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Encyclopedia > Madness (band)
Madness

Background information
Origin Flag of the United Kingdom London, UK
Genre(s) 2 Tone, Ska, Pop, New Wave
Years active 1976 – 1986, 1992 – present
Label(s) 2 Tone, Stiff, Virgin, V2
Associated
acts
The Madness, Feargal Sharkey, The Fink Brothers[1]
Website Madness.com, Madness Official MySpace
Members
Suggs
Mike Barson
Lee Thompson
Chris Foreman
Mark Bedford
Daniel Woodgate
Chas Smash

Madness are a British pop/ska band from Camden Town, London, that formed in 1976.[2] As of 2007, the band has continued to perform with their most recognised lineup of seven members, although their lineup has varied slightly over the years. They were one of the most prominent bands of the late-1970s 2 Tone ska revival.[3] However, as their career progressed, the band has moved away from ska and closer towards more conventional pop music.[3] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1130 × 847 pixel, file size: 460 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... New Wave was a pop and rock music genre that existed during the late 1970s and the early-to-mid 1980s. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... 2 Tone Records was a British record label which released ska and reggae influenced music with a punk overtone. ... Stiff Records logo Stiff Records is a record label created in London in 1976 by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera), and active until 1985. ... Virgin Records was a British recording label founded by English entrepreneur Richard Branson, and Nik Powell in 1972. ... V2 Records (or V2 Music) is a record label that was started in 1996 by Richard Branson, five years after he sold Virgin Records to EMI. Over the years V2 acquired Junior Boys Own, Gee Street Records, Blue Dog Records, and Big Cat Records. ... Feargal Sharkey. ... Graham McPherson (born on January 13, 1961 in Hastings), better known as Suggs, is an English singer, actor, radio DJ, and TV personality — most famous as the frontman of the band Madness. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... Lee Jay Thompson (b. ... Chris Foreman in Lovestruck video Christopher John Foreman (born August 8, 1956), sometimes nicknamed Chrissy Boy, is a British guitarist, best known a member of a second wave ska band Madness. ... Better known as the ultimate bender, this Ginger shirt lifter is reputed to have slept with more than 3000 men - mainly taking. ... Daniel Mark Woodgate (born October 19, 1960), sometimes nicknamed Woody, is a drummer for the British second wave ska band Madness. ... Chas Smash Chas Smash (born Cathal Joseph Patrick Smyth on January 14, 1959), earlier known as Carl Smyth is a British musician, best known as a backing singer and dancer of the second wave ska band Madness. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Camden, see Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Madness achieved most of their success in the 1980s. Both Madness and UB40 spent exactly 214 weeks on the UK singles charts over the course of the decade. The bands therefore hold the record for most weeks spent by a group in the 1980s UK singles charts.[4][5][6] UB40 are a British dub band formed in 1978 in Birmingham. ...

Contents

Career

1976–1978: Formation

The core of the band formed as The North London Invaders in 1976 (although their name was often shortened to The Invaders), and included Mike Barson (Monsieur Barso) on keyboards and vocals, Chris Foreman (Chrissy Boy) on guitar and Lee Thompson (Kix) on saxophone and vocals.[2] They later recruited John Hasler on drums and Cathal Smyth (better known as Chas Smash) on bass guitar. Later in the year, they were joined by lead vocalist "Dikron".[2] Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Chris Foreman in Lovestruck video Christopher John Foreman (born August 8, 1956), sometimes nicknamed Chrissy Boy, is a British guitarist, best known a member of a second wave ska band Madness. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... Lee Jay Thompson (b. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Chas Smash Chas Smash (born Cathal Joseph Patrick Smyth on January 14, 1959), earlier known as Carl Smyth is a British musician, best known as a backing singer and dancer of the second wave ska band Madness. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...

This six-piece lineup lasted until part way through 1977, when Graham McPherson (better known as Suggs) took over the lead vocals after seeing the band perform in a friend's garden.[7] Smyth, who was poor on bass guitar, was replaced by Gavin Rogers, an acquaintance of Barson.[7] McPherson was kicked out of the band for too often choosing to watch football instead of rehearsing.[8] Thompson left the band after Barson criticised his saxophone playing.[8] Image File history File links Madness_logo. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Suggs Suggs (born Graham McPherson on 13 January 1961 in Hastings), is a British singer, best known as a vocalist of the popular second wave ska band, Madness. ... photo of a backyard A yard is an enclosed area of land, usually tied to a building. ... Chas Smash (born Cathal Joseph Patrick Smyth, January 14, 1959, in Rainham, Kent, England), earlier known as Carl Smyth is an English musician, best known as a backing singer and dancer of the second wave ska band Madness. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ...


By 1978, the band had allowed McPherson to return, after filling in temporarily for Hasler (who had taken over vocals when McPherson was removed).[8] Thompson returned after patching things up with Barson, and Daniel Woodgate (Woody) and Mark Bedford (Bedders) also joined the band, on drums, replacing Garry Dovey, and bass guitar replacing Gavin Rogers.[8] After briefly changing their name to Morris and the Minors, the band renamed itself as Madness; paying homage to one of their favourite songs by ska/reggae artist Prince Buster.[9] The band remained a sextet until late 1979, when Chas Smash rejoined and officially became the seventh member of Madness as a backing vocalist and trumpet player.[9] Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Daniel Mark Woodgate (born October 19, 1960), sometimes nicknamed Woody, is a drummer for the British second wave ska band Madness. ... Better known as the ultimate bender, this Ginger shirt lifter is reputed to have slept with more than 3000 men - mainly taking. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... Cecil Bustamente Campbell (born May 28, 1938), better known as Prince Buster, is a musician from Kingston, Jamaica and regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of ska and rocksteady music. ... A backup vocalist or background singer (or, especially in the U.S., backup singer or sometimes background singer) is a singer who sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, other backing vocalists, or alone but not singing the lead. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ...


1979–1981: Early success

  • "The Prince" (1979)
    Sample of the original recording of "The Prince". The song was the band's first single, released on Two Tone.
    "One Step Beyond" (1980)
    A cover of a Prince Buster B-Side. The song was Madness' first single to enter the top 10 of the UK singles chart.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

In 1979, the band recorded the Lee Thompson composition "The Prince".[9] The song, like the band's name, paid homage to their idol, Prince Buster. The song was released through 2 Tone Records, the label of The Specials founder Jerry Dammers.[9] The song was a surprise hit, peaking in the UK music charts at number 16.[9] A performance of "The Prince" on popular UK music show Top of the Pops helped Madness gain public recognition. Madness then toured with fellow 2 Tone bands The Specials and The Selecter, before recording their debut album, One Step Beyond..., which was released by Stiff Records.[9] The album included a re-recording of "The Prince" and the band's second and third singles: "One Step Beyond" and "My Girl". The title song was a cover of the B-side of the 1960s Prince Buster hit "Al Capone". One Step Beyond... stayed in the British charts for 37 weeks, peaking at number 2.[10][9] After the release of "My Girl", the band felt that they had exhausted the material from One Step Beyond..., and did not want to release any more singles from the album.[11] However, Dave Robinson, head of Stiff Records, disagreed.[11] Eventually, a compromise was made, and the band decided to release an EP featuring one album track and three new tracks.[11] The result was the Work Rest and Play EP, which was headlined by the song "Night Boat to Cairo", from the One Step Beyond album.[11] The EP reached number 6 in the UK singles chart.[11] Image File history File links Madness_-_The_Prince. ... Image File history File links Madness_-_One_Step_Beyond. ... See also: Musical groups established in 1979 Record labels established in 1979 1979 in music (UK) // Stevie Wonder uses digital audio recording technology in recording his album Journey through the Secret Life of Plants. ... Lee Jay Thompson (b. ... The Prince is the first single by the British ska/pop band Madness. ... Cecil Bustamente Campbell (born May 28, 1938), better known as Prince Buster, is a musician from Kingston, Jamaica and regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of ska and rocksteady music. ... 2 Tone Records was a British record label which released ska and reggae influenced music with a punk overtone. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Jerry Dammers (born Jeremy Dammers on 22 May 1955, in Ootacamund, India) was the founder and keyboard player of the Coventry-based ska band, The Specials (later changed to The Special A.K.A.). He also contributed in founding the 2 Tone record label, which helped to popularize the new... Top of the Pops, also known as TOTP, was a long-running British music chart television programme, made and broadcast by the BBC. It was originally shown each week, mostly on BBC One, from 1 January 1964 to 30 July 2006. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Selecters Three Minute Hero single cover The Selecter were a 2 Tone ska revival band from Coventry, England, formed in the late 1970s. ... One Step Beyond. ... Stiff Records logo Stiff Records is a record label created in London in 1976 by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera), and active until 1985. ... One Step Beyond is a song originally written by a Jamaican ska singer Prince Buster as a b-side for his single Al Capone. It was made famous by British band Madness that covered it for their debut 1979 album One Step Beyond. ... This article is about the 1979 Madness song. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ... EP can stand for: EP is the IATA code for Iran Aseman Airlines Extended play, a music recording (usually consisting of several tracks, but shorter than a typical album) European Parliament, the parliamentary body of the European Union Evolutionary psychology, a belief that psychology can be better understood in light... Work Rest and Play is an EP by British ska/pop band Madness. ... Night Boat to Cairo is a song by British ska/pop band Madness from their debut 1979 album One Step Beyond. ...


The following year, the band's second album, Absolutely reached number 2 in the UK album charts.[11] Absolutely spawned some of the band's biggest hits, most notably "Baggy Trousers", which peaked at number 3 in the UK singles chart.[11] "Embarrassment" reached number 4 in the charts, and the instrumental song "Return of the Los Palmas 7" climbed to number 7.[11] Although the album reviews were generally less enthusiastic than those of One Step Beyond..., they were mostly positive. Robert Christgau gave the album a favorable B- grade,[12] but Rolling Stone Magazine awarded the album just one out of five stars.[13] Rolling Stone was particularly scathing of the ska revival in general, stating that "The Specials wasn't very good" and Madness were simply "the Blues Brothers with English accents".[13] Absolutely is the 1980 second album from the British ska band Madness. ... Baggy Trousers is a single by English ska/pop band Madness from their 1980 album Absolutely. ... This article is about a song. ... The Return of the Los Palmas 7 is the third single by Madness from their 1980 album Absolutely. ... Robert Christgau (born April 18, 1942), is an American essayist, music journalist, and the self-declared Dean of American Rock Critics.[1] In print, his name is sometimes abbreviated as Xgau. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Specials is the debut album by British second wave ska band, The Specials. ... The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and the late John Belushi The Blues Brothers is the name of a blues band fronted, incognito, by comedians Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. ...


1982–1984: Change of direction

  • "Our House" (1982)
    The band's most internationally successful single. The song inspired a musical of the same name in 2003, which featured songs from Madness.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

In 1981, the band's third studio album, 7 reached number 5 in the UK album charts and contained three hit singles.[14] In an article in 1979, Chris Foreman explained that the band's music would move with the times, and change styles as time goes on.[15] This was shown to be the case, as unlike the two ska-filled, fast-paced albums that preceded it, 7 was somewhat of a change in direction. Suggs' vocal performance changed significantly, and his strong Cockney accent from the previous albums had been watered down. The album strayed from the ska-influenced sound of One Step Beyond... and Absolutely, and moved towards a more conventional and mature pop sound; a trend that continued with subsequent albums. Near the end of 1981, Madness released one of their most recognised songs; a remake of Labi Siffre's 1971 hit "It Must Be Love".[14] The song climbed to number 4 in the UK, and in 1983, the song peaked at number 33 in the US charts.[14][16] In 1982, Madness released their only number 1 hit to date, "House of Fun"; as well as their fourth studio album The Rise & Fall.[17] The album was well received in the UK, but didn't get an American release. Instead, many of the albums songs were included on the US compilation Madness, including "Our House", which was their most internationally successful single to date. "Our House" reached number 5 in the UK music charts and number 7 in the US charts.[17][18] Many reviewers compared the The Rise & Fall to The Kinks' Village Green Preservation Society,[19] and it is at times retrospectively considered a concept album. The album also featured "Primrose Hill", which was more similar to The Beatles song "Strawberry Fields Forever", containing similar psychedelic imagery and a layered arrangement.[20] Image File history File links Madness_-_Our_House. ... 7 is the third album from the British ska group Madness. ... Chris Foreman in Lovestruck video Christopher John Foreman (born August 8, 1956), sometimes nicknamed Chrissy Boy, is a British guitarist, best known a member of a second wave ska band Madness. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... Suggs Suggs (born Graham McPherson on 13 January 1961 in Hastings), is a British singer, best known as a vocalist of the popular second wave ska band, Madness. ... St Mary-le-Bow The term cockney is often used to refer to working-class people of London, particularly east London, and the slang used by these people. ... One Step Beyond. ... Absolutely is the 1980 second album from the British ska band Madness. ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... See also: Musical groups established in 1981 Record labels established in 1981 list of years in music // January 10 - Revival of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta The Pirates of Penzance opens at Broadways Uris Theatre, starring Linda Ronstadt and Rex Smith February 14 - Billy Idol leaves the band Generation... Labi Siffre (born June 25, 1945) is an English poet, songwriter and singer. ... It Must Be Love is a song originally written and recorded in 1971 by Labi Siffre. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... House of Fun is a song by British ska/pop group Madness, credited to Mike Barson and Lee Thompson. ... The Rise & Fall is the fourth album by the British ska band Madness. ... Madness is a self-titled compilation album by a British ska/pop band Madness. ... Audio sample Our House is a single by English ska/pop band Madness, from their UK album The Rise & Fall and their US compilation Madness. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... This article or section should be merged with The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society Village Green Preservation Society is a folk-rock and psychedelia album by British rock band The Kinks. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Music sample Strawberry Fields Forever Problems? See media help. ... Psychedelia in music (or also psychedelic music, less formally) is a term that refers to a broad set of popular music styles, genres and scenes, that may include psychedelic rock, psychedelic folk, psychedelic pop, psychedelic soul, psychedelic ambient, psychedelic trance, psychedelic techno, and others. ... Imagery is any of the five senses (sight, touch, smell, hearing, and taste). ...


In 1983, their single "Wings of a Dove" peaked at number 2 in the UK charts.[21] Their following album, Keep Moving, peaked at number 6 in the UK album charts, and several singles from that album reached the top 20 in the UK music charts.[22] The album received some good reviews, with Rolling Stone Magazine giving the album four out of five stars, applauding the band's changing sound.[23] This review was a vast improvement on the last album reviewed by the magazine, Absolutely, which was heavily criticised.[13] For the country song, see Bob Ferguson Wings of a Dove (also known as Wings of a Dove (A Celebratory Song)) is a song by Madness. ... Keep Moving is the fifth album by the British ska band Madness from 1984. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...


1985–1988: Decline and breakup

The Keep Moving album was Mike Barson's last contribution to the band, until their subsequent reunion.
The Keep Moving album was Mike Barson's last contribution to the band, until their subsequent reunion.

In October 1983, the band's founder, keyboardist and prominent songwriter Mike Barson decided to leave the band, partly because he had relocated to Amsterdam, Netherlands.[21] He officially left the band in June 1984, following the release of "One Better Day".[22] The six remaining members left Stiff Records and formed their own label, Zarjazz Records, which was sub-label of Virgin Records.[22] In 1985, the label released the band's sixth album, Mad Not Mad. Barson's keyboard parts were filled by synthesisers and Steve Nieve joined the band to take his place. Paul Carrack also joined the band to play keyboards on tour. In later years, frontman Suggs described the production as "polished turd".[24] The album reached number 16 in the UK charts, which was the band's lowest position on the album charts to date. Despite the poor chart showing, the album was listed as number 55 in NME's All Time 100 Albums.[25] The singles for the album fared even worse, with "Yesterday's Men" peaking at number 18 in the UK charts. The subsequent singles, "Uncle Sam" and "Sweetest Girl", failed to make the top 20, which was a first for Madness singles. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (659x667, 46 KB) This image is of a cover of an audio recording, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the recording or cover artwork in... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (659x667, 46 KB) This image is of a cover of an audio recording, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the album or the artist(s) which produced the recording or cover artwork in... See also: 1983 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1983 Record labels established in 1983 // Michael Jacksons Thriller, the most successful album not only of 1983, but of all time, was released in 1982 and began its epic domination of the music charts the following year, 1983. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... Michael Caine is a song by British band Madness from their 1984 album Keep Moving. ... Stiff Records logo Stiff Records is a record label created in London in 1976 by entrepreneurs Dave Robinson and Andrew Jakeman (aka Jake Riviera), and active until 1985. ... Zarjazz was a record label, a sub-label of Virgin Records. ... Virgin Records was a British recording label founded by English entrepreneur Richard Branson, and Nik Powell in 1972. ... Mad Not Mad is the sixth album by the British ska band Madness, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... The term synthesiser is also used to mean frequency synthesiser, an electronic system found in communications. ... Keyboardist Steve Nieve (born Steven Nason in London, England, on February 19, 1958) is best known for his work with Elvis Costello. ... Paul Carrack, 2003 Paul Carrack (born April 22, 1951 in Sheffield, England) is a British keyboardist, singer and songwriter. ... Graham McPherson (born on January 13, 1961 in Hastings), better known as Suggs, is an English singer, actor, radio DJ, and TV personality — most famous as the frontman of the band Madness. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Yesterdays Men is a single by British band Madness from their 1985 album Mad Not Mad. ... Uncle Sam is a single by British band Madness from their 1985 album Mad Not Mad. ... The Sweetest Girl is a single by British band Scritti Politti, released in 1981. ...


The band then attempted to record a new album, and 11 demo tracks were recorded.[24] However, musical differences arose between band members, and in September 1986, the band announced that they were to split.[24][26] Barson rejoined the band for a farewell single, "(Waiting For) The Ghost Train", but did not appear in the music video.[26] The band officially split following the release of the single, which reached a high of number 18 in the UK. In 1988, four members of the band — Suggs, Chas Smash, Lee Thompson and Chris Foreman — created a new band, using the name The Madness.[27] After one self-titled album and two singles that failed to make the top 40, the band split. (Waiting For) The Ghost Train is a one-off single by Madness. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... See also: Musical groups established in 1988 Record labels established in 1988 // Peter Ruzicka becomes director of the Hamburg State Opera and State Philharmonic Orchestra. ... Chas Smash Chas Smash (born Cathal Joseph Patrick Smyth on January 14, 1959), earlier known as Carl Smyth is a British musician, best known as a backing singer and dancer of the second wave ska band Madness. ... Lee Jay Thompson (b. ... Chris Foreman in Lovestruck video Christopher John Foreman (born August 8, 1956), sometimes nicknamed Chrissy Boy, is a British guitarist, best known a member of a second wave ska band Madness. ... The Madness is a selftitled album by the British ska group Madness. ...


1992–2003: Reunion

In early 1992, "It Must Be Love" was re-released and reached number 6 in the UK singles chart.[28] Following that, the singles compilation Divine Madness was released and peaked at number 1 in the album charts. Madness then announced plans for a reunion concert, Madstock!, which was held at Finsbury Park, London on August 8 and 9 of that year.[29] The original lineup reunited, performing together for the first time since Mike Barson left the band in 1984. Over 75,000 fans attended the weekend festival, and during "One Step Beyond", the crowd danced so much they caused an earth tremor which measured over 4.5 on the Richter scale.[30][6] A subsequent live album was released, and the associated single, "The Harder They Come" (a cover of Jimmy Cliff's 1973 song) reached number 44 in the UK, with the album reaching number 22.[31] See also: 1992 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1992 Record labels established in 1992 // 1992 was a pivotal year in the development of music. ... It Must Be Love is a song originally written and recorded in 1971 by Labi Siffre. ... Divine Madness is the 1992 greatest hits album from the British ska band Madness. ... Madstock! is a live album by ska/pop band Madness, released on November 2, 1992 (see 1992 in music). ... This is an article about the park called Finsbury Park. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... See also: // January 21 - Relax by Frankie Goes to Hollywood reaches number one in the UK singles chart: it spends a total of forty-two weeks in the Top 40. ... One Step Beyond is a song originally written by a Jamaican ska singer Prince Buster as a b-side for his single Al Capone. It was made famous by British band Madness that covered it for their debut 1979 album One Step Beyond. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... // Many successful recording artists release at least one live album at some point during their career. ... The Harder They Come is a 1972 Jamaican crime film directed by Perry Henzell. ... Jimmy Cliff, real name James Chambers OM (Jamaica) (born April 1, 1948, in St Catherine, Jamaica) is a Jamaican reggae musician, best known among mainstream audiences for songs like Sittin in Limbo, You Can Get It If You Really Want and Many Rivers to Cross from The Harder They Come... // January 9 - Mick Jaggers request for a Japanese visa is rejected on account of a 1969 drug bust, putting an abrupt end to The Rolling Stones plans to tour Asia. ...

  • "Lovestruck" (1999)
    Released in 1999, this was the band's first original single in 13 years. It was a hit for the band, entering the top ten in the UK charts.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

The band continued to reunite for annual UK Christmas season tours and held three more Madstock! festivals; in 1994, 1996 and 1998. Also in 1998, Madness returned to America for their first tour there since 1984. The live album Universal Madness was recorded at the Universal Ampitheatre in L.A. and released the following year. In 1999, Madness released their first studio album since 1986, entitled Wonderful. The album reached number 17 in the UK album charts, and the lead single, "Lovestruck", gave the band their first new top 10 hit in the UK since 1983.[32] Neither of the two subsequent singles from the album, "Johnny The Horse" and "Drip Fed Fred", entered the top 40 of the UK charts.[33][34] Image File history File links Madness_-_Lovestruck. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Universal Madness is the second live album by ska/pop band Madness, released in March 2, 1999 (see 1999 in music). ... Wonderful is an album by the British ska band Madness. ... Dream. ... Johnny The Horse is a single by British band Madness from their 1999 album Wonderful. ... Drip Fed Fred is a single by British band Madness from their 1999 album Wonderful, featuring Ian Dury on vocals. ...


From October 28, 2002 to August 16, 2003, a musical based on Madness songs, Our House, ran at the Cambridge Theatre in west London. Madness played a role in the executive production of the show, and Suggs played a role in the production for a period of time, playing the central character's father.[35] It won an Olivier Award for best new musical of 2003,[36] and the performance was released on DVD on November 1, 2004.[36] There was also a previous musical based on Madness songs, One Step Beyond!, written by Alan Gilbey.[37][38] The musical had a brief run at the Theatre Royal Stratford East in 1993.[37][38] The Black Crook (1866) is considered the first musical comedy Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Our House was a relatively short-lived musical production staged at the Cambridge Theatre in Londons West End that ran from 28th October 2002 to 16th August 2003. ... Jerry Springer – The Opera at the Cambridge Theatre The Cambridge Theatre in London is a modern theatre, facing Seven Dials, built using steel and concrete and is notable for its elegant and clean lines of design. ... Satellite image of the inner part of West London Ayad Dibis is the best in West London. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Theatre Royal Stratford East is a theatre in Stratford, London, which opened in 1884. ...


2004–Present: The Dangermen and beyond

Madness performing as The Dangermen at Melkweg in Amsterdam in 2005.

In 2004, the band played a series of low-key concerts as The Dangermen, performing covers of classic reggae and ska songs. A lot of the songs were those played by the band when they were first forming,[39] and the band performed the songs as a celebration of their 25 year anniversary.[39] This led to the release of the album The Dangermen Sessions Vol. 1 in August 2005.[40] However, during the sessions which produced the album, the band's guitarist Chris Foreman announced his departure. Foreman left the band in mid 2005, citing "the petty, time consuming bollocks that goes on in the band" in a statement announcing his decision to leave.[40] The band completed the album without him, and on release, it peaked at number 11 in the UK album charts,[41] which was the band's highest studio album chart position in 21 years. Although two singles were released, neither was a major success in the UK. The more successful of the two, "Shame & Scandal", reached number 38, but was more successful in France, where it peaked at number 12.[42] "Girl Why Don't You?" did not enter the top 75 in the UK. Image File history File linksMetadata Madness-19-07-2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Madness-19-07-2005. ... Reggae is a music genre developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. ... For other uses, see SKA (disambiguation). ... The Dangermen Sessions, Vol. ... See also: 2005 in heavy metal music 2005 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 2005 Record labels established in 2005 Albums released in 2005 January 1 - In most of Europe, copyright expired on a number of classic pop and rock-and-roll songs recorded in 1954 and earlier, including... Chris Foreman in Lovestruck video Christopher John Foreman (born August 8, 1956), sometimes nicknamed Chrissy Boy, is a British guitarist, best known a member of a second wave ska band Madness. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shame & Scandal is a song originally performed by calypso singer Sir Lancelot. ... Girl Why Dont You is a song originally performed by Prince Buster, covered by ska band Madness for their 2005 album, The Dangermen Sessions Vol. ...

The full Madness lineup continue to tour.

In late 2006, this six remaining members of Madness began working on their first original album in seven years. However, for Madness' 2006 Christmas season tour, Foreman rejoined the band. In March 2007, the single "Sorry" was released from the band's upcoming album, peaking in the UK charts at number 23. The single included a version featuring UK hip hop artists Sway DaSafo and Baby Blue. Both artists were included on the music video which accompanied the hip-hop version of the song, but not on the original music video. Both music videos were also without Chris Foreman, despite the fact that he was a band member at the time of release. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sorry is a single by the band Madness, released in March 2007 and written by Mike Barson, the bands keyboard player and prominent songwriter. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses of Sway, see Sway (disambiguation). ...


The new Madness song "NW5 (I Would Give You Everything)" and a re-recorded version of "It Must Be Love" were featured in the German film Neues vom Wixxer. The two songs were released in Germany as a double A-Side, and both of them were turned into music videos. While promoting "Sorry", Sway DaSafo confirmed in an interview with NME that he will perform in the recording of Madness' updated version of their song "Baggy Trousers", entitled "Baggy Jeans".[43] The updated song will be featured on Madness' upcoming studio album, and also released as a single.[43] DaSafo predicted the song will be a "huge smash guaranteed", although the date of release is not yet known.[43] However, lead singer Suggs has stated that the album will be released in January 2008, although it has not yet been given an official release date.[44] It was announced in September 2007 that Madness would embark on a seven date U.K. stadium tour including a date at the 02 in London. A re-recorded version of 'NW5' is set for UK single release in December 2007/January 2008 along with the new album scheduled for a January 2008 release date. It Must Be Love is a song originally written and recorded in 1971 by Labi Siffre. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into B-side. ... A music video (also video clip, promo) is a short film or video meant to present a visual representation of a popular music song. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Baggy Trousers is a single by English ska/pop band Madness from their 1980 album Absolutely. ... The O2 , with the Canary Wharf complex in the background, seen from the River Thames. ...


Collaborations

Madness collaborated with Elvis Costello in 1983 on a version of their song Tomorrow's (Just Another Day). It was released as a b-side to the single. In later years Mike Barson stated that Costello's 'Watching the Detectives' was the main influence on the song. For the Wonderful album in 1999, Ian Dury laid down vocals on the track Drip Fed Fred which was released as the last single from the album. Subsequently it was Ian's last recording before his death. Live, Madness have collaborated with artists such as UB40 and Prince Buster, notably at their first Madstock concert. Elvis Costello (born Declan Patrick McManus August 25, 1954) is an English musician, singer, and songwriter. ... Tomorrows (Just Another Day) is a song by British band Madness from their fourth album The Rise and Fall. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... Look up wonderful in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ian Dury, in a look combining Gene Vincent with a Cockney pearly king. ... Drip Fed Fred is a single by British band Madness from their 1999 album Wonderful, featuring Ian Dury on vocals. ... UB40 are a British dub band formed in 1978 in Birmingham. ... Cecil Bustamente Campbell (born May 28, 1938), better known as Prince Buster, is a musician from Kingston, Jamaica and regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of ska and rocksteady music. ...


Lyrical themes

Although Madness were seen by many as somewhat of a humorous band with catchy, bouncy songs,[45] they sometimes tackled, what were at the time, controversial issues in their lyrics. "Embarrassment" (from the Absolutely album) was written by Lee Thompson, and reflected the unfolding turmoil following the news that his teenage sister had become pregnant and was carrying a black man's child.[46] The band discussed animal testing in the song "Tomorrow's Dream".[47] The band criticized the National Health Service in "Mrs. Hutchinson", which told the story of a woman who, after several misdiagnoses and mistreatment, became terminally ill. The story was based on the experiences of Mike Barson's mother.[48] Madness' final single prior to disbanding, "(Waiting For) The Ghost Train", commented on apartheid in South Africa.[26] This article is about a song. ... Absolutely is the 1980 second album from the British ska band Madness. ... Lee Jay Thompson (b. ... A pregnant woman Pregnancy is the process by which a mammalian female carries a live offspring from conception until it develops to the point where the offspring is capable of living outside the womb. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... For other uses, see Animal testing (disambiguation). ... NHS redirects here. ... This article is about incurable disease. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... (Waiting For) The Ghost Train is a one-off single by Madness. ... For the legal definition of apartheid, see the crime of apartheid. ...


Skinhead controversy

Early in their career, Madness were linked to skinheads; members of a British working class subculture that the media often stereotyped as racist (although many skinheads, including the original generation, are anti-racist).[9][49] Not only were Madness, along with other 2 Tone bands, popular with skinheads, but it was said that the band members themselves were associated with the subculture. The band's relationship with the skinheads varied at times. Mike Barson was particularly displeased with the band's racist skinhead association (which was of course product of a large misunderstanding), often finding it disappointing that so many were present at performances. Prior to becoming a full member of the band, Chas Smash had been involved in fights with skinheads at performances. In one particular incident on November 18, 1979, Madness were supported by "Red Beans and Rice", who featured a black lead singer, and the band were prevented from completing the performance due to the racist chants from certain members of the skinhead filled audience. Suggs later came on stage to show his displeasure at their behaviour, but this didn't stop much of the audience from Nazi saluting at the end of the show.[9] Skinheads, named for their close-cropped or shaven heads, are a working-class subculture that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1960s, and then spread to other parts of the world. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Anti-racism includes beliefs, actions, movements, and policies adopted or developed to oppose racism. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Mike Barson in Bed and Breakfast Man video Michael Wilson Barson (born May 21, 1958 in North London, England), sometimes nicknamed Monsieur Barso, is an English musician, best known as a founding member and keyboardist of the second wave ska band Madness. ... Chas Smash Chas Smash (born Cathal Joseph Patrick Smyth on January 14, 1959), earlier known as Carl Smyth is a British musician, best known as a backing singer and dancer of the second wave ska band Madness. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Though most indigenous Africans possess relatively dark skin, they exhibit much variation in physical appearance. ... Graham McPherson (born on January 13, 1961 in Hastings), better known as Suggs, is an English singer, actor, radio DJ, and TV personality — most famous as the frontman of the band Madness. ... The Roman salute is a closed finger, flat-palm-down hand raised at an angle (usually 45 degrees) and was used by the Roman Republic. ...


In a 1979 NME interview, Madness member Chas Smash was quoted as saying "We don't care if people are in the NF as long as they're having a good time." This added to speculation that Madness was a racist band supporting the National Front, although the band members denied those allegations, and Chas Smash responded to the NME article in the song "Don't Quote Me On That".[9] Eventually, band members denied their skinhead roots, which disappointed much of their skinhead fan base.[50] For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... The British National Front (most commonly called the National Front) is a British far right political party whose major political activities were during the 1970s and 1980s. ...


Awards

The band's first notable musical award came in 1983 when they won an "Ivor Novello Award" for Best Song for the international hit "Our House".[6][21] They received another "Ivor Novello Award" 17 years later for an "Outstanding Song Collection".[6][51] In 2005, they were awarded the Mojo Magazine "Hall Of Fame" award, notably for being 'an artist's artist'.[52] As of 2007, a campaign is taking place by fans of Madness for the band to be awarded a Brit award.[53] Many fans and critics feel they have been overlooked over their past 30 years in the music industry.[53] Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Ivor Novello Awards, named after the Cardiff born entertainer Ivor Novello, are awards awarded for songwriting and composing. ... Audio sample Our House is a single by English ska/pop band Madness, from their UK album The Rise & Fall and their US compilation Madness. ... Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... The Brit Awards are annual United Kingdom pop music awards, considered to be on a par with the Grammys in the United States. ...


Discography

Main article: Madness discography

Studio albums

UK Compilation albums

UK Top 10 singles

As of June 2007, Madness have released eight studio albums. ... One Step Beyond. ... Absolutely is the 1980 second album from the British ska band Madness. ... 7 is the third album from the British ska group Madness. ... The Rise & Fall is the fourth album by the British ska band Madness. ... Keep Moving is the fifth album by the British ska band Madness from 1984. ... Mad Not Mad is the sixth album by the British ska band Madness, released in 1985 (see 1985 in music). ... Wonderful is an album by the British ska band Madness. ... The Dangermen Sessions, Vol. ... Complete Madness is the first greatest hits album by a ska/pop group Madness. ... Utter Madness is a greatest hits album by a British pop band Madness, released in 1986 (see 1986 in music). ... Its. ... Its. ... Divine Madness is the 1992 greatest hits album from the British ska band Madness. ... The Business - the Definitive Singles Collection is a 3 disc box set by a ska/pop band Madness released in 1993 (see 1993 in music). ... VHS cover Divine Madness is the 1992 greatest hits album from the British ska/pop band Madness. ... One Step Beyond is a song originally written by a Jamaican ska singer Prince Buster as a b-side for his single Al Capone. It was made famous by British band Madness that covered it for their debut 1979 album One Step Beyond. ... This article is about the 1979 Madness song. ... Work Rest and Play is an EP by British ska/pop band Madness. ... Baggy Trousers is a single by English ska/pop band Madness from their 1980 album Absolutely. ... This article is about a song. ... The Return of the Los Palmas 7 is a song by British ska/pop band Madness, written by Mike Barson, Mark Bedford and Daniel Woodgate. ... Grey Day is a song by English ska/pop band Madness. ... Shut Up is a pop song written by Suggs and Chris Foreman. ... It Must Be Love is a song originally written and recorded in 1971 by Labi Siffre. ... House of Fun is a song by British ska/pop group Madness, credited to Mike Barson and Lee Thompson. ... Driving in My Car is a one-off single by Madness. ... Audio sample Our House is a single by English ska/pop band Madness, from their UK album The Rise & Fall and their US compilation Madness. ... Tomorrows (Just Another Day) is a song by British band Madness from their fourth album The Rise and Fall. ... Madness (Is All In The Mind) is a song by British band Madness from their fourth album The Rise and Fall. ... For the country song, see Bob Ferguson Wings of a Dove (also known as Wings of a Dove (A Celebratory Song)) is a song by Madness. ... The Sun and the Rain is a single by Madness. ... It Must Be Love is a song originally written and recorded in 1971 by Labi Siffre. ... Dream. ...

References

  1. ^ "The Fink Brothers" were an alter ego created by band members Suggs and Chas Smash. They released a solitary single in February 1985. See The Madness Timeline: 1985. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c The Madness Timeline: 1976. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  3. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Allmusic.com 'Madness' biography". Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  4. ^ Rice 1990. p286
  5. ^ For Madness, the figure of 214 weeks does not include the 4 weeks on the charts by spin-off band "The Madness". For UB40, the 214 weeks does not include the 8 weeks spent on the charts by "Reckless", credited to "Afrikaa Bambaataa and Family with UB40".
  6. ^ a b c d IMDB profile for Graham McPherson. Retrieved on June 10, 2007.
  7. ^ a b The Madness Timeline: 1977. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  8. ^ a b c d The Madness Timeline: 1978. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j The Madness Timeline: 1979. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  10. ^ One Step Beyond chart information. Retrieved on July 30, 2007.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h The Madness Timeline: 1980. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  12. ^ Christgau, Robert. Robert Christgau Madness album reviews. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  13. ^ a b c Marcus, Greil. Rolling Stone "Absolutely" review. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  14. ^ a b c The Madness Timeline: 1981. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  15. ^ Millar, Robbi (September, 1979), Sounds Magazine (The full article was also included on the back cover of the Absolutely LP.)
  16. ^ 2 Tone Records - Artists. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  17. ^ a b The Madness Timeline: 1982. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  18. ^ The Madness Story: Chapter 5. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  19. ^ Woodstra, Chris. "Allmusic.com The Rise & Fall overview". Retrieved on August 2, 2007.
  20. ^ Mason, Stewart. "Allmusic.com Primrose Hill review". Retrieved on August 2, 2007.
  21. ^ a b c The Madness Timeline: 1983. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  22. ^ a b c The Madness Timeline: 1984. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  23. ^ Puterbraugh, Parke.Rolling Stone "Keep Moving" review. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  24. ^ a b c Clayden, Andy. "The Madness Story: Chapter 6" Retrieved June 6, 2007
  25. ^ NME Writers All Time Albums. Retrieved on June 2, 2007.
  26. ^ a b c The Madness Timeline: 1986. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  27. ^ Cater, Darryl. "Allmusic.com 'The Madness' biography". Retrieved on June 20, 2007.
  28. ^ Chart information for "It Must Be Love (1992). Retrieved on July 30, 2007.
  29. ^ BBC Top of the Pops 2 Top 5. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  30. ^ Radford, Tim. "Guardian article mentioning Finsbury Park tremor". Retrieved on June 3, 2007.
  31. ^ "The Harder They Come" chart information. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  32. ^ "Lovestruck" chart information. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  33. ^ "Johnny The Horse" chart information. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  34. ^ "Drip Fed Fred" chart information. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  35. ^ Shenton, Mark. "Our House with Suggs, a first night review". Retrieved on June 20, 2007.
  36. ^ a b "Laurence Olivier Awards - Chronological list of winning musicals". Retrieved on June 6, 2007.
  37. ^ a b "Theatre Review", The Guardian, April 13, 1993.
  38. ^ a b "Alan Gilbey C.V.". Retrieved on July 7, 2007.
  39. ^ a b Long, Chris. "Interview with Suggs of Madness (June 2004)". Retrieved on June 20, 2007.
  40. ^ a b Cohen, Jonathan. "Madness Inks With V2, New Album In Works". Retrieved on July 12, 2007.
  41. ^ "The Dangermen Sessions - Vol 1" chart information. Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  42. ^ "Madness - Shame & Scandal: Charts". Retrieved on August 1, 2007.
  43. ^ a b c Madness to re-record classic hit with Sway. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  44. ^ "An interview with Madness". Retrieved on August 15, 2007.
  45. ^ Woodstra, Chris. "Allmusic.com Absolutely overview". Retrieved on July 5, 2007.
  46. ^ Duffy, Jonathan. "An embarrassment no more". Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  47. ^ Thompson, Lee. "Tomorrow's Dream": What's it all about?. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  48. ^ Barson, Mike. "Mrs. Hutchinson": What's it all about?. Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  49. ^ "SHARP Skinheads". Retrieved on June 25, 2007.
  50. ^ Pateman, John. "This Was England: a Skinhead exhibition from the 1980s". Retrieved on June 5, 2007.
  51. ^ Ivor Novello awards: The winners. Retrieved on June 19, 2007.
  52. ^ Mojo honours list for 2005. Retrieved on June 10, 2007.
  53. ^ a b Madness Brit Award campaign. Retrieved on June 10, 2007.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Sources

  • Rice, Tim (1990). Guinness Book of Hits of the 80's. Guinness World Records Ltd. ISBN 0851123988. 

Sir Timothy Miles Bindon Rice (born 10 November 1944) is an English Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, Tony Award and Grammy Award winning lyricist, author, radio presenter and television gameshow panelist. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Official Madspace
  • French fan club website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Band Madness! (391 words)
BAND MADNESS is a March-Madness style, single elimination tournament of pop/rock bands where the winners are determined strictly by fan voting.
In case you missed it, Band Madness 2006 quickly took on a life of its own, boasting tens of thousands of visitors per day over the course of the tournament, including a peak of over 500,000 visitors in June 2006.
Band Madness has appeared on Collegehumor.com, VH1’s Best Week Ever blog, Stereogum.com, and literally hundreds of fan sites from around the world, all uniting together to insult Oasis fans in dozens of languages.
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