FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Maelgwn Gwynedd

Maelgwn ap Cadwallon (c.480-c.547, reigned from 520s?) (Latin: Maglocunus; English: Malcolm), also known as Maelgwn Gwynedd and Maelgwn Hir ('the Tall'), was king of Gwynedd, and a character from Celtic mythology. Events Odoacer defeats an attempt by Julius Nepos to recapture Italy, and has Julius killed; Odoacer also captured Dalmatia. ... Events Ida founds the kingdom of Bernicia at Bamburgh (traditional date). ... Centuries: 5th Century - 6th Century - 7th Century Decades: 470s - 480s - 490s - 500s - 510s - 520s - 530s - 540s - 550s - 560s - 570s Years: 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 Events and Trends Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon, perhaps legendary, assumes the throne of Gwynedd in Great Britain (possible date... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ... A Celtic cross incorporating the Celtic knotwork motif associated with later Celtic cultures Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, the apparent religion of the Iron Age Celts. ...


The historical Maelgwn was one of the most influential rulers of 6th century Britain, and has become one of the most famous (or infamous) leaders in Welsh history. The Christian writer Gildas (who referred to him Malgocunus, meaning 'Great Hound') attacked him in De Excidio Britanniae as 'first in evil,' one of the most vicious tyrants in British history, and accused him of having murdered his uncle while still a youth. Geoffrey of Monmouth (calling him Malgo) specifically noted his handsome features, but also claimed that he was homosexual. Other notable misdeeds said to have been performed by Maelgwn include murdering his first wife and his nephew in order to clam his nephew's wife as his own. Maelgwn remained rather unpopular with leading church writers, despite several attempts at patronage, including founding the bishopric of Bangor. (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the Scots, began migrating to Caledonia (later known as Scotland) Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland founded by St. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² Ethnicity: 97. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Gildas (c. ... A tyrant (from Greek τυραννος tyrannos) is a usurper of rightful power, possessing absolute power and ruling by tyranny. ... Geoffrey of Monmouth was a clergyman and one of the major figures in the development of British history. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... Bangor, in Gwynedd, North Wales, UK, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ...


He was also said to be a great patron of the arts and a skilled lawgiver, although some attribute this reputation to Maelgwn's own propaganda. He established court at Deganwy, and surrounded himself with an entourage of bards and artisans who wrote glowingly of his achievements. By the time of his death, Maelgwn had established himself as the preeminent ruler of the region, and his sons Rhun and Brude would inherit control over both Gwynedd and the lands of the Picts in southern Britain. North Korean propaganda showing a soldier destroying the United States Capitol building. ... Deganwy is a small town in the county borough of Conwy. ... Rhun ap Maelgwn (492-586, reigned from 549) (Latin: Rugenus, English: Run), also known as Rhun Hir (the Tall) was a king of Gwynedd. ... Converted by Saint Columba. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Elias Gruffydd preserved the following mythological tradition in a manuscript he wrote in the mid-16th century, although some critics believe this story is much older. A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...

King Maelgwn demanded that a distant son of one of his lords, Elphin, praise him and his court. Elphin refused, claiming his bard, Taliesin was a better bard and his wife a prettier woman than anyone the King had in his court. Taliesin knew what was happening, because he was a seer, and told Elphin's wife. Maelgwn's son Rhun went to Elphin's house to seduce his wife and prove Elphin's claims weren't true. Rhun got her drunk. When she passed out, Rhun tried to take her wedding ring off to prove her unfaithfulness; since the ring wouldn't come off, he cut off her finger. When King Maelgwn attempted to show the finger to Elphin, he pointed out that his wife cut her fingernails more often than the owner of the finger, had servants to kneed dough and never had any under her nails, and her ring was loose on her finger, and that one was tight.
Maelgwn demanded Taliesin come to his court to prove the other claim wrong. Taliesin gave twenty minutes for both himself and the King's bards to come up with an epic. The royal bards couldn't do it. When it came Taliesin's time, he caused a massive wind to rattle the castle. Frightened, Maelgwn sent for Elphin. Taliesin's next song caused Elphin's chains to detach. Maelgwn challenged the pair to a horse race. Taleisin arrived the next day with an old, weak horse. As each of the king's horses passed him at the very start of the race, Taliesin touched its rump with a twig of holly. When they had all passed, he dropped his hat to the ground. When the king's horses came back, right before the finish line, they stopped at the holly twigs Taliesin had laid there, and began to dance. Taliesin's old horse strolled back in quite a bit later and won the race.

The 1911 Britannica has this tale to tell of him... In Celtic mythology, Elphin was a son of Lord Gwyddno Garanhir of Gwynedd. ... For the studio established by Frank Lloyd Wright, see Taliesin (studio) Taliesin or Taliessin (c. ... In Welsh mythology, Prince Rhun was a son of Maelgwn. ... Species Ilex aquifolium - European Holly Ilex canariensis - Small-leaved Holly Ilex cassine - Dahoon Holly Ilex crenata - Japanese Holly Ilex decidua - Possumhaw Ilex dipyrena - Himalayan Holly Ilex glabra - Gallberry, inkberry Ilex latifolia - Tarajo Holly Ilex montana - Mountain Holly Ilex opaca - American Holly Ilex paraguariensis - Yerba Mate Ilex perado - Madeiran Holly Ilex... (Redirected from 1911 Britannica) The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...

The first Eisteddfod of which any account seems to have descended to us was one held on the banks of the Conway in the 6th century, under the auspices of Maelgwn Gwynedd, prince of North Wales. Maelgwn on this occasion, in order to prove the superiority of vocal song over instrumental music, is recorded to have offered a reward to such bards and minstrels as should swim over the Conway. There were several competitors, but on their arrival on the opposite shore the harpers found themselves unable to play owing to the injury their harps had sustained from the water, while the bards were in as good tune as ever.

Another legend concering Maelgwn is that he challenged the other kings of Wales to a contest to decide who would be overall ruler. He suggested that all the kings should sit on their thrones on the shore as the tide came in. The king who could stay on his throne the longest would be the winner. The other kings were forced from their thrones by the rising tide, but Maelgwn had ordered the construction of a throne which would float and therefore won the contest by a trick. The Eisteddfod (from Welsh eistedd, to sit; plural is eisteddfodau) is a Welsh festival of literature, music, and song. ... Conway can refer to any of the following: // People David Conway Deborah Conway Derek Conway Elias Nelson Conway Gerry Conway Henry Seymour Conway Henry Wharton Conway James Conway James Sevier Conway Jill Ker Conway Jimmy Conway John Conway, mathematician Jon Conway Lynn Conway Moncure Daniel Conway Rob Conway Sean Conway... (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the Scots, began migrating to Caledonia (later known as Scotland) Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland founded by St. ... North Wales is the northernmost region of Wales, bordered to the south by Mid Wales. ... A minstrel was a bard who played songs to tell stories about other places or about historical events of the Middle Ages. ... Harper is from an old English surname which originally belonged to a person that played the harp or who made harps. ...


Maelgwn 'the Dragon of the Isle' was also a main character in the two trilogies ('The Ancient Future' trilogy and 'The Celestial Triad') written by Australian author Traci Harding. In the books, Maelgwn is portrayed as a fair, kind and loving man, whose childhood tutor was Taliesin. His father Caswallon was imprisoned by his uncle Cadfer, who then raped his mother Sorcha Lawhir (she killed herself rather than live with the consequences of the rape). Maelgwn killed his uncle eventually, and gave the throne back to his father. Traci Harding is an Australian novelist. ... For the studio established by Frank Lloyd Wright, see Taliesin (studio) Taliesin or Taliessin (c. ...



Preceded by:
Cadwallon Lawhir
Kings of Gwynedd Followed by:
Rhun Hir


Cadwallon ap Einion (460-534; reigned from 500), also known as Cadwallon Lawhir (Long Hand), was a king of Gwynedd. ... Gwynedd was one of the kingdoms or principalities of medieval Wales. ... Rhun ap Maelgwn (492-586, reigned from 549) (Latin: Rugenus, English: Run), also known as Rhun Hir (the Tall) was a king of Gwynedd. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Medieval Gwynedd (2147 words)
he history of the kingdom of Gwynedd from the 5th to 11th centuries reflects its struggles against its neighbors within Wales, notably with Deheubarth to the south and Powys to the south-east, and against increasingly powerful Saxon kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria, which threatened the area east of the river Clwyd.
Gwynedd, with its capital at Aberffraw, was naturally strong, its rich Anglesey farmlands protected by the barrier of Snowdonia.
Indeed, in Gwynedd, where Llywelyn ap Iorwerth rose to power at the beginning of the 13th century, and was quick to adopt the stone castle, one might expect to see a more clearly defined pattern to the use of such strongholds by the Welsh.
Maelgwn Hir ap Cadwallon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1173 words)
When King Maelgwn attempted to show the finger to Elphin, he pointed out that his wife cut her fingernails more often than the owner of the finger, had servants to kneed dough and never had any under her nails, and her ring was loose on her finger, and that one was tight.
Maelgwn on this occasion, in order to prove the superiority of vocal song over instrumental music, is recorded to have offered a reward to such bards and minstrels as should swim over the Conway.
Maelgwn "the Dragon of the Isle" was a main character in the two trilogies (The Ancient Future trilogy and The Celestial Triad) written by Australian author Traci Harding.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m