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Encyclopedia > Lutsk

Lutsk (Ukrainian: Луцьк) is the capital of the Volyn Oblast, Ukraine. The city is situated by the Styr River, and has a population of 202,500 (2004). Volyn Oblast (Волинська область, Volyns’ka oblast’ or Волинь/ Волынь, Volyn’ in Ukrainian and Russian respectevely). ... The Styr is a river, approximatedly 436 kilometers long, of northwest Ukraine flowing northward to the Pripyat River. ...

Lutsk
Coat of Arms of Lutsk
Motto:
Location of Lutsk
Oblast
Historical Region
Volyn Oblast
Volhynia
Mayor Bohdan Shyba
Area 41.61 kм²
Population
 - city
 - density

202,500 (2004)
5,213 /km²
Founded
City Rights
1085
1432
Latitude
Longitude
50°45′N 25°20′E
Area code +380 3322
sister cities Lublin
Municipal Website

Contents

Image File history File links Lutsk-COA.PNG Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Lutsk ... A motto is a phrase or a short list of words meant to formally describe the general motivation or intention of a social group or organization. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x799, 79 KB) Summary Description:Luzk geographical position Source: own graphic Layout: Sebastian Klüsener Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Lutsk ... Ukraine is subdivided into 24 oblasts (Ukrainian singular: область, oblast; plural області, oblasti), one autonomous republic (автономна республіка, avtonomna respublika), and two cities with special status (singular місто зі спеціальним статусом, misto zi spetsialnym statusom). ... Volyn Oblast (Волинська область, Volyns’ka oblast’ or Волинь/ Волынь, Volyn’ in Ukrainian and Russian respectevely). ... Pochayiv Lavra, the spiritual heart of Volhynia Volhynia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: ; also called Volynia) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Pripyat and Western Bug -- to the north of Galicia and of Podolia. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... World map of the population density in 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were a set of city laws regulating the degree of internal autonomy within cities and villages granted with it by a local ruler. ... Events May 25 - Alfonso VI of Castile takes Toledo, Spain back from the Moors. ... Events June 1 - Battle of San Romano - Florence defeats Siena foundation of Université de Caen In the end of the Hook and Cod wars, Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut and Holland is forced by Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, to abdicate all her estates in his favour; end of Hainaut... A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... For other uses, see Lublin (disambiguation). ...


Name

Lutsk is an ancient Slavic town, mentioned in the Hypatian Chronicle as Luchesk in the records under 1085. The etymology of the name is unclear. There are three hypotheses: The Slavic peoples are defined by their usage of the Slavic languages. ... The Hypatian Codex (Hypatian Chronicle, Ipatiev Chronicle, Russian: ) is a compendium of three chronicles: Primary Chronicle, Kiev Chronicle, and Halych-Volhynian Chronicle. ... Events May 25 - Alfonso VI of Castile takes Toledo, Spain back from the Moors. ...

  • the name is derived from the old-Slavic word luka, an arc or bend (of a river).
  • the name is derived from Luka, the chieftain of the Dulebs, an ancient Slavic tribe living in the area
  • the name is derived from Luchanii (Luchans), an ancient branch of the aforementioned tribe

It is also historically known as Russian: Луцк; Polish: Łuck. The Dulebs (Дулёбы in Russian) were a tribe of Early East Slavs between the 6th (still questionable) and the 10th centuries. ...


History

Lutsk castle
Lutsk castle

According to legends, Luchesk was founded in the 7th century. However, the first known documental reference is from the year 1085. The town was the capital of Halych-Volynia until the foundation of Volodymyr-Volynsky. Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 210 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 210 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Events May 25 - Alfonso VI of Castile takes Toledo, Spain back from the Moors. ... Halych-Volynia principality was the Ruthenian successor state of Kievan Rus on the territory of Rus menora (Rus propria) including the lands of Red Ruthenia, Black Ruthenia, and the remainder of southwestern Rus. This state also briefly controlled the region of Bessarabia and Moldavia. ... Volodymyr-Volynsky (Володимир-Волинський; Polish: Włodzimierz Wołyński, Russian: Vladimir Volynski) is a city in Volyn region, northwestern Ukraine, with a population of 38,000 (2004). ...


The town was founded around a wooden castle built by a local branch of the Rurik Dynasty. At times the stronghold was a capital of the duchy, but since there was no need for a fixed capital in medieval Europe, the town did not become an important centre of commerce or culture. In 1240 the nearby town was seized and looted by the Tartars, but the castle was not harmed. In 1321 George son of Lev, the last of the line, died in a battle with the forces of Gediminas, Grand Duke of Lithuania and the castle was seized by the forces of the latter. In 1349 the town was captured by the forces of Casimir the Great, but it was soon retaken by Lithuania. The Rurik Dynasty was the ruling dynasty of Russia from 862 to 1598. ... Tatars or Tartars is a collective name applied to the Turkic-speaking people of Europe and Asia. ... Gediminas, duke of Lithuania - engraving of XVII ct. ... Casimir the Great Casimir III or the Great (Kazimierz Wielki), (1310-1370), King of Poland , son of Władyslaw I Łokietek (Wladyslaw the Elbow High), 1305-1333 and Jadwiga. ...


During the Lithuanian rule the town began to prosper. Lubart, son of Gediminas, erected a stone castle as a part of his fortification effort. Vytautas the Great founded the proper town by importing colonists (mostly Jews, Tartars, Armenians and Karaims). In 1427 he also transferred the Catholic bishopric from Volodymyr to Luchesk. His heir, Vytautas, was the last monarch to underline the title of Duke of Volhynia and reside in the Luchesk castle. The town grew very fast and by the end of the 15th century there were 19 Orthodox and 2 Catholic churches. It was the seat of two Christian bishops: Catholic and Orthodox. Because of that, the town was nick-named the Volhynian Rome. Coat of arms of Galicia Lubart (Lubko, Lubartas, Dymitr; ca 1300 – 1384) was the King of Galicja (independent kingdom 1253 – 1349) 1340 – 1349, Prince of Polock 13?? – 1342, Wlodzimierz, Luck 1340 – 138?, Wolynia 1340 – 1349, 1350 – 1366, 1371 – 1383. ... Gediminas, duke of Lithuania - engraving of XVII ct. ... Vytautas the Great, 17th century painting The castle in Trakai. ... Tatars or Tartars is a collective name applied to the Turkic-speaking people of Europe and Asia. ... Karaite Judaism is a Jewish denomination characterized by reliance on the Tanakh as the sole scripture, and rejection of the Oral Law (the Mishnah and the Talmuds) as halakha (Legally Binding, i. ... Vladimir (Влади́мир in Russian, Владимир in Serbian), also Volodimir or Volodimer (in Old Russian), Volodymyr (Володимир in Ukrainian), is an ancient Slavic name, most commonly associated with Ukraine and Russia. ... Vytautas the Great - engraving of XVI ct. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus as recounted in the New Testament. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC (mythical), early 1st millennium BC (archaeological) Region Latium Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ...


In 1429 Lutsk was a meeting place for a conference of monarchs on handling the Tartar threat organized by Ladislaus II of Poland and Jadwiga of Poland. Among those invited were Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, Vasili II the Blind of Russia, king of Denmark Eric of Pomerania, Grand Master of the Livonian Order Zisse von Rutenberg, Duke of Szczecin Kazimierz V, Dan II the Hospodar of Wallachia and electors of most of countries of Germany. Tatars or Tartars is a collective name applied to the Turkic-speaking people of Europe and Asia. ... Wladislaus II on Jan Matejkos painting Wladislaus II Jagiello (Polish Władysław II Jagiełło, Lithuanian Jogaila, and in Belarusian as Jahajla (Ягайла)) (c. ... This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... Sigismund (February 14/15, 1368 - December 9, 1437) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1433 to 1437. ... Vasili II Vasiliyevich Tyomniy (Blind) (Василий II Васильевич Тёмный in Russian) (March 10, 1415 – March 27, 1462) was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425-1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of medieval Russian history. ... Eric of Pomerania Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) or Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title), was adopted by Margaret I of Denmark and became the hereditary king of Norway (1389 – 1440), elected king of Denmark (1412 – 1439... The Livonian Brothers of the Sword (Latin Fratres militiae Christi, literally the brothers of the army of Christ), also known as the Christ Knights, Sword Brethren or The Militia of Christ of Livonia, was a military order started in 1202 by Albert von Buxhövden, bishop of Riga (or Prince-Bishop... Szczecin (pronounce: [ʃʧɛtÉ•in], Latin: Stetinum or Scecinum, also Sedinum; Kashubian/Pomeranian Sztetëno; best known worldwide by its German name: Stettin), is now in Poland, its sixth largest city, and the largest Polish seaport on the Baltic. ... Dan II was a ruler of the principality of Wallachia in the 15th Century, ruling an extraordinary 5 times, and succeeded 4 times by Radu II Chelul, his rival for the throne. ... This article is about the region in what is now Southern Romania. ... An elector can be: In the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation, the collegiate of seven Electors (eight since 1648) (Kurfürsten) consisted of those lay or clerical princes who had the right to vote in the election of the king or Holy Roman Emperor; see prince-elector. ...


After the death of Švitrigaila in 1432 Volhynia became a fief of the Crown of Poland and the town became the seat of the governors, and later the Marshalls of the Land of Volhynia. The same year, Lutsk was granted Magdeburg rights. In 1569 Volhynia was fully incorporated into Poland and the town became the capital of the Volhynian Voivodship and the Łuck powiat. After the Union of Lublin the local Orthodox bishop converted to Greek-Catholicism. Pillars of Giedymin (Gedimino stulpai) Å vitrigaila (alternative spellings: ÅšwidrygieÅ‚Å‚o, Svitrigaylo, Svidryhajla, Svidrigailo, Swidrigailo; BolesÅ‚aw; ca 1370 – 10 February 1452 Łuck) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania during 1430 - 1432, Prince of Witebsk 1392 – 1393, 1430 – 1436, Podolia 1400 – 1402, Novhorod-Siversky 1404 – 1408, 1420 – 1438, Czernichow 1419 – 1430... Pochayiv Lavra, the spiritual heart of Volhynia Volhynia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: ; also called Volynia) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Pripyat and Western Bug -- to the north of Galicia and of Podolia. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a vassal knights service (usually fealty, military service, and security). ... Motto: Unofficial mottos of Poland Anthem: Polish: Mazurek DÄ…browskiego (Translation: DÄ…browskis Mazurka) Capital Warsaw Largest city Warsaw Official language(s) Polish[1] Government Republic  â€¢ President  â€¢ Prime minister Lech KaczyÅ„ski Kazimierz Marcinkiewicz Independence  â€¢ Christianisation Date[2]  â€¢ Declared  â€¢ Redeclared 966 10th century November 11, 1918 Accession to EU... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were a set of city laws regulating the degree of internal autonomy within cities and villages granted with it by a local ruler. ... Pochayiv Lavra, the spiritual heart of Volhynia Volhynia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: ; also called Volynia) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Pripyat and Western Bug -- to the north of Galicia and of Podolia. ... Volhynian Voivodship (województwo wołyńskie) was one of the 16 voivodships of Poland prior to 1939 in Second Polish Republic and Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... A powiat (pronounced povyat; plural, powiaty) is the Polish third-level unit of administration, equivalent to a county, district or prefecture (NUTS-3) in some countries. ... The Union of Lublin, painted by Jan Matejko The Union of Lublin (Lithuanian: Liublino unija; Belarusian: Лю́блінская ву́нія; Polish: Unia lubelska) - signed on July 1, 1569 in Lublin, united the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania into a single state, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, with the official... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ...


The town continued to prosper as an important economic centre of the region. By mid-17th century Łuck had approximately 50,000 inhabitants and was one of the biggest in the area. During the Khmelnytskyi Uprising the town was seized by the forces of Colonel Kolodko. Up to 4,000 people were slaughtered, approximately 35,000 fled and the town was looted and partially burnt. It never fully recovered. In addition, in 1781 the city was struck by a fire which destroyed 440 houses, both cathedrals, and several other churches. Combatants Cossacks Poland-Lithuania Commanders Bohdan Khmelnytsky MikoÅ‚aj Potocki, Jeremi WiÅ›niowiecki Khmelnytskyi Uprising (also Chmielnicki Uprising or Chmielnicki Rebellion) is the name of a civil war in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in the years 1648–1654. ...


In 1795 as a result of Partitions of Poland, Lutsk was annexed by Russia. The Voivodship was liquidated and the town lost its significance as the capital of the province (which was moved to Zhytomir). After the November Uprising efforts increased to remove Polish influence and Russian became dominant. The Greek Catholic churches were turned into Orthodox Christian ones which caused the self-liquidation of the Unia here. In 1845 another great fire struck the city further depopulating it. The Partitions of Poland (Polish: Rozbiór Polski or Rozbiory Polski; Lithuanian: Padalijimas) took place in the 18th century and ended the existence of the sovereign Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... A Voivodship (also voivodeship, Romanian: voievodat, Polish: województwo, Serbian: vojvodstvo or vojvodina) was a feudal state in medieval Romania, Hungary, Poland, Russia and Serbia (see Vojvodina), ruled by a Voivod (voivode). ... Zhytomyr (Ukrainian, Russian Житомир, Polish: Żytomierz) is the capital of the Zhytomyrska oblast in Ukraine. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... ...


In 1850 three major forts were built around Lutsk and the town became a small fortress called Mikhailogorod. During the First World War the town was seized by Austria-Hungary on August 29, 1915. The town was slightly damaged. During more than a year of Austro-Hungarian occupation Lutsk became an important military centre with the headquarters of the IV Army under Archduke Franz Ferdinand stationed there. However, poor food supply led to a plague of epidemic typhus which decimated the city's inhabitants. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Archduke Francis Ferdinand. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Typhus. ...


On June 4, 1916 four Russian armies under general Aleksei Brusilov started the so called Brusilov Offensive. After up to three days of heavy artillery barrage, the Battle of Lutsk started. On June 7, 1916 the Russian forces recaptured the city. After the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk in 1917 the city was seized by Germany on February 7, 1918. On February 22, 1918 the town was transferred by the withdrawing German army to the forces loyal to Semen Petlura. However, on May 16, 1919 it was captured by Polish forces under Gen. Aleksander Karnicki. June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... General Brusilov at 64 (1917) Aleksei Alekseevich Brusilov (Russian: Алексей Алексеевич Брусилов) (August 19, 1853 - March 17, 1926) was a Russian cavalry general most noted for the development of a military offensive tactic used in the Brusilov offensive of 1916. ... Combatants Russian Empire Austria-Hungary Imperial Germany Commanders Aleksei Brusilov Conrad von Hötzendorf Alexander von Linsingen Strength 40+ infantry divisions (573,000 men) 15 cavalry divisions (60,000 men) 39 infantry divisions (437,000 men) 10 Cavalry divisions (30,000 men) Casualties ~500,000 men killed and wounded 1... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was a peace treaty signed on March 3, 1918, at Brest, formerly Brest-Litovsk, between Russia and the Central Powers, marking Russias exit from World War I. The treaty was practically obsolete before the end of the year but is significant as a chief... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... February 22 is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Symon Petlyura (Симон Петлюра; also spelt Simon, Semen, Semyen Petliura or Petlura, May 10, 1879 – May 25, 1926) was a Ukrainian politician. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


After the World War I Łuck was annexed by the newly-reborn Poland as the capital of the Volhynian Voivodship. It was connected by railroad to Lwów and Przemyśl and several factories were built both in the city and its outskirts. 13 Kresowy Light Artillery Regiment was stationed in the city centre. In 1938 the construction of the biggest and the most modern radio transmitter was started in the city. On January 1, 1939 Łuck itself had 39,000 inhabitants (approximately 17,500 Jews and 13,500 Poles). The powiat formed around the town had 316,970 inhabitants, with 59% of Ukrainians, 19.5% of Poles, 14% of Jews and approximately 23,000 Czechs and Germans. Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total of dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian deaths: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First... Volhynian Voivodship (województwo wołyńskie) was one of the 16 voivodships of Poland prior to 1939 in Second Polish Republic and Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Motto: Semper fidelis Oblast Lviv Oblast Municipal government City council (Львівська міська рада) Mayor City chairman Lyubomyr Bunyak Area 171,01 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 808,900 ? 4786/km² Founded City rights 13th century 1353 Latitude Longitude 49°51′ N 24°01′ E Area code +0322 Car plates  ? Twin towns Corning, Freiburg... Places PrzemyÅ›l – a city in SE Poland, probably established by an unknown duke called PrzemysÅ‚ PrzemyÅ›l Voivodship – a Polish province from 1975 to 1998 People PrzemysÅ‚, PrzemysÅ‚aw, PÅ™emysl or Przemko is a common Slavic name. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A powiat (pronounced povyat; plural, powiaty) is the Polish third-level unit of administration, equivalent to a county, district or prefecture (NUTS-3) in some countries. ...


In 1939 as a result of the September Campaign and the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact Lutsk, along with the rest of eastern Volyn was annexed by the Soviet Union. Most of the factories (including the almost-finished radio station) were dismantled and sent to Russia. Approximately 10 000 of the city's inhabitants (mostly Poles) were sent to Gulag (more than 7 000 people) or arrested by the NKVD (approximately 1,550). Combatants Poland Germany Soviet Union Slovakia Commanders Edward Rydz-Śmigły Fedor von Bock (Army Group North) Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group South) Ferdinand Čatloš (Field Army Bernolak) Strength 39 divisions 16 brigades 4,300 guns 880 tanks 400 aircraft Total: 1,000,000[1] 56 German divisions, 33+ Soviet... Molotov signs the German-Soviet non-aggression pact. ... Gulag ( , Russian: ) is an acronym for Главное Управление Исправительно—Трудовых Лагерей и колоний, Glavnoye Upravleniye Ispravitelno-trudovykh Lagerey i kolonii, The Chief Directorate [or Administration] of Corrective Labour Camps and Colonies of the NKVD. Anne Applebaum, in her book Gulag: A History, explains: Literally, the word GULAG is an acronym, meaning Glavnoe Upravlenie Lagerei, or Main Camp... The NKVD (Narodnyi Komissariat Vnutrennikh Del )(Russian: НКВД, Народный комиссариат внутренних дел) or Peoples Commisariat for Internal Affairs was a government department which handled a number of the Soviet Unions affairs of state. ...


After the start of Operation Barbarossa the city was captured by the Wehrmacht. Most of the Jewish inhabitants of the city were forced into a ghetto and then murdered at the Polanka hill nearby the city. During the Massacres of Poles in Volhynia approximately 10,000 Poles were murdered by the Ukrainian Uprising Army in the area. Combatants Axis Powers Soviet Union Commanders Supreme commander: Adolf Hitler Supreme commander: Josef Stalin Strength ~ 3. ... German cavalry and motorized units entering Poland from East Prussia during the Polish Campaign of 1939 Wehrmacht (Defence force) was the name of the armed forces of Germany from 1935 to 1945. ... A ghetto is an area where people from a specific racial or ethnic background or united in a given culture or religion live as a group, voluntarily or involuntarily, in milder or stricter seclusion. ... The Massacre of Poles in Volhyn was an ethnic cleansing conducted in Volhyn (Polish: ) during World War II. In the course of it, up to 80,000 Poles are thought to have been massacred by the nationalist Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainska Povstanska Armiya, or UPA). ... Ukrainian Insurgent Army (Ukrainian Ukrainska Povstanska Armiya, UPA) was a guerilla army formed on October 14, 1942, in Volhynia. ...


Following the end of the war most of the Polish inhabitants of the city were forcibly expelled, mostly to the Polish Regained Territories. The city eventually became an industrial centre in the Ukrainian SSR. Note: although the term recovered territories has a clear meaning in Poland and Polish historiography, it is not a widely accepted term or concept in English speaking nations. ... State motto: Пролетарі всіх країн, єднайтеся! Official language None. ...


Being one of the largest cities of Western Ukraine, in 2003 Lutsk hosted the General Consulate of Poland.


Famous people born or working in Lutsk

Lesya Ukrainka Larysa Petrivna Kosach-Kvitka (Лариса Петрівна Косач-Квітка, February 23, 1871 – August 1, 1913) better known under her literary pseudonym Lesya Ukrainka (Леся Українка), was one of Ukraines best-known writers. ... Alojzy FeliÅ„ski (1771 in Łuck - 1820 in Krzemieniec) was a Polish writer. ... Józef Ignacy Kraszewski (1812-1887) was a Polish writer and novelist. ... Peter Bondra, #12 (#10 while with the Ottawa Senators in the 2003-2004 NHL season) was born on February 7, 1968 in Luck in the U.S.S.R., now in Ukraine. ... Slovakia Hockey Logo The Slovak national (mens) ice hockey team is one of the major ice hockey national teams in the world. ...

Places of interest

  • parts of two castles (the Upper Castle from the 13th century and the Lower Castle from the 14th century)
  • a Catholic cathedral (built 1610 as a Jesuit church, reconstructed in 1781)
  • an Orthodox cathedral (built 1755 as a church and monastery of Bernardines)
  • Several monasteries, both Catholic and Orthodox: Basilians (17th century), Dominicans (17th century), Trinitarians (18th century) and Charites (?) (18th century)
  • Two 16th century Greek-Catholic churches
  • Fortified synagogue (Little Castle, 15th century)

The Society of Jesus (Societas Iesu (S.I. or S.J.) in Latin) is a Christian religious order of the Roman Catholic Church in direct service to the Pope. ... This article chronicles the spread of the Franciscan Order of Roman Catholic friars in Modern Times. ... The Basilian Fathers, also known as The Congregation of Saint Basil, is an international order of Roman Catholic priests and students studying for the priesthood. ... The Trinitarians are an order of monks founded at Rome in 1198 by St. ... Lesko synagogue, Poland A synagogue (Hebrew: בית כנסת ; beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: שול, shul) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ...

Industry and commerce

Lutsk is an important centre of industry. Factories of cars, shoes, bearings, furniture, machines and electronics, as well as weaveries, steel mills and a chemical plant are located in the area.


Culture and science

The city has an opera, an art gallery and a regional museum. A school for teachers (subordinate to the Lviv Polytechnic) is located in the city. Lviv Polytechnic (full name Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukrainian Національний університет Львівська політехніка, Polish Politechnika Lwowska) is the biggest scientifical university in Lviv. ...


External links

Commons logo
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Lutsk
  • (English)/(Ukrainian) Official website of Lutsk City Council
  • (English) Lutsk - Steinberg family history site
  • (Ukrainian) European Lutsk
  • (Ukrainian) Lutsk city blog - Live in Lutsk, news, photo, links
  • (Polish) Łuck - Illustrated Guidebook to Wolyń, 1929


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

COA of Volyn Oblast Cities in Volyn Oblast Flag of Ukraine
Oblast capital: Lutsk

Berestechko | Horokhiv | Kamin-Kashyrskyi | Kivertsi | Kovel | Lyuboml | Novovolynsk | Rzhysche | Ustyluh | Volodymyr-Volynskyi Image File history File links Wolhynien-oblast-COA.PNG File links The following pages link to this file: Volyn Oblast ... Volyn Oblast (Волинська область, Volyns’ka oblast’ or Волинь/ Волынь, Volyn’ in Ukrainian and Russian respectevely). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Coat of Arms, circa 1993 Kovel (In Ukrainian and in Russian: Ковель, in Polish: Kowel) is a town now situated in western Ukraine in the Volyn oblast. ... Lyuboml (Ukrainian: Любомль; Polish: ) is a city in Volyn Oblast, Ukraine. ... Volodymyr-Volynsky (Володимир-Волинський; Polish: Włodzimierz Wołyński, Russian: Vladimir Volynski) is a city in Volyn region, northwestern Ukraine, with a population of 38,000 (2004). ...


 
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Subdivisions of Ukraine:
Cherkasy Oblast | Chernihiv Oblast | Chernivtsi Oblast | Autonomous Republic of Crimea | Dnipropetrovsk Oblast | Donetsk Oblast | Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast | Kharkiv Oblast | Kherson Oblast | Khmelnytskyi Oblast | Kiev City | Kiev Oblast | Kirovohrad Oblast | Luhansk Oblast | Lviv Oblast | Mykolaiv Oblast | Odessa Oblast | Poltava Oblast | Rivne Oblast | Sevastopol City | Sumy Oblast | Ternopil Oblast | Vinnytsia Oblast | Volyn Oblast | Zakarpattia Oblast | Zaporizhia Oblast | Zhytomyr Oblast
Administrative centers of subdivision units:
Cherkasy | Chernihiv | Chernivtsi | Dnipropetrovsk | Donetsk | Ivano-Frankivsk | Kharkiv | Kherson | Khmelnytskyi | Kiev | Kirovohrad | Luhansk | Lutsk | Lviv | Mykolaiv | Odessa | Poltava | Rivne | Sevastopol | Simferopol | Sumy | Ternopil | Uzhhorod | Vinnytsia | Zaporizhia | Zhytomyr

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lutsk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1305 words)
Lutsk (Ukrainian: Луцьк) is the capital of the Volyn Oblast, Ukraine.
Lutsk is an ancient Slavic town, mentioned in the Hypatian Chronicle as Luchesk in the records under 1085.
In 1429 Lutsk was a meeting place for a conference of monarchs on handling the Tartar threat organized by Ladislaus II of Poland and Jadwiga of Poland.
Lutsk, Ukraine (7158 words)
Lutsk is 386km from Kiev and 62km from Rovno.
Lutsk is 480km from Kiev and 62km from Rovno.
Lutsk is 400km from Kiev and 62km from Rovno.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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