FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Magdalen College, Oxford
Magdalen College, Oxford
                     
College name Magdalen College
Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae
Named after Mary Magdalene
Established 1458
Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge
President Professor David Clary FRS
JCR President Jessica Jones
Undergraduates 395
MCR President Eloise Scotford
Graduates 230


Location of Magdalen College within central OxfordCoordinates: 51°45′09″N 1°14′50″W / 51.752374, -1.247077
Homepage
Boatclub

Magdalen College (pronounced [ˈmɔːdlɪn]) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. It is also one of the wealthiest, with, in 2003, an estimated financial endowment of £116 million. Download high resolution version (880x584, 84 KB)Magdalen College, Oxford, 2004-06-13. ... The penitent Mary Magdalen, a much reproduced composition by Titian. ... Events January 24 - Matthias I Corvinus becomes king of Hungary Foundation of Magdalen College, University of Oxford George of Podebrady becomes king of Bohemia Pope Pius II becomes pope Turks sack the Acropolis Births February 15 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (d. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... Professor David Clary is a British theoretical chemist who has been President of Magdalen College, Oxford since 2005. ... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (360 × 370 pixel, file size: 156 KB, MIME type: image/png) Small map of central Oxford This map may be incomplete, and may contain errors. ... Image File history File links Blue_pog. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Magdalen College was founded as Magdalen Hall in 1448 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester. It became Magdalen College in 1458. The founder's statutes included provision for a choral foundation of men and boys (a tradition that has continued to the present day) and made reference to how the name of the College should be pronounced. Events January 5/ 6 - Christopher of Bavaria, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden dies with no designated heir leaving all three kingdoms with vacant thrones. ... William Waynflete (1395 - 1486), English Lord Chancellor and bishop of Winchester, was the son of Richard Pattene or Patyn, alias Barbour, of Wainfleet, Lincolnshire ( Reg, f. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ... Events January 24 - Matthias I Corvinus becomes king of Hungary Foundation of Magdalen College, University of Oxford George of Podebrady becomes king of Bohemia Pope Pius II becomes pope Turks sack the Acropolis Births February 15 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (d. ...


Widely regarded as one of the most beautiful of the Oxford and Cambridge colleges, Magdalen is also one of the most visited. It stands next to the River Cherwell and has within its grounds a deer park and Addison's Walk. Magdalen College School also lies nearby. The large, square Magdalen Tower is a famous Oxford landmark, and it is a tradition that the college choir sings from the top of it early on May Morning. The college's current president, Professor David Clary FRS, was earlier a Fellow and Senior Tutor at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... The River Cherwell is a river which flows through the midlands of England. ... “Fawn” redirects here. ... View along Addisons Walk. ... Magdalen College School or MCS is a boys independent day school currently located on the edge of central Oxford, England. ... Magdalen Tower, as seen from nearby Founders Tower Magdalen Great Tower is a bell tower in Oxford, England. ... May Day is May 1, and refers to any of several holidays celebrated on this day. ... Professor David Clary is a British theoretical chemist who has been President of Magdalen College, Oxford since 2005. ... The Fellowship of the Royal Society was founded in 1660. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as...

Contents

Grounds

The college has large grounds, close to the city centre. They stretch north and east from the college, and are most of the area bounded by Longwall Street, the High Street (where the porter's lodge is located), and St Clement's. Longwall Street is a street in central Oxford, England. ... Carfax, at the west end of the High Street, Oxford. ... The Alcuin College porters lodge at the University of York A porters lodge is a place near the entrance of a building where one or more porters can be found to respond to enquiries from the public and direct them around the building. ... St Clements is a street in Oxford, England. ...

The deer in the Grove

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 360 KB) The deer in Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 360 KB) The deer in Magdalen College, Oxford. ...

The Grove (Deer Park)

This large meadow occupies most of the north west of the college's grounds, from the New Buildings and the Grove Quad up to Hollywell Ford. During the winter and spring, it is the home of a herd of deer. It is possible to view the meadow (and also the deer) from the path between New Buildings and Grove Quad, and also from the archway in New Buildings. “Fawn” redirects here. ...


In the 16th century, long before the introduction of the deer, the grove consisted of gardens, orchards, and bowling greens. During the Civil War, it was used to house a regiment of soldiers. At one point in the C19th it was home to three traction engines belonging to the works department of the college. Bowling Green is the name of some places in the United States of America: Bowling Green, Florida, named after the town in Kentucky. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ...

Addison's Walk in Autumn
Addison's Walk in Spring

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 2989 KB) Addisons Walk, Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 2989 KB) Addisons Walk, Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 431 KB) Addisons Walk, Magdalen College, Oxford, looking back towards the College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 431 KB) Addisons Walk, Magdalen College, Oxford, looking back towards the College. ...

The Meadow (bounded by Addison's Walk)

This triangular meadow lies to the east of the college, bounded on all sides by the River Cherwell. In the spring, it is filled with the flower Fritillaria Meleagris (commonly known as Snakeshead Fritillary), which gives it an attractive green-purple colour. These flowers grow in very few places, and have been recorded growing in the meadow since around 1785. Once the flowering has finished, the deer are moved in for the Summer and Autumn. In wet winters, some or all of the meadow may flood, as the meadow is lower lying than the surrounding path. All around the edge of the meadow is a tree-lined path, Addison's Walk. It is a beautiful and tranquil walk, favoured by students, dons, and visitors alike. In high summer, however, the walk can suffer from unpleasant smells due to the putrifaction of the river. It also links the college with Holywell Ford, and the Fellows' Garden. The River Cherwell is a river which flows through the midlands of England. ... Binomial name Fritillaria meleagris L. Fritillaria meleagris, commonly known as Snakess head (the original English name), and also Snakes Head Fritillary, Leper Lily, and Guinea-hen Flower (possibly also checkered daffodil) is a fritillary, a flower from the family Liliaceae. ...

The Fellows' Garden
The Fellows' Garden

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 526 KB) The Fellows Garden, Magdalen College, Oxford, as seen from near the entrance from Addisons Walk, with a view of the River Cherwell. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 526 KB) The Fellows Garden, Magdalen College, Oxford, as seen from near the entrance from Addisons Walk, with a view of the River Cherwell. ...

The Fellows' Garden

Located to the north east of the Meadow, this long and (fairly) narrow garden follows the Cherwell to the edge of the University Parks. In spring, the ground is covered with flowers. In summer, there are some flowers, many different shrubs, and the varied trees provide dappled cover from the sun. It is linked to Addison's Walk by a bridge. The Oxford University Parks, or simply and more normally the University Parks to members of the community, is one large parkland area slightly northeast of the Oxford town centre. ...


Buildings

The Great Tower was built between 1492 and 1509, and is an imposing landmark on the eastern approaches to the city centre. The hall and chapel were built at similar times, though both have undergone some changes in the intervening years.

The cloister and the New Building
The cloister and the New Building
The Cloisters
The Cloisters

The Cloister was built in the fifteenth century, and has been altered several times since then. In 1822, the north side was in bad shape, and was knocked down while most of the fellows were away from college (only a small group of fellows were in favour of demolishing it). It was rebuilt shortly afterwards. In the early 1900s, renovations were performed, and it was returned to a more mediaeval character. Student rooms were installed in the (very large) roof space in the 1980s, and remain some of the most sought after rooms in the college. The New Building was built in 1733. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 329 KB) The Cloisters and the New Buildings of Magdalen College, Oxford, as seen from Magdalen Great Tower. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 329 KB) The Cloisters and the New Buildings of Magdalen College, Oxford, as seen from Magdalen Great Tower. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (790x800, 314 KB) I took all 4 of these photos for the purpose of uploading to my personal Flickr page (www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (790x800, 314 KB) I took all 4 of these photos for the purpose of uploading to my personal Flickr page (www. ...

St Swithun's Quad and Grammar Hall
St Swithun's Quad and Grammar Hall

The college has a number of other quads. St John's Quad is the first on entering the college, and includes the Outdoor Pulpit. There is Chaplain's Quad, which runs along the side of the Chapel and Hall, to the foot of the Great Tower. St Swithun's Quad and Longwall Quad (which contains the Library) date from the late 19th and early 20th century, and make up the south west corner of the college. The Grove Buildings are the newest (built in the 1990s), and are built in a traditional style. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 172 KB) St Swithuns Quad, Grammar Hall and Great Tower of Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 172 KB) St Swithuns Quad, Grammar Hall and Great Tower of Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Magdalen Tower may mean: Magdalen Tower, Oxford Magdalen Tower (Ireland) Category: ...


Choir

Magdalen is one of the three Choral Foundations in Oxford, meaning that the formation of the choir was part of the statutes of the college, the other two choral foundations being New College and Christ Church. College name New College of St Mary Collegium Novum Oxoniensis/Collegium Sanctae Mariae Wintoniae Named after Mary, mother of Jesus Established 1379 Sister College Kings College Warden Prof. ... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ...


The choir consists of twelve Academical Clerks who are students at the College, and sixteen boys aged seven to fourteen, all of whom have scholarships at Magdalen College School. The school was originally founded for this express purpose but has long since become an independent public school. Magdalen College School or MCS is a boys independent day school currently located on the edge of central Oxford, England. ...


The choristers' day begins at 7:30, with an early morning practice before school. There is further practice immediately after school, followed by Choral Evening Prayer (during the week) or Choral Evensong (weekends) six nights a week, in term; the Monday service is sung by the boys only, and the Friday service only by the Academical Clerks. On Saturdays there is an afternoon practice, while on Sundays there is a practice at 09:30 followed by Eucharist, then a further afternoon practice followed by Evensong which ends at 7pm. Most of the boys thus have a longer working day, and a busier weekend, than their parents.


The Choir has numerous College duties as well as a recording and touring schedule. Traditionally the Choir sings at College Gaudies and at other special events throughout the year, as well as performing on social occasions such as Carols by Candlelight before Christmas and the famous May Morning. On this occasion the Choir sings madrigals at 6am from the top of the college bell-tower to the assembled mass of students and townsfolk celebrating in the streets below. May Morning is an annual event in Oxford on May Day (1 May). ...


In its long history the choir has had many well known organists, such as Daniel Purcell, Sir John Stainer and Bernard Rose, while past Organ Scholars include Dudley Moore, and past Academical Clerks include Sir Harry Christophers (founder and director of The Sixteen) and Robin Blaze. Daniel Purcell (1664 - November 26, 1717), was an English composer, the younger brother of Henry Purcell. ... John Stainer (June 6, 1840 - March 31, 1901) was an English composer and organist. ... Dr Bernard William George Rose (1916-1996), was variously a student at the Royal College of Music, organist, soldier, and composer. ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Harry Christophers is a British conductor, born on December 26, 1953 in Goudhurst, Kent. ... Robin Blaze is a countertenor. ...


The choir records regularly and In 2005 was nominated for a prestigious Grammy Award for its CD, With a Merrie Noyse, of music by Orlando Gibbons. Other recent works include the BBC's Blue Planet and Paul McCartney's classical piece Ecce Cor Meum. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A Compact Disc or CD is an optical disc used to store digital data, originally developed for storing digital audio. ... Orlando Gibbons Orlando Gibbons (baptised December 25, 1583 – June 5, 1625) was an English composer and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. ... The Blue Planet is a Discovery Channel/BBC Natural History Unit co-produced television series subtitled A Natural History of the Oceans, comprising eight episodes, narrated by David Attenborough, originally transmitted in September/ October 2001. ... Ecce Cor Meum is the fourth classical album by Paul McCartney. ...


The current Informator Choristarum (the master and conductor of the choir) is the composer Bill Ives, possibly better known as a former King's Singer. A disc of his music, Listen Sweet Dove, is amongst the choir's latest releases. Grayston Bill Ives (b. ...


Notable Alumni

(P. G. Wodehouse attributes a Magdalen undergraduateship to his fictional literary character Bertie Wooster; Tibby, in E. M. Forster's Howard's End, is also a Magdalen undergraduate.) John Mark Ainsley is a British tenor. ... James Richard Atkin, Baron Atkin (November 28, 1867 - June 25, 1944) was an English jurist. ... Kenneth Baker Kenneth Wilfrid Baker, Baron Baker of Dorking, CH, PC, (born November 3, 1934), is a British politician, and former Conservative MP. Son of a civil servant, he was educated at Hampton Grammar school between 1946 and 1948 and thereafter at St Pauls School, London and Magdalen College... Barnes as Francophile and Francophone in Bernard Pivots Double je (France 2, March 2005) Julian Patrick Barnes (born January 19, 1946 in Leicester) is a contemporary English writer whose novels and short stories have been seen as examples of postmodernism in literature. ... Sir Eric Alfred Berthoud KCMG, (born 10 December 1900, Kensington, London, died 29 April 1989, Tunbridge Wells, Kent) was an oil industrialist and diplomat. ... Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906–19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family in Edwardian London. ... Prince Al-Muhtadee Billah Bolkiah Crown Prince Haji Al-Muhtadee Billah ibni Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiah (Arabic: المهتدي بالله بلقية) (born February 17, 1974) is the first born son and heir to the Sultan of Brunei. ... Hugh Boulter Hugh Boulter, ( January 4, 1672 – September 27, 1742), was the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh, the Primate of All Ireland, from 1724 until his death. ... Sir (Ernest) Ashley Bramall (January 6, 1916 – February 10, 1999) was a British Labour Party politician, Member of Parliament for Bexley from 1946 to 1950 and Leader of the Inner London Education Authority for 11 years. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Peter Stephen Paul Brook CH CBE (born 21 March 1925) is a highly influential British theatrical producer and director. ... Harry Christophers is a British conductor, born on December 26, 1953 in Goudhurst, Kent. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... Norman Davies, Warsaw (Poland), October 7, 2004 Norman Davies (born June 8, 1939 in Bolton, Lancashire) is an English historian of Welsh descent, noted for his publications on the history of Poland, Europe and the British Isles. ... John Michael Terence Wellesley Denison CBE (November 1, 1915 - July 22, 1998) was educated at Harrow School. ... The Right Honourable Alfred Thompson Denning, Baron Denning, OM, PC (23 January 1899 – 5 March 1999) was a British barrister from Hampshire who became Master of the Rolls (the senior civil judge in the Court of Appeal of England and Wales) and was generally well liked, both within the legal... Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (22 October 1870 – 20 March 1945) was a poet, a translator and a prose writer, better known as the intimate friend and lover of the writer Oscar Wilde. ... Ronald Dworkin (born 1931) is an American legal philosopher, and currently professor of Jurisprudence at University College London and the New York University School of Law. ... Fernanda Eberstadt (born 1960 in New York City, New York) is an American writer. ... Sir John Carew Eccles (January 27, 1903 – May 2, 1997) was an Australian neurophysiologist who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the synapse. ... Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David Windsor; later The Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of Great Britain, Ireland, the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from the death of his father, George V (1910–36), on... Marc S. Ellenbogen Marc S. Ellenbogen (born February 6, 1963) is Chairman of the Global Panel Foundation and President of the Prague Society for International Cooperation. ... Gareth Evans may refer to: Gareth Evans, a philosopher and linguist. ... James Fenton (born April 25, 1949, Lincoln, England) has been, at various times, a journalist, poet, literary critic, and professor. ... Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey of Adelaide and Marston, OM, FRS, (September 24, 1898 – February 21, 1968) was a pharmacologist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the extraction of penicillin. ... Giovanni Florio (1553 – ?1625), English writer, was born in London about 1553. ... Martha Lane Fox (born February 10, 1973) is a British e-commerce business woman and charity trustee, daughter of the British historian and gardening correspondent Robin Lane Fox and great-granddaughter maternally of Charles Henry Alexander Paget, 6th Marquess of Anglesey. ... This article is about the former Prime Minister of Australia; for the Western Australian public servant, see Malcolm Fraser (surveyor). ... As I See It, J. Paul Getty Autobiography Jean Paul Getty (December 15, 1892 – June 6, 1976) was an American industrialist and founder of the Getty Oil Company. ... Edward Gibbon (1737–1794). ... Ben Goldacres humourous byline photo Ben Goldacre is an London-based British journalist and doctor. ... Anthony Clifford Grayling MA, DPhil (Oxon) FRSA (born 3 April 1949) is a British philosopher and author. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sir Matthew Hale (1609—1676), Lord Chief Justice of England, was born on the 1st of November 1609 at Alderley in Gloucestershire, where his father, a retired barrister, had a small estate. ... John Hemming John Alexander Melvin Hemming (born 16 March 1960) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Birmingham Yardley and Group Chair of the Liberal Democrats on the city council of Birmingham, England. ... Hislop on the set of Have I Got News for You singing a Jimmy Somerville song Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy... Alan Hollinghurst is a British novelist. ... Albert Habib Hourani (March 31, 1915 – January 17, 1993) was a prominent scholar of Middle Eastern history through much of the 20th century. ... Charles Bousfield Huleatt (1863-1908) also known under the pseudonym of Caulifield, was an Anglican Reverend born in Folkestone, England. ... Brian Inglis (31 July 1916-11 February 1993) was a British journalist, historian and television presenter. ... Benedikt S. J. Isserlin (1916 - October 23, 2005), former Reader and Head of the Department of Semitic Studies at the University of Leeds. ... Sir Michael Jay KCMG was born in Hampshire in June 1946 and educated at Winchester College, Magdalen College, Oxford, of which he is an honorary fellow, and London Universitys School of Oriental and African Studies. ... Keith Sinjohn Joseph, Baron Joseph, Bt, CH , PC (17 January 1918–10 December 1994) was a British barrister, politician, and Conservative Cabinet Minister under three different Ministries. ... Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... Nicholas D. Kristof Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is a political scientist, author, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist specializing in East Asia. ... John Lyly (Lilly or Lylie) (c. ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an Assyrian American film director. ... Sir Peter Brian Medawar (February 28, 1915 – October 2, 1987) was a Brazilian-born English scientist best known for his work on how the immune system rejects or accepts organ transplants. ... Dudley Stuart John Moore, CBE (April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002), was an Academy-Award nominated British comedian, actor and musician. ... Dr Desmond Morris (born 24 January 1928 in the village of Purton, UK) is most famous for his work as a zoologist and ethologist. ... Henry Phillpotts (1778–1869), or Henry of Exeter, as he was commonly called, was one of the most striking figures in the English Church of the 19th century. ... Hormuzd Rassam (1826-1910) was an Assyriologist and traveller, born at Mosul of Christian parents. ... The Right Honourable John Redwood Dr. John Alan Redwood (born June 15, 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Wokingham and formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Deregulation in the Shadow Cabinet. ... Sir Robert Robinson, (13 September 1886 – 8 February 1975), won the 1947 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [1] for his research on plant dyestuffs (anthocyanins) and alkaloids. ... James Edwin Thorold Rogers (1823-1890), English economist, was born at West Meon, Hampshire. ... Henry Sacheverell (1674 - June 15, 1724) was an English churchman and politician. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys1 (January 24, 1908-November 26, 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... Sir John McLeod Scarlett, KCMG, OBE (born August 18, 1948) is head of the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6). ... Erwin Rudolf Josef Alexander Schrödinger (August 12, 1887 – January 4, 1961) was an Austrian physicist who achieved fame for his contributions to quantum mechanics, especially the Schrödinger equation, for which he received the Nobel Prize in 1933. ... Sherrington is considered one of the fathers of neuroscience. ... John Sergeant (born 14 April 1944, Oxford) is a journalist and broadcaster. ... Siôn Llewelyn Simon (born 23 December 1968) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... he was a very cool writerf ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a conservative author and political commentator, distinguished by his intimate and insightful style of political analysis, and pioneering achievements in the field of blog journalism. ... Louis Theroux Louis Sebastian Theroux (born 20 May 1970) is an English broadcaster holding both British and US citizenship, best known for his television series Louis Therouxs Weird Weekends and // Theroux was born in Singapore,[1] the younger son of the American travel writer and novelist Paul Theroux and... Prince Tomohito of Mikasa (三笠宮寬仁 Mikasa-no-miya Tomohito shinnō), eldest son of the current HIH Prince Mikasa and HIH Princess Mikasa (Yuriko). ... William Tyndale (sometimes spelled Tyndale,Tindall or Tyndall) (ca. ... Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck is the Crown Prince of Buthan. ... The Reverend Thomas William Webb (December 14, 1807 – May 19, 1885) was a British astronomer. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (c. ... Lord Frederick Windsor Lord Frederick Michael George David Louis Windsor (born 6 April 1979) is a British financial analyst who is the only son of Prince and Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine von Reibnitz). ... Gideon Defoe is the author of The Pirates! in an Adventure with Scientists. ... Stephen Potts is a British author of children’s books, particularly historical adventure novels set at sea. ... P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse KBE (October 15, 1881 – February 14, 1975) (IPA: ) was an English comic writer who enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... Bertie Wooster portrayed by Hugh Laurie in ITVs Jeeves and Wooster series Bertram Wilberforce Bertie Wooster is the wealthy, good-natured co-protagonist and narrator of P. G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories. ... Edward Morgan Forster, OM, (January 1, 1879 – June 7, 1970) was an English novelist, short story writer, and essayist. ... Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, which tells the story of class struggle in turn-of-the-century England. ...

See also Former students of Magdalen College, Oxford.

Teachers/academics

Joseph Addison, the Kit-cat portrait, circa 1703–1712, by Godfrey Kneller. ... This article has significant problems in multiple areas. ... Ewen Henry Harvey Green (October 16, 1958 − September 16, 2006), known as E.H.H. Green or Ewen Green, was a British historian famed for his work on 20th-century Britain and, in particular, the history of the 20th-century Conservative Party. ... Canon Adam Fox (1883–1977) was the Dean of Divinity at C.S. Lewiss Magdalen College, Oxford. ... For other people named John Fuller, see Fuller (disambiguation). ... Robert T. Gunther (23 August 1869 – 9 March 1940), historian of science and founder of the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. ... Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: //) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer from County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... George Horne (November 1, 1730 - January 27, 1792), English divine, was born at Otham near Maidstone, and received his education at Maidstone school and University College, Oxford. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Kenneth Bruce McFarlane was the twentieth centurys most influential historian of late medieval England. ... For others named John Taylor, see John Taylor. ... Professor Oliver Taplin is a fellow and tutor of Classics (Literae Humaniores) at Magdalen College, Oxford. ... Felipe Fernández-Armesto (born 1950) is a British historian and author of several popular works of history. ... Timothy Ware was born in 1934. ...

Old members who are current Members of Parliament

Dominic Charles Roberts Grieve (born May 24, 1956) British politician and barrister He is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Beaconsfield and is the shadow Attorney General. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... John Hemming John Alexander Melvin Hemming (born 16 March 1960) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Birmingham Yardley and Group Chair of the Liberal Democrats on the city council of Birmingham, England. ... Christopher Murray Paul Huhne, known as Chris Huhne, (born 2 July 1954) is a British Liberal Democrat politician and the current Member of Parliament for the Eastleigh constituency in Hampshire. ... Jeremy Hunt (born November 1, 1966) is the Conservative MP for Surrey South West. ... The Rt Hon. ... Edward OHara (born 1 October 1937, Bootle, near Liverpool) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... George Gideon Oliver Osborne (born 23 May 1971 in London) is a Conservative politician in the United Kingdom, and has been Member of Parliament for Tatton since 2001. ... The Right Honourable John Redwood Dr. John Alan Redwood (born June 15, 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Wokingham and formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Deregulation in the Shadow Cabinet. ... Siôn Llewelyn Simon (born 23 December 1968) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ...

External links

  • Virtual Tour of Magdalen College
  • A history of the choristers of Magdalen Chapel, Oxford

  Results from FactBites:
 
Magdalen College, Oxford - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (288 words)
Magdalen College (pronounced [ˈmɔːdlɪn]) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
The college's large square tower is a famous Oxford landmark and it is a tradition that the college choir sings from the top of it early on May Day morning.
Magdalen College was founded as Magdalen Hall in 1448 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester.
Magdalen College, Oxford - definition of Magdalen College, Oxford in Encyclopedia (164 words)
Magdalen College (pronounced maudlin) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
Its large square tower is a famous landmark, and it is from the top of this tower early on May morning that the Magdalen College choir sings.
Magdalen College was founded 1458 in Oxford by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester, originally as Magdalen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m