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Encyclopedia > Madeleine L'Engle
This article is about a recently deceased person.
Some information, such as the circumstances of the person's death and surrounding events, may change rapidly as more facts become known.
Madeleine L'Engle

L'Engle Publicity photo from Random House
Born: November 29, 1918(1918-11-29)
Flag of New York New York City, New York, United States
Died: September 06, 2007 (aged 88)
Flag of Connecticut Litchfield, Connecticut, United States
Occupation: novelist
Nationality: American
Writing period: 19452007
Genres: fiction, poetry, essays
Subjects: science fiction, fantasy etc.
Website: Madeleine L'Engle's official site

Madeleine L'Engle (November 29, 1918September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her children's books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. Her works reflect her strong interest in modern science; mitochondrial DNA, for instance, is featured prominently in A Wind in the Door, tesseracts in A Wrinkle in Time, organ regeneration in The Arm of the Starfish and so forth. Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... // The following is a list of notable deaths in 2007. ... Image File history File links Madeleine_L'Engle. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_York. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... “NY” redirects here. ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Connecticut. ... Litchfield is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut and is known as a affluent summer resort. ... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... An illustration from Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland, depicting the fictional protagonist, Alice, playing a fantastical game of croquet. ... This article is about the art form. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... For the movie adaptation, see A Wrinkle in Time (film) . A Wrinkle in Time is a childrens fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle, written between 1959 and 1960[1] and published in 1962 after at least 26 rejections by publishers[2] because it was, in LEngles words... A Wind in the Door is a 1973 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... A Swiftly Tilting Planet A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a 1978 science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... Many Waters is a 1986 novel by Madeleine LEngle, part of the authors Time Quartet. ... Mitochondrial DNA (some captions in German) Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the DNA located in organelles called mitochondria. ... For other uses, see Tesseract (disambiguation). ... The Arm of the Starfish is a novel by Madeleine LEngle, first published in 1965. ...

Contents

Early life

Madeleine L'Engle Camp was born in New York City, and named after her great-grandmother, Madeleine L'Engle, otherwise known as Mado. Her mother, a pianist, was also named Madeleine. Her father, Charles Wadsworth Camp, was a writer and critic, and a foreign correspondent whose lungs were damaged by exposure to mustard gas during World War I. She wrote her first story at the age of five, and started keeping a journal at the age of eight. These early literary attempts did not translate into success at the New York City private school where she was enrolled. A shy, clumsy child, she was branded as stupid by some of her teachers. Unable to please them, she retreated into her own world of books and writing. Her parents often disagreed about how to raise her and as a result she went to a number of boarding schools and had many governesses. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


In 1929 the Camps moved to a chateau near Chamonix in the French Alps, in the hope that the cleaner air would be easier on Charles Camp's lungs. Madeleine herself was sent to a boarding school in Switzerland. In 1933 the family moved to northern Florida, and she attended another boarding school, Ashley Hall, in Charleston, South Carolina. When her father died in 1935, she arrived home too late to say goodbye. A château ( French for castle; plural châteaux) is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of gentry, usually French, with or without fortifications. ... Panorama of Chamonix valley Chamonix-Mont-Blanc or, more commonly, Chamonix is a town and commune in eastern France, in the Haute-Savoie département, at the foot of Mont Blanc. ... The French Alps are simply those parts of the Alps mountain range which lie in France. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Ashley Hall is an all girls school in Charleston, South Carolina, founded in 1909 by Mary Vardrine McBee, who headed the institution until 1949. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ...


She attended Smith College from 1937 to 1941. After graduation she moved to an apartment in New York City. In 1942 she met actor Hugh Franklin when she appeared in the play The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov. L'Engle married Franklin on January 26, 1946, the year after the publication of her first novel, The Small Rain. The couple's first daughter, Josephine, was born in 1947. Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Hugh Franklin (August 24, 1916 – September 26, 1986) was an American soap opera actor. ... Bust of Anton Chekhov at Badenweiler, Germany The Cherry Orchard (Вишнëвый сад or Vishniovy sad in Russian) is Russian playwright Anton Chekhovs last play. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Small Rain is a semi-autobiographical novel by Madeline LEngle, about the many difficulties in the life of talented pianist Katherine Forrester between the ages of 10 and 18. ...


In 1952 the family moved to a 200-year-old farmhouse called Crosswicks in rural Connecticut. To replace Franklin's lost acting income, they purchased and operated a small general store while L'Engle continued with her writing. Their son, Bion, was born that same year. During this period, L'Engle also served as choir director of the local Congregational Church. In 1956, Maria, the seven-year-old daughter of family friends, came to live with the Franklins after the deaths of her parents, eventually becoming part of the family. Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


In 1959 the Franklins moved back to New York City, where Hugh could resume his acting career. The move was preceded by a ten-week cross-country camping trip, during which L'Engle first had the idea for her most famous novel, A Wrinkle in Time. L'Engle completed the book in 1960. Literally dozens of publishers rejected the story before Farrar, Straus and Giroux finally published it in 1962. Farrar, Straus and Giroux is a book publishing company, founded in 1946 by Roger W. Straus, Jr. ... See also: 1961 in literature, other events of 1962, 1963 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Later years

From 1960 to 1966 (and again in 1989 and 1990), L'Engle taught at St. Hilda's & St. Hugh's School in New York. In 1965 she became a volunteer librarian at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, also in New York. During the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s she wrote dozens of books for children and adults. One of her books for adults, Two-Part Invention, was a memoir of her marriage, completed after her husband's death from cancer on September 26, 1986. L'Engle was seriously injured in an automobile accident in 1991, but recovered enough to visit Antarctica in 1992. Bion Franklin died December 17, 1999. The Western facade, including the Rose Window Western entrance on Amsterdam Avenue The Cathedral of St. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


For many years, L'Engle maintained her role as writer-in-residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, generally spending her winters in New York and her summers at Crosswicks. She became unable to travel or teach in her final years, however, due to reduced mobility from osteoporosis, and especially after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage in 2002. She also abandoned her former schedule of speaking engagements and seminars. A few compilations of older work, some of it previously unpublished, appeared after 2001. Osteoporosis is a disease of bone in which the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, bone microarchitecture is disrupted, and the amount and variety of non-collagenous proteins in bone is altered. ... A cerebral hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum. ...


L'Engle died at a nursing home in Litchfield, Connecticut of natural causes on Thursday, September 6, 2007, according to a statement by her publicist the following day. [2] Litchfield is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut and is known as a affluent summer resort. ...


Awards, honors and organizations

In addition to the numerous awards, medals and prizes won by individual books L'Engle wrote, she personally received many honors over the years. These included being named a Dame in the Order of St. John of Jerusalem (1972) the USM Medallion from the University of Southern Mississippi (1978), the Smith College Award "for service to community or college which exemplifies the purposes of liberal arts education" (1981), the Sophia Award for distinction in her field (1984), the Regina Medal (1985), the ALAN Award for outstanding contribution to adolescent literature, presented by the National Council of Teachers of English (1986), and the Kerlan Award (1990). This page deals with the order after its revival in the 19th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In 1985 she was a guest speaker at the Library of Congress, giving a speech entitled "Dare to be Creative!" That same year she began a two-year term as President of the Authors Guild. In addition she received over a dozen honorary degrees from as many colleges and universities, such as Haverford College.[3] Many of these name her as a Doctor of Humane Letters, but she was also made a Doctor of Literature and a Doctor of Sacred Theology, the latter at Berkeley Divinity School in 1984. In 1995 she was Writer in Residence for Victoria Magazine. In 2004 she received the National Humanities Medal, but could not attend the ceremony due to poor health. The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... Authors Guild is a 86-year-old (as of September 2005) professional group for published writers. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... Berkeley Divinity School, founded in 1854, is an official seminaries of The Episcopal Church, based in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The National Humanities Medal honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nation’s understanding of the humanities, broadened citizens’ engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans’ access to important resources in the humanities. ...


Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of Madeleine L'Engle's papers. Wheaton College is a private Evangelical Protestant, coeducational, liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois, a suburb 25 miles west of Chicago in the United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Bibliographic overview

L'Engle's best-known works are divided between "chronos" and "kairos"; the former is the framework in which the stories of the Austin family take place, and is presented in a primarily realistic setting, though occasionally with elements that might be regarded as science fiction. The latter is the framework in which the stories of the Murry and O'Keefe families take place, and is presented sometimes in a realistic setting and sometimes in a more fantastic or magical milieu. Generally speaking, the more realistic kairos material is found in the O'Keefe stories, which deal with the second generation characters. For other uses, see Chronos (disambiguation). ... Kairos Kairos () is an ancient Greek word meaning the right or opportune moment . The ancient Greeks had two words for time, chronos and kairos. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ...


The Murry-O'Keefe and Austin families should not be regarded as living in separate worlds, because several characters cross over between them, and historical events are also shared.


In addition to novels and poetry, L'Engle wrote many nonfiction works, including the autobiographical Crosswicks Journals and other explorations of the subjects of faith and art. For L'Engle, who wrote repeatedly about "story as truth," the distinction between fiction and memoir was sometimes blurred. Real events from her life and family history made their way into some of her novels, while fictional elements, such as assumed names for people and places, can be found in her published journals.


A theme often implied and occasionally explicit in L'Engle's works is that the phenomena that people call religion, science and magic are simply different aspects of a single seamless reality; a similar theme may arguably be discerned in the fiction works of C. S. Lewis or Diane Duane.[citation needed] In literature, a theme is a broad idea in a story, or a message or lesson conveyed by a work. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Diane Duane (b. ...


Partial list of works

Kairos

A Swiftly Tilting Planet was published before Many Waters but takes place a few years later. The Time Quartet plus An Acceptable Time are marketed as "The Time Quintet". The Time Quartet is a fantasy/science fiction series of four young adult novels written by Madeleine LEngle. ... For the movie adaptation, see A Wrinkle in Time (film) . A Wrinkle in Time is a childrens fantasy novel by Madeleine LEngle, written between 1959 and 1960[1] and published in 1962 after at least 26 rejections by publishers[2] because it was, in LEngles words... See also: 1961 in literature, other events of 1962, 1963 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. ... A Wind in the Door is a 1973 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1972 in literature, other events of 1973, 1974 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A Swiftly Tilting Planet A Swiftly Tilting Planet is a 1978 science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Many Waters is a 1986 novel by Madeleine LEngle, part of the authors Time Quartet. ... The year 1986 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... The Arm of the Starfish is a novel by Madeleine LEngle, first published in 1965. ... See also: 1964 in literature, other events of 1965, 1966 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Thirteen-year-old Simon Renier has no idea when he boards the M.S. Orion with his cousin Forsyth Phair that the journey will take him not only to Venezuela, but into his past as well. ... See also: 1975 in literature, other events of 1976, 1977 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A House Like a Lotus (ISBN 0-374-33385-8) is a 1984 young adult novel by Madeline LEngle. ... See also: 1983 in literature, other events of 1984, 1985 in literature, list of years in literature. ... An Acceptable Time is a 1989 young adult science fiction novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1988 in literature, other events of 1989, 1990 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Chronos

Meet the Austins is the title of a 1960 novel by Madeline LEngle, the first of her books about the Austin family. ... See also: 1959 in literature, other events of 1960, 1961 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Moon by Night (ISBN 0-374-35049-3) is the title of a young adult novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1962 in literature, other events of 1963, 1964 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Young Unicorns (1968, ISBN 0-374-38778-8) is the title of a young adult suspense novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1967 in literature, other events of 1968, 1969 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A Ring of Endless Light is a 1980 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1979 in literature, other events of 1980, 1981 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Newbery Honor is a citation given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA). ... Troubling a Star is the last of the Austin family series by Madeleine LEngle, published in 1994. ... See also: 1993 in literature, other events of 1994, 1995 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

Other fiction

Katherine Forrester series:

Camilla Dickinson: The Small Rain is a semi-autobiographical novel by Madeline LEngle, about the many difficulties in the life of talented pianist Katherine Forrester between the ages of 10 and 18. ... See also: 1944 in literature, other events of 1945, 1946 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Small Rain is a semi-autobiographical novel by Madeline LEngle, about the many difficulties in the life of talented pianist Katherine Forrester between the ages of 10 and 18. ... See also: 1967 in literature, other events of 1968, 1969 in literature, list of years in literature. ... A Severed Wasp (1982, ISBN 0-374-26131-8), is a novel by Madeline LEngle. ... See also: 1981 in literature, other events of 1982, 1983 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

Single titles: Camilla Dickinson, also published as Camilla, is a novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1950 in literature, other events of 1951, 1952 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

  • Ilsa (1946) (no ISBN)
  • And Both Were Young (1949), ISBN 0-440-90229-0
  • A Winter's Love (1957), ISBN 0-345-30644-9
  • The Love Letters (1966), revised and reissued as Love Letters (2000), ISBN 0-87788-528-1
  • The Other Side Of The Sun (1971) ISBN 0-374-22805-1
  • Dance in the Desert (1988), ISBN 0-374-41684-2
  • Certain Women (1996) ISBN 0-374-12025-0

(Note: some ISBNs given are for later paperback editions, since no such numbering existed when L'Engle's earlier titles were published in hardcover.) Ilsa is a 1946 novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1945 in literature, other events of 1946, 1947 in literature, list of years in literature. ... And Both Were Young is a novel by Madeleine LEngle. ... See also: 1948 in literature, other events of 1949, 1950 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1956 in literature, other events of 1957, 1958 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1965 in literature, other events of 1966, 1967 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1970 in literature, other events of 1971, 1972 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1987 in literature, other events of 1988, 1989 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1995 in literature, other events of 1996, 1997 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


The Crosswicks Journals

  • A Circle of Quiet (1972)
  • The Summer of the Great-grandmother (1974)
  • The Irrational Season (1977)
  • Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage (1988)

See also: 1971 in literature, other events of 1972, 1973 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1973 in literature, other events of 1974, 1975 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1976 in literature, other events of 1977, 1978 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1987 in literature, other events of 1988, 1989 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

The Genesis Trilogy

  • And It Was Good (1983)
  • A Stone For A Pillow (1986)
  • Sold Into Egypt (1989)

Poetry

  • Lines Scribbled On An Envelope (1969)
  • The Weather Of The Heart (1978)
  • A Cry Like A Bell (1987)
  • The Ordering of Love: The New and Collected Poems of Madeleine L'Engle (2005) (includes reprints from the above)

See also: 1968 in literature, other events of 1969, 1970 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1977 in literature, other events of 1978, 1979 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // Events February 25 - Canada Reads selects Rockbound by Frank Parker Day as the novel to be read across the nation. ...

Religion, the arts, and more autobiography

  • Madeleine L'Engle Herself: Reflections on a Writing Life (2001) Compiled by Carole Chase
  • Penguins and Golden Calves: Icons and Idols in Antarctica and other Spiritual Places (2003)
  • The Rock That Is Higher: Story as Truth (1993)
  • Walking on Water: Personal Reflections (1982)

See also: 2000 in literature, other events of 2001, 2002 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 1981 in literature, other events of 1982, 1983 in literature, list of years in literature. ...

Important L'Engle characters

Madeleine LEngle, an American novelist, diarist and poet, has produced over fifty books since her first novel, The Small Rain, in 1945. ...

References

  • A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L'Engle. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1972 ISBN 0-374-12374-8
  • Scholastic BookFiles: A Reading Guide to A Wrinkle in Time ISBN 0-439-46364-5
  • Suncatcher: A Study of Madeleine L'Engle And Her Writing by Carole F. Chase ISBN 1-880913-31-3
  • Madeline L'Engle Herself: Reflections on a Writing Life by Madeleine L'Engle and Carole F. Chase ISBN 0-87788-157-X
  • Christian Mythmakers: C. S. Lewis, Madeleine L'Engle, J. R. R. Tolkien, George MacDonald, G. K. Chesterton and Others by Rolland Hein ISBN 0-940895-48-X
  1. ^ Martin, Douglas. "Madeleine L'Engle, Children's Writer, Is Dead", The New York Times, 9/8/07. (English) 
  2. ^ (2007-09-07) "Obituaries: Esther Mitgang; Madeleine L’Engle". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-09-07. 
  3. ^ A Commencement for the Millennium. Haverford News. Haverford College (2002). Retrieved on 2007-09-07.

Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Madeleine L'Engle's life and works
Time Quartet: A Wrinkle in Time | A Wind in the Door | Many Waters | A Swiftly Tilting Planet
Polly O'Keefe series: The Arm of the Starfish | Dragons in the Waters | A House Like a Lotus | An Acceptable Time
Austin family series: Meet the Austins | The Moon by Night | The Young Unicorns | A Ring of Endless Light | Troubling a Star | The Twenty-four Days Before Christmas | A Full House: An Austin Family Christmas
Katherine Forrester series: The Small Rain | A Severed Wasp
Camilla Dickinson series: Camilla Dickinson | A Live Coal in the Sea
Other fiction: Ilsa | And Both Were Young | The Other Side of the Sun
TV Adaptations based on L'Engle's work: A Wrinkle in Time | A Ring of Endless Light
Characters: Meg Murry | Charles Wallace Murry | Calvin O'Keefe | Sandy and Dennys Murry
Polly O'Keefe | Vicky Austin | Canon Tallis | Adam Eddington | Zachary Gray
Major characters in the works of Madeleine L'Engle
Other: Places | Kything | Echthroi | Madeleine L'Engle | Hugh Franklin

  Results from FactBites:
 
CWHF-Madeline L'Engle (408 words)
Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City, the only child of a foreign correspondent and a gifted pianist.
Madeleine L'Engle continues to receive honors for her over forty volumes of plays, poems, essays, and novels for children and adults.
Madeleine, age 78 at the time of her induction, is still publishing new books at an astonishing rate while also serving as writer-in-residence at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York.
Madeleine L'Engle at AllExperts (2441 words)
Madeleine L'Engle (born November 29, 1918) is an American writer best known for her children's books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and Many Waters.
Madeleine L'Engle Camp was born in New York City, and named after her great-grandmother, Madeleine L'Engle, otherwise known as Mado.
L'Engle's best-known works are divided between "chronos" and "kairos"; the former is the framework in which the stories of the Austin family take place, and is presented in a primarily realistic framework, though occasionally with elements that might be regarded as science fiction.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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