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Encyclopedia > Lynchburg, Virginia
Lynchburg, Virginia
The Allied Arts Building in downtown Lynchburg, completed in 1931.
The Allied Arts Building in downtown Lynchburg, completed in 1931.

Seal
Location in Virginia
Coordinates: 37°24′13″N 79°10′12″W / 37.40361, -79.17
Country United States
State Virginia
Government
 - Mayor Joan Foster
Area
 - City 49.8 sq mi (128.9 km²)
 - Land 49.4 sq mi (127.9 km²)
 - Water 0.4 sq mi (0.9 km²)
Elevation 630 ft (192 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 71,282
 - Density 1,321.5/sq mi (510.2/km²)
 - Metro 239,510
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 434
FIPS code 51-47672[1]
GNIS feature ID 1479007[2]
Website: http://www.lynchburgva.gov

Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2007 census, the city has a total population of 71,282, growing from 67,720 in 2006. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains along the banks of the James River, Lynchburg is known as the "City of Seven Hills", "The Hill City" and sometimes described as "A City Unto Itself" mostly in reference to the city's historical avoidance of State and Federal entanglements. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 655 KB) The Allied Arts Building in downtown Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Image File history File links Map_of_Virginia_highlighting_Lynchburg_City. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... The 434 area code was created on June 1, 2001 as a split from the 804 area code. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ...


The 2,122 square mile Metropolitan Statistical Area of Lynchburg is near the geographic center of Virginia and encompasses Amherst County, Appomattox County, Bedford County, Campbell County, City of Bedford, and City of Lynchburg. It is the fifth largest MSA in Virginia with a population of 239,510. Other nearby cities include Roanoke, Charlottesville and Danville. Lynchburg's sister cities are Rueil-Malmaison, France and Glauchau, Germany. Lynchburg, VA MSA is a U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June, 2003. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Amherst County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Appomattox County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Campbell County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Bedford is an independent city located within the confines of Bedford County in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Roanoke (The Star City of the South) is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the state of Virginia. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... Rueil-Malmaison is a French town near Paris, part of the Hauts-de-Seine département and within the Parisian conurbation. ... GLAUCHAU, a town of Germany, in the federal state of Saxony, on the right bank of the Mulde, 7 m. ...


Lynchburg is the home of Central Virginia Community College, Christ College, Liberty University, Lynchburg College, Randolph College, and Virginia University of Lynchburg. The Lynchburg MSA also includes Sweet Briar College. Charted in 1966, Central Virginia Community College, CVCC, a two-year college located in Lynchburg, Virginia, is part of the Virginia Community College System. ... Christ College is a residential college at the University of Tasmania, and is currently located near the Universitys grounds in Sandy Bay. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Lynchburg College is a private college in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) with approximately 2,400 undergraduate and graduate students. ... Randolph College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Virginia University of Lynchburg is a private, historically black university located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Sweet Briar College is a liberal arts womens college in Sweet Briar, Virginia. ...


Lynchburg is the regional center for commerce and retail. Industries within the Lynchburg MSA include nuclear technology, pharmaceuticals and material handling. A diversity of small businesses with the region has helped maintain a stable economy and minimized the downturns of the national economy.[3][4] Reaching as high as 1st place (tied) in 2007, Lynchburg has been within the Top 10 Digital Cities survey for its population since the survey's inception in 2004.

Contents

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 65,269 people, 25,477 households, and 15,591 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,321.5 people per square mile (510.2/km²). There were 27,640 housing units at an average density of 559.6/sq mi (216.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 66.63% White, 29.70% African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.63% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.35% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 25,477 households out of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.6% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.92. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 22.1% under the age of 18, 15.5% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 84.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.1 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $32,234, and the median income for a family was $40,844. Males had a median income of $31,390 versus $22,431 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,263. About 12.3% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 10.7% of those age 65 or over. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Lynchburg ranks below the 2006 median annual household income for the U.S. as a whole, which was $48,200, according to the US Census Bureau.[1]


The city's population has been stable for 25+ years: in 2006, it was 67,720; in 2000, it was 65,269; in 1990, it was 66,049; in 1980, it was 66,743.[2][3]


Geography and climate

Lynchburg is located at 37°24′13″N, 79°10′12″W (37.403672, -79.170205)[5].


Map


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 49.8 square miles (128.9 km²), of which, 49.4 square miles (127.9 km²) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km²) of it (0.74%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 80 79 87 94 93 100 103 102 101 93 83 79
Norm High °F 37.5 40.6 54.6 68 75.5 82.5 86.4 85.1 78.3 68.4 58 48.4
Norm Low °F 24.5 26.9 34.4 42.6 51.2 59.5 63.7 62.4 55.9 43.7 35.2 27.9
Rec Low °F -10 -10 7 20 31 40 49 45 35 21 8 -4
Precip (in) 3.54 3.1 3.83 3.46 4.11 3.79 4.39 3.41 3.88 3.39 3.18 3.23
Source: USTravelWeather.com [4]

Adjacent counties

Amherst County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Bedford County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Campbell County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ...

Business and industry

Lynchburg was founded on commerce and industry. It features a skilled labor force, below average, and often negative, unemployment rate, [6] and below average cost of living. Of Virginia's larger metro areas, Forbes Magazine ranks Lynchburg the 5th best place in Virginia for business, with Virginia being the best state in the country for business[7]. It should be noted that only 6 places in Virginia were surveyed and most of Virginia’s cities were grouped together by Forbes as "Northern Virginia". Lynchburg achieved the rank 109 in the whole nation in the same survey.


The Lynchburg News & Advance reports that while more people are working than ever in greater Lynchburg, wages since 1990 have not kept up with inflation. Central Virginia Labor Council President Walter Fore believes this is due to lack of white-collar jobs. According to the Census Bureau, adjusted for inflation, 1990 median household income was about $39,000 compared to 2006 median household income of $36,010.


Virginia Business Magazine reports that Young Professionals in Lynchburg recently conducted a study that clearly showed how much of its young workforce has been lost[8]. According to Lee Cobb, executive director of Region 2000 Economic Development Council, Lynchburg has a reputation for being a low priority choice of location for young folks just starting out[9]. This may be further evidenced by the below state average population with high school and college degrees [10] and nearly zero population growth over the past 30 years (see Demographics above). Both the Region 2000 Economic Development Council and The Young Professionals of Central Virginia are attempting to improve the reputation and increase opportunities for young professionals.


History

First settled in 1757, Lynchburg was named for its founder, John Lynch, who at the age of 17 started a ferry service at a ford across the James River to route traffic to and from New London. He was also responsible for Lynchburg's first bridge across the river, which replaced the ferry in 1812. The "City of Seven Hills" quickly developed along the hills surrounding Lynch's Ferry. Thomas Jefferson maintained a home near Lynchburg, called Poplar Forest. Jefferson frequented Lynchburg and remarked "Nothing would give me greater pleasure than to be useful to the town of Lynchburg. I consider it as the most interesting spot in the state." The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson, the architect of such buildings as Monticello, the University of Virginia, and Virginias State Capitol, built the more remote and lesser-known Poplar Forest in Bedford County, Virginia as a private retreat from a very public life. ...


Lynchburg was established by charter in 1786 at the site of Lynch's Ferry on the James River. These new easy means of transportation routed traffic through Lynchburg, and allowed it to become the new center of commerce for tobacco trading. In 1810, Jefferson wrote, "Lynchburg is perhaps the most rising place in the U.S.... It ranks now next to Richmond in importance..." Lynchburg became a center of commerce and manufacture in the 19th century, and by the 1850s, Lynchburg (along with New Bedford, Mass.) was one of the richest towns per capita in the U.S. [11] . Chief industries were tobacco, iron and steel. Transportation facilities included the James River Batteau on the James River, and later, the James River and Kanawha Canal and, still later, four railroads, including the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad and the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Fe redirects here. ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... The James River and Kanawha Canal was a canal in Virginia, which was built to facilitate shipments of passengers and freight by water between the western counties of Virginia and the coast. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Virginia and Tennessee Railroad - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad map, circa 1858-1870, issued by William Mahone, President The Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad was built between Norfolk and Petersburg, Virginia and was completed by 1858. ...


Early on, Lynchburg was not known for its religiosity. In 1804, evangelist Lorenzo Dow wrote of Lynchburg "... where I spoke in the open air in what I conceived to be the seat of Satan's Kingdom. Lynchburg was a deadly place for the worship of God." This was in reference to the lack of churches in Lynchburg. As the wealth of Lynchburg grew, prostitution and other "rowdy" activities became quite common and, in many cases, ignored, if not accepted, by the "powers that be" of the time. Much of this activity took place in an area of downtown referred to as the "Buzzard's Roost[citation needed]." This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


During the American Civil War, Lynchburg, which served as a Confederate supply base, was approached within one mile by the Union forces of General David Hunter as he drove south from the Shenandoah Valley. Under the false impression that the Confederate forces stationed in Lynchburg were much larger than anticipated, Hunter was repelled by the forces of Confederate General Jubal Early on June 18, 1864, in the Battle of Lynchburg. To create the false impression, a train was continuously run up and down the tracks while the citizens of Lynchburg cheered as if reinforcements were unloading. Local prostitutes took part in the deception, misinforming their Union "clients" of the large number of Confederate reinforcements. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... David Hunter David Hunter (July 21, 1802 – February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... For other uses, see Jubal Early (disambiguation). ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Battle of Lynchburg took place on June 17th 1864. ...


From April 6-10, 1865, Lynchburg served as the Capital of Virginia. Under Gov. William Smith, the executive and legislative branches of the commonwealth moved to Lynchburg for the few days between the fall of Richmond and the fall of the Confederacy. The Virginia State Capitol is the seat of state government in the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in Richmond, the third State Capital of Virginia. ...


In the latter 19th century, Lynchburg's economy evolved into manufacturing (sometimes referred to as the "Pittsburgh of the South") and, per capita, made the city one of the wealthiest in the United States. In 1880, Lynchburg resident James Albert Bonsack invented the first cigarette rolling machine, and shortly thereafter Dr. Charles Browne Fleet, a physician and pharmacological tinkerer, introduced the first mass marketed over-the-counter enema, which the company he founded still manufactures (along with other laxative and bowel cleansing products, as noted on the company's website [5]). Dr. Fleet also invented ChapStick as a lip balm in Lynchburg in the early 1880s. About this time, Lynchburg was also the preferred site for the Norfolk & Western junction with the Shenandoah Valley Railroad. However, the citizens of Lynchburg did not want the junction due to the noise and pollution it would create. Therefore, it was located in what would become the City of Roanoke. James Albert Bonsack (1859 - ?, Lynchburg, Virginia USA) invented and patented the Bonsack-Machine, the first cigarette rolling machine, in 1880. ... Do[[Media:Insert non-formatted text here]]ctor Charles Browne Fleet (September 18, 1843 - May 12, 1916) was a pharmacist and inventor of the laxative but more importantly, Chapstick. ... This 2qt (about 1. ... A tube of ChapStick ChapStick Flava-Craze ChapStick is a brand name for lip balm manufactured by Wyeth Consumer Healthcare, used in the United States, Australia, Canada, and United Kingdom. ...


In the late 1950s, a number of interested citizens requested the federal government to change its long-planned route for the interstate highway now known as I-64 between Clifton Forge and Richmond.[12] Since the 1940s, maps of the federal interstate highway system depicted that highway taking a northern route, with no interstate highway running through Lynchburg.[13] The state highway commission's minutes reflected its approval of the northern route.[14] Although the proponents of a southern route succeeded in persuading a majority of Virginia Highway Commissioners to support the change after a study, in July 1961 Governor Lindsay Almond and U.S. Secretary of Commerce Luther Hodges announced that the route would not be changed.[15] This left Lynchburg as the only city with a population in excess of 50,000 (at the time) not served by an interstate.[16].


Lynchburg is sometimes referred to as "A City Unto Itself", in part due to geographic and cultural isolation, but mostly in reference to the city's historical avoidance of State and Federal entanglements. The phrase was the title of a history book by columnist Darrell Laurant.

1919 panorama
1919 panorama

For several decades throughout the mid-20th century, the state of Virginia authorized compulsory sterilization of the mentally retarded for the purpose of eugenics. The operations were carried out at the Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded, now known as the Central Virginia Training School, located just outside Lynchburg. An estimated 8,300 Virginians were sterilized and relocated to Lynchburg, known as a "dumping ground" of sorts for the feeble-minded, poor, blind, epilectic, and those otherwise seen as genetically "unfit".[17] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 203 pixelsFull resolution (3892 × 988 pixel, file size: 552 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Lynchburg, Virginia, circa 1919. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 203 pixelsFull resolution (3892 × 988 pixel, file size: 552 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Lynchburg, Virginia, circa 1919. ... Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Eugenics Conference [10], 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ...


Sterilizations were carried out for 35 years until 1972, when operations were finally halted. Later in the late 1970s, the American Civil Liberties Union filed a class-action lawsuit against the state of Virginia on behalf of the sterilization victims. As a result of this suit, the victims received formal apologies and counseling if they chose. Requests to grant the victims reverse sterilization operations were denied. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is an American organization consisting of two separate entities: the ACLU Foundation, a non-profit organization that focuses on litigation and communication efforts, and the American Civil Liberties Union which focuses on legislative lobbying and does not have non-profit status. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ...


Carrie Buck, the plaintiff in the United States Supreme Court case cBuck v. Bell, was sterilized after being classified as "feeble-minded", as part of the state's eugenics program while she was a patient at Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded in Lynchburg. Categories: People stubs | 1906 births | 1983 deaths ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Holding The Court upheld a statute instituting compulsory sterilization of the mentally retarded for the protection and health of the state. ...


Education

The city is served by the Lynchburg City Public Schools. The school board is appointed by the Lynchburg City Council. // Lynchburg City Schools at a Glance. ...

    • Linkhorne Middle School - 2525 Linkhorne Dr
    • Paul Laurence Dunbar Middle School - 1208 Polk St
    • Sandusky Middle School - 805 Chinook Place
      • William Marvin Bass Elementary School
      • Bedford Hills Elementary School
      • Dearington Elementary School for Innovation
      • Heritage Elementary School
      • Linkhorne Elementary School
      • Paul M. Munro Elementary School
      • Perrymont Elementary School
      • Robert S. Payne Elementary School
      • Sandusky Elementary School
      • Sheffield Elementary School
      • Thomas C. Miller Elementary School

The city is also home to a number of private schools, including Holy Cross Regional Catholic School, James River Day School, Liberty Christian Academy, New Covenant Classical Christian School, and Virginia Episcopal School. Heritage High School is a public high school located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Holy Cross Regional Catholic School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Virginia Episcopal School is an Episcopalian college preparatory boarding and day school located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...


Healthcare

Centra Health manages four hospitals in the Lynchburg Area:

  • Lynchburg General Hospital-Lynchburg, VA
  • Virginia Baptist Hospital-Lynchburg, VA
  • Bedford Memorial Hospital-Bedford, VA (has joint partnership with Carilion Health System in Roanoke)
  • Southside Community Hospital-Farmville, VA

Along with four hospitals, Centra Health manages numerous treatment, rehabilitation, mamography, and medical facilities across Central Virginia. Bedford is an independent city located within the confines of Bedford County in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Farmville is a town located in Virginia. ...


Arts and culture

  • Academy of Fine Arts: A nonprofit organization committed to promoting and presenting the visual and performing arts, while creating opportunities for arts education. Located in the old Academy theatre (circa 1905)
  • Batteau Festival: Celebrates the era when Lynchburg, Virginia was the center of the trade route between East and West. Flat-bottom boats called Batteaux filled the James River transporting tobacco and other goods to Richmond and bringing prosperity to the region.
  • Dance Theatre of Lynchburg: Offers a full schedule of classes, a season of performances, and special events throughout the year.
  • E.C. Glass High School Theatre: Offers productions from September through May each year.
  • The Ellington Fellowship Playhouse: Hosts local, regional and national music acts on a regular basis.
  • Jefferson Choral Society: The 100-plus voices that comprise the Jefferson Choral Society represent 15 different communities in and around Central Virginia.
  • Kaleidoscope: An annual festival that offers exceptional recreational, cultural, educational, and entertainment opportunities that appeal to a broad spectrum of the community.
  • Liberty University Theatre: Offers productions from October through May each year.
  • Little Town Players: Offers productions throughout the year. Their theatre is located on the grounds of the Elks National Home in Bedford.
  • Lynchburg College Theatre: Offers productions from October through April each year.
  • Lynchburg Symphony Orchestra
  • Lynchburg Youth Orchestra: A full orchestra comprised of high school students and a few talented middle school students.
  • The Maier Museum of Art: Randolph College's nationally recognized museum features works by outstanding American artists of the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Randolph College Theatre
  • Renaissance Theatre: Offers an open space, excellent acoustics, and an inviting atmosphere to enjoy the best of local theatre.
  • Riverviews Artspace: A private, nonprofit art organization with galleries, public programs, open artist studios, classrooms, and shared performance studio.
  • Sedalia Center's Chili Cook-Off: 40-50 chili-cooking teams compete for Best Chili (1st, 2nd, and 3rd place), Best Presentation, and Popular Choice. Taste them all and cast your vote! Live music, beer and other beverages available.
  • Virginia Christmas Spectacular
  • Virginia School of the Arts: Founded in 1985, the Virginia School of the Arts has developed an international reputation for excellence by providing an outstanding pre-professional arts training program for students of high school age.
  • Virginia Wine and Garlic Festival: An annual fall event featuring the state's wines, food from over 20 participating restaurants, and crafts from local artisans.

Bedford is an independent city located within the confines of Bedford County in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Randolph College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...

Architecture

Lynchburg is filled with remarkable architecture, and is quite diverse. Through the 1800's and into the 1920's, the city was blessed with a rich tobacco industry, and rich Lynchburgers commissioned fine houses, public buildings, and churches for themselves during that time.


Lynchburg boasts fine examples of Italian Renaissance, Federal, Georgian, Neo-Classical, Neo-Gothic, Romanesque, Jeffersonian, Queen Anne, Second Empire, Colonial, and even Art Deco styles. Many of the old neighborhoods fell into disrepair since the Depression, and many beautiful houses and buildings have sat empty over the years. Many of the larger houses in neighborhoods like Diamond Hill and Rivermont were converted into duplexes. However, now Lynchburg is experiencing an explosion of restoration work. Many fine old buildings are getting much needed investment.


Attractions and entertainment

The following attractions are located within the Lynchburg MSA:

  • Poplar Forest: Thomas Jefferson's retreat home. Jefferson designed the octagonal house during his second term as president and sojourned here in his retirement to find rest and leisure and escape public life. Ongoing restoration and archaeology.
  • Cattle Annie's Restaurant & Entertainment: A 1000+ capacity, multi-function venue providing a variety of entertainment and other events. Established in 1993, Cattle Annie's is perhaps best-known for hosting nationally recognized artists on a frequent basis. Local, regional and nationally touring rock, pop and country artists perform regularly as well. The facility hosts numerous community and private events and has a full-service restaurant and banquet services.
  • Amazement Square: Central Virginia’s first multidisciplinary, hands-on children’s museum.
  • Fort Early: Named after General Jubal Anderson Early, whose Confederate troops defended the city against invasion by Union General David Hunter.
  • Lynchburg Museum: Through the doors of the Lynchburg Museum one can relive the city's past,­ rich with tales of Monacan tribes, early Quaker settlers, the reign of King Tobacco, the bloody struggle of the Civil War, the New South, and the drama of change in the 20th century.
  • The Old Court House: The Hill City's most famous historic landmark built in 1855. Fashioned as a Greek temple high above the James River, it is now the home of Central Virginia's best collection of memorabilia, fine furnishings, costumes and industrial history.
  • Point of Honor: The Federal-era mansion of Dr. George Cabell, Sr., friend and physician of the patriot Patrick Henry
  • Miller-Claytor House: Pre-19th century townhouse where Thomas Jefferson allegedly proved to the owner of the house's garden that tomatoes were not poisonous by eating one of the fruit. Home was dismantled in 1936 and rebuilt at its Riverside Park location, where the garden was also restored.
  • Smith Mountain Lake: A public lake with a surface area of over 22,000 acres (89 km²) and a shoreline that exceeds 500 miles.
  • Natural Bridge: Once owned by Thomas Jefferson.
  • Peaks of Otter: Three mountain peaks in the Blue Ridge Mountains, overlooking the town of Bedford, Virginia and in prominent view through-out most of Lynchburg
  • Crabtree Falls: The falls trails lead hikers along a rigorous five-mile loop which offers stunning views of the five cascades of Crabtree Falls. The vertical drop totals over 1,500 feet!
  • Appomattox Courthouse: The site of the Battle of Appomattox Court House, where the surrender of the Confederate Army under Robert E. Lee to Union commander Ulysses S. Grant took place on April 9, 1865, effectively ending the American Civil War.
  • National D-Day Memorial: Located in Bedford, Virginia, it commemorates all those who served the United States during the D-Day Invasion of Normandy, France on June 6, 1944 during World War II.
  • James River Heritage Trail: Composed of two smaller trails, the Blackwater Creek Bikeway and RiverWalk.

Thomas Jefferson, the architect of such buildings as Monticello, the University of Virginia, and Virginias State Capitol, built the more remote and lesser-known Poplar Forest in Bedford County, Virginia as a private retreat from a very public life. ... For other uses, see Jubal Early (disambiguation). ... David Hunter David Hunter (July 21, 1802 – February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... The Monacan are an Indian tribe in Virginia, located in Amherst County, Virginia near Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Smith Mountain Lake Smith Mountain Lake is a large artificial lake southeast of Roanoke, Virginia, and southwest of Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia circa 1909 Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek has carved out a gorge of the limestone mountainous terrain, forming an arch 215 ft (66 m) high with a span of 90 ft (27 m). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... The Peaks of Otter are three mountain peaks in the Blue Ridge Mountains, near 37°2649N, 79°3501W, overlooking the town of Bedford, Virginia, nine miles (14km) to the southeast along Virginia State Highway 43. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Mayor E. Thomas Messier Area    - City 17. ... Crabtree Falls Crabtree Falls is located in the George Washington National Forest in Nelson County, Virginia and is the tallest waterfalll in the United States east of the Mississippi River. ... The court house The Appomattox Court House is a historic court house located in Appomattox, Virginia famous as the site of the surrender of the Confederate Army under Robert E. Lee to Union commander Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865, effectively ending the American Civil War. ... Battle of Appomattox Courthouse Conflict American Civil War Date April 9, 1865 Place Appomattox Court House, Virginia Result Union victory; surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia The Battle of Appomattox Courthouse was the final engagement of Robert E. Lees Army of Northern Virginia before surrendering to Ulysses S... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... National D-Day Memorial pool with Overlord Arch The National D-Day Memorial is located in Bedford, Virginia. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Mayor E. Thomas Messier Area    - City 17. ...

Sports and recreation

Lynchburg claims to be the "Sports Capital of Virginia"[citation needed] and as such, is home to numerous sporting events and organizations including:

  • Liberty University Athletics
  • Lynchburg College Athletics
  • Lynchburg Hillcats: A Class High-A professional baseball team in the Carolina League. They are affiliated with the Pittsburgh Pirates.
  • Jamerson YMCA - 801 Wyndhurst Drive
  • Downtown YMCA - 1315 Church Street
  • Lynchburg Road Runners Club
  • Seven Hills Hash House Harriers: The purpose of "hashing" is to promote physical fitness among its members, to get rid of hangovers, to persuade the older members that they are not as old as they feel, and to acquire a good thirst and satisfy it with beer. The "7h4" is one of thousands of chapters of Hash House Harriers located through-out the world.
  • Virginia Ten Miler: "One of the most challenging road races in the country."
  • Hiking areas include Crabtree Falls, Sharp Top, Candlers Mountain to Camp Hydaway, Flat Top, Appalachian Trail, Blackwater Creek Natural Area, Mount Pleasant National Scenic Area, Holliday Lake, Apple Orchard Trail, Otter Creek Trail
  • The Southwest Virginia Outdoor And Social Club

Lynchburg YMCA Swimming- Local swim club registered with YMCA swimming and Virginia swimming. This club was recently given the honor of a Bronze USA Swimming club for 2008. The club is one of the Top 200 in the nation, according to USA Swimming The Lynchburg Hillcats are a minor league baseball team in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... The Hash House Harriers (commonly abbreviated HHH or H3 and referred to as The Hash) is a more social version of Hare and Hounds, where one joins a pack of hounds (runners) to chase down the trail set by a hare or hares (other runners), then gather together for a...


Neighborhoods

The first neighborhoods of Lynchburg developed upon seven hills adjacent to the original ferry landing. These neighborhoods include:

  • College Hill
  • Daniel's Hill
  • Diamond Hill
  • Federal Hill
  • Franklin Hill
  • Garland Hill
  • White Rock Hill

Other major neighborhoods include Boonsboro, College Park, Rivermont, Fairview Heights, Fort Hill, Forest Hill (Old Forest Rd. Area), Timberlake, Windsor Hills, Sandusky, Linkhorne, and Wyndhurst.


Notable residents

Lynchburg was the home of Carter Glass, who sat for many years in Congress as a representative and Senator of the Democratic Party in the early 20th century, served as the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson, and co-sponsored a bill (the Glass-Steagall Act), which created FDIC insurance and, from 1932 until its repeal in 1999, prohibited U.S. commercial banks from affiliating with investment banks (securities firms). Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... Two separate United States laws are known as the Glass-Steagall Act. ... The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) was created by the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933. ...


Lynchburg was the hometown of the late televangelist Jerry Falwell, senior pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist Church and founder of the "Moral Majority" in the early 1980s. He also established Liberty Baptist College, now known as Liberty University. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Jerry Falwell, Sr. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...


It was also the birthplace of Charlie Thomas, an American rhythm and blues singer best known for his work with The Drifters and a member of the Rock n' Roll Hall of Fame, and Donna Andrews, an American golfer who won six titles on the LPGA Tour between 1993 and 1998, including one major championship, the 1994 Nabisco Dinah Shore. Other notable residents include: Charlie Thomas (born 7 April 1937 in Lynchburg, Virginia) is an American rhythm and blues singer best known for his work with The Drifters. ... The Drifters are a long-lived American doo wop/R&B vocal group, originally formed by Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward & the Dominoes) in 1953. ... Donna Andrews (born April 12, 1967) in Lynchburg, Virginia is a American golfer. ... The Kraft Nabisco Championship (originally the Colgate/Dinah Shore Winners Circle Championship) is one of the four major golf tournaments for women on the LPGA Tour. ...

Daniel Weissiger Adams (1820 – June 13, 1872) was a noted lawyer and brigadier general in the Confederate Army. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Carl Anderson (February 27, 1945 – February 23, 2004) was an American singer, film and theatre actor best known for his Golden Globe Award nominated portrayal of Judas Iscariot in the Broadway and film versions of the rock opera by Andrew Lloyd-Webber, Jesus Christ Superstar. ... Iscariot redirects here. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article is about the rock opera. ... Chad Allegra is an American professional wrestler better known by his stage name Karl Machine Gun Anderson currently working for Pro Wrestling Guerrilla. ... Dylan Baker Dylan Baker is an American actor best known for playing supporting roles in both major studio movies and independent films. ... The Murder of Mary Phagan, a 1988 two-part TV-movie presenting the true story of Leo Frank, a factory manager falsely accused of murdering a little girl in Georgia in 1913, featured Jack Lemmon, Kevin Spacey, Rebecca Miller, Charles Dutton, Peter Gallagher, Cynthia Nixon, Dylan Baker, and William H... This article is about the 2004 film. ... Gregory Alan Best (born July 23, 1964 in Lynchburg, VA) is an equestrian competitor and coach, best known for winning two silver medals for the US in the 1988 Summer Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea riding the famous Gem Twist. ... Johnson winning the 100 m final The 1988 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIV Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games celebrated in 1988 in Seoul, South Korea. ... Ota Benga in 1904. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: Justice – Paix – Travail(French) Justice – Peace – Work Anthem: Debout Congolais Capital (and largest city) Kinshasaa Official languages French Recognised regional languages Lingala, Kongo/Kituba, Swahili, Tshiluba Demonym Congolese Government Semi-Presidential Republic  -  President Joseph Kabila  -  Prime Minister Antoine Gizenga Independence  -  from Belgium June 30, 1960  Area  -  Total 2,344... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo located within the Bronx Park, in the Bronx borough of New York City. ... This article is about the primate. ... Leslie Louise Bibb (born November 17, 1974) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Crossing Jordan is an American television crime/drama series that aired on NBC from September 24, 2001 to May 16, 2007. ... Connie Britton (born Constance Womack on March 6, 1967, in Boston, Massachusetts) is an American actress who is most well-known for her role as Tami Taylor in Friday Night Lights starring opposite Kyle Chandler and as Nikki Faber on ABCs Spin City from 1996-2000. ... Friday Night Lights is an award-winning American television serial drama adapted by Peter Berg, Brian Grazer and David Nevins from a book of the same name. ... Spin City is an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ... 24 is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American action drama television series. ... Cornell Brown (born March 15, 1975) is a American football linebacker playing for the Baltimore Ravens. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Ruben Brown (b. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Wren Building with a snow-covered statue of Lord Botetourt. ... Anthony Clark (b. ... Yes, Dear is an Emmy-Nominated American television sitcom which aired from 2000 to 2006 on CBS. It starred Anthony Clark, Jean Louisa Kelly, Mike OMalley and Liza Snyder. ... Romeo Crennel (born June 18, 1947 in Lynchburg, Virginia) has been the head coach of the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League since February 8, 2005. ... Browns redirects here. ... Desmond T. Doss (January 17, 1919 – March 23, 2006) was the first conscientious objector to receive the Medal of Honor (Cpl. ... John T. Neufeld was a WWI conscientious objector sentenced to 15 years hard labour in the military prison at Leavenworth. ... For other uses, see Medal of Honor (disambiguation). ... dc Talk (also DC Talk and dc talk) is a Christian rock band formed in the late 1980s in Lynchburg, Virginia by Toby McKeehan, Kevin Max, and Michael Tait. ... Grammy Award The Grammy Awards (originally called the Gramophone Awards), presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Toby McKeehan, professionally known as tobyMac, is best known for his role as frontman for Christian music group dc Talk. ... Kevin Max (born August 17, 1967) is an Christian singer, songwriter, and poet. ... Press photo of Michael Tait. ... The name Jubal Early may refer to: Jubal Anderson Early - a Confederate General during the American Civil War Jubal Early - a character on the Firefly television series. ... Do[[Media:Insert non-formatted text here]]ctor Charles Browne Fleet (September 18, 1843 - May 12, 1916) was a pharmacist and inventor of the laxative but more importantly, Chapstick. ... Dr. Douglas Southall Freeman (May 16, 1886-June 13, 1953) was an American journalist and author. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Charles Lewis Haley (born January 6, 1964, Lynchburg, Virginia) is a former American Football Linebacker/Defensive End who played for the San Francisco 49ers (1986-1991, 1999) and the Dallas Cowboys (1992-1996). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Keith Lamarr Hamilton (born May 25, 1971) is a former American football player. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Earl Hamner Jr. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The primary role of a television producer is to coordinate and control all aspects of production, ranging from show idea development and cast hiring to shoot supervision and fact-checking. ... For other uses, see The Waltons (disambiguation). ... Falcon Crest is an American primetime television soap opera which aired on the CBS network for nine seasons, from December 4, 1981 to May 17, 1990. ... Charles Brandon Inge [INJ] (born May 19, 1977, in Lynchburg, Virginia) is a third baseman (converted from catcher) playing for the Detroit Tigers. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bengals, The Tigs, Motor City Kitties Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin... William A. Johnson, Jr. ... There is also a Rochester in Ulster County, New York; for that town see Rochester, Ulster County, New York. ... Luke Jordan (1892-1952) was a blues guitarist and vocalist of some renown in his local area of Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Paris Michael Lenon (born November 26, 1977 in Lynchburg, Virginia) is an American football linebacker for the Detroit Lions of the NFL. He attended the University of Richmond. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A Linebacker (LB) is a position in American and Canadian football that was invented by football coach Fielding Yost of the University of Michigan and first played by Germany Schulz. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... This article concerns Patriots in the American Revolutionary War. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Leland D. Melvin (February 15, 1964, Lynchburg, Virginia) is an American astronaut. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Faith Prince (born 5 August 1957) is an American actress. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Rudy Rucker, Fall 2004, photo by Georgia Rucker. ... Computer science (informally: CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Lucius Shepard (born August 1947, Lynchburg, Virginia, though stories and articles published under his name from 1952-1955 in Collins Magazine indicate that he may be several years older than is officially claimed) is an American writer whose work transcends easy categorization. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Samuel Howard Sloan (b. ... The United States Chess Federation (USCF) is a non-profit organization, the governing chess organization within the United States, and one of the federations of the FIDE. The USCF was founded in 1939 from the merger of two regional chess organizations, and grew gradually until 1972, when membership doubled to... Securities are tradeable interests representing financial value. ... Annie Bethel Scales Bannister better known as Anne Spencer (1882-1975) was an American Black poet and active participant in the New Negro Movement. ... The Harlem Renaissance was named after the anthology The New Negro, edited by Alain Locke in 1925. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Bryan Ray Skeet Ulrich (born January 20, 1970) is an American actor who starred in the CBS drama Jericho. ... This article is about the CBS television drama. ... Scream is a 1996 horror film, directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson. ... Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858- March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was an American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionare. ... Millionairess redirects here. ... Sheldon Vanauken (August 4, 1914–October 18, 1996) is an American author, best known for his autobiographical book A Severe Mercy (1977), which recounts his and his wifes friendship with C. S. Lewis, their conversion to Christianity and dealing with tragedy. ... A Severe Mercy is an autobiographical book by Sheldon Vanauken, relating the authors relationship with his wife, their friendship with C.S. Lewis, conversion to Christianity and subsequent tragedy. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... Phil Vassar (born May 28, 1964 in Lynchburg, Virginia[1]) is an American country music artist, most notable for his songwriting and use of a piano as his most prominent backing instrument. ... Charles Vess (born 1951) is an American illustrator. ... Warehouse District in Walkers Point George H. Walker (October 22, 1811 – September 20, 1866) was an American trader and politician who helped found the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... Randall Wallace is an American screenwriter, producer and director. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... The Man in the Iron Mask was a prisoner believed to have been held in the Bastille prison from an unknown date to his death on November 19, 1703. ... Pearl Harbor DVD Cover Pearl Harbor is the title of a war film released in the summer of 2001 by Touchstone Pictures. ... Robert Enoch Withers (September 18, 1821– September 21, 1907) was an American physician and politician from Lynchburg, Virginia. ... This article is about the Roman rank. ... The Pancho Villa Expedition was an abortive punitive expedition conducted by the United States against the military forces of Mexican Revolutionary General Pancho Villa in retaliation for Villas invasion of the United States and attack on the village of Columbus, New Mexico. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Panama Canal Zone (Spanish: ), was a 553 square mile (1,432 km²) territory inside of Panama, consisting of the Panama Canal and an area generally extending 5 miles (8. ...

Media

Print

  • The News & Advance, Lynchburg's daily newspaper that serves the Central Virginia region and is owned by Media General.
  • The Shepherd's Guide, The America's Favorite Christian Business Directory.
  • Lynchburg Ledger, weekly newspaper
  • Lynchburg Living, bi-monthly periodical
  • The Lynchburg Guide, quarterly resource directory
  • The Burg, weekly entertainment newspaper published by the The News & Advance
  • Lynch's Ferry, a biannual journal of local history

Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Media General, Inc. ...

Television

  • WSET, ABC affiliate based in Lynchburg
  • WSLS, NBC affiliate based in Roanoke
  • WDBJ, CBS affiliate based in Roanoke
  • WBRA, PBS affiliate based in Roanoke
  • WFXR, FOX affiliate based in Roanoke
  • WWCW, FOX affiliate based in Lynchburg, which was previously WJPR
  • WPXR, ION affiliate based in Roanoke
  • W40BM, TBN affiliate based in Lynchburg
  • WTLU-CA, Liberty University channel based in Lynchburg

WSET-TV is the ABC television network affiliate in Lynchburg-Roanoke, Virginia. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WSLS-TV is the NBC network affiliate serving the Roanoke-Lynchburg, Virginia television market. ... This article is about the television network. ... WDBJ is the CBS television network affiliate serving the Roanoke-Lynchburg television market. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... WBRA is the Roanoke-Lynchburg, Virginia PBS network affiliate, operating on UHF channel 15 owned by Blue Ridge Public Television. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... WFXR-TV is an affiliate of the Fox Television Network in Roanoke, Virginia. ... This article is about the animal. ... WFXR-TV is an affiliate of the Fox Television Network in Roanoke, Virginia. ... This article is about the animal. ... WPXR is the i affiliate for Roanoke, Virginia. ... ION Television is a broadcast and cable television network first broadcast on August 31, 1998 under the name PAX TV (early on in its development, it was called PaxNet). ... The Trinity Broadcasting Network, or TBN, is the largest Christian religious television network in the world and is headquartered near Los Angeles in Costa Mesa, California with studios near Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex in Irving, Texas and near Nashville in Hendersonville, Tennessee. ... WTLU-CA, channel 19, is an independent television station owned by Liberty University with studios and offices located at the universitys campus in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...

Radio

  • WJJX 102.7, Urban Contemporary based in Lynchburg
  • WLNI 105.9, Talk Radio based in Lynchburg
  • WLEQ 106.9, BOB-FM, Good Times,Great Oldies,Home of Rock'n'Roll's Great Hits,Lynchburg
  • WNRN (WNRS 89.9), Modern Rock based in Charlottesville
  • WROV 96.3, Rock based in Roanoke
  • WRMV 94.5, Southern Gospel based in Madison Heights
  • WRVL 88.3, Christian Radio based in Lynchburg
  • WRXT 90.3, Contemporary Christian Radio based in Roanoke
  • WSLC 94.9, Country based in Roanoke
  • WSLQ 99.1, Adult Contemporary based in Roanoke
  • WSNZ 102.7, Adult Contemporary based in Roanoke
  • WVBE 100.1, Urban Contemporary based in Lynchburg
  • WVTF 89.1, Public Radio based in Blacksburg
  • WWMC 90.9, Christian CHR/Rock radio based at Liberty University
  • WWZW 96.7, Hot AC based in Buena Vista
  • WXLK 92.3, Top-40 Radio based in Roanoke
  • WYYD 107.9, Country based in Lynchburg
  • WZZI/WZZU 101.5,Roanoke/ 97.9,Lynchburg,Classic/Modern Rock based in Lynchburg
  • WAMV 1420, Southern Gospel based in Madison Heights
  • WBRG 1050, Talk/ Sports based in Lynchburg
  • WKPA 1390, Religious based in Lynchburg
  • WLLL 930, Gospel Music based in Lynchburg
  • WLVA 590, Religious based in Lynchburg
  • WVGM 1320, Sports based in Lynchburg
  • WKDE 104.5, 105.5, Country based in Altavista
  • WKDE 1000 AM, CNN Headline News based in Altavista

WJJS and WJJX (AKA JAMMIN 106. ... WNRN is a multi-format, non-commercial, public radio station in Charlottesville, Virginia, broadcasting on 91. ... WSLC-FM / 94. ... WXLK-FM / K92 (aka K92 Radio, K92-FM) is a Top 40 radio station serving the Roanoke - Lynchburg and the New River Valley area of Virginia and West Virginia, in the United States. ...

Transportation

Bus

The Greater Lynchburg Transit Company operates the local bus service within the city. The GLTC additionally provides the shuttle bus service on the Liberty University campus.


Rail

Amtrak's Crescent train connects Lynchburg with the cities of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Charlotte, Atlanta, Birmingham and New Orleans. The Amtrak station is situated at 825 Kemper Street. Lynchburg will be a primary hub of the TransDominion Express. Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Charlotte redirects here. ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... NOLA redirects here. ... The Lynchburg (Amtrak station) is located at 825 Kemper St in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Transdominion Express (TDX) is a passenger rail transportation project in Virginia in the United States. ...


Air

Lynchburg Regional Airport provides service by US Airways Express to Charlotte and Delta Connection to Atlanta. Lynchburg Regional Airport (IATA: LYH, ICAO: KLYH), also known as Preston Glenn Field is a public airport located just south of Lynchburg, Virginia. ... US Airways Express is a brand name used by several individually owned airlines or airline holding companies which provide regional airline and commuter service for US Airways. ... Delta Connection jet landing at BWI airport on March 4, 2007 Delta Connection is the name under which eight regional airlines operate short and medium haul routes for mainline carrier, Delta Air Lines. ...


Highway

Primary roadways include U.S. Route 29, U.S. Route 501, U.S. Route 221, running north-south, and U.S. Highway 460, running east-west. Lynchburg is among the largest cities in the United States not served by an interstate, although much of Route 29 has been upgraded to interstate standard and significant improvements have been made to Highway 460. United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ... U.S. Highway 501 is a spur of U.S. Highway 1. ... U.S. Highway 221 is a spur of U.S. Highway 21. ... U.S. Highway 460 is a spur of U.S. Highway 60. ...


List of local businesses

  • Aerofin Corporation
  • Amusement Safety Organization, Inc.
  • American Hofmann Corporation
  • Andrew Corp
  • AREVA
  • Banker Steel
  • Barr Labs
  • Belvac Production Machinery, Inc.
  • BWX Technologies, Inc.
  • C.B. Fleet
  • Centra Health
  • Centralva.net
  • DePaul Family Services
  • English Construction
  • Flowserve
  • Frito Lay
  • Genworth Financial
  • Griffin Pipe Products Company
  • InService America
  • Intermet Corporation - Archer Creek Foundry
  • J. Crew Outfitters
  • Mail America Communications
  • Milwaukee Iron - Custom motorcycle fabricator featured in the television show "Southern Steel"
  • Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company
  • Norcraft Companies - StarMark Cabinetry
  • Old Virginia Candle Company
  • Parker Hannifin Corporation - Powertrain Division
  • Progress Printing
  • Rose Computers & Network Solutions
  • R.R. Donnelley
  • Sentry Equipment & Erectors, Inc.
  • Southern Air
  • StarTek
  • Taylor-Ramsey Corporation
  • Tyco Electronics - M/A-COM Critical Communications - Private Land Mobile Radio Systems
  • Trax Tech Services

This article is about professional equipment. ...

Miscellaneous

  • The Monacan Indian tribe still lives in the Lynchburg area.[6]
  • The Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers, were the first religious group to settle in Lynchburg.
  • The phrase "Lynch's Law" may have been derived from a relative of founder John Lynch, Col. Charles Lynch, who organized and administered trials of British loyalists during the revolutionary war. There is no other known connection between the phrase and Lynchburg.
  • In October 1868, Dr. Malcolm Loomis, a part-time resident of Lynchburg, used a vertical antenna, a high-frequency detector and a spark gap transmitter to successfully send electro-magnetic waves through the atmosphere, thus inventing radio six years before the birth of the “father of radio,” Guglielmo Marconi. Despite records that indicate Loomis invented the radio, he lacked the necessary funds to perfect his equipment and gain recognition for his invention.[citation needed]
  • In the winter of 1951, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., selected Lynchburg’s Randolph-Macon Woman’s College as a storage facility in the event of a national emergency. In exchange for participating in “Project Y,” the college was allowed to use the facility’s front rooms as its own exhibition space, which the college began doing in the 1970s. Despite escalating Cold War tensions during the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s, the National Gallery was never forced to move any national treasures to Project Y.[citation needed]
  • In the movie Escape From L.A., the capital city of a "more theocratic" United States has been moved Lynchburg. Lynchburg is also the hometown of the movie's president.
  • In reference to Lynchburg's historical avoidance of State and Federal entanglements, the phrase "Send it to the Governor" can be found in some public bathrooms. Lynchburg is upstream of Richmond on the James River.
  • Lynchburg is identified on-screen as the scene of destructive shootout in 2007 film Shooter, starring Mark Wahlberg.
  • Famous visitors: Andrew Jackson, Andrew Johnson, John Wilkes Booth, William McKinley and James A. Garfield, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, George A. Custer, Frank James, Will Rogers, Ronald Reagan, William Kunstler, The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Jesse Jackson.[citation needed]

The Monacan are an Indian tribe in Virginia, located in Amherst County, Virginia near Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Escape From L.A. (also known as John Carpenters Escape From L.A.) is a 1996 film directed by John Carpenter. ... Shooter is a 2007 action/conspiracy thriller directed by Antoine Fuqua. ... For the actor and television game show host, see Mark L. Walberg. ...

References

  1. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ City Quietly Growing http://www.wset.com/news/stories/0907/459115.html
  4. ^ Bureau of Economic Analysis http://www.bea.gov/regional/gdpmetro/
  5. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics(http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/surveymost?la+51)
  7. ^ http://www.forbes.com/lists/2006/1/VA_Rank_1.html Forbes Magazine, Best Paces for Business
  8. ^ Virginia Business Magazine
  9. ^ http://richmondfed.org/publications/economic_research/region_focus/summer_2005/feature4.cfm Youth Movement, Richmond Federal Reserve
  10. ^ http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/51/5147672.html US Census Bureau
  11. ^ Clifton Potter and Dorothy Potter, Lynchburg: A City Set on Seven Hills (Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2004), 39
  12. ^ "Additional Interstate Road Systems Approved," Petersburg-Colonial Heights Progress-Index, 1958-04-27 at 20.
  13. ^ Routes of the Recommended Interregional Highway System, ca. 1943.
  14. ^ Minutes of the Meeting of the State Highway Commission of Virginia, Held in Richmond September 11, 1945, page 12.
  15. ^ "Opposition to Northern Route Dropped," Danville Bee, 1961-07-06 at 3
  16. ^ Richmond Times-Dispatch, June 13, 1999 http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/timesdispatch/access/42384609.html?dids=42384609:42384609&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:FT&date=Jun+13%2C+1999&author=Carlos+Santos&pub=Richmond+Times+-+Dispatch&edition=&startpage=C.6&desc=CHARLOTTESVILLE+WON%2C+AND+LYNCHBURG+LOST+ROUTING+OF+I-64+WAS+MAJOR+TUSSLE
  17. ^ [ "A Simple Act of Mothering", Poor Magazine Online, http://www.poormagazine.com/public_html/columns/column_91.html]
  18. ^ (1963) Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • City of Lynchburg
  • The Survival of Professional Baseball in Lynchburg, Virginia, 1950s-1990s
  • The News & Advance is Lynchburg's daily newspaper serving Central Virginia.
  • Lynchburg Online
  • The Lynchburg Guide
  • Historic Lynchburg Photographs Series vintage post cards, railroad images & more
  • Lynchburg Virginia is Lynchburg's site for interactive local news and useful links for the residents of Lynchburg
  • "Little-Known" Attractions of Lynchburg and Central Virginia Lynchburg's Infamous "Alternate Reality" Web Site
  • Lynchburg History Old photos of Lynchburg
  • Lynchburg, Virginia is at coordinates 37°24′13″N 79°10′13″W / 37.403672, -79.170205 (Lynchburg, Virginia)Coordinates: 37°24′13″N 79°10′13″W / 37.403672, -79.170205 (Lynchburg, Virginia)
  • Historical Facts about Lynchburg, circa 1938

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lynchburg Virginia (451 words)
You can view many of my photos here, they are all taken in the Central Virginia Area.
I have been lucky enough to have my photos in Lynchburg Life Magazine and they were recently exhibited in the Musée de l'Elysée, Lausanne in Switzerland,(a museum for photography).
This is a Flickr badge showing photos in a set called Lynchburg Viriginia.
Lynchburg Real Estate and Homes for Sale in Lynchburg, Virginia: The Lynchburg Company Realtors, ph.(434) 384-8000. (513 words)
Lynchburg Real Estate and Homes for Sale in Lynchburg, Virginia: The Lynchburg Company Realtors, ph.(434) 384-8000.
We are a personal and professional real estate brokerage representing the best residential property in Lynchburg and Central Virginia, as well as the newest upscale neighborhoods in Lynchburg and Bedford County.
She knows Lynchburg's market, neighborhoods and builders thoroughly, and can can help you find a home not just a house.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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