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Encyclopedia > Maclean's
A cover of the Canadian magazine Maclean's.

Maclean's is Canada's leading weekly news magazine. It's the sort of magazine you will find in abundance in Canadian doctors' waiting rooms. You will pick it up, skim through a few articles, go "tsk" in disgust, throw it down and go back to worrying about your blood test results. Image File history File links Maclean's_cover. ... Image File history File links Maclean's_cover. ... A newsmagazine, sometimes called news magazine, is a usually weekly magazine featuring articles on current events. ...

Contents

History

The magazine was founded in 1905 by Toronto journalist/entrepreneur Lt.-Col. John Bayne Maclean. The 43-year-old trade magazine publisher purchased an advertising agency's in-house business journal — along with its 5,000-strong subscription base. The Business Magazine, was launched in October of that year as a pocket-sized digest of articles gathered from Canadian, U.S. and British periodicals. It sold 6,000 copies. Inside its bright blue cover, the fledgling monthly anointed itself, "the Cream of the World's magazines reproduced for Busy People". Its aim, Maclean wrote a year later, was not "merely to entertain but also to inspire its readers." It was renamed The Busy Man's Magazine in December 1905, and began soliciting original manuscripts on varied topics such as immigration, national defence, woman's suffrage and home life as well as fiction. Maclean renamed the magazine after himself in 1911, dropping the previous title as too evocative of a business magazine for what had become a general interest publication. This does not cite its references or sources. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French) is a person who undertakes and operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Lieutenant Colonel John Bayne Maclean (1862-1950) was a Canadian publisher. ... United States is the current Good Article Collaboration of the week! Please help to improve this article to the highest of standards. ...


Maclean hired Thomas B. Costain as editor in 1917. Costain invigorated the magazine's coverage of the First World War, running first-person accounts of life on the Western Front and critiques of Canada's war effort that came into conflict with wartime censorship regulations. Constain was ordered to remove an article by Maclean himself as it was too critical of war policy. Thomas Bertram Costain (1885-1965) was a Canadian journalist who became a best-selling author of historical novels at the age of 57. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ...


Costain encouraged literary pieces and artistic expressions and ran fiction by Robert Service, Lucy Maud Montgomery and O. Henry, commentary by Stephen Leacock and illustrations by C. W. Jefferys, F.S. Coburn and several Group of Seven members, including A. J. Casson, Arthur Lismer and J. E. H. MacDonald.[1]. Robert W. Service Robert William Service (January 16, 1874 – September 11, 1958) was a poet born into a Scottish family while they were living in Preston, England. ... Lucy Maud Montgomery Lucy Maud Montgomery, (always called Maud by family and friends) and publicly known as L. M. Montgomery, (November 30, 1874–April 24, 1942) was a Canadian author, best known for a series of novels beginning with Anne of Green Gables. ... William Sydney Porter in his thirties O. Henry was the pen name of American writer William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862–June 5, 1910), whose clever use of twist endings in his stories popularized the term O. Henry Ending. His middle name at birth was Sidney; he later changed the... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Group of Seven was a group of Canadian landscape painters in the 1920s, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley. ... Alfred Joseph Casson, OC (May 17, 1898 - February 20, 1992) was a member of the Canadian group of painters, the Group of Seven. ... Arthur Lismer CC (June 27, 1885 – March 23, 1969) was born in England in 1885. ... J.E.H. MacDonald (1888-1949) was a member of the famous Group of Seven Canadian artists. ...


In 1919, the magazine moved from monthly to fortnightly publication and ran a notable expose of the drug trade by Emily Murphy. Costain left the magazine to become a novelist and was replaced by J. Vernon Mackenzie who remained at the helm until 1926. During his tenure, Maclean's achieved national stature. A fortnight is a unit of time equal to two weeks: that is 14 days, or literally 14 nights. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Statue of Emily Murphy in the monument to The Famous Five, Parliament Hill, Ottawa // Introduction Emily Murphy (March 14, 1868 - October 17, 1933) was a Canadian womens rights activist. ...


H. Napier Moore became the new editor. An Englishman, he saw the magazine as an expression of Canada's role in the British Empire. Moore ultimately became a figurehead with the day to day running of the magazine falling to managing editor W. Arthur Irwin, a Canadian nationalist, who transformed saw the magazine as an exercise in nation-building, giving it a mandate to promote national pride. Under Irwin's influence, the magazine's covers promoted Canadian scenery and imagery - the magazine also sponsored an annual short story contest on Canadian themes and acquired a sports department. Irwin was also responsible for orienting the magazine towards both small and big "l" Liberalism. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned at the centre of the political spectrum, combining a progressive social policy with moderate economics. ...


During the Second World War, Maclean's ran an overseas edition for Canadian troops serving abroad. By the time of its final run in 1946, the "bantam" edition had a circulation of 800,000. Maclean's war coverage featured war photography by Yousef Karsh, later an internationally acclaimed portrait photographer, and articles by war correspondents John Clare and Leonard Shapiro. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Yousuf Karsh - Self portrait Yousuf Karsh, CC (December 23, 1908 – July 13, 2002) was one of the world’s most renowned portrait photographers. ...


Irwin officially replaced Moore as editor in 1945, and reoriented the magazine by building it around news features written by a new stable of writers that included Pierre Berton, W.O. Mitchell, Scott Young, Ralph Allen and Blair Fraser. Pierre Francis Berton, CC, O.Ont, BA, D.Litt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. ... William Ormond Mitchell (March 13, 1914 - February 25, 1998) was a Canadian writer. ... Scott Young (April 14, 1918 – June 12, 2005) was a sportswriter and novelist and the father of folk rocker Neil Young. ... Ralph Allen (25 August 1913 – 2 December 1966) was a Canadian journalist, editor, and novelist. ...


Allen became editor upon Irwin's acceptance of a diplomatic posting in 1950. This era of the magazine was noted for its articles on the Canadian landscape and profiles of town and city life. The feature article "Canada's North" by Pierre Berton promoted a new national interest in the Arctic. Prominent writers during this period included Robert Fulford, Peter Gzowski, Peter C. Newman, Trent Frayne, June Callwood, McKenzie Porter and Christina McCall. Exposes in the 1950s challenged the criminal justice system, explored LSD and artificial insemination. Pierre Francis Berton, CC, O.Ont, BA, D.Litt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. ... Alternate use: see Robert Fulford (croquet player) for the English croquet player. ... CBC promotional image of Peter Gzowski, circa 2000 Peter Gzowski, CC , LL.D , D.Litt (July 13, 1934 - January 24, 2002) was a Canadian broadcaster, writer and reporter, most famous for his work on the CBC radio show Morningside. ... Peter Charles Newman (born May 10, 1929 in Vienna, Austria) is a Canadian journalist who emigrated from Czechoslovakia to Canada in 1940 as a Jewish refugee. ... June Callwood, CC , O.Ont , LL.D (born June 2, 1924 in Chatham, Ontario) is a Canadian journalist, author and social activist. ... Christina McCall (1935-2005) was a Canadian political writer. ...


Maclean's published a memorable editorial the day after the 1957 federal election announcing the predictable re-election of the St. Laurent Liberal Party. Written before the election results were known, Allen failed to anticipate the upset election of John Diefenbaker's Progressive Conservative Party. The Canadian federal election of 1957 was held June 10, 1957. ... Louis Stephen St. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned at the centre of the political spectrum, combining a progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ...


The magazine struggled to compete with television in the 1960s by increasing its international coverage and attempting to keep up with the sexual revolution through a succession of editors including Gzowski and Charles Templeton. Templeton quit after a short time at the helm due to his frustration with interference by the publishing company, Maclean-Hunter. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Templeton as an evangelist Charles Bradley Templeton (October 7, 1915 _ June 7, 2001) was successively a Canadian cartoonist, evangelist, politician, newspaper editor, broadcaster and author. ...


Peter C. Newman became editor in 1971, and attempted to revive the magazine by publishing feature articles by writers such as Barbara Frum and Michael Enright, and poetry by Irving Layton. Walter Stewart, correspondent and eventually managing editor during this period, often clashed with Newman. Barbara Frum Barbara Frum, OC , BA , LL.D (September 8, 1937 – March 26, 1992) was one of Canadas most respected and influential journalists, a legendary news anchor for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... Michael Enright is a Canadian radio broadcaster. ... Irving Layton OC (March 12, 1912 – January 4, 2006) was a Canadian poet. ... Walter Gordon Stewart (April 19, 1931 – September 15, 2004) was an outspoken Canadian writer, editor and journalism educator, a veteran of newspapers and magazines and author of more than twenty books, several of them bestsellers. ... A managing editor is a figure who overseas and coordinates the editorial activites of a publication. ...


Under Newman, the magazine switched from being a monthly general interest publication to a bi-weekly news magazine in 1975, and to a weekly newsmagazine three years later. The magazine opened news bureaus across the country and in London, England and Washington D.C.. London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Current

Today Maclean's remains one of Canada's leading sources of news and information. Maclean's is also famous for its annual ranking of Canadian universities for the "undergraduate experience", which compares universities in three peer groupings. Maclean's has also been noted for its annual announcement of Canada's Top 100 Employers.


In 2001, Anthony Wilson-Smith became the fifteenth editor in the magazine's history. He left the post at the end of February 2005 and was replaced by Kenneth Whyte, who also serves as the magazine's publisher. The magazine has been owned by the Rogers Communications conglomerate since Rogers acquired Maclean-Hunter, the former publisher, in 1994. Kenneth Whyte (born August 12, 1960 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, grew up in Edmonton, Alberta) is a Canadian newspaper and magazine editor and publisher. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... Maclean-Hunter was a Canadian communications company, which had diversified holdings in radio, television, magazines, newspapers and cable television distribution. ...


Noted Maclean's contributors during its incarnation as a newsweekly include columnists Barbara Amiel, Allan Fotheringham, Diane Francis and Paul Wells as well as Newman. Barbara Joan Estelle Amiel, Lady Black of Crossharbour (born in Watford, Hertfordshire, UK on December 4, 1940), is a British-Canadian journalist and writer. ... Allan Fotheringham (born August 31, Canadian newspaper and magazine journalist. ... Diane Francis (born 7th November 1946) is a Canadian journalist and author. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Criticism

Maclean's has been criticized for having a supposedly pro-Liberal (both the party and political stance) position by conservatives such as Conrad Black. Whyte, a former editor at the National Post, is seen to have taken the magazine in a more conservative direction. He has hired a number of former Post writers and has brought back former Maclean's columnist Barbara Amiel, wife of Conrad Black, as well as noted liberal academic Andrew Potter. Recently, Steve Maich wrote a story in the July 25, 2005 issue praising Wal-Mart, in which he argued that Wal-Mart benefits the community, with the cover showing a halo over a Wal-Mart store. The magazine has also published a sympathetic portrait of New Democratic Party leader Jack Layton and criticisms of Canadian environmental policy. It has created waves with investigative reports on Canada's powerful Thomson family and the apparent mistreatment of snipers in the Canadian military. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned at the centre of the political spectrum, combining a progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... Conservatism is a political philosophy that generally favors free markets, traditional values and strong foreign defense. ... Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour OC, PC, (born August 25, 1944, in Montreal, Quebec), is a British biographer, financier and newspaper magnate. ... The National Post is a major Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ... Barbara Joan Estelle Amiel, Lady Black of Crossharbour (born in Watford, Hertfordshire, UK on December 4, 1940), is a British-Canadian journalist and writer. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ...


Maclean's Guide to Canadian Universities

The Maclean's Guide to Canadian Universities is published annually in March. It is also known as Maclean's University Guide. It includes information from the Maclean's University Rankings, an issue that is published annually in November. Both the Guide and the Rankings Issue feature articles discussing Canadian universities and ranking them by order of quality. The rankings take a measure of the undergraduate experience, comparing universities in three peer groupings: Medical Doctoral, Comprehensive and Primarily Undergraduate. Medical Doctoral institutions have a broad range of PhD programs and research, as well as medical schools. Comprehensives have a significant amount of research activity and a wide range of graduate and undergraduate programs, including professional degrees. Schools in the Primarily Undergraduate category are largely focused on undergraduate education, with relatively few graduate programs.


In early 2006, Maclean's announced that in June, 2006, it would be introducing a new annual issue called the University Student Issue. The issue would feature the results of a survey of recent university graduates from each Canadian university. However, some universities, such as the University of Calgary, McMaster University and the University of Toronto, refused to take part in this exercise. [1] In response, Maclean's sought the results of two university-commissioned student surveys: the Canadian Undergraduate Survey Consortium and the National Survey of Student Engagement. [2] Results from these surveys, along with Maclean's own graduate survey, were published in the June 26, 2006, edition of Maclean's. As of September 2006, 22 prominent Canadian universities have withdrawn from the magazine's rankings, among them the University of British Columbia, the University of Toronto, Dalhousie University, McMaster University, the University of New Brunswick, the University of Manitoba, Simon Fraser University, the University of Calgary, the University of Lethbridge, the Université de Montréal, the University of Ottawa, York University, Concordia University, the University of Western Ontario, Queen's University, Carleton University, and the University of Alberta, as a means of voicing their displeasure with the methodology used to determine the Maclean's ranking. [3][4] The University of Calgary is a public university located in the north-western quadrant of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ... McMaster University is a medium-sized research-intensive university located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, with an enrollment of 18,238 full-time and 3,836 part-time students (as of 2006). ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a coeducational public research university in Toronto, Ontario. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a public university with its main campus located at Point Grey, in the University Endowment Lands adjacent to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada and another smaller campus known as UBC Okanagan located in Kelowna, British Columbia. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a coeducational public research university in Toronto, Ontario. ... Dalhousie University is a university located on the Halifax Peninsula in the Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... McMaster University is a medium-sized research-intensive university located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, with an enrollment of 18,238 full-time and 3,836 part-time students (as of 2006). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University of Manitoba is the largest university of the province of Manitoba, most comprehensive and only research-intensive post-secondary educational institution. ... Simon Fraser University (SFU) is located in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, part of the metropolitan area of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The University of Calgary is a public university located in the north-western quadrant of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ... The University of Lethbridge sits among the coulees on the scenic west side of the Oldman River in the city of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. ... The Université de Montréal (UdeM) (translated into English commonly as (the) University of Montreal) is one of six universities in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The University of Ottawa or Université dOttawa in French (also known as uOttawa or nicknamed U of O or Ottawa U) is a bilingual [1], research-intensive, non-denominational, international university in Ottawa, Ontario. ... York University, located in Toronto, Ontario, is Canadas third-largest university. ... Concordia University is a large urban university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, one of Montreals two universities that teach primarily in the English language (the other is McGill University). ... The University of Western Ontario (Western or UWO) is a coeducational, non-denominational, research-intensive university located in London, Ontario. ... Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian, research-intensive university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Carleton University is a co-educational, international university in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ... The University of Alberta is situated along the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River in the heart of the city of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ...


The University Rankings Issue contains a compilation of different charts and lists judging the different aspects and overalls of universities in different categories. The two main charts listed in the University Rankings Issue as of November 3, 2006 are the two National Reputational Rankings and the official Maclean's researched rankings. November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The National Reputational Rankings are broken into three subcategories: medical doctoral, comprehensive and primarily undergraduate based on the opinions on the quality of universities. The opinions gathered were contributed by secondary school principals, guidance counsellors, organization and company heads and recruiters.


Canada's Top 100 Employers

Maclean's is also well-known for announcing the annual list of Canada's Top 100 Employers, which is featured in a special issue each October.[5] First published by Maclean's in 2002, this issue profiles the winners of an annual competition to determine Canada's best places to work. The competition is open to employers of all sizes, both private and public-sector. Winners are selected using a variety of criteria, which range from forward-thinking human resources policies to progressive community involvement projects that make use of employees' talents.[6] Detailed reasons for each employer's selection are published in an annual paperback by an outside firm, which manages the Canada's Top 100 Employers competition and provides the research to Maclean's.[7] A distinguished panel of academic advisors, drawn from universities across Canada, oversees the selection criteria for the annual competition. Human resources has at least two meanings depending on context. ...


See also

Canada has a well-developed media sector, but cultural output—particularly in English Canada—is often overshadowed by imports from the United States. ...

References

  1. ^ Universities opt out of Maclean's graduate survey.
  2. ^ How we got these survey results.
  3. ^ "11 universities bail out of Maclean's survey", CBC News, 2006-08-14. Retrieved on 2006-08-14.
  4. ^ Letter to Maclean's from university presidents.
  5. ^ Maclean's, October 13, 2006 issue.
  6. ^ Selection criteria for Canada's Top 100 Employers.
  7. ^ About the Canada's Top 100 Employers competition.

CBC redirects here, as this is the most common use of the abbreviation. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ...

Source

  • Macleans: the First 100 Years

External links

  • Maclean's website
  • Macleans.ca: Universities
Rogers Communications Inc.

Corporate Directors: Ronald Besse | Charles Birchall | H. Garfield Emerson | Peter Godsoe | Thomas Hull | Philip Lind | Nadir Mohamed | David Peterson | Edward Rogers | Edward Rogers III | Loretta Rogers | Melinda Rogers | William Schleyer | John A. Tory | J. Christopher Wansbrough | Colin Watson Rogers Communications Inc. ... A corporation is a legal person which, while being composed of natural persons, exists completely separately from them. ... In relation to a company, a director is an officer of the company charged with the conduct and management of its affairs. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Honourable David Robert Peterson, PC , LL.B , BA (born December 28, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario) was the twentieth Premier of the Province of Ontario, Canada, from June 26, 1985 to October 1, 1990. ... Edward Samuel Ted Rogers, OC , BA (born May 27, 1933 in Toronto, Ontario) is the President and CEO of Rogers Communications Inc. ... John A. Tory is a Toronto lawyer and corporate executive. ... Colin Scott Watson (born July 17, 1989) is a pimp born in Auburn, Washington. ...

Magazines: Canadian Business | Chatelaine | Flare | glow | L'actualité | LOU LOU | Maclean's | Marketing Magazine | MoneySense | Ontario Out of Doors | Profit | Today's Parent
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Radio stations: CFAC | CFFR | CFRV | CFSR | CFTR | CHEZ | CHFI | CHFM | CHMN | CHNI | CHTT | CHUR | CHYM | CICX | CIGM | CIOC | CISQ | CISS | CISW | CITI | CIWW | CJAQ | CJCL | CJET | CJMX | CJNI | CJQM | CJQQ | CJRQ | CJRX | CKAT | CKBY | CKCL | CKFX | CKGB | CKGL | CKIS | CKLG | CKNI | CKQC | CKSR | CKWX | CKY
This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Canadian Business is the longest-publishing business magazine in Canada. ... Chatelaine is a Canadian womens magazine, published by Rogers Media Publishing (a subsidiary of Rogers Communications). ... Flare is a Canadian fashion magazine. ... Glow is a Canadian fashion magazine. ... Lactualité is a French-language news and general interest magazine in Canada, published in Montreal, Quebec by Rogers Communications. ... MoneySense is a Canadian financial magazine owned by Rogers Communications. ... Ontario Out of Doors is a Canadian hunting and fishing magazine, published by Rogers Media. ... Braun HF 1, Germany, 1958 OT-1471 Belweder, Poland, 1957 Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. ... G4techTV Canada (formerly TechTV Canada) is a Canadian category 1 digital cable television channel co-owned by Rogers Media (66. ... TVTropolis is a Canadian cable television specialty channel, formerly known as Prime, which launched on June 1, 2006. ... OMNI Television is a Canadian television brand owned and operated by Rogers Communications. ... Rogers Sportsnet is a Canadian cable television specialty channel with programming featuring sports, operating four regional feeds and one national high-definition feed. ... Rogers Television is the brand of community channels owned by Rogers Cable Inc. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Shopping Channel is a Canadian shopping television network. ... For the US television sports channel formerly known as OLN, see Versus. ... The Cable Public Affairs Channel (or CPAC; originally Canadian Parliamentary Channel), is a Canadian cable television service devoted to coverage of public and government affairs, including carrying a full, uninterrupted feed of proceedings of the Canadian House of Commons, with two seperate audio channels; one in English and the other... The Biography Channel Canada is a Canadian category 1 digital cable television channel. ... Viewers Choice is a Canadian English language pay-per-view and Near Video on Demand provider that launched in 1991 and is owned by Astral Media. ... A television station is a type of broadcast station that broadcasts both audio and video to television receivers in a particular area. ... CFMT is a Canadian television station, which broadcasts multicultural programming in Toronto, Ontario. ... CHNU is a religious television station in Surrey, British Columbia, owned by Rogers Media. ... CIIT is a Christian television station in Winnipeg, Manitoba previously owned by Trinity Television before being sold to Rogers Communications. ... CJMT is a Canadian television station, which broadcasts multicultural programming in Toronto, Ontario. ... Fido Solutions, formerly known as Microcell Telecommunications is a Canadian wireless Personal Communications Service telecommunications service provider. ... Primary Jack FM logo Jack FM is the moniker and on-air brand of several radio stations in Canada, the United States and now the United Kingdom. ... Rogers Communications Inc. ... Rogers Centre, formerly known as (and often still unofficially called) SkyDome, [1] is a multi-purpose stadium in Toronto, Ontario, situated next to the CN Tower near the shores of Lake Ontario. ... Rogers Hi-Speed Internet is Rogers Communications Internet Service Provider of broadband Internet access. ... Rogers Telecom Inc. ... Rogers Video is the largest chain of video stores in Canada. ... Rogers Wireless, previously known as Rogers AT&T Wireless, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rogers Communications. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Ballpark Rogers Centre (f. ... A radio station is a site configured for broadcasting sound. ... CFAC is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts at AM 960 in Calgary, Alberta. ... CFFR is a Canadian AM radio station broadcasting at 660 kHz in Calgary, Alberta. ... CFRV-FM is a radio station broadcasting out of Lethbridge, Alberta on a frequency of 107. ... CKSR (known on-air as Star FM) is a Canadian radio station located in Chilliwack, British Columbia. ... CFTR, broadcasting under the brand 680 News, is an all-news radio station based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, which broadcasts live 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 680 kHz on the AM dial. ... CHEZ is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts classic rock at 106. ... CHFI is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts an adult contemporary format at 98. ... CHFM (also called CHFM-FM and Lite 96) is a radio station in Calgary, Alberta, which broadcasts at 95. ... CHNI-FM (News 88. ... CHTT is a radio station in Victoria, British Columbia, which airs at 103. ... CHUR is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts an adult contemporary format at 100. ... CHYM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts at 96. ... CICX is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 105. ... CIGM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts in Greater Sudbury, Ontario. ... CIOC (identified on air as The Ocean 98. ... CISQ (identified as Mountain FM) is an FM radio station owned by Rogers Communications and operating in southwestern British Columbia. ... CISS is a Canadian radio station in Ottawa, Ontario. ... CITI is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts classic rock at 92. ... CIWW is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 1310 AM in Ottawa, Ontario. ... CJAQ is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 92. ... CJCL is a Canadian sports radio station in Toronto, Ontario. ... CJET is a Canadian radio station. ... CJMX is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts an adult contemporary format at 105. ... CJNI is a radio station broadcasting in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada at 95. ... CJQM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts country music at 104. ... CJQQ is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 92. ... CJRQ is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts in Greater Sudbury, Ontario. ... CJRX-FM is Rock 106 Lethbridge, a division of rogers broadcasting limited. ... CKAT is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at 600 AM in North Bay, Ontario. ... CKBY is a Canadian radio station, which airs a country music format at 101. ... CKCL (identified on-air as 104. ... CKFX is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts at 101. ... CKGB is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts an adult contemporary format at 99. ... CKGL is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts at 570 AM in Kitchener, Ontario. ... CKIS-FM is a Canadian radio station, which broadcasts at 96. ... CKLG is a Canadian radio station, broadcasting at FM 96. ... CKNI-FM (News 91. ... CKSR (known on-air as Star FM) is a Canadian radio station located in Chilliwack, British Columbia. ... CKWX News 1130 is a 24-hour all-news station broadcsating to residents of Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, British Columbia. ... CKY-FM has been the callsign of two radio stations in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ...

Annual Revenue: $5.60 billion CAD ( 24% FY 2004) | Employees: 18,057 | Stock Symbols: TSX: RCI.A, TSX: RCI.B, NYSE: RG | Website: www.rogers.com ISO 4217 Code CAD User(s) Canada Inflation 2. ... Image File history File links Green_Arrow_Up. ... A fiscal year or financial year is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial reports in businesses and other organizations. ... The Toronto Stock Exchange (also known as the TSX) is Canadas largest stock exchange, North Americas third largest stock exchange, and the sixth largest in the world. ... The Toronto Stock Exchange (also known as the TSX) is Canadas largest stock exchange, North Americas third largest stock exchange, and the sixth largest in the world. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Maclean's - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1057 words)
Maclean renamed the magazine after himself in 1911, dropping the previous title as too evocative of a business magazine for what had become a general interest publication.
Maclean's published a memorable editorial the day after the 1957 federal election announcing the predictable re-election of the St.
Maclean's is also famous for its annual ranking of Canadian universities for the "undergraduate experience", which compares universities in three peer groupings.
Clan MacLean - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1096 words)
The Macleans, who were in possession, claimed to hold the lands in dispute as tenants of the crown, but the privy council decided that Macdonald of Islay was really the crown tenant.
Sorley Maclean, born in 1911, is a distinguished poet.
The Countess of Wessex, formerly Sophie Rhys-Jones, is descended from the Macleans of Duart and Coll.
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