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Encyclopedia > Macau
澳門特別行政區
Região Administrativa Especial de Macau
Macau Special Administrative Region
Flag of Macau
Flag Coat of arms
AnthemMarch of the Volunteers
Location of Macau
Largest freguesia (population) Freguesia de Nossa Senhora de Fátima
Official languages Portuguese, Chinese, Cantonese, [1]
Demonym Macanese
Government
 -  Chief Executive Edmund Ho Hau-wah
Establishment
 -  Portugal-administered trading post 1557 
 -  Portuguese colony December 1, 1887 
 -  Transfer of sovereignty to the PRC
December 20, 1999 
Area
 -  Total 28.6 km² (not ranked)
11.04 mi² 
 -  Water (%) 0
Population
 -  2007 (1st qtr) estimate 520,400[2] (167th)
 -  2000 census 431,000 
 -  Density 17,310/km² (2nd)
44,784/mi²
GDP (PPP) 2006 estimate
 -  Total US$17,600 m (99th)
GDP (nominal) 2007 estimate
 -  Total US$15,997 m (94th)
 -  Per capita US$36,357[3] 
HDI (2004) 0.909[4] (high) (25th)
Currency Macanese pataca (MOP)
Time zone MST (UTC+8)
Internet TLD .mo
Calling code +853

Coordinates: 22°10′00″N, 113°33′00″E The Macau Special Administrative Region, commonly known as Macau or Macao (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: Aòmén; jyutping: ou3 mun4), is one of the two special administrative regions of the People's Republic of China, the other being Hong Kong. Macau lies on the western side of the Pearl River Delta, bordering Guangdong province in the north and facing the South China Sea in the east and south.[5] The territory has thriving industries such as textiles, electronics and toys, and a notable tourist industry that boasts a wide range of hotels, resorts, stadiums, restaurants and casinos.[6] Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... The ruins of the Cathedral of Saint Paul in Macau A view of Largo do Senado (Senado Square), part of the Historic Centre of Macao The Historic Centre of Macao (Portuguese: ; Traditional Chinese: ), on Macao Peninsula, is composed of sites that showcase the unique cultural heritage of Macao. ... Macau may refer to: Macau, a special administrative region of the Peoples Republic of China Macau, a commune in the Gironde département of France Macau, a port city in Brazil Same pronunciation: Macaw, a parrot specie Macao, a village in Portugal This is a disambiguation page, a list... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macau. ... Flag ratio: 2:3, The differences between this edition and old one are stars, bridge, color, and water. ... Macau Regional Emblem (since 1999) The current devised emblem came into use in 20 December 1999, when the sovereignty of Macau was transferred to the Peoples Republic of China. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... March of the Volunteers (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is the national anthem of the Peoples Republic of China, written in the midst of the Second Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) by the noted poet and playwright Tian Han with music composed by Nie Er. ... Image File history File links Macau_Location. ... Macaus population is 95% Chinese, primarily Cantonese and some Hakka, both from nearby Guangdong Province. ... Our Lady of Fatima Parish (Portuguese: ) is the northernmost and largest region of Macau Peninsula, in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, in the Peoples Republic of China. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... This article is on all of the Yue dialects. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Broadly, Macanese (Traditional Chinese: ; literally people of Macau) refers to the people of Macau. ... The Chief Executive of Macao is the head of the government of Macao, a special administrative region of the Peoples Republic of China and a former Portuguese overseas province. ... Edmund Ho Hau-wah (何厚鏵, pinyin: Hé Hòuhuá) (born March, 1955) is the Chief Executive of the Macau Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Seal of Macau Special Administrative Region The transfer of the sovereignty of Macau from the Portuguese Republic to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) occurred on December 20, 1999. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... World map of GDP (Nominal and PPP). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... The pataca is the monetary unit of Macau (currency code MOP; Chinese: 澳門圓), made up of 100 avos. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Macau Standard Time is the time in Macau. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .mo is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Macau. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... The Macau telephone numbering plan remains separate from that of mainland China, as Macau, like Hong Kong, is a Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: or ; traditional Chinese: or ; pinyin: or ) is one of two standard sets of Chinese characters of the contemporary Chinese written language. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Jyutping (sometimes spelled Jyutpin) is a romanization system for Standard Cantonese developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) in 1993. ... A Special administrative region (SAR) is an administrative division of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... Map of Pearl River Delta (details) The Pearl River Delta Region (PRD) in China occupies the low-lying areas alongside the Pearl River estuary where the Pearl river flows into the South China Sea. ... Guangdong (Simplified Chinese: 广东; Traditional Chinese: 廣東; pinyin: Guǎngdōng; Wade-Giles: Kuang-tung; Kwangtung in older transliteration; Cantonese: gwong2 dung1), is a province on the south coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Filipino name Tagalog: Timog Dagat Tsina (Dagat Luzon for the portion within Philippine waters) Malay name Malay: Laut China Selatan Portuguese name Portuguese: Mar da China Meridional Vietnamese name Vietnamese: The South China Sea is a marginal sea south of China. ...


Macau was both the oldest and the last European colony in China.[7][8] Portuguese traders first settled in Macau in the 16th century and subsequently administered the region until the handover on December 20, 1999. The Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration and the Basic Law of Macau stipulate that Macau operates with a high degree of autonomy until at least 2049, fifty years after the transfer.[9] Under the policy of "one country, two systems", the Central People's Government is responsible for the territory's defence and foreign affairs, while Macau maintains its own legal system, police force, monetary system, customs policy, immigration policy, and delegates to international organisations and events.[9][10] Seal of Macau Special Administrative Region The transfer of the sovereignty of Macau from the Portuguese Republic to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) occurred on December 20, 1999. ... The Basic Law of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China is the constitution of Macao. ... An autonomous (subnational) entity is a subnational entity that has a certain amount of autonomy. ... Portuguese name Portuguese: Um país, dois sistemas One country, two systems is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping during the early 1980s, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the reunification of China. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with State Council of the Peoples Republic of China. ... On December 20, 1999, the various police force branches of Macau (Security Forces of Macau (SFM) and Judiciary Police), under the jurisdiction of Security and Justice departments (except the customs police, who were reassigned to the Financial Service Department) were merged into a single force - the Forças de Seguran... With the increase in prosperity and the expansion of the economy in Macau, there is a growing demand from all over the world for residency in the Special Administrative Region. ...

Contents

Etymology

Main article: Names of Macau

Before the Portuguese settlement in the early 16th century, Macau was known as Haojing (Oyster Mirror) or Jinghai (Mirror Sea).[11] The name Macau is thought to be derived from the Templo de A-Má, a temple built in 1448 dedicated to Matsu - the goddess of seafarers and fishermen. It is said that when the Portuguese sailors landed at the coast just outside the temple and asked the name of the place, the natives replied "A-Ma-Gao" (Bay of A-Ma). The Portuguese then named the peninsula Macau.[12] The name Macau (Portuguese pronunciation IPA: //) is thought to be derived from the Templo de A-Má (Temple of A-Ma or Ma Kok Temple) (媽閣廟, Cantonese Jyutping: Maa1 Gok3 Miu6, local pronunciation: Maa5 Gok3 Miu6 or Maa5 Gok3 Miu5), a still-existing landmark built in 1448 dedicated to the goddess... A-Ma Temple A-Ma Temple (Traditional Chinese:媽閣廟; Portuguese:Templo de A-Má) is one of the landmarks of Macao, situated on the southwest tip of the Macao Peninsula. ... Clothed statues of Matsu Matsu (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma-tsu; Pe̍h-ōe-jÄ«: Má-chó·; literally Mother-Ancestor), also spelled Mazu, is the Taoist goddess of the Sea who protects fishermen and sailors, and is revered as the patron saint who protects East Asians who are...


History

Main articles: History of Macau and Transfer of the sovereignty of Macau

The recorded history of Macau can be traced back to the Qin Dynasty (221–206 BC), when the region now called Macau came under the jurisdiction of Panyu County, Nanhai Prefecture of the province of Guangdong.[11] The first recorded inhabitants of the area were people seeking refuge in Macau from invading Mongols, during the Southern Song Dynasty.[13] Later in the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644 AD), fishermen migrated to Macau from various parts of Guangdong and Fujian provinces. However, Macau did not develop as a major settlement until the Portuguese arrived in the 16th century.[14] In 1535, the Portuguese traders obtained the right to anchor ships in Macau's harbours and the right to carry out trading activities, though not the right to stay onshore.[15] Around 1552–1553, they obtained a temporary permission to erect storage sheds onshore, in order to dry out goods drenched by sea water.[16] They later built some rudimentary stone-houses around the area now called Nam Van. But not until 1557 did the Portuguese establish a permanent settlement in Macau, at an annual rent of 500 taels of silver.[16] This article details the history of Macau. ... Seal of Macau Special Administrative Region The transfer of the sovereignty of Macau from the Portuguese Republic to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) occurred on December 20, 1999. ... Qin Dynasty in 210 BC Capital Xianyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy History  - Unification of China 221 BC  - Death of Qin Shi Huangdi 210 BC  - Surrender to Liu Bang 206 BC The Qin Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chin Chao) (221 BC - 206 BC) was preceded by the... Panyu or Pun Yue (番禺) is a district in Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. ... Nanhai (南海) is a district of Foshan prefecture-level city, in Guangdong province, southern China. ... Not to be confused with the former Kwantung Leased Territory in north-eastern China. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... Alternative meaning: Song Dynasty (420-479) The Song dynasty (Chinese: 宋朝) was a ruling dynasty in China from 960-1279. ... For other uses, see Ming. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal map spelling: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The tael (兩), PY: Liang, was part of the Chinese system of weights and currency. ...

St. Paul's Cathedral by George Chinnery (1774—1852). The cathedral was built in 1602 and destroyed by fire in 1835. Today only the southern stone façade remains.
St. Paul's Cathedral by George Chinnery (1774—1852). The cathedral was built in 1602 and destroyed by fire in 1835. Today only the southern stone façade remains.

Since then, more Portuguese settled in Macau to engage in trading activities, and there were demands for self-administration. In 1576, Macau was established as an episcopal see by Pope Gregory XIII.[17] In 1583, the Portuguese in Macau were permitted to form a Senate to handle various issues concerning their social and economic affairs, with the understanding that there was no transfer of sovereignty.[13] Macau prospered as a port but was the target of repeated attempts by the Dutch to conquer it in the 17th century. Following the Opium War (1839–42), Portugal occupied Taipa and Coloane in 1851 and 1864 respectively. In 1887, the Qing government was forced to sign the Sino-Portuguese Treaty of Amity and Commerce, under which China ceded to Portugal the right of "perpetual occupation and government of Macau"; conversely, Portugal pledged to seek China's approval before transferring Macau to another country. Macau officially became a Portuguese colony.[13] George Chinnery (錢納利) was an English painter who spent most his life in Asia, especially India and southern China. ... Pope Gregory XIII (January 7, 1502 – April 10, 1585), born Ugo Boncompagni, was Pope from 1572 to 1585. ... There were two Opium Wars between Britain and China. ... Taipa (氹仔島; Cantonese Jyutping; Tam5 Zai2 Dou2; pinyin: DàngzÇŽi DÇŽo) is an island of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Coloane (Traditional Chinese: 路環島; Simplified Chinese: 路环岛; Pinyin: Lùhuán DÇŽo; Jyutping: Lou6-waan4 Dou2, literally Road Ring Island) is one of the two main islands of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; pinyin: qīng cháo; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing the...


After the Qing Dynasty was overthrown following the Xinhai Revolution, in 1928 the Kuomintang government officially notified Portugal that it was abrogating the former treaty,[18] and in its place the Sino-Portuguese Friendship and Trade Treaty was signed. Making only a few provisions concerning tariff principles and matters relating to business affairs, the treaty failed to mention the question with regard to the sovereignty of Macau. Consequently, the situation of Portuguese occupation and government of Macau remained unchanged.[19] After the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949, the Beijing government declared the Sino-Portuguese Treaty of Amity and Commerce to be invalid as an “unequal treaty” imposed by foreigners on China. However, Beijing was not ready to settle the treaty question, leaving the maintenance of “the status quo” until a more appropriate time.[20] Belligerents Qing Dynasty Chinese Revolutionary Alliance Commanders Feng Guozhang, Yuan Shikai, and local Qing governors. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China (ROC), now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in terms of seats in the Legislative Yuan, and the oldest political party in the... ...

The flag used by the Portuguese Government of Macau until 1999.

In 1966, with the general dissatisfaction of the Portuguese government and under the influence of the Cultural Revolution in mainland China, more serious riots broke out in Macau. The most serious one is the so-called 12-3 incident that resulted in more than 200 people killed or injured.[21][22] On January 28, 1967 the Portuguese government signed a statement of apology. This marked the beginning of equal treatment and recognition of Chinese identity and of de facto Chinese control of the colony, as an official apology underlined the fact that after 1949, administration of Macau continued only at the behest of the mainland communist government.[22] Shortly after the Carnation Revolution leftist military coup of 1974 in Lisbon, the newly assigned government of Portugal was determined to relinquish all its overseas possessions. In 1976, Lisbon redefined Macau as a "Chinese territory under Portuguese administration," and granted it a large measure of administrative, financial and economic autonomy. Portugal and China agreed in 1979 to regard Macau as "a Chinese territory under (temporary) Portuguese administration".[13][23] Negotiations between the Chinese and Portuguese governments on the question of Macau started in June 1986. In 1987, an international treaty, known as the Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration, was signed to make Macau a special administrative region of China.[24] The Chinese government assumed sovereignty over Macau on December 20, 1999.[25] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the Peoples Republic of China. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Carnation Revolution (Portuguese, Revolução dos Cravos) was an almost bloodless, leftist, military-led coup détat, started on April 25, 1974, in Lisbon, Portugal, that effectively changed the Portuguese regime from an authoritarian dictatorship to a liberal democracy after two years of a transitional period known as PREC... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ... The Government is one of the four sovereignty organs of the Portuguese Republic. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


Government and politics

Headquarters of the Government of Macau, previously the Governor's House until 1999.
Headquarters of the Government of Macau, previously the Governor's House until 1999.
Office building of the Legislative Assembly of Macau.
Office building of the Legislative Assembly of Macau.

The Sino-Portuguese Joint Declaration and the Basic Law, Macau's constitution promulgated by China's National People's Congress in 1993, specify that Macau's social and economic system, lifestyle, rights, and freedoms are to remain unchanged for at least 50 years after the transfer of sovereignty to China in 1999.[9] Under the principle of "one country, two systems", Macau enjoys a high degree of autonomy in all areas except in defence and foreign affairs.[9] Macau officials, rather than PRC officials, run Macau through the exercise of separate executive, legislative, and judicial powers, as well as the right to final adjudication.[26] Macau maintains its own separate currency, customs territory, immigration and border controls, and police force.[27][28] In accordance with Article 31 of the Constitution of the Peoples Republic of China, Macau has Special Administrative Region status, which provides constitutional guarantees for implementing the policy of one country, two systems and the constitutional basis for enacting the Basic Law of the Macau Special Administrative Region. ... The Legislative Assembly of the Macao Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: [ ; ] ; Portuguese: Assembleia Legislativa da Região Administrativa Especial de Macau [ ]) is the organ of the legislative branch of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Macau law is broadly based on Portuguese law, and therefore part of the civil law tradition of continental European legal systems. ... // The municipalities of Macau were formally abolished in 1999, when Macau became a special administrative region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3875x2165, 964 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Macau Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3875x2165, 964 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Macau Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 2814 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Macau Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2304x1728, 2814 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Macau Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... The Legislative Assembly of the Macao Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: [ ; ] ; Portuguese: Assembleia Legislativa da Região Administrativa Especial de Macau [ ]) is the organ of the legislative branch of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Great Hall of the People, where the NPC convenes The National Peoples Congress (全国人民代表大会 in Pinyin: Quánguó Rénmín Dàibiǎo Dàhuì, literally Pan-Nation Congress of the Peoples Representatives), abbreviated PNCOTPR, is the highest legislative body in the Peoples Republic of China. ...


The Macau government is headed by the chief executive, who is appointed by the central government upon the recommendation of an election committee, whose three hundred members are nominated by corporate and community bodies. The recommendation is made by an election within the committee.[29] The chief executive's cabinet comprise five policy secretaries and is advised by the Executive Council that has between seven and eleven members.[30] Edmund Ho Hau Wah, a community leader and former banker, is the first chief executive of the Macau SAR, replacing General Vasco Rocha Vieira at midnight on December 20, 1999. Ho is currently serving his second term of office.[31] The Chief Executive of Macao is the head of the government of Macao, a special administrative region of the Peoples Republic of China and a former Portuguese overseas province. ... Vasco Rocha Vieira (born 1939) is a Portuguese administrator and army officer. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


The legislative organ of the territory is the Legislative Assembly, a 29-member body comprising 12 directly elected members, ten indirectly elected members representing functional constituencies and seven members appointed by the chief executive.[32] Any permanent residents at or over 18 years of age are eligible to vote in direct elections.[33] For indirect election, it is only limited to organisations registered as "corporate voters" and a 300-member election committee drawn from broad regional groupings, municipal organisations, and central governmental bodies.[34] The basic and original framework of the legal system of Macau, based largely on Portuguese law or Portuguese civil law system, is preserved after 1999. The territory has its own independent judicial system, with a high court. Judges are selected by a committee and appointed by the chief executive. Foreign judges may serve on the courts.[35] Macau has a three-tier court system: the Court of the First Instance, the Court of the Second Instance and the Court of Final Appeal.[36] The Legislative Assembly of the Macao Special Administrative Region (Traditional Chinese: [ ; ] ; Portuguese: Assembleia Legislativa da Região Administrativa Especial de Macau [ ]) is the organ of the legislative branch of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A functional constituency, in Hong Kong politics, refers to professional and special interest groups involved in the electoral process. ... The Portuguese legal system is a civil law or continental legal system, based on Roman law. ... The Court of Final Appeal (終審法院 / Portugese - Tribunal de Ultima Instancia) is the court with the final adjudication power on laws of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Macau
The map of Macau, showing Macau Peninsula, Cotai, Taipa and Coloane.
The map of Macau, showing Macau Peninsula, Cotai, Taipa and Coloane.

Macau is situated 60 kilometres (37 mi) southwest of Hong Kong and 145 kilometres (90 mi) from Guangzhou.[37][5] It consists of the peninsula itself and the islands of Taipa and Coloane. The peninsula is formed by the Zhujiang (Pearl River) estuary on the east and the Xijiang (West River) on the west.[37] It borders the Zhuhai Special Economic Zone in mainland China. The main border crossing between Macau and China is known as the Portas do Cerco (Barrier Gate) on the Macau side, and the Gongbei checkpoint on the Zhuhai side.[38] Macau Peninsula was originally an island, but a connecting sandbar gradually turned into a narrow isthmus, thus changing Macau into a peninsula. Land reclamation in the 17th century transformed Macau into a peninsula with generally flat terrain, though numerous steep hills still mark the original land mass.[37] Alto de Coloane is the highest point in Macau, with an altitude of 170.6 metres (559.7 ft).[5] With a dense urban environment, Macau has no arable land, pastures, forest, or woodland. The administrative division within Macao (Click here for Satellite Image) Macau is a city on the southern coast of China. ... Image File history File links Macau-CIA_WFB_Map. ... Image File history File links Macau-CIA_WFB_Map. ... Macau Peninsula is the oldest and most populous part of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Cotai is new reclaimed land between Taipa and Coloane that has not yet been assigned to any of the freguesias. ... Taipa (氹仔島; Cantonese Jyutping; Tam5 Zai2 Dou2; pinyin: DàngzÇŽi DÇŽo) is an island of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Coloane (Traditional Chinese: 路環島; Simplified Chinese: 路环岛; Pinyin: Lùhuán DÇŽo; Jyutping: Lou6-waan4 Dou2, literally Road Ring Island) is one of the two main islands of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Macau Peninsula is the oldest and most populous part of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Taipa (氹仔島; Cantonese Jyutping; Tam5 Zai2 Dou2; pinyin: DàngzÇŽi DÇŽo) is an island of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Coloane (Traditional Chinese: 路環島; Simplified Chinese: 路环岛; Pinyin: Lùhuán DÇŽo; Jyutping: Lou6-waan4 Dou2, literally Road Ring Island) is one of the two main islands of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Pearl River (珠江 Pinyin: Zhū Jiāng) is Chinas third largest river (2197 km, after Huang He and the Yangtze) located in the south, flowing into the South China Sea between Hong Kong and Macau. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Xi River (西江, pinyin: Xī Jiāng, Postal System Pinyin: Si Kiang, lit. ... Zhuhai waterfront Zhuhai Campus of Zhongshan University Zhuhai (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; lit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Portas do Cerco (Chinese: 關閘, literally border gate) is an area on Macao Peninsula, Macao near the border checkpoint with mainland China at Gongbei, Zhuhai. ... In geography, a bar is a linear shoaling landform feature within a body of water. ... For other uses, see Isthmus (disambiguation). ... Urbanization is the degree of or increase in urban character or nature. ...


Macau has a humid subtropical climate, with average humidity between 75% and 90%.[39] Seasonal climate is greatly influenced by the monsoons and therefore temperature difference between summer and winter is significant. The average annual temperature of Macau is 22.3 °C (72.1 °F).[40] July is the warmest month, with average temperature being 28.6 °C (83.5 °F). The coolest month is January, with average temperature 14.5 °C (58.1 °F).[39] Located in the coastal region of south of China, Macau has ample rainfall, with average annual precipitation being 2,030 millimetres (80 in).[41] However, winter is mostly dry due to the monsoon from mainland China. Autumn in Macau (i.e. October to December) is sunny and warm with low humidity. Winter (i.e. January to March) is relatively cold but sunny. In spring (i.e. start from April), the humidity starts to increase and in summer (i.e. May to September) the climate is warm to hot and humid with rain and occasional typhoons.[39] Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ... For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...

Weather averages for Macau
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 18 (64) 18 (64) 21 (70) 24 (75) 28 (82) 31 (88) 32 (90) 32 (90) 30 (86) 28 (82) 24 (75) 19 (66) 25.4 (78)
Average low °C (°F) 13 (55) 13 (55) 16 (61) 20 (68) 24 (75) 26 (79) 27 (81) 27 (81) 26 (79) 23 (73) 18 (64) 14 (57) 20.5 (69)
Precipitation mm (inches) 32.4 (1.3) 58.8 (2.3) 82.5 (3.2) 217.4 (8.6) 361.9 (14.2) 339.7 (13.4) 289.8 (11.4) 351.6 (13.8) 194.1 (7.6) 116.9 (4.6) 42.6 (1.7) 35.2 (1.4) 2,122.9 (83.6)
Source: WMO - Macau[42] 2007-11-12

Economy

Main article: Economy of Macau
Employed population by
occupation 2007[43]
Occupation no.
('000)
Senior officials/managers 14.6
Professionals 9.9
Technicians 28.1
Clerks 83.7
Service & sale workers 63.2
Workers in agriculture/fishery 0.8
Craft & similar workers 33.7
Nightview of Macau Tower, a communication and entertainment tower that has various restaurants, theaters, shopping malls and a variety of adventurous activities.
Nightview of Macau Tower, a communication and entertainment tower that has various restaurants, theaters, shopping malls and a variety of adventurous activities.
The central business district of Macau. The building shown is the BNU tower.
The central business district of Macau. The building shown is the BNU tower.

Macau's economy is based largely on tourism, much of it geared toward gambling. Other chief economic activities in Macau are export-geared textile and garment manufacturing, banking and other financial services.[6] The clothing industry has provided about three quarters of export earnings, and the gaming, tourism and hospitality industry is estimated to contribute more than 50% of Macau's GDP, and 70% of Macau government revenue.[30] The economy of Macau is based largely on tourism (including gambling) and textile and fireworks manufacturing. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1066 × 1600 pixel, file size: 347 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 399 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1066 × 1600 pixel, file size: 347 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Macau Tower, Macau The observation deck, viewed from underneath A fountain in the shape of a lotus, the representative flower of Macau, outside the Macau Tower Macau Tower, also known as Macau Sky Tower, is a tower located in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of... A piece of artwork for the National Overseas Bank (Banco Nacional Ultramarino) in Lisbon, with coats-of-arms symbolizing the colonies of the Portuguese Empire. ...


Macau is a founding member of the WTO and has maintained sound economic and trade relations with more than 120 countries and regions, with European Union and Portuguese-speaking countries in particular; Macau is also a member of the IMF.[44] World Bank classifies Macau as a high income economy[45] and the GDP per capita of the region in 2006 was US$28,436. After the Handover in 1999, there has been a rapid rise in the number of mainland visitors due to China's easing of travel restrictions. Together with the liberalization of Macau's gaming industry in 2001 that induces significant investment inflows, the average growth rate of the economy between 2001 and 2006 is approximately 13.1% annually.[46] For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ... Headquarters Lisbon, Portugal Official language Portuguese Membership 8 (plus 2 observers) Leaders  -  Executive Secretariat Luís de Matos Monteiro da Fonseca Establishment 1996 Website http://www. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... Seal of Macau Special Administrative Region The transfer of the sovereignty of Macau from the Portuguese Republic to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) occurred on December 20, 1999. ... World GDP/capita changed very little for most of human history before the industrial revolution. ...


In a World Tourism Organization report of international tourism statistics for 2006, Macau ranked 21st in terms of tourist arrivals and 24th in terms of tourism receipts.[47] From 9.1 million visitors in 2000, arrivals to Macau has grown to 18.7 million visitors in 2005 and 22 million visitors in 2006,[48] with over 50% of the arrivals coming from mainland China and another 30% from Hong Kong. Macau is expected to receive between 24 and 25 million visitors in 2007.[49] Since the Handover, Triad underworld violence, a deterring factor for tourists, has virtually disappeared, to the benefit of the tourism sector.[50] World Tourism Organization Building in Madrid The United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) is a United Nations agency dealing with questions relating to tourism. ... Triad (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally Triad Society) or (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally Black Society, a general term for criminal organizations) is a term that describes many branches of Chinese underground society and/or organizations based in Hong Kong and Macau and also operating in Taiwan, mainland...

Image:The Venetian Macau Interior1.jpg
The interior of Venetian Macau, a casino resort in Cotai owned by the Las Vegas Sands hotel-casino chain.

Starting in 1962, the gambling industry had been operated under a government-issued monopoly license by Stanley Ho's Sociedade de Turismo e Diversões de Macau. The monopoly ended in 2002, and several casino owners from Las Vegas attempted to enter the market. With the opening of the Sands Macau, the largest casino in the world as measured by total number of table games,[51] in 2004 and Wynn Macau in 2006,[52] gambling revenues from Macau's casinos were for the first time greater than those of Las Vegas Strip (each about $6 billion),[53][54] making Macau the highest-volume gambling centre in the world.[55] In 2007, Venetian Macau, the second largest building in the world, opened its doors to the public, followed by MGM Grand Macau. Numerous other hotel casinos, including Galaxy Cotai Megaresort and Ponte 16, are also to be opened in near future. Cotai is new reclaimed land between Taipa and Coloane that has not yet been assigned to any of the freguesias. ... Las Vegas Sands Corp. ... Stanley Ho, GBS (born November 25, 1921), also known as Ho Hung-sun, Stanley Ho Hung-sun (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), is an entrepreneur in Hong Kong and Macau. ... The Sociedade de Turismo e Diversões de Macau, SA (Chinese: 澳門旅遊娛樂股份有限公司 abbreviated as STDM) is owned by Stanley Ho and his family. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... The Sands Macau located in Macau, Peoples Republic of China, on the Cotai Strip. ... The Wynn Macau is owned by Wynn Resorts and is a hotel and casino in Macao, Peoples Republic of China. ... The south end of The Strip; approximately one third of the entire Strip is represented here. ... The MGM Grand Macau is a 28-story, 600-room casino resort in Macau which is scheduled for completion in 2007. ...


In 2002, the Macau government ended the monopoly system and six casino operating concessions and subconcessions are granted to Sociedade de Turismo e Diversões de Macau, Wynn Resorts, Las Vegas Sands, Galaxy Entertainment Group, the partnership of MGM Mirage and Pansy Ho Chiu-king, and the partnership of Melco and PBL. Today, there are 16 casinos operated by the STDM, and they are still crucial in the casino industry in Macau, but in 2004, the opening of the Sands Macau ushered in the new era.[51][56][57] The Sociedade de Turismo e Diversões de Macau, SA (Chinese: 澳門旅遊娛樂股份有限公司 abbreviated as STDM) is owned by Stanley Ho and his family. ... Wynn Resorts Limited NASDAQ: WYNN was formed on October 25, 2002 by former Mirage Resorts Chairman and CEO Stephen A. Wynn. ... Las Vegas Sands Corp. ... MGM Mirage (NYSE: MGM) is a Las Vegas, Nevada-based business engaged in the development, ownership and operation of hotels and casinos throughout the world. ... The Sands Macau located in Macau, Peoples Republic of China, on the Cotai Strip. ...


Macau is an offshore financial centre, a tax haven, and a free port with no foreign exchange control regimes.[58][59][60] The offshore finance business is regulated and supervised by the Monetary Authority of Macau,[61] while the regulation and supervision of the offshore non-finance business is mainly controlled by the Macau Trade and Investment Promotion Institute.[62] In 2007, Moody's Investors Service upgraded Macau's foreign and local currency government issuer ratings to 'Aa3' from 'A1', citing its government's solid finances as a large net creditor. The rating agency also upgraded Macau's foreign currency bank deposit ceiling to 'Aa3' from 'A1'.[63] An offshore financial centre (or OFC), although not precisely defined, is usually a low-tax, lightly regulated jurisdiction which specialises in providing the corporate and commercial infrastructure to facilitate the use of that jurisdiction for the formation of offshore companies and for the investment of offshore funds. ... A tax haven is a place where certain taxes are levied at a low rate or not at all. ... A free port (porto franco) or free zone (US: Foreign-Trade Zone) is a port or area with relaxed jurisdiction with respect to the country of location. ... The Monetary Authority of Macau (澳門金融管理局; AMCM as the abbreviation retained from the past; Autoridade Monetaria de Macau, in Portuguese) is a regulatory institution established on December 20, 1999, upon the return of the Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) to the Peoples Republic of China. ... Moodys Corporation (NYSE: MCO) is the holding company for Moodys Investors Service which performs financial research and analysis on commercial and government entitities. ...


As prescribed by the Macau Basic Law, the government follows the principle of keeping expenditure within the limits of revenues in drawing up its budget, and strive to achieve a fiscal balance, avoid deficits and keep the budget commensurate with the growth rate of its gross domestic product. All the financial revenues of the Macau Special Administrative Region shall be managed and controlled by the Region itself and shall not be handed over to the Central People's Government. The Central People's Government shall not levy any taxes in the Macau Special Administrative Region.[64] This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... A fiscal adjustment is a reduction in the government primary budget deficit, and it can result from a reduction in government expenditures, an increase in tax revenues, or both simultaneously. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... GDP redirects here. ... In business, revenue is the amount of money that a company actually receives from its activities, mostly from sales of products and/or services to customers. ... State power within the government of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is divided among three bodies: the Communist Party of China, the state, and the Peoples Liberation Army, (PLA). ... -1...


Demographics

Residents' usual
language spoken at home[65]
Language Percentage of
population
Cantonese 85.7%
Mandarin 3.2%
Other
Chinese dialects
6.7%
Portuguese 0.6%
English 1.5%
Others 2.3%

Macau is one of the most densely populated regions in the world, with a population density of 17,310 persons per square kilometre (44,784/sq mi).[66] 95% percent of Macau's population is Chinese; another 2% is of mixed Chinese/Portuguese descent, an ethnic group often referred to as Macanese.[65] According to the 2006 by-census, 47% of the residents were born in mainland China, of whom 74.1% born in Guangdong and 15.2% in Fujian. Meanwhile, 42.5% of the residents were born in Macau, and those born in Hong Kong, the Philippines and Portugal shared 3.7%, 2.0% and 0.3% respectively.[65] Macaus population is 95% Chinese, primarily Cantonese and some Hakka, both from nearby Guangdong Province. ... 結合東西宗教特色的中葡友好紀念物——觀音蓮花苑 Religion in Macau means the religion which can be find in Macau Special Administrative Region. ... Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Spoken Chinese The Chinese spoken language(s) comprise(s) many regional variants. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... Broadly, Macanese (Traditional Chinese: ; literally people of Macau) refers to the people of Macau. ... Not to be confused with the former Kwantung Leased Territory in north-eastern China. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal map spelling: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


The growth of population in Macau mainly relies on immigrants from mainland China and the influx of overseas workers since its birth rate is one of the lowest in the world.[67] According to a recent survey conducted by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Macau is among the top 10 countries/regions with the highest life expectancy at birth,[68] while its infant mortality rate ranks among the lowest in the world.[69] CIA redirects here. ... This article is under construction. ...

Ruins of St. Paul's, the façade of what was originally the Cathedral of St. Paul built in 1602.
Ruins of St. Paul's, the façade of what was originally the Cathedral of St. Paul built in 1602.
Macau religiosity
religion percent
Taoism and Buddhism
 
73%
Mahayana Buddhism
 
17%
Christianity
 
9%
Others
 
1%

Both Chinese (Cantonese) and Portuguese are Macau's official languages.[70] Standard Macanese Portuguese is identical to European Portuguese. Other languages such as Mandarin, English and Hokkien are also spoken by some local communities.[71] The Macanese language, a distinctive creole generally known as Patuá, is still spoken by several dozen Macanese.[72] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 890 KB) Summary This photograph was taken by Arman Aziz (the uploader) who donated this to public domain on May 11, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 890 KB) Summary This photograph was taken by Arman Aziz (the uploader) who donated this to public domain on May 11, 2006. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngwén) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: Hànyǔ, Huáyǔ, or Zhōngwén) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... This article is about all of the Cantonese (Yue) dialects. ... Macanese Portuguese (Portuguese: Macaense Português) is a Portuguese dialect spoken in Macau. ... European Portuguese (also named Continental Portuguese or Lusitanian Portuguese) is a group of Portuguese dialects spoken in Portugal. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Mǐn N n (Chinese: 閩南語), also spelt as Minnan or Min-nan; native name B ; literally means Southern Min or Southern Fujian and refers to the local language/dialect of southern Fujian province, China. ... Macanese or Macao Creole (Patuá to its speakers) is a creole language derived mainly from Malay, Sinhalese, Cantonese, and Portuguese, which was originally spoken by the Macanese community of the Portuguese colony of Macao. ... A creole language, or simply a creole, is a stable language that originates seemingly as a nativized pidgin. ...


Most Chinese in Macau are profoundly influenced by their own tradition and culture, of which Chinese folk religion, that includes the faiths of Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, forms an integral part.[30] Macau has a sizable Christian community; Roman Catholics and Protestants constitute 7% and 2% of the population respectively. In addition, 17% of the population follows distilled original Mahayana Buddhism.[73] Clothed statues of Matsu/Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor veneration and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ... Taoism (or Daoism) refers to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... A Confucian temple in Wuwei, Peoples Republic of China. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Guan Yin from Mt. ...

A-Ma Temple, a temple built in 1448 dedicated to the goddess Matsu.
A-Ma Temple, a temple built in 1448 dedicated to the goddess Matsu.

Having an economy driven by tourism, 14.6% of Macau's workforce is employed in restaurants and hotels, and 10.3% in the gambling industry.[71] With the opening of several casino resorts and other major constructions underway, it is reported that many sectors experience a shortage of labour. The government responds by importing labour from other neighboring regions. A-Ma Temple A-Ma Temple (Traditional Chinese:媽閣廟; Portuguese:Templo de A-Má) is one of the landmarks of Macao, situated on the southwest tip of the Macao Peninsula. ... Clothed statues of Matsu Matsu (Traditional Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Ma-tsu; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Má-chó·; literally Mother-Ancestor), also spelled Mazu, is the Taoist goddess of the Sea who protects fishermen and sailors, and is revered as the patron saint who protects East Asians who are...


Currently the number of imported labours stands at a record high of 75,391 (Q2 2007), representing more than a quarter of the labour force in Macau.[74] Some local workers complain about the lack of jobs due to the influx of cheap imported labour. Some also claim that the problem of illegal labour is severe.[75] Another concern is the widening of income inequality in the region: Macau's Gini coefficient, a popular measure of income inequality where a low value indicates a more equal income distribution, rises from 0.43 in 1998 to 0.48 in 2006. It is higher than those of other neighbouring regions, such as mainland China (0.447), South Korea (0.316) and Singapore (0.425).[76]. Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ...


In 2007, there were a total of 4,537 births and 1,545 deaths. [1]


Education

Main article: Education in Macau
The administrative building of the University of Macau, the first modern university in the region.
The administrative building of the University of Macau, the first modern university in the region.

A fifteen-year free education is currently being offered to residents, that includes a three-year kindergarten, followed by a six-year primary education and a six-year secondary education. Despite the fifteen-year free education, the literacy rate of the territory is only 93.5%. The illiterates are, however, mainly among the senior residents aged 65 or above; the younger generation, for example the population aged 15-29, has a literary rate of above 99%.[65] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The University of Macau, Traditional Chinese: 澳門大學, formerly known as the University of East Asia (Portuguese: Universidade de Ásia de Leste, Traditional Chinese: 東亞大學), was established in 1981, as the first university in Macau. ... Literacy is the ability to use text to communicate across space and time. ...


Macau does not have its own universal education system; non-tertiary schools follow either the British, the Chinese, or the Portuguese education system. There are currently 10 tertiary educational institutions in the region, four of them being public.[30] In 2006, the Programme for International Student Assessment, a world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildren's scholastic performance coordinated by OECD, ranked Macau as the fifth and sixth in science and problem solving respectively.[77] Nevertheless, education levels in Macau are low among high income regions. According to the 2006 by-census, among the resident population aged 14 and above, only 51.8% has a secondary education and 12.6% has a tertiary education.[65] The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildrens scholastic performance, the implementation of which is coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


As prescribed by the Basic Law of Macau Chapter VI Article 121, the Government of Macau shall, on its own, formulate policies on education, including policies regarding the educational system and its administration, the language of instruction, the allocation of funds, the examination system, the recognition of educational qualifications and the system of academic awards so as to promote educational development. The government shall also in accordance with law, gradually institute a compulsory education system. Community organisations and individuals may, in accordance with law, run educational undertakings of various kinds.[64] This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... Government of Macau are headed by secretariats or commissioners and report directly to the Chief Executive of Macau. ... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... Compulsory education is education which children are required by law to receive and governments to provide. ...


Healthcare

Macau is served by one major public hospital, the Hospital Conde S. Januário, and one major private hospital, the Hospital Kiang Wu, both located in Macau Peninsula, as well as a university hospital called Macau University of Science and Technology Hospital in Cotai. In addition to hospitals, Macau also has numerous health centres providing free basic medical care to residents. Consultation in traditional Chinese medicine is also available.[78] Currently none of the Macau hospitals is independently assessed through international healthcare accreditation. There are no western-style medical schools in Macau and thus all aspiring physicians in Macau have to obtain their education and qualification elsewhere.[30] Local nurses are trained at the Macau Polytechnic Institute and the Kiang Wu Nursing College.[79][80] Currently there are no training courses in midwifery in Macau. A list of hospitals in Macau: Hospital Conde S. Januário Hospital Kiang Wu Macau University of Science and Technology Hospital (also known as MUST Hospital) A list Healthcare centers: Macau Oriental Health Center(Tap Seac) North Health Center(Fai Chi Kei) Areia Preta Health Center Porto Interior Health Center... Hospital Conde S. Januário is an acute care hospital in Macau. ... Hospital Kiang Wu is a private hospital in Macau and one of three hospitals in Macau. ... Cotai is new reclaimed land between Taipa and Coloane that has not yet been assigned to any of the freguesias. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... // Midwifery is the term traditionally used to describe the art of assisting a woman through childbirth. ...


The Health Bureau in Macau is mainly responsible for coordinating the activities between the public and private organisations in the area of public health, and assure the health of citizens through specialised and primary health care services, as well as disease prevention and health promotion.[81] The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention was established in 2001, which monitors the operation of hospitals, health centres, and the blood transfusion centre in Macau. It also handles the organisation of care and prevention of diseases affecting the population, sets guidelines for hospitals and private health care providers, and issues licences.[82] Public health is the study and practice of addressing threats to the health of a community. ... Primary health care was a new approach to health care that came into existence following an international conference in Alma Ata in 1978 organised by the World Health Organisation and the UNICEF. The Alma Ata conference defined primary health care as follows: Primary health care is essential health care based... Health promotion is the science and art of helping people change their lifestyle to move toward a state of optimal health. ... Blood transfusion is the process of transferring blood or blood-based products from one person into the circulatory system of another. ... In most countries, only persons licensed by specified government-approved professional associations are allowed to practice medicine. ...


Transport

Main article: Transport in Macau
Trishaw used to be a major public mode of transport in Macau. But now it is only for sightseeing purposes.
Trishaw used to be a major public mode of transport in Macau. But now it is only for sightseeing purposes.

While the traffic in mainland China drives on the right, in Macau traffic moves on the left. Macau has a well-established public transport network connecting the Macau Peninsula, Cotai, Taipa Island and Coloane Island. Buses and taxis are the major modes of public transport in Macau. Currently two companies, namely Transmac and Transportas Companhia de Macau, operate franchised public bus services in Macau.[83] The trishaw, a hybrid of the tricycle and the rickshaw, is also available, though it is mainly for sightseeing purposes. // Bus in Macau. ... A velotaxi, also known as a pedicab, cycle rickshaw or trishaw (from tricycle rickshaw), is a human-powered vehicle for hire, usually with one or two seats for carrying passengers in addition to the driver. ... Macau Peninsula is the oldest and most populous part of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Cotai is new reclaimed land between Taipa and Coloane that has not yet been assigned to any of the freguesias. ... Taipa (氹仔島) is an island of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Coloane ( Simplified: 路環島, Traditional: 路环岛, Pinyin: L n Dǎo, Jyutping: Lou6-waan4 Dou2, literally Road Ring) is an island of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Transportes Urbanos de Macau SARL (Transmac) operates public transit buses in Macau. ... TCM is Macaus other bus operator (Transmac being the other). ... A velotaxi, also known as a pedicab, cycle rickshaw or trishaw (from tricycle rickshaw), is a human-powered vehicle for hire, usually with one or two seats for carrying passengers in addition to the driver. ...


The Outer Harbour Ferry Terminal provides cross-border transportation services for passengers travelling between Macau and Hong Kong, while the Yuet Tung Terminal in the Inner Harbour serves those travelling between Macau and cities in mainland China, including Shekou and Shenzhen.[84] Macau has one active international airport, known as Macau International Airport located at the eastern end of Taipa and neighbouring waters. Since currently there are no regular direct passenger-flights between mainland China and Taiwan, the airport serves as a transient avenue for the passengers travelling between the two regions.[85][86] It is the primary hub for Viva Macau and Air Macau. In 2006, the airport handled about 5 million passengers. [87] Shekou (蛇口) is an area at the tip of Nantau Peninsula in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, south of Nantau and facing Lau Fau Shan of Hong Kong across the Deep Bay. ... For other uses, see Shenzhen (disambiguation). ... Macau International Airport is the only airport in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, now a Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Viva Macau is a budget airline based in Macau. ... Air Macau (Chinese:澳門航空), is an airline based in Macau. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Macau
The Statue of Guan Yin, a blend between the traditional images of the goddess Guan Yin and Holy Mary.
The Statue of Guan Yin, a blend between the traditional images of the goddess Guan Yin and Holy Mary.

The mixing of the Chinese and Portuguese cultures and religious traditions for more than four centuries has left Macau with an inimitable collection of holidays, festivals and events. The biggest event of the year is the Macau Grand Prix in November,[88] when the main streets in Macau Peninsula are converted to a racetrack bearing similarities with the Monaco Grand Prix. Other annual events include Macau Arts festival in March,[89] the International Fireworks Display Contest in September,[90] the International Music festival in October and/or November,[91] and the Macau International Marathon in December.[92] Macaus population consists of mostly Han Chinese with a minority (less than 2%) of Portuguese. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 890 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 觀音蓮花苑全身像 photo taken by 9old9 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Religion in... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 890 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 觀音蓮花苑全身像 photo taken by 9old9 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Religion in... For the Chen Dynasty empress whose Buddhist nun name was Guanyin, see Empress Shen Wuhua. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional Catholic picture displayed sometimes in homes. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Introduction Originally conceived in 1954 as an amateur event for local motoring enthusiasts, the Macau Grand Prix is today a race meeting to which the worlds leading riders and drivers vie for entries. ... The Monaco Grand Prix (Grand Prix de Monaco) is a Formula One race held each year on the Circuit de Monaco. ...

The Portuguese style stone-road at Largo do Senado.
The Portuguese style stone-road at Largo do Senado.

The Lunar Chinese New Year is the most important traditional festival and celebration normally takes place in late January or early February.[93][37] The Pou Tai Un Temple in Taipa is the place for the Feast of Tou Tei, the Earth god, in February. The Procession of the Passion of Our Lord is a well-known Catholic rite and journey, which travels from Igreja de Santo Agostinho to Igreja da Sé Catedral‎, also taking place in February.[37] A-Ma Temple, which honours the Goddess Matsu, is in full swing in April with many congratulant worshippers during the A-Ma festival. To look on dancing dragons at the Feast of the Drunken Dragon and twinkling-clean Buddhas at the Feast of Bathing of Lord Buddha in May is common. In Coloane Village, the Taoist god Tam Kong is also honoured on the same day.[37] Dragon Boat festival is brought into play on Nam Van Lake in June and Hungry Ghosts' festival, in late August and/or early September every year. All events and festivities of the year end with Winter Solstice in December.[92] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (532 × 800 pixels, file size: 300 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 399 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (532 × 800 pixels, file size: 300 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other traditions of celebrating lunar new year, see Lunar New Year. ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... Dragon Boat Festival is also called Duan Wu or Tuen Ng Festival (端午节/端午節), which is a festival on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern hemisphere winter solstice Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the southern hemisphere winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is...


Local cooking in Macau consists of a blend of Cantonese and Portuguese cuisines.[94] Many unique dishes resulted from the spice blends that the wives of Portuguese sailors used in an attempt to replicate European dishes. Its ingredients and seasonings include those from Europe, South America, Africa, India, and Southeast Asia, as well as local Chinese ingredients.[95] Typically, Macanese food is seasoned with various spices and flavours including turmeric, coconut milk, cinnamon and bacalhau, giving special aromas and tastes.[96] Famous dishes include Galinha à Portuguesa, Galinha à Africana (African chicken), Bacalhau, Macanese Chili Shrimps and stir-fry curry crab. Pork chop bun, ginger milk and Portuguese-style egg tart are also very popular in Macau.[97] South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Binomial name Linnaeus Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae which is native to tropical South Asia. ... Coconut milk in a bowl. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Galinha à Portuguesa (Portuguese-style Chicken) is a dish of Macanese cuisine. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Stir frying is a common Chinese cooking technique used because of its fast cooking speed. ... A pork chop bun is one of the most famous and popular snacks in Macau. ... Ginger milk curd (Chinese: 薑汁撞奶), also known as ginger-juice milk curd or simply ginger milk, is a Chinese hot dessert originated in Shawan town of Panyu District, Guangzhou in the Guangdong Province in southern China. ... This article is about egg tarts in Chinese cuisine. ...


Macau preserves many historical properties in the urban area. The Historic Centre of Macau, which includes some twenty-five historic monuments and public squares, was officially listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO on July 15, 2005 during the 29th session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Durban, South Africa.[98] The ruins of the Cathedral of Saint Paul in Macau A view of Largo do Senado (Senado Square), part of the Historic Centre of Macao The Historic Centre of Macao (Portuguese: ; Traditional Chinese: ), on Macao Peninsula, is composed of sites that showcase the unique cultural heritage of Macao. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... For other uses, see Durban (disambiguation). ...


See also

Further information: List of Macau-related topics

The following is a list of Macao-related topics. ... This article details the history of Macau. ... Captain Fernão Pires de Andrade (also spelled as Fernão Perez de Andrade) was a Portuguese merchant and official under the explorer and Malacca governor Alfonso dAlbuquerque. ... Charles Elliot, also Charles Elliott (義律, b. ... The Governor of Macau was a Portuguese colonial official who headed the executive branch of the colony of Macau. ... Hong Kongs development in the 1960s are most notably at industries. ... This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of Macau. ... Prior to the handover, Portugal had limited military personnel in Macau; the last major military presence was in 1974. ... Seal of Macau Special Administrative Region The transfer of the sovereignty of Macau from the Portuguese Republic to the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) occurred on December 20, 1999. ... Fortalezo do Monte Fortaleza do Monte (Portuguese for Mount Fortress, also Monte Forte, officially Fortaleza de Nossa Senhora do Monte de São Paulo, in English: ; Chinese: , Pinyin: Dapaotai) is the historical military centre of the former Portuguese colony of Macau, in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Macau. ... The recent situation of Hac Sa Beach, with 2 kinds of sand mixed together Hac Sa Beach (Traditional Chinese: 黑沙海灘, Pinyin: Heisha Haitan; Portuguese: Baía de Hác Sá; literally Black Sand Bay) is the largest natural beach in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, now a Special Administrative Region... Ilha Verde (Portuguese literally meaning island green; Chinese: 青洲; Cantonese Yale: chīng jāu, Jyutping: cing1 zau1; Mandarin pinyin: Qīngzhōu) was formerly an island to the west of the Macao Isthmus. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for Macau. ... // The municipalities of Macau were formally abolished in 1999, when Macau became a special administrative region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A freguesia (pron. ... Cotai is new reclaimed land between Taipa and Coloane that has not yet been assigned to any of the freguesias. ... Macaus population consists of mostly Han Chinese with a minority (less than 2%) of Portuguese. ... Macaus population is 95% Chinese, primarily Cantonese and some Hakka, both from nearby Guangdong Province. ... FEBRUARY (or JANUARY) Chinese New Year The Chinese in Macau celebrate the same religious festivals as their counterparts in Hong Kong and other regions in Asia. ... Cantopop (Chinese: 粵語流行曲) is a colloquial portmanteau for Cantonese popular music. It is also referred to as HK-pop, short for Hong Kong popular music. It is categorized as a subgenre of Chinese popular music within C-pop. ... Macanese or Macao Creole (Patuá to its speakers) is a creole language derived mainly from Malay, Sinhalese, Cantonese, and Portuguese, which was originally spoken by the Macanese community of the Portuguese colony of Macao. ... Cantonese opera is one of the major categories in Chinese opera, originating in southern Chinas Cantonese culture. ... José dos Santos Ferreira, better known as Adé, was born in Portuguese Macau on 28 July 1919 and died in Hong Kong on 24 March 1993. ... Macao is a black-and-white 1952 film noir adventure film. ... Membership badge of the Escoteiros de Macau The Scout Association of Macau is the national Scouting association in Macau. ... In accordance with Article 31 of the Constitution of the Peoples Republic of China, Macau has Special Administrative Region status, which provides constitutional guarantees for implementing the policy of one country, two systems and the constitutional basis for enacting the Basic Law of the Macau Special Administrative Region. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... Portuguese name Portuguese: Um país, dois sistemas One country, two systems is an idea originally proposed by Deng Xiaoping during the early 1980s, then Paramount Leader of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), for the reunification of China. ... Political parties in Macau lists political parties in Macau. ... Macau elects on national level a legislature. ... Foreign relations of Macau is governed by the the Peoples Republic of China. ... The General Union for Development of Macau (União Geral para o Desenvolvimento de Macau) is a political party in the Chinese Special Administrative Region of Macau, a former Portugese posession. ... The Municipality of the Islands (Portuguese: Concelho das Ilhas) was one of the two municipalities of Macau. ... Since December 20, 1999, the defense of Macau has been the responsibility of the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army (PLA), which stations up to 1,000 troops in the Macau Special Administrative Region. ... Assembleia Legislativa da Região Administrativa Especial de Macau (literally Legislative Assembly or Legislative Council of the Special Administrative Region of Macao) (Chinese: 澳門特別行政區立法會) is the organ of the legislative branch of the Macao Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Commission Against Corruption of the Macau Special Administrative Region was established after the handover from Portugal to the Communist China in 1999 from article 59 of the Basic Law of Macau and modeled after the Independent Commission Against Corruption of Hong Kong. ... Gaming law is the set of rules and regulations that apply to the gaming or gambling industry. ... Secretariat for Administration and Justice (Macau) is a member of the Macau Government. ... Hengqin (横琴岛, 橫琴島; Pinyin: Héngqín Dǎo) is an island in Zhuhai, a prefecture-level city in the Guangdong Province of Peoples Republic of China. ... With the increase in prosperity and the expansion of the economy in Macau, there is a growing demand from all over the world for residency in the Special Administrative Region. ... The pataca is the monetary unit of Macau (currency code MOP; Chinese: 澳門圓), made up of 100 avos. ... The Mainland and Macau Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (Portuguese: Acordo de Estreitamento das Relações Económicas e Comerciais entre o Continente Chinês e Macau; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , or Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA; Traditional Chinese: ), is an economic agreement between the Government of the Macao Special Administrative Region... The Monetary Authority of Macao (澳門金融管理局; AMCM as the abbreviation retained from the past; Autoridade Monetária de Macau, in Portuguese) is a regulatory institution established on December 20, 1999, upon the transfer of the sovereignty of Macao from Portugal to the Peoples Republic of China as the Macao Special... This is a list of the more prominent companies in Macao. ... Macau is famous for the blend of Portuguese and Chinese cultures and its gambling industry, which includes Casino Lisboa, Macau, Sands Macau, The Venetian Macao, and Wynn Macau. ... The Canidrome, (Traditional Chinese: ) in Macau, is the only greyhound racing stadium in Asia. ... Gambling in Macau has been legal since the 1850s when the Portuguese government legalized the activity in the colony. ... The Individual Visit Scheme (Chinese: 自由行 (Mandarin Pinyin: zì yóu xíng; Cantonese IPA: ) in Hong Kong and Macau; 个人游 (Pinyin: gè rén yóu) in Mainland China) was begun on July 28, 2003, to allow travelers from Mainland China to visit Hong Kong and Macau on an individual basis. ... Introduction Originally conceived in 1954 as an amateur event for local motoring enthusiasts, the Macau Grand Prix is today a race meeting to which the worlds leading riders and drivers vie for entries. ... Macau Tower, Macau The observation deck, viewed from underneath A fountain in the shape of a lotus, the representative flower of Macau, outside the Macau Tower Macau Tower, also known as Macau Sky Tower, is a tower located in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of... Ponte de Amizade and the HK-Macau Ferry Terminal Hong Kong-Macau Ferry Pier (Traditional Chinese: 港澳碼頭; Simplified Chinese: 港澳码头; Portuguese Terminal Marítimo) is located in Porto Exterior, Macau Peninsula, in the former Portuguese colony of Macau, now a Special Administrative Region of the Peoples Republic of China, near the... Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge in relation to Lantau Island The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge (港珠澳大橋) is a giant proposed bridge that would connect the west side of Hong Kong with Macau and the neighbouring city of Zhuhai, situated on the west side of the Pearl River Delta, and part... A list of major roads in Macau: Macau Peninsula * Rua da Papaia * Patio dos Cules * Rua Central * Rua da Madeira * Rua da Grunta * Rua do Patane * Rua do Campo * Ramal dos Mouros * Rue de Madrid * Rua de Roma * Rua de Paris * Rud de Pequim * Rua Sul do Patane * Avenida Doutor... Transportes Urbanos de Macau SARL (Transmac) operates public transit buses in Macau. ... TCM is Macaus other bus operator (Transmac being the other). ... Air Macau (Chinese:澳門航空), is an airline based in Macau. ... The planning network of the Macau Light Transit System The Macau Light Transit System is a planned mass transit system of Macau in the Peoples Republic of China. ... // There are seventeen newspapers (twelve in Chinese, four in Portuguese and one in English). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Most of the schools in Macau are private or subsidized schools. ... The name Macau (Portuguese pronunciation IPA: //) is thought to be derived from the Templo de A-Má (Temple of A-Ma or Ma Kok Temple) (媽閣廟, Cantonese Jyutping: Maa1 Gok3 Miu6, local pronunciation: Maa5 Gok3 Miu6 or Maa5 Gok3 Miu5), a still-existing landmark built in 1448 dedicated to the goddess...

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This page is a candidate to be moved to Wikisource. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Simplified Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: or ; traditional Chinese: or ; pinyin: or ) is one of two standard sets of Chinese characters of the contemporary Chinese written language. ... ... Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Chan, S. S. (2000). The Macau Economy. Publications Centre, University of Macau. ISBN 99937-26-03-6. 
  • Fung, Bong Yin (1999). Macau: a General Introduction (in Chinese). Joint Publishing (H.K.) Co. Ltd.. ISBN 962-04-1642-2. 
  • Government Information Bureau (2007). Macau Yearbook 2007. Government Information Bureau of the Macau SAR. ISBN 978-99937-56-09-5. 

Further reading

Image:Coat of arms of Macau.svg Macau Portal
  • Cremer (Editor) (1988). Macau: City of Commerce and Culture. Univ of Washington Pr. ISBN 0295966084. 
  • De Pina-Cabral (2002). Between China and Europe - Person, Culture and Emotion in Macau. Berg Publishers. ISBN 0826457495. 
  • Eayrs, James (2003). Macau Foreign Policy and Government Guide. International Business Publications, USA. ISBN 0739764519. 

External links

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  • Macau travel guide from Wikitravel
Profiles
  • CIA - The World Factbook — Macau
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  • Macau Yearbook
  • Encyclopedia of Macau (in Chinese)

Of the emerging democracies in central and eastern Europe, Czechia has one of the most developed industrialized economies. ... Tourism, petroleum transhipment, and offshore finance are the mainstays of the Netherlands Antillean economy, which is closely tied to the outside world. ... The United Kingdom has the fifth largest economy in the world in terms of market exchange rates and the sixth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China is an administrative division of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Macau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4369 words)
Macau prospered as a port and was the subject of repeated attempts by the Dutch to conquer it in the 17th century.
The general requirements of suffrage for direct election in Macau is an adult at or over 18 years of age and he or she must be a permanent resident in that region.
The growth of population in Macau is mainly relying on Chinese immigrants from mainland China and the influx of overseas workers.
Macau (10/05) (2269 words)
Macau has ten higher education institutions, including the University of Macau; 85.5% of the University of Macau’s 4,708 students are local and 14.5% from overseas.
The city of Macau and the islands of Taipa and Coloane each had a municipal council until January 1, 2002, when the Civic and Municipal Bureau was formally established to replace the two municipal councils.
Macau's foreign relations and defense are the responsibility of China.
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