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Encyclopedia > MUTCD

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or MUTCD, is a document issued by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to specify the standards by which traffic signs, road markings (see lane), and signals are designed and installed. These specifications include the shapes, colors, and fonts used in road markings and signs. In the United States, all traffic control devices must generally conform to these standards. The manual is used by state agencies as well as private construction firms to ensure that the traffic control devices they use conform to the national standard. While some state agencies have developed their own set of standards, these must be in substantial conformance with the MUTCD. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a division of the U.S. Department of Transportation that specializes in automobile transportation. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. ... See also: street sign theft External links http://homepages. ... A road is a strip of land, smoothed or otherwise prepared to allow easier travel, connecting two or more destinations. ... For people named Lane, please see Lane (people) The word lane has two meanings: A narrow road, usually lacking a shoulder or a median. ... Traffic lights can have several additional lights for filter turns or bus lanes. ...


At the start of the 20th century—the early days of the rural highway—each road was promoted and maintained by automobile clubs of private individuals, who generated revenue through club membership and increased business along cross-country routes. However, each highway had its own set of signage, usually designed to promote the highway rather than to assist in the direction and safety of travelers. In fact, conflicts between these automobile clubs frequently led to multiple sets of signs—sometimes as many as eleven—being erected on the same highway. Mitchell Freeway in Perth, Western Australia For other uses, see Highway (disambiguation). ... The AAA (often called “triple-A”), formerly known as the American Automobile Association, is an American not-for-profit automobile advocacy and service organization. ...


Government action to begin resolving the wide variety of signage that had cropped up did not occur until the early 1920s, when groups from Indiana, Minnesota, and Wisconsin began surveying the existing road signs in order to develop a standard. They reported their findings to the Mississippi Valley Association of Highway Departments, which adopted the report's suggestions for the shapes to be used for road signs. These suggestions included the familiar circular railroad crossing sign and octagonal stop sign.


In 1927, the American Association of State Highway Officials, or AASHO, published the Manual and Specifications for the Manufacture, Display, and Erection of U.S. Standard Road Markers and Signs to set standards for traffic control devices used on rural roads. This was followed by the Manual on Street Traffic Signs, Signals, and Markings, which set similar standards for urban settings. While these manuals set similar standards for each environment, the use of two manuals was decided to be unwieldy, and so the AASHO began work in 1932 with the National Conference on Street and Highway Safety, or NCSHS, to develop a uniform standard for all settings. This standard was the MUTCD. This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


The MUTCD was first released in 1935, and set standards for both road signs and pavement markings. Since that time, eight more editions of the manual have been published with numerous minor updates occurring between, each taking into consideration changes in usage and size of the nation's system of roads as well as improvements in technology.


The National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (NCUTCD) advises FHWA on additions, revisions, or changes to the MUTCD. The National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, or NCUTCD, is a private, non-profit organization whose purpose is to assist in the development of standards, guides and warrants for traffic control devices and practices used to regulate, warn and guide traffic on streets and highways in the United States. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) - FHWA (530 words)
The incumbent will serve as a member of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Team where he/she is responsible for initiating, developing, issuing, interpreting and managing regulations, standards, policies and guidelines for traffic control devices as well as their application on all roads open to public travel.
MUTCD 2003 Edition Revision 1 is the most current edition of the MUTCD
FHWA is not printing copies of the MUTCD because of the prohibitive costs involved.
Federal Register: January 9, 1997 (Volume 62, Number 6) (7606 words)
The MUTCD is incorporated by reference in 23 CFR Part 655, Subpart F and recognized as the national standard for traffic control devices on all public roads.
However, for local roads with speed limits 25 mph or less, the existing MUTCD language is modified to provide an option for the continued use of a minimum 4 inch uppercase letter size with 2 inch lowercase letters for street abbreviations or city sections.
The MUTCD is incorporated by reference in 23 CFR part 655, subpart F, which requires that changes to the national standards issued by the FHWA shall be adopted by the States or other Federal agencies within two years of issuance.
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