FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "MI5" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


The Security Service
MI5
MI5 seal
MI5 seal
Agency overview
Formed 1909 as the Secret Service Bureau
Jurisdiction Government of the United Kingdom
Headquarters Thames House, London, United Kingdom
Employees 3,000
Minister Responsible Jacqui Smith MP, Home Secretary
Agency Executive Jonathan Evans, Director General
Parent agency Home Office
Website
www.mi5.gov.uk
MI5 Logo. Motto translates as "Defend the Realm"—a reflection of the David Maxwell-Fyfe's directive for the Service to Defend the Realm
MI5 Logo. Motto translates as "Defend the Realm"—a reflection of the David Maxwell-Fyfe's directive for the Service to Defend the Realm

The Security Service, commonly known as MI5 (Military Intelligence, Section 5),[1] is the United Kingdom's counter-intelligence and security agency and is part of the intelligence machinery alongside the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS or MI6), Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) and the Defence Intelligence Staff (DIS). All come under the direction of the Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC). The service has a statutory basis in the Security Service Act 1989 and the UK Intelligence Services Act of 1994. Its remit includes the protection of British parliamentary democracy and economic interests, fighting serious crime, militant separatism, terrorism and espionage within the UK. While mainly concerned with internal security, it does have an overseas role in support of the mission. For the music band, see The Spooks. ... Image File history File links MI5_logo. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ... Thames House is an office development in London on the bank of the River Thames adjacent to Lambeth Bridge. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Jacqueline Jill Smith (born 3 November 1962) is a British politician who has been Home Secretary since 28 June 2007 and is the current Member of Parliament for Redditch, since 1997. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Jonathan Evans (born c. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... Image File history File links MI5_logo. ... Image File history File links MI5_logo. ... David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... During the First World War, British secret services were divided into numbered sections referred to as Military Intelligence, department number X: this was shortened to MIX. MI5 (officially the Security Service) and MI6 (officially the Secret Intelligence Service) are often still referred to using these names by members of the... Counter Intelligence A uk label started and owned by John Machielsen. ... Security agency is an organization which conducts intelligence activities for the internal security of a nation, state or organization. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6). ... The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) is a British intelligence agency responsible for providing signals intelligence (SIGINT) and information assurance. ... The Defence Intelligence Staff (DIS) is an element of the United Kingdoms Ministry of Defence, responsible for collection and assessment of all-source intelligence. ... The Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) was founded in 1936 as a sub-committee of the Committee of Imperial Defence. ... Intelligence Services Act 1994 (c. ... “Separatists” redirects here. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...


The service has had a national headquarters at Thames House on Millbank in London since 1995, drawing together personnel from a number of locations into a single HQ facility. Thames House is shared with the Northern Ireland Office and is also home to the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre, a subordinate organisation to the Security Service. It has been alleged that the Service has regional facilities with one claimed to be in Glasgow.[2] Within the civil service community the service is colloquially known as Box 500 (after its official wartime address of PO Box 500; its current address is PO Box 3255, London SW1P 1AE)[3] Thames House is an office development in London on the bank of the River Thames adjacent to Lambeth Bridge. ... Millbank is an area of London, England, that is east of Pimlico and south of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Northern Ireland Office (NIO) is an arm of the United Kingdom government, responsible for Northern Ireland affairs. ... The Joint Terrorist Analysis Centre (JTAC) advises the United Kingdom government on terrorist threat levels and related security considerations. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... London SW1 is the London postal district covering the area of central London on the north bank of the River Thames, roughly between Hungerford Bridge and Chelsea Bridge. ...

Contents

Command, control and organisation

The Security Service comes under the authority of the Home Secretary within the Cabinet.[4] The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The service is headed by a Director General of the British Civil Service who is directly supported by an internal security organisation, secretariat, legal advisory branch and information services branch. The Deputy DG is responsible for the operational activity of the service, being responsible for four branches; international counter-terrorism, National Security Advice Centre (counter proliferation and counter espionage), Irish and domestic counter-terrorism and technical and surveillance operations. The Permanent Secretary, in most departments officially titled the Permanent Under-Secretary of State (although the full title is rarely used), is the most senior civil servant of a British Government ministry, charged with running the department on a day-to-day basis. ... Her Majestys Civil Service is the permanent bureaucracy of Crown employees that supports UK Government Ministers. ...


The service is subject to the direction of the Joint Intelligence Committee [5]for intelligence operational priorities and liaises with the SIS, GCHQ, DIS and a number of other bodies within the British government and industrial base. The service is overseen by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Members of Parliament directly appointed by the Prime Minister. Judicial oversight is also vested in the Interception of Communications Commissioner and the Intelligence Services Commissioner. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


Operations of the service are required to be proportionate and compliant with British legislation including Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, Data Protection Act and various other items of legislation. The service is not subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIP or RIPA) is a United Kingdom law covering the interception of communications. ... The Data Protection Act (DPA) is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament. ... Freedom of Information logo See Freedom of information in the United Kingdom for a general discussion of freedom of information legislation throughout the United Kingdom. ...


The current Director General is Jonathan Evans, who succeeded Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller on 8 April 2007.[6] Jonathan Evans (born c. ... Dame is the female equivalent of address to Sir for a British knighthood. ... Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller giving a speech at Queen Mary, University of London, November 2006 Dame Elizabeth (Eliza) Lydia Manningham-Buller, DCB (born 14 July 1948) is the current director general (DG) of MI5, the British internal national security agency, appointed in October 2002. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The service will mark its centenary in 2009 by publishing an official history, to be written by Professor Christopher Andrew, Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at Cambridge University, to be published in hardback in 2009 by Allen Lane, an imprint of Penguin Books. [7] Christopher Maurice Andrew (born 23 July 1941) is a British historian and professor with a special interest in international relations and in particular the history of intelligence services. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ...


History

Another, pre-1955 MI5 Logo

Image File history File links Mi5_2. ... Image File history File links Mi5_2. ...

Early years

The Security Service is derived from the Secret Service Bureau, founded in 1909 in a national climate of pre-war paranoia and possibly influenced by invasion literature, William Le Queux among others,[8] to control secret intelligence operations in the UK and overseas, particularly concentrating on the activities of the Imperial German government as a joint initiative of the Admiralty and the War Office. The Bureau was split into naval and army sections which, over time, specialised in foreign target espionage and internal counter-espionage activities respectively. This specialisation was a result of the Admiralty intelligence requirements related to the maritime strength of the Imperial German Navy. This specialisation was formalised prior to 1914 and the opening of World War I with the two sections undergoing a number of administrative changes and the home section becoming Directorate of Military Intelligence Section 5 (MI5), the name by which it is frequently known in popular culture today. The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6)[1] is the United Kingdoms external intelligence agency. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Battle of Dorking (1871) triggered an explosion of invasion literature. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Old War Office Building, seen from Whitehall, London - the former location of the War Office The War Office was a former department of the British Government, responsible for the administration of the British Army between the 17th century and 1963, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Directorate of Military Intelligence is a department within the British Ministry of Defence (or MoD for short). ...


The founding head of the Army section was Captain Vernon Kell of the South Staffordshire Regiment, who remained in that role until the early part of the Second World War. Its role was originally quite restricted; existing purely to ensure national security through counter-espionage. With a small staff and working in conjunction with the Special Branch of the Metropolitan Police the service was responsible for overall direction and the identification of foreign agents, whilst Special Branch provided the manpower for the investigation of their affairs, arrest and interrogation. Chuck 19:28, 28 July 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) is the name currently used by the territorial police force which is responsible for Greater London other than the City of London (the responsibility of the City of London Police). ...


Founded in a climate of hysteria over an alleged huge German spy network the service was successful, against admittedly weak opposition, prior to the war. The service identified a total of 22 agents, 21 of whom were interned at the start of the war following a period of covert surveillance. This strategy was adopted based on the assessment that agents apprehended would likely be replaced, their identities unknown to the service. Predicated on the ability of the service to quickly apprehend the suspects success was assured by providing Kell twelve hours' notice of the outbreak of war. The arrests deprived Germany completely of reliable intelligence from within Britain.


Inter-war period

After this auspicious start, the history of MI5 becomes darker. It was consistently successful throughout the rest of the 1910s and the 1920s in its core counter-espionage role. Germany continued to attempt to infiltrate Britain throughout the war, but using a method that depended on strict control of entry and exit to the country and, crucially, large-scale inspection of mail, MI5 was easily able to identify all the agents that were dispatched. In post-war years attention turned to attempts by the Soviet Union and the Comintern to surreptitiously support revolutionary activities within Britain, and MI5's expertise combined with the early incompetence of the Soviets meant the bureau was successful once more in correctly identifying and closely monitoring these activities. // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The Comintern (Russian: Коммунистический Интернационал, Kommunisticheskiy Internatsional – Communist International, also known as the Third International) was an international Communist organization founded in March 1919, in the midst of the war communism period (1918-1921), by Vladimir Lenin and the Russian Communist Party (Bolshevik), which intended to fight by all available means, including...


However, in the meantime MI5's role had been substantially enlarged. Due to the spy hysteria, MI5 was formed with far more resources than it actually needed to track down German spies. As is common within governmental bureaucracies, this meant it expanded its role in order to use its spare resources. MI5 acquired many additional responsibilities during the war. Most significantly, its strict counter-espionage role was considerably blurred. It became a much more political role, involving the surveillance not merely of foreign agents but of pacifist and anti-conscription organisations, and organised labour. This was justified on the basis of the common (but mistaken) belief that foreign influence was at the root of these organisations. Thus by the end of the war MI5 was a fully-fledged secret police (although it never had the powers of arrest), in addition to being a counter-espionage agency. Pacifism is the opposition to war or violence as a means of settling disputes or gaining advantage. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


This expansion of its role has continued, after a brief post-war power struggle with the head of the Special Branch, Sir Basil Thompson. MI5 also managed to acquire responsibility for security operations not only in Great Britain but throughout the British Empire, and with the decline in the Empire the Security Officers based in the British High Commissions returned to London and joined the Service, which gave it a significant role in Ireland. MI5 now has a role similar to that of the United States' Federal Bureau of Investigation, if not as extensive, which includes crime-prevention activities as well as political surveillance and counter-espionage. This expansion had happened almost entirely without supervision; MI5 had no responsibility to Parliament, and was often able to act with considerable independence even from the Cabinet and Prime Minister. Since 1994, MI5 activities have been subject to scrutiny by Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee. Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Basil Thompson was an acclaimed ballet dancer, master and teacher. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Intelligence and Security Committee is a unique committee, as it is not a committee of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


MI5's Irish operations during the Anglo-Irish War were an unmitigated disaster. Its operation was penetrated by the Irish Republican Army, and even before Michael Collins ordered a ruthless purge of MI5's Irish agents—almost all of whom were assassinated—it was unable to provide useful intelligence on the Irish republican movement during the Home Rule and independence controversies. {See Cairo Gang}. An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... Michael John (Mick) Collins (Irish: ; 16 October 1890 – 22 August 1922) was an Irish revolutionary leader, Minister for Finance in the Irish Republic, Director of Intelligence for the IRA, and member of the Irish delegation during the Anglo-Irish Treaty negotiations, both as Chairman of the Provisional Government and Commander... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... The Cairo Gang, also known as the Cairo Group, was a group of 18 British Intelligence agents - employed by the Army and trained by MI5 - sent to Dublin during the Anglo-Irish War. ...


MI5's decline in counter-espionage efficiency began in the 1930s. It was to some extent a victim of its own success; it was unable to break the ways of thinking it had evolved in the 1910s and 1920s. In particular, it was entirely unable to adjust to the new methods of the NKVD, the Russian secret intelligence organisation (later KGB). It continued to think in terms of agents who would attempt to gather information simply through observation or bribery, or to agitate within labour organisations or the armed services, while posing as ordinary citizens. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NKVD (Narodny Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del  ) (Russian: , ) or Peoples Commissariat for Internal Affairs was the leading secret police organization of the Soviet Union that was responsible for political repressions during Stalinism. ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ...


The NKVD, however, had evolved more sophisticated methods; it began to recruit agents from within the Establishment, most notably from Cambridge University, who were seen as a long-term investment. They succeeded in gaining positions within the Government (and, in Kim Philby's case, within British intelligence itself), from where they were much more easily able to provide the NKVD with sensitive information. The most successful of these agents—Harold 'Kim' Philby, Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess, Anthony Blunt and John Cairncross—went undetected until after the Second World War, and were known as the Cambridge Five. The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Kim Philby Harold Adrian Russell Kim Philby or H.A.R. Philby (OBE: 1946-1965), (1 January 1912 – 11 May 1988) was a high-ranking member of British intelligence, a communist, and spy for the Soviet Unions NKVD and KGB. In 1963, Philby was revealed as a member of... Donald Duart Maclean Donald Duart Maclean (25 May 1913 – 6 March 1983) was a career British diplomat turned Soviet intelligence agent. ... Wanted poster of Burgess (right) with Donald_Duart_Maclean. ... Anthony Frederick Blunt (26 September 1907 – 26 March 1983), known as Sir Anthony Blunt, KCVO between 1956 and 1979, was an English art historian, formerly Professor of the History of Art, University of London and director of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London (1947-74). ... John Cairncross (July 25, 1913 – October 8, 1995) was a British intelligence officer during World War II who, along with four other men (Kim Philby, Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt) passed secrets to the Soviet Union during the war. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Cambridge Five (also sometimes known as the Cambridge Four) was a ring of Soviet spies in the UK who passed information to the Soviet Union during World War II and into the early 1950s. ...


Second World War

Thames House's Millbank entrance, Westminster, London.
Thames House's Millbank entrance, Westminster, London.

MI5 experienced further failure during the Second World War. It was chronically unprepared, both organisationally and in terms of resources, for the outbreak of war, and utterly unequal to the task which it was assigned—the large-scale internment of enemy aliens in an attempt to uncover enemy agents. The operation was badly mishandled and contributed to the near-collapse of the agency by 1940. Download high resolution version (904x1108, 109 KB)Thames House - Millbank Entrance - Westminster - London - England - 240404. ... Download high resolution version (904x1108, 109 KB)Thames House - Millbank Entrance - Westminster - London - England - 240404. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


One of the earliest actions of Winston Churchill on coming to power in early 1940 was to sack the agency's long-term head, Vernon Kell. He was replaced initially by the ineffective Brigadier A.W.A. Harker, as Acting Director General. Harker in turn was quickly replaced by David Petrie, an SIS man, with Harker as his deputy. With the ending of the Battle of Britain and the abandonment of invasion plans (correctly reported by both SIS and the Bletchley Park ULTRA project), the spy scare eased, and the internment policy was gradually reversed. This eased pressure on MI5, and allowed it to concentrate on its major wartime success, the so-called "double-cross" system. Churchill redirects here. ... Sir David Petrie was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1940 to 1946. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6). ... This article is about military history. ... During World War II, codebreakers at Bletchley Park decrypted and interpreted messages from a large number of Axis code and cipher systems, including the German Enigma machine. ... Ultra (sometimes capitalized ULTRA) was the name used by the British for intelligence resulting from decryption of German communications in World War II. The term eventually became the standard designation in both Britain and the United States for all intelligence from high-level cryptanalytic sources. ... The Double Cross System or XX System, was a World War II anti-espionage and deception operation of the British military intelligence arm, MI5. ...


This was a system based on an internal memo drafted by an MI5 officer in 1936, which criticised the long-standing policy of arresting and sending to trial all enemy agents discovered by MI5. Several had offered to defect to Britain when captured; before 1939, such requests were invariably turned down. The memo advocated attempting to "turn" captured agents wherever possible, and use them to mislead enemy intelligence agencies. This suggestion was turned into a massive and well-tuned system of deception during the Second World War.


Beginning with the capture of an agent named Owens, codenamed SNOW, MI5 began to offer enemy agents the chance to avoid prosecution (and thus the possibility of the death penalty) if they would work as British double-agents. Agents who agreed to this were supervised by MI5 in transmitting bogus "intelligence" back to the German secret service, the Abwehr. This necessitated a large-scale organisational effort, since the information had to appear valuable but in actual fact be misleading. A high-level committee, the Wireless Board, was formed to provide this information. The day-to-day operation was delegated to a subcommittee, the Twenty Committee (so called because the Roman numerals for twenty, XX, form a double cross). Arthur George Owens (died 1976) was a Welsh electrical engineer who acted as a double agent during World War II. He was working for MI5 while appearing to the Abwehr (the German intelligence agency) to be one of their agents. ... The Abwehr was a German intelligence organization from 1921 to 1944. ... Double Cross is the first produced, but the second aired, episode for the third season of the science fiction television show Sliders. ...


The system was extraordinarily successful. A postwar analysis of German intelligence records found that of the 115 or so agents targeted against Britain during the war, all but one (who committed suicide) had been successfully identified and caught, with several "turned" to become double agents. The system played a major part in the massive campaign of deception which preceded the D-Day landings, designed to give the Germans a false impression of the location and timings of the landings (see Operation Mincemeat). Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Operation Mincemeat was a highly successful British deception plan during World War II which convinced the German High Command (OKW) that the Allies would invade the Balkans and Sardinia instead of the island of Sicily, the actual objective. ...


All aliens entering the country were processed at the London Reception Centre (LRC) at the Royal Patriotic School which was operated by MI5 subsection B1D, 30,000 were inspected at LRC. Captured enemy agents were taken to Camp 020, Latchmere House, for interrogation. This was commanded by Colonel Robin Stephens. There was a Reserve Camp, Camp 020R, at Huntercombe which was used mainly for long term detention of prisoners. [9]


Post-war

The Prime Minister's personal responsibility for the Service was delegated to the Home Secretary Maxwell-Fife in 1952, with a directive issued by the Home Secretary setting out the role and objectives of the Director-General. The service was subsequently placed on a statutory basis in 1989 with the introduction of the Security Service Act. This was the first government acknowledgment of the existence of the service. The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


The post-war period was a difficult time for the Service with a significant change in the threat as the Cold War began, being challenged by an extremely active KGB and increasing incidence of Irish separatism and international terrorism. Whilst little has yet been released regarding the successes of the service there have been a number of intelligence failures which have created embarrassment for both the service and the government. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... Terrorist redirects here. ...


In 1983 one of its officers, Michael Bettaney, was caught trying to sell information to the KGB. He was subsequently convicted of espionage. Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Bettany was an officer of MI5 who was convicted at the Old Bailey in 1984 of treason, after spying for the Soviet Union. ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ...


Following the Michael Bettaney case, Sir Philip Woodfield was appointed as a staff counsellor for the security and intelligence services. His rôle was to be available to be consulted by any member or former member of the security and intelligence services who had "anxieties relating to the work of his or her service"[10] that it had not been possible to allay through the ordinary processes of management-staff relations, including proposals for publications.[11] Michael Bettany was an officer of MI5 who was convicted at the Old Bailey in 1984 of treason, after spying for the Soviet Union. ... Philip Woodfield was born on 10 August 1923 in Dulwich, south-east London, and attended Alleyns School, Dulwich. ...


The Service was instrumental in breaking up a large Soviet spy ring at the start of the 1970s, with 105 Soviet embassy staff known or suspected to be involved in intelligence activities being expelled from the country in 1971. Soviet redirects here. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversy arose when it was alleged that the service was monitoring trade unions and left-wing politicians; Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson was convinced that personnel were conspiring against him, and as Home Secretary the Labour MP Jack Straw discovered the existence of his own file dating from his days as a student radical. A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and appeal to a wider international audience, this article may require cleanup. ...


One of the most significant and far reaching failures was an inability to conclusively detect and apprehend the "Cambridge Five" spy ring which had formed in the inter-war years and achieved great success in penetrating the government, and the intelligence agencies themselves. Related to this failure were suggestions of a high-level penetration within the service, Peter Wright (especially in his controversial book Spy Catcher, which Britain banned) and others believing that evidence suggested the former Director-General himself, Roger Hollis. The Trend inquiry of 1974 cleared Hollis of that accusation, later corroborated by the former KGB officer Oleg Gordievsky. The Cambridge Five (also sometimes known as the Cambridge Four) was a ring of Soviet spies in the UK who passed information to the Soviet Union during World War II and into the early 1950s. ... Sir Roger Henry Hollis, KBE, CB (1905 - 1973) was a British journalist, secret-service agent and director general (DG) of MI5. ... Sir Burke St John Trend, Baron Trend, PC (1914–21 July 1987) was a British civil servant, becoming Secretary to the Cabinet under both Harold Wilson and Ted Heath between 1963 to 1973. ... Oleg Antonovich Gordievsky (born 10 October 1938 in Moscow, Russia), was a Colonel of the KGB and KGB Resident-designate (rezidentura) and bureau chief in London, who defected to the United Kingdom. ...


The Security Service's role in counter-terrorism

Thames House, London. Headquarters of the Security Service
Thames House, London. Headquarters of the Security Service

The end of the Cold War resulted in a change in emphasis for the operations of the service, assuming responsibility for the investigation of all Irish republican activity within Britain and increasing the effort countering other forms of terrorism, particularly in more recent years the more widespread threat of Islamist extremism. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Irish republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a single independent republic, whether as a unitary state, a federal state or as a confederal arrangement. ...


The service has been attributed with a number of successes in breaking up and monitoring extremist Islamist networks since 2001. It is also attributed with successfully infiltrating the Provisional IRA (PIRA), with operations in conjunction with Special Branch from various police forces leading to 21 convictions for terrorism-related offences between 1992 and 1999. The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA) is a paramilitary group which aimed, through the use of violence, to achieve three goals: (i) British withdrawal from Ireland, (ii) the political unification of Ireland through the merger of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland , and (iii) the creation of an all... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


Whilst the British security forces in the six affected Irish Counties provide support in the countering of both Republican and Loyalist paramilitary groups since the early 1970s, Republican sources have often accused these forces of collusion with Loyalists. Irish republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a single independent republic, whether as a unitary state, a federal state or as a confederal arrangement. ... For other uses, see Loyalist (disambiguation). ... Paramilitary designates forces whose function and organization are similar to those of a professional military force, but which are not regarded as having the same status. ... Look up collusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 2006, an Irish government committee inquiry found that there was widespread collusion between British security forces and Loyalist terrorists in the 1970s, which resulted in 18 deaths.[12][13] For other uses, see Loyalist (disambiguation). ...


The Security Service will take responsibility for all security intelligence work in Northern Ireland from 2007 from the Police Service of Northern Ireland. Both Nuala O'Loan, the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland, and Al Hutchinson, the Oversight Commissioner of the Police Service of Northern Ireland, have expressed reservations. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... Nuala OLoan the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland Nuala OLoan is the first Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland. ... The Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman, also known as the Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration (PCA), is the official ombudsman institution responsible for invesigating complaints regarding governmental departments, agencies and some other public bodies in the United Kingdom, and the National Health Service (NHS) in England, have not acted properly or... Al Hutchinson is a former RCMP Assistant Commissioner, who served as the Police Oversight Commissioner in Northern Ireland, who in November 2007 became the second Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ...


With the emergence of other terrorist threats in the United Kingdom the service has increased its resource commitment to the detection and prevention of these activities. Numerous raids against suspected militants, and the internment of key suspects in HM Prison Belmarsh in London, have been credited to Security Service intelligence. It has been reported that Security Service officers have been involved in interrogation of British citizens interned at the United States' Guantanamo Bay facility in Cuba. Her Majestys Prison Service is the British Executive Agency reporting to the Home Office tasked with managing most of the prisons within England and Wales (Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own Prison Services). ... HM Prison Belmarsh is a high security prison in the Thamesmead area of the London Borough of Greenwich in south-east London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ...


Serious Crime

In 1996, legislation formalised the extension of the Security Service's statutory remit to include supporting the law enforcement agencies in their work against serious crime.[14] Tasking was reactive, acting at the request of law enforcement bodies.[14] This role has subsequently been passed to the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) is a policing agency in the United Kingdom that acts against organised crime, including the illegal drugs trade, money laundering, and people smuggling. ...


Surveillance

In July 2006, Norman Baker MP accused the British Government of "hoarding information about people who pose no danger to this country", after it emerged that MI5 holds secret files on 272,000 individuals - equivalent to one in 160 adults [15]. It was later revealed that a "traffic light" system operates[16] [17]: Norman John Baker (born 26 July 1957 in Aberdeen) is a British politician. ... This article is about a traffic control device. ...

  • Green – active – about 10% of files
  • Amber – enquiries prohibited, further information may be added – about 46% of files.
  • Red – enquiries prohibited, substantial information may not be added – about 44% of files

Directors-General of the Security Service

Link titleThe head of the Security Service (MI5), the U.Ks internal counter terrorism and counter espionage service. ... Chuck 19:28, 28 July 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Sir David Petrie was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1940 to 1946. ... Sir Percy Sillitoe was director general (DG), the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1946 to 1953. ... Sir Dick Goldsmith White was director-general of MI5 1953-1956 and Head of the British Secret Intelligence Service from 1956 - 1968. ... Sir Roger Henry Hollis, KBE, CB (1905 - 1973) was a British journalist, secret-service agent and director general (DG) of MI5. ... Sir Martin Furnival Jones was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1965 to 1972. ... Sir Michael Hanley was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1972 to 1979. ... Sir Howard Smith was director general (DG) of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1979 to 1981. ... Sir John Jones was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1981 to 1985. ... Sir Anthony Duff was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1985 to 1988. ... Sir Patric Walker was Director General of MI5, the United Kingdoms internal security service, from 1988 to 1991. ... Dame Stella Rimington in her official photo as Director-General of MI5 Dame Stella Rimington, DCB (born May 1935) was the Director-General (DG) of MI5 from 1992 to 1996. ... Sir Stephen Lander (b. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... Dame is the female equivalent of address to Sir for a British knighthood. ... Dame Eliza Manningham-Buller giving a speech at Queen Mary, University of London, November 2006 Dame Elizabeth (Eliza) Lydia Manningham-Buller, DCB (born 14 July 1948) is the current director general (DG) of MI5, the British internal national security agency, appointed in October 2002. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Jonathan Evans Jonathan Evans (born c. ...

Historical names of the Security Service

Although commonly referred to as "MI5", this was the Service's official name for only thirteen years (1916-29). However, as an acknowledgment of popular thought, "MI5" is used as a sub-title on the various pages of the official Security Service website (see links, below).

  • October 1909: Founded as the "Home Section of the Secret Service Bureau".
  • April 1914: Became a subsection of the War Office "Directorate of Military Operations, section 5" (MO5) - MO5(g).
  • September 1916: Became "Military Intelligence section 5" - MI5.
  • 1929: Renamed the "Defence Security Service".
  • 1931: Renamed the "Security Service".

See also

British Military Intelligence Systems in Northern Ireland is a term used to describe various HUMINT, ELINT, and SIGINT systems used by the RUC and British Army Intelligence in Northern Ireland during the latest round of the conflict there. ... The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) (previously named the Government Code and Cipher School (GC&CS)) is the main British intelligence service providing signals intelligence (SIGINT). ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence Section 6), or the Secret Service, is the United Kingdom external security agency. ... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... For the music band, see The Spooks. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Joint Terrorist Analysis Centre (JTAC) advises the United Kingdom government on terrorist threat levels and related security considerations. ...

References

  1. ^ Security Service or MI5: What's in a name? on the MI5 website
  2. ^ Kirkup, James. "MI5 plans Scottish base to target terrorists", The Scotsman, 2005-01-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-27. 
  3. ^ Timothy Gerraty, The Irish War
  4. ^ Security Service Act of 1989
  5. ^ UK Intelligence Services Act of 1994
  6. ^ Security Service Mi5 gets new new Director General, publictechnology.net
  7. ^ http://www.mi5.gov.uk/output/Page232.html
  8. ^ Casey, Dennis (2006-01-04). William Le Queux: novelist or counter-sleuth?. U.S. Air Intelligence Agency. Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  9. ^ Oliver Hoare, Camp 020: MI5 and the Nazi Spies - The Official History of MI5's Wartime Interrogation Centre, PRO 2000 ISBN 1-903365-08-2
  10. ^ HC Debs., 2 November 1987, col. 312.
  11. ^ Official Report, 21 December 1988 ; Vol. 144, c. 538.
  12. ^ Irish Times article on report findings— The Irish Times
  13. ^ Full Transcript of the Report
  14. ^ a b Lords Hansard text for 10 June 1996. Hansard. Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Retrieved on 2007-09-27.
  15. ^ MI5 has secret dossiers on one in 160 adults — The Mail on Sunday, 9 July 2006.
  16. ^ Parliamentary Answer Revealing Traffic Light Coding of MI5 FilesHansard, 25 February 1998.
  17. ^ Traffic Light Coding of MI5 Files — Hansard, 5 June 2006.
  18. ^ MI5 (2007-03-07). New Director-General Accounced. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  • http://www.mi5.gov.uk/output/Page65.html new page for whats in a name.

The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Intelligence Services Act 1994 (c. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Agency (AF ISR) (F.K.A. the Air Intelligence Agency (AIA)) is an agency of the United States Air Force, with headquarters at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, and was activated 1 October 1993. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail and its Sunday edition the Mail on Sunday are British newspapers, first published in 1896. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°29′38.3″N, 0°07′32.2″W During the First World War, British secret services were divided into numbered sections referred to as Military Intelligence, department number X: this was shortened to MIX. MI5 (officially the Security Service) and MI6 (officially the Secret Intelligence Service) are often still referred to using these names by members of the... The Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) is a British intelligence agency responsible for providing signals intelligence (SIGINT) and information assurance. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), commonly known as MI6 (Military Intelligence, Section 6). ... The Defence Intelligence Staff (DIS) is an element of the United Kingdoms Ministry of Defence, responsible for collection and assessment of all-source intelligence. ... The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) is a policing agency in the United Kingdom that acts against organised crime, including the illegal drugs trade, money laundering, and people smuggling. ... The Joint Intelligence Committee (JIC) was founded in 1936 as a sub-committee of the Committee of Imperial Defence. ... MI1 or British Military Intelligence, Section 1 was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI2, the British Military Intelligence Section 2 (now defunct), was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI3, the British Military Intelligence Section 3 (now defunct), was a division of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... Military Intelligence 4 (MI4) was the British intelligence map support unit in World War II. References Zabecki, David T. (1999). ... MI7, the British Military Intelligence Section 7 (now defunct) was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... The name MI8 was temporarily applied to a cryptography effort mounted within the US Army during World War I. Herbert Yardley was assigned to this unit during the War, and after it continued his cryptographic work during the 1920s at what Yardley called the American Black Chamber in his book... MI9, the British Military Intelligence Section 9 (now defunct), was a department of the British War Office during World War II. It was charged with aiding resistance fighters in Nazi-controlled Europe and recovering Allied troops who found themselves behind enemy lines (e. ... MI10, or Military Intelligence, section 10, was a British Weapons and technical analysis during World War II. The group was merged into Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ). ... MI11, or Military Intelligence, section 11, was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office and acted as Field Intelligence Police. ... MI12, the British Military Intelligence Section 12 (now defunct), was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI13 is the Reconnaissance Branch of the British Secret Service. ... MI14, or British Military Intelligence, Section 14 was an intelligence agency of the War Office, which specialised in intelligence about Germany. ... MI15, the British Military Intelligence Section 15 (now defunct), was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI16, the British Military Intelligence Section 16 (now defunct), was a department of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence, part of the War Office. ... MI17, or Military Intelligence, section 17, was the secretariat to the other departments of the British Directorate of Military Intelligence. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... MI19 was a division of the British War Office in World War II responsible for torturing German civilans and POWs. ... The following is a partial list of current intelligence agencies. ... ASIO Central Office, Canberra. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article covers the history of Polands intelligence services. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... BfV headquarters in Cologne Verfassungsschutz (Protection of the Constitution) is the short name for Germanys federal and state-based secret services for the interior (Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... “CSIS” redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Direction de la Surveillance du Territoire (DST; Directorate of Territorial Surveillance) is a directorate of the French National Police operating as a domestic intelligence agency. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see FSB. Minor emblem of FSB The FSB (Federal Security Service) (Russian: ФСБ, Федера́льная слу́жба безопа́сности; Federalnaya Sluzhba Bezopasnosti) is a domestic state security agency of the Russian Federation and the main successor of the Soviet Cheka, NKVD, and KGB. Its headquarters are in Lubyanka Square, Moscow. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... The CBI emblem. ... The Intelligence Bureau is Indias internal intelligence agency. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... The Intelligence Bureau of Pakistan is part of the Interior Ministry of Pakistan. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Singapore. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Logo of South Africas National Intelligence Agency (NIA) The National Intelligence Agency (NIA) is a South African intelligence agency. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... The National Intelligence Coordinating Agency or NICA is the primary intelligence collection and analysis arm of the Philippine government in charge in carrying out overt, covert, and clandestine intelligence programs. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... The Hellenic National Intelligence Service (NIS or EYP) (Greek: Ethniki Ypiresia Pliroforion, Εθνική Υπηρεσία Πληροφοριών, ΕΥΠ) is the national intelligence service of Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... The New Zealand Security Intelligence Service (NZSIS or SIS) is an intelligence agency of the New Zealand government. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not include all significant viewpoints. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Serviciul Român de InformaÅ£ii (SRI) is the Romanian domestic intelligence service and it is considered the descendant of the former Departamentul Securităţii Statului (also called Securitate), of the Romanian Communist Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... The Ministry of Intelligence and National Security (Persian: وزارت اطلاعات Ùˆ امنیت کشور) is the primary intelligence agency of the Islamic Republic of Iran. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... SISDE is the Italian Domestic Intelligence and Security Agency. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
MI5 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2536 words)
MI5 was quickly successful in identifying this group, and Kell took the intelligent decision not to arrest them but to keep them under surreptitious observation until the outbreak of war.
MI5 also managed to acquire responsibility for security operations not only in Great Britain but throughout the British Empire, and with the decline in the Empire the Security Officers based in the British High Commissions returned to London and joined the Service, which gave it a significant role in Ireland.
MI5 now has a role similar to that of the United States' FBI, if not as extensive, which includes crime-prevention activities as well as political surveillance and counter-espionage.
EducationGuardian.co.uk | Humanities | MI5 seeks historian for centenary (431 words)
MI5 is looking for an author to write a history of the agency to mark its centenary in 2009, it was revealed last night.
MI5 says it wants its centenary history to be an "authoritative" work which would be used as a source by future historians and students.
MI5, originally a branch of military intelligence, was set up in 1909 at a time of spy mania and anti-German xenophobia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m