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Encyclopedia > Maahes

In Egyptian mythology, Maahes (also spelled Mihos, Miysis, Maihes, and Mahes) was a lion-god. The first mentions of Maahes occur in the New Kingdom, and some European archeologists have purported that Ma'ahes was of foreign origin; indeed there is some evidence that he may have been analogous with the lion-god Apedemak worshipped in Nubia and Egypt's Western Desert. His name was the start of the hieroglyphs for lion, although in isolation it also means (one who can) see in front. However, the first glyph is also part of the glyph for Ma'at, meaning truth/order and so it came to be that Maahes was considered to be the devourer of the guilty and protector of the innocent. Maahes was rarely referred to by name and was instead referred to as "The Lord of the Massacre." This is unfortunate because it is misleading. The Lord of the Massacre terminology was adopted during the Persian and later Roman periods when foreign conquerors met with fierce resistance from Ma'ahes chiefs and their supporters. Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ... The New Kingdom is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BCE and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ... Apedemak was a lion-god worshipped in Nubia. ... Nubia (not to be confused with Nuba a collective term used for the peoples who inhabit the Nuba Mountains, in Kordofan province, Sudan, Africa) is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan. ... A section of the Papyrus of Ani showing cursive hieroglyphs. ... The goddess Maat Maat, reconstructed to have been pronounced as * (Muh-aht),[1] was the Ancient Egyptian concept of order—law, morality, and justice[2] which was deified as a goddess. ...


The term Ma'ahes was used to describe the caste of high-priests of Amen,these were high ranking hereditary chiefs who originated in Upper Egypt and in the western desert oases of Siwa, Dahkhla and Kharga, Pinudjem, Psusennese and Masaharta were all Ma'ahes. In this terminology, Ma'ahes means literally, "He who is true beside her". This is in reference to the role of the Ma'ahes as guardians of heiresses whose matrilinear ancestry was rooted far back into predynastic days. The Ma'ahes chiefs and their mistresses believed in the physcial manifestions of divine retribution aspects of powerful storms associated with Tefnut, Sekhmet, Bast and other feline deities. As a consequence they were attributed with the ability to control the weather.


The lion hieroglyphic was used in words such as prince, strength, and power, since the lion was considered to have such attributes, and so lion-gods and goddesses were associated with the pharaohs, and became patrons of Egypt. As a lion-god and patron, he was considered the son of Bast, the lion-goddess and patron of Lower Egypt, or of Sekhmet, the lion-goddess and patron of Upper Egypt. As his cult was centred in Leontopolis and Per-Bast, he was more usually the son of Bast. As patron of Egypt, his father was said to be the chief god - either Ptah, or Ra (at this time Atum had already merged into Ra as Atum-Ra). When considered the son of Ra, it was said that he fought Apep during Ra's daily night voyage. Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... In Egyptian mythology, Bast (also spelt Ubasti, and Pasht) is an ancient goddess, worshipped at least since the Second Dynasty, for whom the centre of her cult was in Per-Bast (Bubastis in greek), which was named after her. ... Map of Lower and Upper Egypt Lower Egypt is the northern-most section of Egypt. ... Two statues of Sekhmet (standing) in the Egyptian Museum of Berlin. ... Map of Upper and Lower Egypt Ancient Egypt was divided into two kingdoms, known as Upper and Lower Egypt. ... This article does not discuss cult in its original sense of religious practice; for that usage see Cult (religious practice). ... Leontopolis is the Greek name for the Ancient Egyptian city known as Taremu in ancient times and as Tell al Muqdam today. ... Bubastis is an Ancient Egyptian city, located along the River Nile in the Delta region of Lower Egypt. ... Ptah In Egyptian mythology, Ptah (also spelt Peteh) was the deification of the primordial mound in the Ennead cosmogony, which was more literally referred to as Ta-tenen (also spelt Tathenen), meaning risen land, or as Tanen, meaning submerged land. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... History Atum (alternatively spelt Tem, Temu, Tum, and Atem) is an early deity in Egyptian mythology, whose cult centred on the Ennead of Heliopolis. ... An Egyptian deity wards off the snake-like Apep In Egyptian mythology, Apep (also spelled Apepi, and Aapep, or Apophis in Greek) was an evil demon, the deification of darkness and chaos, and thus opponent of light and Maat (order/truth), whose existence was believed about from the Middle...


He was pictured as a man with the head of a lion, occasionally wearing the double crown of Egypt, holding a knife. Sometimes Maahes was shown with a bouquet of lotuses near him, but he was also depicted as a lion devouring a captive. Some of Maahes’s titles were Lord of Slaughter, Wielder of the Knife, and The Scarlet Lord. Tame lions were kept in a temple dedicated to Maahes (thus the name of the city Leontopolis), and an ancient Greek historian, named Aelian, said: "In Egypt, they worship lions, and there is a city called after them [leontopolis]... the lions have temples and numerous spaces in which to roam; the flesh of oxen is supplied to them daily ... and the lions eat to the accompaniment of song in the Egyptian language." The name Aelian may refer to one of two people: Aelianus Tacticus, a Greek military writer of the 2nd century, who lived in Rome Claudius Aelianus, a Roman teacher and historian of the 3rd century, who wrote in Greek This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists...


The Oases of Siwa and Bahiriya in Egypt's western desert were a last outpost of the Ma'ahes caste and their descendants.

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Maahes: Defender of Ma'at & Leonine God of War

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Maahes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (415 words)
The first mentions of Maahes occur in the New Kingdom, and many think he was a god of foreign origin; indeed there is some evidence that he may have been copied from the lion-god Apedemak worshipped in Nubia.
However, the first glyph is also part of the glyph for Maàt, meaning truth/order and so it came to be that Maahes was considered to be the devourer of the guilty and protector of the innocent.
Sometimes Maahes was shown with a bouquet of lotuses near him, but he was also depicted as a lion devouring a captive.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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