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Encyclopedia > Magi
The Wise Men are given the names Gaspar, Melchior, and Balthasar in this Romanesque mosaic from the Basilica of St Apollinarius in Ravenna, Italy. In fact, their number is unknown as it was never stated in the Bible; only that there were three gifts — the supposition that this implied three givers is speculation.
The Wise Men are given the names Gaspar, Melchior, and Balthasar in this Romanesque mosaic from the Basilica of St Apollinarius in Ravenna, Italy. In fact, their number is unknown as it was never stated in the Bible; only that there were three gifts — the supposition that this implied three givers is speculation.
Gothic depiction of the adoration of the Magi from Strasbourg Cathedral
Gothic depiction of the adoration of the Magi from Strasbourg Cathedral
The Worship of the Magi window at Trinity Church, Boston, designed by Edward Burne-Jones and executed by William Morris, 1882

The Magi (singular Magus, from Latin, via Greek μάγος ; Old English: Mage; from Old Persian maguš and Proto-Kurdish magî) were a tribe from ancient Media, who — prior to the conquest of the Medes by the Achaemenid Empire in 550 BC — were responsible for religious and funerary practices. Later they accepted the Zoroastrian religion, not without changing the original message of its founder, Zarathustra (Zoroaster), to what is today known as Zurvanism, which would become the predominant form of Zoroastrianism during the Sassanid era (AD 226–650). No traces of Zurvanism exist beyond the 10th century. The best known Magi are the "Wise Men from the East" in the Bible, whose graves Marco Polo claimed to have seen in what is today the district of Saveh, in Tehran, Iran. In English, the term may refer to a shaman, sorcerer, or wizard; it is the origin of the words magic and magician. Magi, Mage or Magus may refer to: The Magi were religious shamanist priests (Magus singular) Biblical Magi - The three wise men portrayed in Matthews story of Jesus nativity. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 754 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2043 × 1625 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 754 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2043 × 1625 pixel, file size: 2. ... Three Kings, or Three Wise Men redirects here. ... The name Gaspar can be used as: an alternate spelling of Casper; a males given name a city in Brazil; Gaspar, Santa Catarina a character in Chrono Trigger; Gaspar This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Melchior can refer to One of the Three Wise Men Malchior, a villain in the Teen Titans animated series. ... Balthazar can refer to One of the Three Wise Men A size of wine bottle, equal to 16 standard bottles, or 12 litres A 1909 book by Anatole France A 1958 novel by Lawrence Durrell Balthazar Getty, great grandson of J. Paul Getty Hans Urs von Balthasar - 20th c. ... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... Mosaic is the art of decoration with small pieces of colored glass, stone or other material. ... SantApollinare Nuovo: The 38. ... Province of Ravenna Ravenna is a city and comune in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Image File history File links France_Strasbourg_Magi. ... Image File history File links France_Strasbourg_Magi. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... West façade of the cathedral The Cathédrale Notre-Dame (English Our Ladys Cathedral) in Strasbourg, France belongs to the grand history of European cathedrals architectural design. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (343x764, 143 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Morris Edward Burne-Jones Magi Trinity Church, Boston Morris & Co. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (343x764, 143 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): William Morris Edward Burne-Jones Magi Trinity Church, Boston Morris & Co. ... Trinity Church in Boston. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris (March 24, 1834 – October 3, 1896) was an English artist, writer, socialist and activist. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Penis[1], Englisc by its speakers) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... See Aryan Language or Old Persian For more information visit: *[Ancient Iranian Languages & Literature The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS) ... The Proto-Kurdish language was a originally spoken by several ancient tribes that comprise Kurdish ancestry in the mountains of the Hakkari region south of Lake Van and west of Lake Urmia. ... Founder of empires: Cyrus, The Great is still revered in modern Iran as he was in all the successor Persian Empires. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Zoroaster (Greek Ζωροάστρης, ZōroastrÄ“s) or Zarathustra (Avestan: ZaraθuÅ¡tra), also referred to as Zartosht (Persian: ), was an ancient Iranian prophet and religious poet. ... Zurvan is the Persian god of infinite time, space and fate. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Sassanid Empire or Sassanian Dynasty (Persian: []) is the name used for the fourth Iranian dynasty, and the second Persian Empire (226–651). ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Three Kings, or Three Wise Men redirects here. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Marco Polo (September 15, 1254 – January 8, 1324) was a Venetian trader and explorer who gained fame for his worldwide travels, recorded in the book Il Milione (The Million or The Travels of Marco Polo). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A shaman doctor of Kyzyl. ... John Dee and Edward Kelley evoking a spirit: Elizabethans who claimed magical knowledge A magician is a person skilled in the mysterious and hidden art of magic, which can be described as either the act of entertaining with tricks that are in apparent violation of natural law, such as those... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ...

Contents

Etymology

In Indo-Iranian languages

There are two different meanings of the term 'Magi': From Herodotus' Histories and from subsequent accounts of them, it is quite clear that the Magi were in fact a sacerdotal caste whose ethnic origin is never again so much as mentioned.[1] In other accounts, we hear of Magi not only in Persia, Parthia, Bactria, Chorasmia, Aria (satrapy), Media, and among the Sakas, but also in non-Iranian lands like Arabia, Ethiopia, and Egypt. …It is, therefore, quite likely that the sacerdotal caste of the Magi was distinct from the Median tribe of the same name.[1] Sacerdotalism (from Latin sacerdos, priest, literally one who presents sacred offerings, sacer, sacred, and dare, to give) is a term applied (usually in a hostile sense) to the system, method, and spirit of a priestly order or class, under which the functions, dignity, and influence of the members of the... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social restriction and social stratification, enforced by law or common practice, based on endogamy, occupation, economic status, race, ethnicity, etc. ... // Introduction Fars is one of the 30 provinces of Iran. ... Parthia[1] (Middle Persian: اشکانیان Ashkâniân) was a civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of the modern countries of Armenia, Iraq, Georgia, eastern Turkey, eastern Syria, Turkmenistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, the Persian Gulf... Bactria, about 320 BC Bactria (Bactriana, Bākhtar in Persian, also Bhalika in Arabic and Indian languages, and Ta-Hia in Chinese) was the ancient Greek name of the country between the range of the Hindu Kush and the Amu Darya (Oxus); its capital, Bactra or Balhika or Bokhdi (now... Khwarezmid Empire (1190-1220) Khwarezm was a series of states centered on the Amu Darya river delta of the former Aral Sea, in modern Uzbekistan, extending across the Ust-Urt plateau and possibly as far west as the eastern shores of the northern Caspian Sea. ... This is the ancient Latin name (Greek name, Areia) for the area around Herat, in NW Afghanistan. ... Saka is also the name of a town in Hiroshima, Japan; for information on this town, see Saka, Hiroshima. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ...


In the texts of the Avesta, the term only appears once, as (Younger Avestan) moghu.tbiš meaning "hostile to the moghu", that is, hostile to "both the teaching of Zoroaster and the community that accepted that teaching."[2] This sense of the term, which the Middle Persian authors of the Zend commentaries adduce to mean 'God's gift', is clearly related to Vedic Sanskrit magha (मघा), meaning 'riches' or 'gift'.[1] In its adjectival form maghavan, it appears to refer to a person enriched by the teachings of Zoroaster or one "possessed of this gospel."[3] The adjectival form survives as maghvand in Classical Persian, where it "seems to mean something like 'adorning'."[1] See Avesta Municipality for the Swedish town Yasna 28. ... Avestan is an Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the sacred hymns and canon of the Zoroastrian Avesta. ... Pahlavi is a term that refers: (1) to a script used in Iran derived from the Aramaic script, and (2) more broadly, to Middle Persian, the Middle Iranian language written in this script. ... Vedic Sanskrit is the language of the Vedas, which are the earliest sacred texts of India,. The Vedas were first passed down orally and therefore have no known date. ...


The other meaning, evident as Herodotus' magoi for the Median tribe, derives from Old Persian magu and Proto-Kurdish magî. Notwithstanding the similarity to the Avestan language word, "there is no reason to suppose that the western Iranian form magu (Magus) has exactly the same meaning."[1] "It may be, however, that Avestan moghu and Medean magu were the same word in origin, a common Iranian term for 'member of the tribe' having developed among the Medes the special sense of 'member of the (priestly) tribe', hence a priest."[4][5][6][7] Modern Persian mobed, derived from Middle Persian magu-pati, 'lord priest', is the unequivocal term for a Zoroastrian priest of a certain rank. See Aryan Language or Old Persian For more information visit: *[Ancient Iranian Languages & Literature The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS) ... The Proto-Kurdish language was a originally spoken by several ancient tribes that comprise Kurdish ancestry in the mountains of the Hakkari region south of Lake Van and west of Lake Urmia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “Farsi” redirects here. ... Pahlavi is a term that refers: (1) to a script used in Iran derived from the Aramaic script, and (2) more broadly, to Middle Persian, the Middle Iranian language written in this script. ...


Kurdish use of mancî

The ancient Medes are said to be one of many Iranic tribes that composed a new Kurdish ethnic pool over 2,000 years ago,[8] and Magi refers precisely to one priestly caste within the Medes social structure and the followers of their teachings.[9] Scholars affirm that the name magî survives in the modern Kurdish language through the traditional endonym of Kurds, Kurmanji, used by native speakers and members that comprise the Kurdish ethnic group.[10] The word mancî or manji is a suffix of the word Kurmancî, which today refers to the sub-group of Kurds who speak a Kurdish dialect of the Kurmanji branch. The prefix simply means child or children. Scholars affirm that the Magi were a hereditary priesthood of ancient tribes of Kurdish ancestry.[11] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Kurdish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Kurdish language is a language spoken in the region called Kurdistan, including Kurdish populations in parts of Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up Kurdish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up Kurdish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Greek use of magos

While, in Herodotus, magos refers to the priestly caste and tribe of the Medes, (1.101) said to be able to interpret dreams (7.37), it could also be used for any enchanter or wizard, and especially to charlatans or quacks (see also goetia), especially by philosophers such as Heraclitus who took a sceptical view of the art of an enchanter, and in comic literature (Lucian's Lucios or the Ass). In Hellenism, magos started to be used as an adjective, meaning "magical", as in magas techne "ars magica" (e.g. used by Philostratus). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Buer, the 10th spirit, who teaches Moral and Natural Philosophy (from the Mathers and Liddell 1995 edition). ... Heraclitus of Ephesus (Ancient Greek - Herákleitos ho Ephésios (Herakleitos the Ephesian)) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure (Ancient Greek - ho Skoteinós), was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of Ephesus on the coast of Asia Minor. ... Lucian. ... The Metamorphoses of Lucius Apuleius, referred to as The Golden Ass (Asinus aureus) by Augustine, is the only Latin novel to survive in its entirety. ... The term Hellenistic (derived from Héllēn, the Greeks traditional self-described ethnic name) was established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen to refer to the spreading of Greek culture over the non-Greek people that were conquered by Alexander the Great. ... Philostratus, was the name of several, three (or four), Greek sophists of the Roman imperial period: Philostratus the Athenian (c. ...


The PIE root *magh- appears to have expressed power or ability, continued e.g. in Attic Greek mekhos (cf. mechanics) and in Germanic magan (English may), magts (English might, the expression "might and magic" thus being a figura etymologica).[12] Look up Appendix:List of Proto-Indo-European roots in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Attic Greek is the ancient dialect of the Greek language that was spoken in Attica, which includes Athens. ... Mechanics (Greek ) is the branch of physics concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effect of the bodies on their environment. ... Figura etymologica describes a rhetorical figure in which words with the same etymological derivation are used adjacently. ...


English language

The plural Magi entered the English language in ca. 1200, referring to the Magi mentioned in Matthew 2:1, the singular being attested only considerably later, in the late 14th century, when it was borrowed from Old French in the meaning magician together with magic. Events University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France The Kanem-Bornu Empire was established in northern Africa around the year 1200 Mongol victory over Northern China — 30,000,000 killed Births Al-Abhari, Persian philosopher and mathematician (died 1265) Ulrich von Liechtenstein, German nobleman and poet (died... Three Kings, or Three Wise Men redirects here. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300 A.D. It was known at the time as the langue doïl to distinguish it from the langue...


Arabic Language

It is speculated that the old Persian word maguš is the origin of the Arabic word majus (Arabic: مجوس ) which is used generally to describe Old Persian religions. MajÅ«s (Arabic and Persian: مجوس, pl. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ...


Chinese Language

Victor H. Mair provides archaeological and linguistic evidence suggesting that Chinese (巫 "shaman; witch, wizard; magician", Old Chinese *myag) was a loanword from Old Persian *maguš "magician; magi".[13] He describes: Victor H. Mair is Professor of Chinese Language and Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States. ... The Seal script characters for harvest (later year) and person. ... See Aryan Language or Old Persian For more information visit: *[Ancient Iranian Languages & Literature The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies (CAIS) ...

The recent discovery at an early Chou site of two figurines with unmistakably Caucasoid or Europoid feature is startling prima facie evidence of East-West interaction during the first half of the first millennium Before the Current Era. It is especially interesting that one of the figurines bears on the top of his head the clearly incised graph which identifies him as a wu (< *myag).[14]

These figurines, which are dated circa 8th century BCE, were discovered during a 1980 excavation of a Zhou Dynasty palace in Fufeng County (扶风县, Shaanxi Province). Boundaries of the Western Zhou Dynasty (1050 - 771 BC) in China The Zhou Dynasty (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chou Ch`ao; 1122 BC to 256 BC [1] preceded by the Shang Dynasty and followed by the Qin Dynasty in China. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the...


The modern Chinese character , which combines (gōng "work") and (rén "person") doubled, is simplified from the Seal Script characters; however, the earliest Bronzeware Script character for 巫 is a cross with T-shaped potents.[15] Mair identifies this ancient Chinese "shaman" character with a Western symbol of magicians, the "Cross Potent" (, see cross), which "can hardly be attributable to sheer coincidence or chance independent origination." Japanese name Kanji: Kana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Hantu: A Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, sometimes Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ... &#12298;&#23563;&#38577;&#32773;&#19981;&#36935;&#12299;&#8212;&#36040;&#23798; &#26494;&#19979;&#21839;&#31461;&#23376; &#35328;&#24107;&#25505;&#34277;&#21435; &#38587;&#22312;&#27492;&#23665;&#20013; &#38642;&#28145;&#19981;&#30693;&#34389; Seeking the Master but not Meeting by Jia Dao Beneath a pine I asked a little child. ... Bronzeware script (&#37329;&#25991; pinyin jin wen or &#37912;&#40718;&#25991; pinyin zhong1 ding3 wen2) is a family of scripts found on Chinese bronzes such as zhong (bells) and ding (tripods), since bronze artifacts with Chinese characters span many centuries and they have been found in many areas of China. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Also known as the Latin cross or crux ordinaria. ...


Compared with the linguistic reconstructions of many Indo-European languages, the current reconstruction of Old (or "Archaic") Chinese is moreprovisional. This velar final -g in Mair's *myag (巫) is evident in several Old Chinese reconstructions (Dong Tonghe's *mywag, Zhou Fagao's *mjwaɣ, and Li Fanggui's *mjag), but not all (Bernhard Karlgren's *mywo and Axel Schuessler's *ma). Linguistic reconstruction is the practice of establishing the features of the unattested ancestor of one or more languages. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Li Fanggui (李方桂, pinyin: Lǐ Fāngguì; Wade-Giles: Li Fang-Kuei, Fang-Kuei Li) (1902-1987), Chinese American linguist. ... Bernhard Karlgren (1889 - 1978) was a Swedish sinologist and eminent philologist, and the founder of Swedish sinology as a scholarly discipline. ...


History in the Persian Empire

According to Herodotus i. 101, which lists the names of the six tribes or castes of the Medes, the Magi were a hereditary caste of priests. They were highly influential in Median society until the unification of the Median and Persian Empires in 550 BC, after which their power was curtailed by Cyrus the Great and by Cyrus' son Cambyses II. The Magi revolted against Cambyses and set up a rival claimant to the throne, one of their own, who took the name of Smerdis. Smerdis and his forces were defeated by the Persians under Darius I. The Magi continued to exist in unified Persia, but their influence was limited after this and other political setbacks, and it was not until the Sassanid era (AD 226–650) that they would again achieve prominence. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC Events and Trends Carthage conquers Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica 559 BC - King Cambyses I of Anshan dies... Cyrus the Great (Old Persian: KÅ«ruÅ¡,[1] modern Persian: کوروش بزرگ, Kurosh-e Bozorg) (c. ... Cambyses II (Persian Kambujiya), was the name borne by the son of Cyrus the Great. ... Smerdis was a Persian king of infamous memory. ... Darius the Great (c. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Sassanid Empire or Sassanian Dynasty (Persian: []) is the name used for the fourth Iranian dynasty, and the second Persian Empire (226–651). ...


The Book of Jeremiah (39:3, 39:13) gives a title rab mag "chief magus" to the head of the Magi, Nergal Sharezar (Septuagint, Vulgate and KJV mistranslate Rabmag as a separate character). It's also believed by some Christians that the Jewish prophet Daniel was "rab mag" and entrusted a Messianic vision (to be announced in due time by a "star") to a secret sect of the Magi for its eventual fulfillment (Daniel 4:9; 5: 11). The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ Yirməyāhū in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ...


The Magi in India

In India there is an atv Maga, Bhojaka or Sakaldwipiya Brahmins. Their major centers are in Rajasthan in Western India and near Gaya in Bihar. According to Bhavishya Purana and other texts, they were invited to settle in Punjab to conduct the worship of Lord Sun (Mitra or Surya in Sanskrit). Bhavishya Purana explicitly associates them to the rituals of the (now extinct) Zurvanite brand of Zoroastrianism. [citation needed] The members of the community still worship in Sun temples in India. They are also hereditary priests in several Jain temples in Gujarat and Rajasthan. Bhojakas are mentioned in the copperplates of the Kadamba dynasty (4-6th cent) as managers of Jain institutions. Images of Lord Sun in India are shown wearing a central Asian dress, complete with boots. The term "Mihir" in India is regarded to represent the Maga influence. Bhojaka is a class of Brahmin priests in Western India. ... Young Indian brahmachari Brahmin A Brahmin (less often Brahman) is a member of the Hindu priestly caste. ... , Rājasthān (DevanāgarÄ«: राजस्थान, IPA: )   is the largest state of the Republic of India in terms of area. ... A map of West India. ... Gaya(गया) is a city in Bihar, India, and it is also the headquarters of Gaya District. ... , Bihar (Hindi: बिहार, Urdu: بہار, IPA: ,  ) is a state of the Indian union situated in north India. ... The Bhavishya Purana is an ancient Sanskrit text authored by Rishi Vyasa, the compiler of the Vedic texts. ... Punjab, 1903 Punjab Province, 1909 Punjab (Persian: ‎, meaning Land of the five Rivers) (c. ... This article is about the Vedic deity Mitra. ... In Hinduism, Surya (Devanagari: सूर्य, sÅ«rya) is the chief solar deity,one of the Adityas, son of Kasyapa and one of his wife Aditi[1] ,in Nordics Tyr he is said to be the son of Dyaus Pitar. ... Zurvan is the Persian god of infinite time, space and fate. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... JAIN is an activity within the Java Community Process, developing APIs for the creation of telephony (voice and data) services. ... This article is for the Indian state. ... An ancient royal family of Karnataka, who ruled from their capital of Banavasi, later branched into Goa, Hanagal and Chandavar. ...


Popular culture

  • The three Magi are major characters in Christopher Moore's light-hearted novel about the life of Jesus, Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.
  • The Magi are the three super-computers, Melchior, Balthasar and Casper, that appear in the anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion, which features many images from Judeo-Christian mythology.
  • In the game Chrono Trigger, the Gurus of Life, Time, and Reason are named Melechior, Belthazar, and Gaspar. Magus is also the name of Frog's Arch Nemesis.
  • Another game (Xenogears) there are Three Wisemen of Shevat named Melchior, Balthazar, and Gaspar.
  • The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn used the title of "Magus" to refer to the second-highest level of attainment in their degree system. This system, with associated titles, would later be adopted by Aleister Crowley for his occult order A∴A∴, wherein the title "Magus" designated the highest attainable grade of magic (considered the mastery of Jesus, Buddha, Lao Tzu, etc.). To be a Magi means to journey to give gifts.
  • In the game Warhammer 40,000, the term Magos is used to describe a high ranking official of the Adeptus Mechanicus, a para-religious cult dedicated to technology.

Christopher Moore (born 1957 in Toledo, Ohio[1]) is an American writer of absurdist fiction. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Original run October 4, 1995 – March 27, 1996 No. ... Chrono Trigger ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square Co. ... The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (or, more commonly, the Golden Dawn) was a magical order of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, practicing a form of theurgy and spiritual development. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... Argenteum Astrum, also known as Argentinum Astrum, Argentinium Astrum (Latin for silver star) or Astron Argyron (Greek for silver star), and often referred to as A∴A∴, was a magical order created by Aleister Crowley after leaving the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Media:Example. ... Lao Zi (also spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tse) was a famous Chinese philosopher who is believed to have lived in approximately the 4th century BC, during the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States Periods. ... This article is about the tabletop miniature wargame and the fictional universe in which it is set. ... In the fictional Warhammer 40,000 universe, the Adeptus Mechanicus is an institution of the Imperium dedicated to the preservation and restoration of science and technology. ...

See also

The shaman is an intellectual and spiritual figure who is regarded as possessing power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, primarily that of a healer ( medicine man). The shaman provides medical care, and serves other community needs during crisis times, via supernatural means (means... Kalku or Calcu, in Chilean folklore and the Mapuche mythology, is a witch or shaman, usually an evil one, but not necessarily. ... Seid (also seiðr, seidhr) was the form of shamanism practised by pre-Christian Norse and other Germanic cultures and continued in modern times by people who practice the reconstructionist beliefs of Ásatrú or heathenry. ... Look up magician in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Warlocks are, among historic Christian traditions, said to be the male equivalent of witches (usually in the pejorative sense of Europes Middle Ages), and were said to ride pitchforks instead of broomsticks. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // [edit] Magical practices and beliefs [1] In the Greco-Roman world, the public and private rituals associated with religion seem to have been a part of everyday life. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Zaehner, Richard Charles (1956). The Teachings of the Magi. New York: MacMillan. 
  2. ^ Zaehner, Richard Charles (1939). "{{{title}}}". BSOS IX. 
  3. ^ Boyce, Mary (1975). A History of Zoroastrianism, Vol. I. Leiden/Köln: Brill. 
  4. ^ Boyce, Mary (1975). A History of Zoroastrianism, Vol. I. Leiden/Köln: Brill, 10–11. 
  5. ^ Benveniste, Emil (1938). "Les Mages dans l'Acien Iran". Publications de la Société des Études Iraniennes 15. 
  6. ^ Eilers, W. (1953). "{{{title}}}". Abhandlung der Akadamie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur in Mainz 2. 
  7. ^ Gershevitch, Ilya (1964). "{{{title}}}". JNES XXIII. 
  8. ^ V. Minorsky, Studies in Caucasian History. London: Taylor's Foreign Press, 1953
  9. ^ http://www.ldolphin.org/magi.html
  10. ^ E.B. Soane, Grammar of the Kurmanji or Kurdish Language, Part I, p 5, London 1913
  11. ^ http://www.khouse.org/articles/1999/142/
  12. ^ Pokorny, IEW s.v. magh-.
  13. ^ Mair, Victor H. (1990). "Old Sinitic *Myag, Old Persian Maguš and English Magician,” Early China 15: 27–47.
  14. ^ Mair, 27.
  15. ^ Seal and Bronze Characters for 巫[1]

Professor Nora Elizabeth Mary Boyce (2 August 1920 - 4 April 2006) was the worlds leading doyenne of Zoroastrian studies. ... Professor Nora Elizabeth Mary Boyce (2 August 1920 - 4 April 2006) was the worlds leading doyenne of Zoroastrian studies. ... The Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (The Indo-European Etymological Dictionary) by the Czech scholar and Irish nationalist Julius Pokorny, was published in 1959. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Magi Astrology - Financial Astrology - Astrology Software Programs (3078 words)
Magi Astrology is the astrology of the Magi Society, the world's largest and wealthiest astrological organization.
Magi Astrology is a special form of astrology that has been developed by the Magi Society, which is a Chinese astrological society that was founded in 1625.
The primary purpose of the Magi Society is to continue to conduct scientific research to improve and expand our knowledge of astrology and to teach it to our members and the world.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Magi (2447 words)
The Church, indeed, in her liturgy, applies to the Magi the words: "The kings of Tharsis and the islands shall offer presents; the kings of the Arabians and of Saba shall bring him gifts: and all the kings of the earth shall adore him" (Psalm 71:10).
The religion of the Magi was fundamentally that of Zoroaster and forbade sorcery; their astrology and skill in interpreting dreams were occasions of their finding Christ.
It is said that after their return home, the Magi were baptized by St. Thomas and wrought much for the spread of the Faith in Christ.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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