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Encyclopedia > MGM Records

MGM Records was a record label started by the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio in 1946, for the purpose of releasing soundtrack albums of their musical films. Their first was the soundtrack of Till the Clouds Roll By, based on the life of composer Jerome Kern. Among their most notable soundtrack albums were those of The Wizard of Oz (not to be confused with the earlier Decca album of songs from the film), Singin' in the Rain, and the 1951 film version of Show Boat, the first album ever made from a film version of the famous musical. MGM 45 rpm gramophone record cardboard sleeve logo; presumed fair use for MGM Records article This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... See also: 1945 in music, other events of 1946, 1947 in music and the list of years in music. // Events February 8 - Béla Bartóks Piano Concerto No. ... A soundtrack album is any album that incorporates music from a particular feature film. ... Till The Clouds Roll By is an American musical-biographical film released by MGM in 1946. ... Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Singin in the Rain. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ...


Popular later albums included music from Ben-Hur and How the West Was Won. Ben-Hur is a 1959 epic film directed by William Wyler, and is the third version of Lew Wallaces novel, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880). ... How the West Was Won is an epic 1962 western film which follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. ...


In the early 1950s, MGM Records was considered as one of the "major" record companies (besides Columbia, RCA, Decca, Capitol and Mercury). Subsidiary Cub Records was launched in the late 1950s and Verve Records was acquired from Norman Granz in 1961. Other MGM subsidiaries and distributed labels included: Kama Sutra (from 1965 until Buddah Records bought the label in 1969), Ava, Heritage, Metro (for budget albums), Hickory, MGM South, L&R, and Lionel. The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... RCA, formerly an acronym for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark owned by Thomson SA through RCA Trademark Management S.A., a company owned by Thomson. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Mercury Records is a record label currently headquartered in the UK, and is a subsidiary of Universal Music Group. ... Cub Records was a subsidiary of MGM Records started in the sixties to distribute their British bands. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ... Norman Granz (Los Angeles, USA, August 6, 1918 - Geneva, Switzerland, November 22, 2001), was an American jazz music impresario and producer. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


MGM also distributed Cameo-Parkway Records briefly in 1967. Four albums were released under this arrangement before Allen Klein bought the Cameo-Parkway catalog and renamed the label ABKCO Cameo and its sister label Parkway were a major Philadelphia-based record label. ... Allen Klein (born December 18, 1931) is an American businessman and record label executive. ... ABKCO Records is a record company owned by music impresario Allen Klein. ...


Another label distributed by MGM was American International Records, the record label division of American International Pictures - whose film library is now owned by MGM. The early AIP logo. ...


MGM Records was sold to PolyGram in 1972. In 1975 PolyGram began to deemphasize the label; before long the MGM release schedule was reduced to a slow trickle of soundtrack albums and reissues, which stopped altogether in 1982. Artists under contract to MGM were moved to the Polydor Records roster by 1976. PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1982 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 1982 Record labels established in 1982 list of years in music // January 15 - K.C. and the Sunshine Bands Harry Wayne Casey is seriously injured in an automobile accident in Miami, Florida. ... 1920s vintage Polydor export label with its double-horn gramophone logo In 1954 Polydor Records introduced their distinctive orange label. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Mention should be made of a short lived Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Records of 1928; it produced recordings of music featured in MGM movies, not sold to the general public but made to be played in movie theater lobbies. These Metro-Goldwyn Mayer records were manufactured under contract with the studio by Columbia Records. Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ...


MGM Records artists

The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... The Animals were a British rock and roll band of the 1960s, formed in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. ... Chris Bartley (born April 17, 1947 or 1949,[1] Harlem) was an American R&B singer. ... Tony Blackburn (born 29 January 1943 in Guildford, Surrey) is an award winning English disc jockey, who broadcast on the pirate stations Radio Caroline and Radio London in the 1960s and was the first presenter to appear on BBC Radio 1 in 1967. ... Bobby Bloom (1946 - 28 February 1974) was an American singer-songwriter. ... Johnny Bristol (born John William Bristol; February 3, 1939 - March 21, 2004), was an African American musician, most famous as a songwriter and record producer for the Motown label in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lou Christie (born Luigi Alfredo Giovanni Sacco on February 19, 1943 in Glenwillard, Pennsylvania) is an American singer-songwriter best known for a string of pop hits in the 1960s. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... The Cowsills were a band specializing in what would later be defined as Pop or Bubblegum Rock. ... This article is about the entertainer. ... Mark Dinning ( August 17, 1933 - March 22, 1986 ) was an American singer. ... Tommy Edwards (born 17 February 1922 - died 22 October 1969) was an American singer. ... Every Mothers Son was a rock band formed in New York City in 1967. ... The Five Man Electrical Band was a rock group from Canadas capital city of Ottawa, best known for their 1971 hit Signs. The group consisted of Les Emmerson, Brian Rading, Ted Gerow, Mike Belanger and Rick Belanger. ... Connie Francis (born December 12, 1938 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American pop singer best known for international hit songs such as Whos Sorry Now?, Where The Boys Are, and Everybodys Somebodys Fool. She is known to have one of the most distinct voices in the... Gloria Gaynor (born Gloria Fowles September 7, 1949) is an American singer, best-known for the disco era hits I Will Survive (Hot 100 #1, 1979), Never Can Say Goodbye (Hot 100 #9, 1974), and I Am What I Am (Hot 100 #82, 1983). ... The Gentrys were an American band of the 1960s and early 1970s, known for their hit, 1965s Keep on Dancing. They also had a follow up hit in 1970 Why Should I Cry. The seven-member group of Treadwell High School (Memphis, Tennessee), alumni included Bruce Bowles (vocals), Bobby... Stanley Getz (February 2, 1927 in Philadelphia – June 6, 1991 in Malibu, California), usually known by his stage name Stan Getz, was an American jazz musician. ... Hermans Hermits were an English rock band in the 1960s, formed in Manchester in 1963. ... The Hombres were a Memphis Band that formed in 1966 with Gary Wayne McEwen on guitar, B.B. Cunningham on the organ (brother of Bill Cunningham of the Box Tops), Jerry Lee Masters on bass and John Will Hunter (d. ... Janis Ian (born April 7, 1951[1]) is a Grammy Award-winning American songwriter, singer, multi-instrumental musician, columnist, and science fiction author. ... The Impalas were an American doo-wop group in the late 1950s, best known for their hit, Sorry (I Ran All the Way Home). The group formed in 1958 in Brooklyn, New York, and comprised of lead singer Joe Speedo Frazier (born 5 September 1943), Richard Wagner, Lenny Renda, and... Joni James on the cover of her 2002 collection Platinum & Gold: The MGM Years Joni James (born Giovanna Carmella Babbo, on September 22, 1930) is an American singer of traditional pop music. ... Jimmy Jones (born June 2, 1937 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an African American singer and songwriter. ... Bob Lind (born Robert Neale Lind, in Baltimore, Ohio, 25 November 1942) was a folk music singer/songwriter in the 1960s, who released one transatlantic chart hit single. ... John Sebastian (born March 17, 1944) is an American songwriter and harmonica player. ... C.W. McCall is the pseudonym of William Dale Fries (born November 15, 1928) in Audubon, Iowa, USA. In 1972, while working for an Omaha, Nebraska advertising firm, Bozell Jacobs, Fries created a television campaign for the Metz Baking Company. ... The Mothers of Invention were a rock and roll band active from the 1960s to the 1990s. ... George Paxton was a big band leader, composer, saxophonist, and arranger of swing jazz music during the late 1930s and early 1940s, and co-founder and producer of the primarily doo-wop Coed Records label in the late 1950s. ... Carson Wayne Newton (born April 3, 1942, in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American singer and entertainer based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... The Ohio Express was a Bubblegum pop/garage band that fronted for Kasenetz and Katzs Super K Productions studio musicians, including singer/songwriter Joey Levine (Yummy Yummy Yummy). Categories: American musical groups | Popular musical groups | Musical group stubs ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... The Osmonds are an American family pop group who achieved enormous worldwide success as teenage music idols in the 1970s. ... Donald Clark Donny Osmond (born December 9, 1957) is an American entertainer. ... Olive Marie Osmond (born October 13, 1959 in Ogden, Utah) is an American actress, singer, and a member of the show business family, The Osmonds. ... James Jimmy Arthur Osmond (born April 16, 1963 in Canoga Park, California) is a singer, actor, and businessman. ... Sandy Posey in the 1960s (CD The Very Best of Sandy Posey, 1993) Sandy Posey (born 18 June 1944[1]) is an American popular singer who is probably best known for her 1966 recording of Martha Sharpes composition, Single Girl. ... Louis Allen Rawls (December 1, 1933 – January 6, 2006[1]) was a Chicago-born American soul music, jazz, and blues singer. ... The Righteous Brothers The Righteous Brothers were the musical duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. ... Tommy Roe, born May 9, 1942 is an American pop music singer/songwriter. ... David Rose was a British-born American songwriter, composer, arranger, and orchestra leader known as one of the most popular and distinctive mainstream instrumental pop composers of the 20th century. ... The Royalettes (also credited as Sheila Ross and her Royalettes) were a girl group of the 1960s from Baltimore, Maryland. ... Sam The Sham and the Pharoahs were a rock and roll band from the mid-1960s led by Domingo Samuido (born 1934), a Spanish Basque living in Texas and then New Orleans, known as Sam The Sham. They had several hits such as Wooly Bully, Little Red Riding Hood, and... Neil Sedaka (born March 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American pop singer, pianist, and songwriter often associated with the Brill Building. ... George Shearing George Shearing (born 13 August 1919 in London) is a well-known jazz pianist. ... Bunny Sigler (born Walter Sigler on March 27, 1942 in Philadelphia, PA) is a pop and R&B song writer and producer who has done extensive work with the team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff, and who was instrumental in creating the Philadelphia Sound in the early 1970s. ... Jim Stafford (born 16 January 1944 in Eloise, Florida) was a comedian and musician in the 1970s and had a couple of semi-novelty hits with four songs, Spiders and Snakes, Swamp Witch Hattie, Wildwood Weed and the controversial My Girl, Bill, and one called Turn Lose Of My Leg... This article is about the 1950s and 1960s singer. ... Conway Twitty (September 1, 1933 - June 5, 1993), born Harold Lloyd Jenkins, was one of the United States most successful country music artists of the 20th century. ... Walter Wanderley (1932-1986) was a Brazilian-born organist best known for his samba and bossa nova music. ... The trade winds are a pattern of wind found in bands around Earths equatorial region. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... This article is about Hank Williams, Jr. ... Shelby F. Sheb Wooley (April 10, 1921 - September 17, 2003) was a character actor and singer, best known for his 1958 novelty hit Purple People Eater. Wooley was born in Erick, Oklahoma and grew up on a farm. ...

External links

  • MGM Records discography
  • The Judy Garland Online Discography Soundtracks Pages

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
MGM Records - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (247 words)
In the early 1950s, MGM Records was considered as one of the "major" record companies (besides Columbia, RCA, Decca, Capitol and Mercury).
Subsidiary Cub Records was launched in the early sixties and Verve Records was acquired from Norman Granz in 1961.
MGM Records was sold to PolyGram in 1972 and discontinued in 1975.
Mike Curb - Biography - AOL Music (869 words)
When Curb took over MGM Records at the end of the 1960s, while he was in his mid-twenties, he began a very public "clean up" of the label by dropping all of the supposed "drug-oriented" acts from the label's roster.
In their stead, MGM (which already had the Cowsills on board) became known as the home of the Osmonds -- the singing Mormon siblings were Curb's crowning glory at the time, and were followed onto the roster a couple of years later by the DeFranco Family of Canada.
But the MGM studios had fallen on hard times in the second half of the 1960s, and 2001 would be their last big-budget hit or hit soundtrack (the studios would yield one huge film music hit in 1971, with the movie Shaft, but its soundtrack was owned by Stax Records).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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