Events Battle of Mons Seleucus - Constantius II defeats the usurper Magnentius. ... The Battle of Mons Seleucus was fought in 353 between the forces of Constantius II and the forces of the usurper Magnentius. ... Rather than surrender to US soldiers, the Mayor (Bürgermeister) of Leipzig Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ...


Following the suppression of Magnentius' rebellion, Constantius commanded an investigation be made to find his followers. The most notorious agent in this search was the primicerius notorarum Paulus Catena. (Etymologically primus in cera, sc. ... Paulus was the name of an imperial notary, or senior civil servant, whose cruelty was infamous throughout the Roman and medieval world. ...


Magnentius' mother was a Frank.[citation needed] This article is about the Frankish people and society. ...


References

  • Cameron, Averil, and Peter Garnsey ed., The Cambridge Ancient History, Vol XIII, Cambridge University Press, 1988.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Magnentius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (270 words)
Magnentius (ruled AD January 18, 350–August 11, 353), was a Roman usurper.
Despite Magnentius' heroism, his troops were defeated and forced to retreat back to Gaul.
Magnentius made a final stand in 353 in the Battle of Mons Seleucus, after which he committed suicide.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m