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Encyclopedia > Mad scientist
"They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! I'll destroy them all!" Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist.
"They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! I'll destroy them all!" Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist.

A mad scientist is a stock character of popular fiction, more specifically Science Fiction, either villainous, benign or neutral. Whether insane, eccentric, or simply bumbling, the mad scientist is often working with some utterly fictional technology in order to forward his schemes. Alternatively, they fail to see the evil that will ensue from the hubris of “playing god”. Not all mad scientists are evil or villains. Some are actually protagonists (or at least positive forces), such as Dexter in the animated series Dexter's Laboratory. Image File history File links Mad_scientist. ... Image File history File links Mad_scientist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Genre fiction is a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to the fans of that genre. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... “Bad guy” redirects here. ... Psychosis is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a loss of contact with reality. Stedmans Medical Dictionary defines psychosis as a severe mental disorder, with or without organic damage, characterized by derangement of personality and loss of contact with reality and causing deterioration... In popular usage, eccentricity refers to unusual or odd behavior on the part of a person, as opposed to being normal. ... Fictional technology is proposed or described in many different contexts for many different reasons: Exploratory engineering seeks to identify if a prospective technology can be designed in detail, and simulated, even if it cannot be built yet - this is often a prerequisite to venture capital funding, or investigation in weapons... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Playing god refers to someone supposedly taking on the role of a god for human purposes. ... Dexters Laboratory (Dexters Lab for short and also the name for the mini series which involved his robot dog) is an American animated television series created by Genndy Tartakovsky. ...


Though the archetypes often overlap, a mad scientist need not be an evil genius. A mad scientist is simply a scientist who has become so obsessively involved with his studies that he has begun to develop eccentricities by normal standards; an evil genius is a genius who uses their gift for explicitly, consciously evil purposes. For example, while a mad scientist would test the bounds of science to create an army of zombies, he may do it to see if – or prove that – he could, or out of boredom, to impress women, to help clean up his house, or many other such reasons. By contrast, an evil genius would construct his army with a purpose, such as taking over the world – in addition to being evil, such characters tend to have large-scale ambition (see Megalomania in fiction). A mad scientist may be a naive pawn of an evil genius, the evil genius often promising the scientist the funds and resources to conduct his research. Also mad scientists, whilst definitely being intelligent usually fail to think things through to their conclusion while an evil genius is usually a clever planner and would have a diabolical use for the army of zombies as well as a plan to avoid being killed by them. “Bad guy” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Bad guy” redirects here. ... A genius is a person of great intelligence. ... For other uses, see Evil (disambiguation). ... Alexander the Great Philip II of Spain Napoleon Bonaparte For other uses, see World domination (disambiguation). ... Look up megalomania in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pawn may refer to: - * Pawn (chess), the piece used in the board game chess and - * Pawn (law), another name for a pledge in certain jurisdictions - * Pawnbroker, one who owns a pawnshop - * Idiomatically, an exploited person or character, considered expendable (from the use of the chess piece), he was only a...

Contents

Defining characteristics

Mad scientists are typically characterized by obsessive behavior and the employment of extremely dangerous or unorthodox methods. They are often motivated by revenge, seeking to settle real or imagined slights, typically related to their unorthodox studies. Guðrún agitates her sons, Hamðir and Sörli, to avenge their sister. ...


Their laboratories often hum with Tesla coils, Van de Graaff generators, Jacob's ladders, perpetual motion machines, and other visually impressive electrical oddments, or are decorated with test tubes, bodies of mutant creatures embalmed in glass jars, and complicated distillation apparatus containing strangely-colored liquids with no obvious purpose. Very often there will be chemicals heating over the yellow flame of a poorly adjusted Bunsen burner despite the fact that this produces soot and less heat. Typically, the laboratory is decorated in the Raygun Gothic style, a term coined precisely to describe this kind of retro-futuristic aesthetic. Tesla Coil at Questacon, the Australian National Science Centre museum A Tesla coil (also teslacoil) is a type of resonant transformer, named after its inventor, Nikola Tesla. ... Van de Graf generator. ... A spark plug. ... This article or section should include material from Parallel Path See also Perpetuum mobile as a musical term Perpetual motion machines (the Latin term perpetuum mobile is not uncommon) are a class of hypothetical machines which would produce useful energy in a way science cannot explain (yet). ... A test tube (Sometimes culture tube) is a kind of laboratory glassware, composed of a fingerlike length of glass tubing, open at the top, sometimes with a rounded lip at the top, and a rounded U shaped bottom. ... This article is about biological mutants. ... Embalming, in most modern cultures, is a process used to temporarily preserve a human cadaver to forestall decomposition and make it suitable for display at a funeral. ... יחכיטכיגיגיוגקאטגקעיגקDistillation is a method of separating chemical substances based on differences in their volatilities in a boiling liquid mixture. ... A Bunsen burner is a common piece of laboratory equipment used for heating, sterilization, and combustion. ... Definition A catchall term for various facets of the googie, Streamline Moderne and Art Deco architectural styles. ...


Other traits include:

Mad scientists are usually among the first fictional characters in mainstream media (movies, TV, written stories) to introduce a newly-developed concept of science to the mainstream public. In the pulp magazine era, mad scientists were building rocket ships to travel to the Moon, Mars, and other planets. When World War II popularized the existence of "radiation" and its mysterious consequences, mad scientists built nuclear bombs and radiation-powered (or mutated) machines and monsters. By the time the 21st century debuted, mad scientists of the time were experimenting with nanotechnology, genetic engineering, and similar sciences. Technology assessment (TA, German Technikfolgenabschätzung) is the study and evaluation of new technologies. ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Playing god refers to someone supposedly taking on the role of a god for human purposes. ... “Natural” redirects here. ... Self-experimentation refers to the very special case of single-subject scientific experimentation in which the experimenter conducts the Wikipedia:experiment on her- or himself. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... // The Island of Doctor Moreau is an 1896 science fiction novel written by H. G. Wells, addressing ideas of society and community, human nature and identity, religion, Darwinism, eugenics, and the dangers of unchecked and irresponsible scientific research. ... The Fly may refer to one of the following: The Fly Films and other media: The Fly (1958 film). ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... Dr. Emmett Lathrop Doc Brown is a fictional character, one of the lead characters in the Back to the Future motion picture trilogy, played by actor Christopher Lloyd in the three films and the live action sequences of the animated series. ... Back to the Future is a 1985 science fiction–comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and produced by Steven Spielberg. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... National Socialism redirects here. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... Operation Paperclip scientists pose together. ... The Manhattan Project resulted in the creation of the first nuclear weapons, and the first-ever nuclear detonation, known as the Trinity test of July 16, 1945. ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... Vladimir Zworykin, 1929, holding his kinescope Vladimir Kozmich Zworykin (Russian: ) (July 30, 1889 - July 29, 1982) was a Russian-American inventor, engineer, and pioneer of television technology. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The term maniac can mean more than one thing: (archaic) A maniac is a person who exhibits the behaviour known as mania. ... In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex- periri, of (or from) trying) is a set of observations performed in the context of solving a particular problem or question, to support or falsify a hypothesis or research concerning phenomena. ... The climax of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama in which the outcome is made known. ... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an Academy Award-nominated American comedic actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Willy Wonka and his collaborations with Mel Brooks, most notably Blazing Saddles, The Producers, and Young Frankenstein, and his many movies with Richard Pryor... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Young Frankenstein is a 1974 comedy film directed by Mel Brooks, starring Gene Wilder as the title character. ... A monologue, pronounced monolog, is a speech made by one person speaking his or her thoughts aloud or directly addressing a reader, audience, or character. ... See Invisible Man for the novel by Ralph Ellison. ... Doctor Albert W. Wily is a video game character and antagonist of the Mega Man Classic series. ... Dr. Drakken is a fictional character in Disneys animated television series Kim Possible. ... Doctor Neo Cortex, often shortened to N. Cortex, Doctor Cortex, or just simply Cortex, is a video game character and main antagonist of the Crash Bandicoot series. ... Professor Hubert Farnsworth Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth is the extremely elderly proprietor of the Planet Express delivery service in the animated television series Futurama. ... Dr. Elrod Purvis Dr. Viper is a part cat part snake mad scientist in the animated television series SWAT Kats: The Radical Squadron, voiced by Frank Welker. ... Trace Beaulieu as Dr. Clayton Forrester (left) and Frank Conniff as TVs Frank). ... From left to right, Crow T. Robot, Joel Robinson, and Tom Servo. ... Professor John Nerdelbaum Frink, Jr. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... For other uses, see Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ... The Nutty Professor, starring Jerry Lewis, was filmed from October 9-December 17, 1962. ... Flynns Detective Fiction from 1941. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Buckminsterfullerene C60, also known as the buckyball, is the simplest of the carbon structures known as fullerenes. ...



As a fictional archetype, the mad scientist can be seen as representing the fear of the unknown, and the consequences that will result when humanity dares to meddle with “things that are best left unknown”. Similarly, the tendency of the mad scientist to place himself in the role of God may be an extension of the differences between religion and science. This is reflected by the recurring role of the mad scientist as a God-like creator, as many fantastic beasts and monsters have been birthed in their laboratories. In the 1931 film Frankenstein, when the monster is brought to life, its creator cries out: “Now I know what it feels like to be God!”. This statement was considered controversial enough for the line to be censored. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Frankenstein is a 1931 science fiction film from Universal Pictures directed by James Whale and very loosely based on the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. ... It has been suggested that Suppression of dissent be merged into this article or section. ...


The mad scientist is the antithesis of the heroic scientist and is considerably more popular. In contrast to the archetypical mad scientist, there are a lesser number of heroic scientists and engineers depicted in western culture who use their skills and knowledge for the betterment of others, often at great personal risk. ...


Dr. Herbert West, the protagonist of H.P. Lovecraft's "Herbert West–Reanimator" is another example of a mad scientist, albeit somewhat less stereotypical. Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... Herbert West—Reanimator is a short story by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft, written between October 1921 and June 1922. ...


History

Precursors

Since ancient times, popular imagination has circulated on archetypal figures who wielded esoteric knowledge. Shamans, witches and witch doctors were held in reverence and fear of their rumored abilities to conjure beasts and create demons. They shared many of the same perceived characteristics such as eccentric behavior, living as hermits, and the ability to create life. Specifically, Shaman (saman) is a term in Evenk, Manchu and other Manchu-Tungus languages for an intellectual and spiritual figure; who usually possess power and influence on other peoples in the tribe and performs several functions, one of which is analogous to the function of a healer in other cultures. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Witchcraft. ... A witch doctor (in southern Africa known as a Sangoma) often refers to exotic healers that believe that maladies are caused by magic and are therefore best cured by it, as opposed to science or developed medicine. ...


Perhaps the closest figure in Western mythology to the modern mad scientist was Daedalus, creator of the labyrinth, who was then imprisoned within it by King Minos. To escape, he invented two pairs of wings made from feathers and beeswax, one for himself and the other for his son Icarus. While Daedalus himself managed to fly to safety, Icarus flew too close to the sun, which melted the wax of his wings, casting him down into the sea below. Daedalus and Icarus, by Charles Paul Landon, 1799 (Musée des Beaux-Arts et de la Dentelle, Alençon) In Greek mythology, Daedalus (Latin, also Hellenized Latin Daedalos, Greek Daidalos (Δαίδαλος) meaning cunning worker, and Etruscan Taitle) was a most skillful artificer, so skillful that he was said to have invented... A Roman mosaic picturing Theseus and the Minotaur. ... Front face of the MINOS far detector. ... Icarus and Daedalus by Frederic Leighton In Greek mythology, Icarus (Latin, Greek – Íkaros, Etruscan – Vicare, German – Ikarus) was son of Daedalus, famous for his death by falling into the sea when he flew too close to the sun, melting the wax holding his artificial wings together. ...


In actual history, Archimedes shares some of the elements of the mad scientist[citation needed], but was closer to the more benign archetype of the absent-minded professor[citation needed]. Archimedes of Syracuse (Greek: c. ... The absent-minded professor is a stock character of popular fiction usually portrayed as an academic with important information, but whose focus on their learning leads them to ignore their surroundings. ...


A more whimsical prototype of the mad scientist can be found in Aristophanes' comedy The Clouds. The play depicts Socrates, a contemporary of Aristophanes, as tinkering with odd devices and performing implausible experiments to determine the nature of the clouds and sky, and presents his philosophical method as a means for deceiving others and escaping blame, closer to the later descriptions of his opponents, the Sophists, than to those usually ascribed to him. While this is at variance with the depictions by Plato and Xenophon, two of Socrates' students, it is plausible that Aristophanes' parody of Socrates is more accurate than their panegyrics. One of Plato's students, Aristotle, is known to have also been an experimentalist, and may have taken the concept up from his teacher's teacher. A similar parody of insane and pointless experimentation may be found in the Academy of Lagado in Gulliver's Travels. Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , ca. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... The Clouds (Νεφέλαι) is a comedy written by the Ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes lampooning the sophists and the intellectual trends of late fifth-century Athens. ... This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... Sophism was originally a term for the techniques taught by a highly respected group of philosophy and rhetoric teachers in ancient Greece. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , ca. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... A Panegyric is a formal public speech delivered in high praise of a person or thing, a generally high studied and undiscriminating eulogy. ... Aristotle (Greek: Aristotélēs) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ...


The protoscience of alchemy long had a resemblance to mad science with its lofty goals and bizarre experiments. Certain alchemists were well known for behaving strangely, sometimes a result of handling dangerous substances, such as mercury poisoning in the case of Isaac Newton. The famous alchemist Paracelsus claimed to be able to create a homunculus, an artificial human. Alchemy steadily declined with the advent of modern science during the Enlightenment. For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Acrodynia be merged into this article or section. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1728) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Presumed portrait of Paracelsus, attributed to the school of Quentin Matsys. ... The concept of a homunculus (Latin for little man, sometimes spelled homonculus, plural homunculi) is often used to illustrate the functioning of a system. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; German: ) was an eighteenth century movement in European and American philosophy, or the longer period including the Age of Reason. ...


Films and fiction

Since the 19th century, fictitious depictions of science have vacillated between notions of science as the salvation of society or its doom. Consequently, depictions of scientists in fiction ranged between the virtuous and the depraved, the sober and the insane. Until the 20th century, optimism about progress was the most common attitude towards science, but latent anxieties about disturbing "the secrets of nature" would surface following the increasing role of science in wartime affairs. Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ...

The manic behavior of Emmett "Doc" Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd in Back to the Future) is that of an archetypical mad scientist

The prototypical fictional mad scientist was Victor Frankenstein, creator of Frankenstein's monster, who made his first appearance in 1818, in the novel Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus by Mary Shelley. Though Frankenstein is a sympathetic character, the critical element of conducting forbidden experiments that cross "boundaries that ought not to be crossed", heedless of the consequences, is present in Shelley's novel. Frankenstein was trained as both alchemist and modern scientist which makes him the bridge between two eras of an evolving archetype. His monster is essentially the homunculus of a new form of literature, science fiction. Image File history File links Doc_85. ... Image File history File links Doc_85. ... Christopher Allen Lloyd (born October 22, 1938) is a three-time Emmy Award-winning American character actor. ... Back to the Future is a 1985 science fiction–comedy film directed by Robert Zemeckis and produced by Steven Spielberg. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Boris Karloff as Frankensteins Monster in Frankenstein (1931). ... Anatomical painting of the human arm by Girolamo Fabrici Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The concept of a homunculus (Latin for little man, sometimes spelled homonculus, plural homunculi) is often used to illustrate the functioning of a system. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Another archetypal Mad Scientist is Faust, or Dr. Faustus. The Faust legend is a widely recognized and referenced example of selling one's soul to the devil. In almost all cases, Faust is selling his soul for knowledge or supernatural power. Faust depicted in an etching by Rembrandt van Rijn (circa 1650) Faust or Faustus (the Latin for auspicious or lucky) is the protagonist of a popular German legend in which a mediæval scholar makes a pact with the Devil. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Fritz Lang's 1927 movie Metropolis brought the archetypical mad scientist to the screen in the form of Rotwang, the evil genius whose machines gave life to the dystopian city of the title. Rotwang's laboratory influenced many subsequent movie sets with its electrical arcs, bubbling apparatus, and bizarrely complicated arrays of dials and controls. Portrayed by actor Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Rotwang himself is the prototypically conflicted mad scientist; though he is master of almost mystical scientific power, he remains slave to his own desires for power and revenge. Rotwang's appearance was also influential -- the character's shock of flyaway hair, wild-eyed demeanor, and his quasi-fascist laboratory garb have all been adopted as shorthand for the mad scientist "look". Even his mechanical right hand has become a mark of twisted scientific power, echoed notably in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove. Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of expressionism. ... Metropolis Metropolis is a science fiction film produced in Germany set in a futuristic urban dystopia. ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... Rotwang is a mad scientist guy. ... This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rudolf Klein-Rogge (1885-1955) was an German stage and silent film actor of the 1920s and 30s // He was born as Friederich Rudolf Klein-Rogg in Cologne, Germany on November 24, 1885. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... “Kubrick” redirects here. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ...


Nevertheless, the essentially benign and progressive impression of science in the public mind continued unchecked, exemplified by the optimistic "Century of Progress" exhibition in Chicago, 1933, and the "World of Tomorrow" at the New York World's Fair of 1939. However after the first World War, public attitudes began to shift, if only subtly, when chemical warfare and the airplane were the terror weapons of the day. As an example, of all science fiction before 1914 which dealt with the end of the world, two-thirds were about naturalistic endings (such as collision with an asteroid), and the other third was devoted to endings caused by humans (about half were accidental, half purposeful). After 1914, the idea of any human actually killing the remainder of humanity became a more imaginable fantasy (even if it was still impossible), and the ratio switched to two-thirds of all end-of-the-world scenarios being the product of human maliciousness or error.[citation needed] Though still drowned out by feelings of optimism, the seeds of anxiety had been thoroughly sown. A 1933 Century of Progress worlds fair poster The Century of Progress International Exposition was a Worlds Fair held in Chicago, Illinois from 1933-1934 to celebrate Chicagos centennial. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... 253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ...


Armand Tesla=Nikola Tesla, Bela Lugosi plays Romanian scientist/vampire in The Return of the Vampire (1944) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0037219/


The most common tool of mad scientists in this era was electricity. It was viewed widely as a quasi-mystical force with chaotic and unpredictable properties by an ignorant public. Lightning strikes during a night-time thunderstorm. ...


A recent survey of 1000 horror films distributed in the UK between the 1930s and 1980s reveals that mad scientists or their creations have been the villains of 30 percent of the films; that scientific research has produced 39 percent of the threats; and, by contrast, that scientists have been the heroes of a mere 11. (Christopher Frayling, New Scientist, 24 September 2005) Sir Christopher John Frayling (born 25 December 1946) is a British educationalist and writer, known for his study of popular culture. ... New Scientist is a weekly international science magazine covering recent developments in science and technology for a general English-speaking audience. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After 1945

Mad scientists had their heyday in popular culture in the period after World War II. The sadistic medical experiments of the Nazis and the invention of the atomic bomb gave rise in this period to genuine fears that science and technology had gone out of control. The scientific and technological build up during the Cold War, with its increasing threats of unparalleled destruction, did not lessen the impression. Mad scientists frequently figure in science fiction and motion pictures from the period. The movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, in which Peter Sellers plays the titular Dr. Strangelove, is perhaps the ultimate expression of this fear of the power of science, or the misuse of this power. Popular culture, sometimes called pop culture, consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... National Socialism redirects here. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... Richard Henry Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was an English comedian, actor, and performer, who came to prominence on the BBC radio series The Goon Show and later became a film star. ...


In more recent years, the mad scientist as a lone investigator of the forbidden unknown has tended to be replaced by mad corporate executives who plan to profit from defying the laws of nature and humanity regardless of who suffers; these people hire a salaried scientific staff to pursue their twisted dreams. This shift is typified by the revised history of Superman's archenemy, Lex Luthor: originally conceived in the 1930s as a typically solitary mad scientist, a major retcon of the character's origins in 1986 made Lex Luthor the head of a megacorporation who also plays a leading role in his R & D department. Also a prime example is Bob Morton, the young executive who masterminds the creation of Robocop by arranging the death of a decorated policeman and handing his still-warm body over to a more traditional team of white-coated mad scientists in a ruthless attempt to advance his career. Bob Page, the master villain in the computer game Deus Ex, is another example. Still, the pose has been used whimsically by popular science writers to attract readers. For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain owned by DC Comics and the noted archenemy of Superman. ... The phrase research and development (also R and D or R&D) has a special commercial significance apart from its conventional coupling of scientific research and technological development. ... RoboCop is a 1987 cyberpunk,action movie and satire of business-driven capitalism, directed by Paul Verhoeven. ... Deus Ex is a futuristic cyberpunk computer game released in 2000 by Ion Storm. ... This article is about the video game. ...


The techniques of mad science also changed after Hiroshima. Electricity was replaced by radiation as the new tool to create, enlarge, or deform life (e.g., Godzilla). As audiences became more savvy, quantum mechanics, genetic engineering, and artificial intelligence have taken the spotlight (e.g., Blade Runner). The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dropping of Little Boy. ... Lightning strikes during a night-time thunderstorm. ... The radiation warning symbol (trefoil). ... This article is about the character itself. ... Fig. ... An iconic image of genetic engineering; this autoluminograph from 1986 of a glowing transgenic tobacco plant bearing the luciferase gene, illustrating the possibilities of genetic engineering. ... Garry Kasparov playing against Deep Blue, the first machine to win a chess game against a reigning world champion. ... Blade Runner is a 1982 cyberpunk, neo-noir American film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, loosely based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. ...


See also

The absent-minded professor is a stock character of popular fiction usually portrayed as an academic with important information, but whose focus on their learning leads them to ignore their surroundings. ... A boffin in action: Dr Alexander Thorkel (Albert Dekker) from Dr. Cyclops (1940) In the slang of the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, boffins are scientists, engineers, and other people who are stereotypically seen as engaged in technical or scientific research. ... Crank is a pejorative term for a person who holds some belief which the vast majority of his contemporaries would consider false, clings to this belief in the face of all counterarguments or evidence presented to him. ... The following is a list of fictional mad scientists in cultural sources (literature, movies, comics, etc. ...

References

  • Haynes, Roslynn Doris (1994). From Faust to Strangelove: Representations of the Scientist in Western Literature. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-4801-6.
  • Christopher FraylingMad, Bad and Dangerous?: The Scientist and the Cinema (Reaktion Books, 2005) ISBN 1-86189-255-1
  • Junge, Torsten; Doerthe Ohlhoff (2004). Wahnsinnig genial: Der Mad Scientist Reader. Aschaffenburg: Alibri. ISBN 3-932710-79-7.
  • Tudor, Andrew (1989). Monsters and Mad Scientists: A Cultural History of the Horror Movie. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 0-631-15279-2.
  • Weart, Spencer R. (1988). Nuclear Fear: A History of Images. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Sir Christopher John Frayling (born 25 December 1946) is a British educationalist and writer, known for his study of popular culture. ...

External links

Robot Combat is a hobby in which two or more radio-controlled machines use varied methods of destroying or disabling the other robot. ... Phil Foglio (born 1956) is a cartoonist and comic book artist best known for his humorous science fiction and fantasy work. ... Kaja Foglio (born 1970) is a Seattle-based writer, artist and publisher. ... Narbonic is a webcomic written and drawn by Shaenon K. Garrity. ... Shaenon K. Garrity at WonderCon 2005 Shaenon K. Garrity (born 1978) is a webcomics writer and artist, best known as the creator of Narbonic. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mad scientist - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2141 words)
Mad scientists are typically characterized by obsessive behaviour and the employment of extremely dangerous or unorthodox methods.
In more recent years, the mad scientist as a lone investigator of the forbidden unknown has tended to be replaced by mad corporate executives who plan to profit from defying the laws of nature and humanity regardless of who suffers; these people hire a salaried scientific staff to pursue their twisted dreams.
Mad scientists, and the relationship between man and technology in general, are the focus of the current webcomic A Miracle of Science [1].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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