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Magar is an ethnic group of Nepal and northern India whose homeland extends along the western and southern edges of the Dhaulagiri mountain range. According to Nepal’s 2001 census, 1,622,421 people identified themselves as belonging to the Magar ethnolinguistic group, representing 7.14% of Nepal’s population and making them the largest indigenous ethnic group in the country. The word indigenous is an adjective derived from the Latin word indigena, meaning native, belonging to, aboriginal; and has several applications: Indigenous peoples, communities and cultures native or indigenous to a territory; Indigenous (band), the Native American blues-rock band; In biology, indigenous means native to a place or biota... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ...


Of the 1,622,421 Magar people in Nepal, 770,116 speak a Magar language as their mother tongue. The Kham Magar of Rukum and Rolpa Districts speak Kham language. In Dolpa District, the Magar speak Tarali or Kaike language. The Magar languages are rooted in the Bodic branch of the Tibeto-Burman family. Jump to: navigation, search Kham Magar is a minority ethnic group in Nepal, living in highland areas of Rapti Zone. ... The Kham language is a complex of unwritten Tibeto-Burmese dialects spoken in the remoter highlands of Rapti Zone, western Nepal. ... The Tibeto-Burman linguistic subfamily of the proposed Sino-Tibetan language family is spoken in various central and south Asian countries: Myanmar (Burmese language), Tibet (Tibetan language), northern Thailand (Mong language), Nepal, Bhutan, India (Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram, Tripura and the Ladakh region of...


The northern Magar practice Lamaist Buddhism with a priest called a Bhusal. The social process of Sanskritization has drawn southern Magar populations to develop a syncretic form of Hinduism that combines animist and Buddhist rituals. Hindu Magar villagers recognize three classes of priest; Rama, Jaisi and Dhami. Jump to: navigation, search A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ...


The Magar traditionally engage in subsistence agriculture, pastoralism, craftsmanship and day labor. The Magar are prominently represented in Nepal’s military, as well as in the British and Indian Gurkha regiments, along with the Gurung, Rai, and other martial ethnic groups from the hills of Nepal. Today, members of the Magar community are also employed as professionals in the fields of medicine, education, government service, law, journalism, development, and aviation. Subsistence agriculture is agriculture carried out for survival — with few or no crops available for sale. ... In a draw in a mountainous region, a shepherd guides a flock of about 20 sheep amidst scrub and olive trees. ... The Gurungs are one of the many ethnic groups living in Nepal descended from Tibeto-Burman origins. ... Jump to: navigation, search Rais belong to the Kirant Tribe confederation. ...


Like other indigenous groups in Nepal, some members of the Magar community have joined the Nepalese People's War, a Maoist insurrection launched in 1996 to topple Nepal's constitutional monarchy. On January 9, 2004, Maoist militants declared a revolutionary autonomous regional government, the Magar Autonomous Region, based in Rolpa District in west Nepal. The word indigenous is an adjective derived from the Latin word indigena, meaning native, belonging to, aboriginal; and has several applications: Indigenous peoples, communities and cultures native or indigenous to a territory; Indigenous (band), the Native American blues-rock band; In biology, indigenous means native to a place or biota... Note: This article needs additional contributors badly. ... Maoism or Mao Zedong Thought (Chinese: 毛澤東思想, pinyin: Máo Zédōng Sīxiǎng), also called Marxism-Leninism–Mao Zedong Thought or Marxism-Leninism-Maoism (MLM), is a variant of communism derived from the teachings of Mao Zedong (1893–1976). ... A rebellion is, in the most general sense, a refusal to accept authority. ... Jump to: navigation, search A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchical government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges a hereditary or elected monarch as head of state. ... The word militant can refer to any individual engaged in warfare, a fight, combat, or generally serving as a soldier. ... Jump to: navigation, search A revolutionary is a person who either advocates or actively engages in some kind of revolution. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ...


References

  • Nepal Population Report 2002
  • Rastriya Janajati Bikas Samiti
  • Nepal Ethnographic Museum
  • Nepal Federation of Indigenous Nationalities
  • Magar Studies Center
  • One Day of War; Shushila Magar
  • Revolutionary Autonomous Region Declared in Western Nepal
  • Bista, Dor Bahadur. (2004). People of Nepal. Kathmandu: Ratna Pustak Bhandar.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Mountain People Nepal (1017 words)
Magars - Gurungs - Thakalis - Tamangs - Newars - Kirantis - Sunwars and Jirels - Bhotia - Ethnic Tibetans - Limipas - Dolpopas - Lopas
The Magars originate in the western and central areas of Nepal, though are found in scattered communities throughout the country.
Traditionally hill farmers inhabiting the lower slopes, they are also known for their fighting abilities and many have been recruited into Gurkha regiments of the British and Indian armies.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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