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Encyclopedia > Lynne Truss
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Lynne Truss is a British writer and journalist. She has written a popular book on punctuation, Eats, Shoots and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. Jump to: navigation, search Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation is a short non-fiction book written by Lynne Truss, the former host of the BBCs Cutting a Dash radio programme. ...


She is the author of three novels and numerous radio comedy dramas, and she spent six years as the television critic of The Times, followed by four years as a sports columnist for the same newspaper. She won Columnist of the Year for her work for Women's Journal. Truss also hosted Cutting a Dash, a popular BBC Radio 4 series about punctuation. She now reviews books for the Sunday Times and is a familiar voice on BBC Radio 4. Her book Eats, Shoots and Leaves (November 2003), about the misuse of punctuation, became a bestseller in both Britain and the United States. The book's declaration for a "Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation" is considered a rallying call for punctuation "sticklers" of the world. The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... BBC Radio 4 is a British domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of chiefly spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... The Sunday Times is the name of several Sunday newspapers. ... Jump to: navigation, search Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation is a short non-fiction book written by Lynne Truss, the former host of the BBCs Cutting a Dash radio programme. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Eats, shoots and leaves, by Lynne Truss (5411 words)
Truss, a former sports columnist for the London Times, appears to have been set a-blaze by two obsessions: superfluous apostrophes in commercial signage (“Potatoe’s” and that sort of thing) and the elision of punctuation, along with uppercase letters, in e-mail messages.
Truss is right (despite what she preaches) when she implies, by her own practice, that the rules really don’t have that much to do with it.
Truss wants you to read her book not to learn the rules of punctuation but to join her in bewailing, as you review these rules, the sorry ignorance of those who don't know them.
Talk To The Hand by Lynne Truss: Reviews (672 words)
Truss examines the death of civil language, the transfer of customer service from those who serve the customers to the customers themselves, the refusal to live by any rules but one's own, the pervasiveness of profanity, the dismissal of criticism, and the universal lack of responsibility.
Truss is clearly keen to cement her highly profitable status as a grumpy old woman and scourge of modern sloppiness.
Truss expounds on [her] themes with fine ire, mordant humor and many examples, but it must be said that the result is not so much a book as a heavily padded magazine article.
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