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Encyclopedia > Lusitania
In red is the province of Lusitania within the Roman Empire, AD 117
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Lusitania was an ancient Roman province including approximately all of modern Portugal south of the Douro river, and part of modern Spain (the present autonomous community of Extremadura and a small part of the province of Salamanca). It was named after the Lusitani or Lusitanian people (an Indo-European people, probably Proto-Celtic or Celt). Its capital was Emerita Augusta (currently Mérida), and it was initially part of the Roman Republic province of Hispania Ulterior, before becoming a province of its own in the Roman Empire. This article is about the year 117. ... Portugal is a European nation whose origins go back to the Early Middle Ages. ... The Prehistory of the Iberian peninsula begins with the arrival of the first hominins c. ... Oestreminis are deemed to be the first native people of Portugal. ... Ophiussa is the ancient name given by the ancient Greeks to the Portuguese territory. ... Gallaecia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Lusitanians (or Lusitani in Latin) were a tribe, or various tribes, from the western Iberian peninsula (province of Lusitania), who spoke a Lusitanian language until the conquest of their territory by the Romans. ... The Celtici were an ancient celtic tribe akin to the Lusitanians and Calaicians or Gallaeci, living in what today is the province of Alentejo in modern Portugal. ... Ancient Map of the Gulf of Cádiz. ... Peoples of the Iberian peninsula just before the Roman process of conquest The Conquest of Hispania was a historical period that began with the Roman landing at Empúries in 218 B.C. and ended with the conclusion of the Roman conquest of the Iberian Peninsula (or Hispania) by Caesar... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Publius Cornelius Scipio†, Tiberius Sempronius Longus Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Gaius Flaminius†, Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus†, Lucius Aemilius Paullus†, Gaius Terentius Varro, Marcus Livius Salinator, Gaius Claudius Nero, Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus†, Masinissa, Minucius†, Servilius Geminus† Hannibal Barca, Hasdrubal Barca†, Mago Barca†, Hasdrubal Gisco†, Syphax... The Lusitanian War, called the Purinos Polemos (meaning Fiery War),[1] was a war of resistance fought between the advancing legions of the Roman Republic and the Lusitani tribes of Hispania Ulterior from 155 to 139 BC. The Lusitani revolted on two separate occassions (155 and again 146 BC) and... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... Gallaecia or Callaecia (from Gaulish *gal-laikos smoke?-hero/warrior) was the name of a Roman province that comprised a territory in the north-west of Hispania (approximately the current Galicia of Spain and the north of Portugal). ... A votive crown belonging to Reccesuinth (653–672) The Visigoths (Latin: ) were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe, the Ostrogoths being the other. ... The Visigothic Kingdom was an European power in the 5e en de 7e censury, created yn Gaul by the German people of the Visigoths when the Romains lost their control of their empire. ... Suebi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... For other uses, see Reconquista (disambiguation). ... Flag Motto: Hoc Signo Tuetur Pius, Hoc Signo Vincitur Inimicus (English: With this sign thou shalt defend the pious, with this sign thou shalt defeat the enemy) Capital Cangas de Onis, San Martín, Pravia, Oviedo Language(s) Asturian, Latin Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King  - 718-737 Pelayo of... Coat of arms Kingdom of León, 1030 Capital León Language(s) Mainly Latin and Astur-Leonese. ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... The County of Coimbra (Portuguese: Condado de Coimbra) was a political entity instituted as a military unit of defense in the borders of the Kingdom of Galicia in the Iberian Peninsula, and in what is today central Portugal. ... History of Portugal Series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383-1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... Anthem: O Hino da Carta (from 1834) The Kingdom of Portugal in 1561 Capital Lisbon¹ Language(s) Portuguese Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy King  - 1139-1185 Afonso I  - 1908-1910 Manuel II History  - Established 26 July, 1139  - Peninsular War 1808-1814  - Brazilian suzerainty 1815  - Brazilian independence October 12, 1822  - Revolution... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... The 1383–1385 crisis is a period of civil war and anarchy in Portuguese history that began with the death of King Fernando I of Portugal, who left no male heirs, and ended with the accession to the throne of King João I in 1385, in the wake of... For additional context, see History of Portugal and Portuguese Empire. ... An anachronous map of the Portuguese Empire (1415-1999). ... // Main article: Portuguese Empire An anachronous map of the Portuguese Empire (1415-1999). ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista Castilian and Leonese rule First County of Portugal County of Coimbra Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385... The history of Portugal from the beginning of Maria Is reign in 1777 to the end of the Liberal Wars in 1834 spans a complex historic period in which several important political and military events led to the end of the absolutist regime and to the installment of a... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... Estado Novo (Portuguese for New State; pron. ... The Portuguese Third Republic is a period in the history of Portugal corresponding to the current democratic regime installed after the Carnation Revolution of 25 April 1974, that put an end to the quasi-fascist Estado Novo regime of António de Oliveira Salazar and Marcello Caetano. ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... ĢÕãÒòùäÊŞ Ä‚ ßõî ŔûñÑèđ òΝ ýëŗ pæŇţž This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista Castilian and Leonese rule First County of Portugal County of Coimbra Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385... History of Portugal series Prehistoric Portugal Pre-Roman Portugal Roman Lusitania and Gallaecia Visigoths and Suevi Moorish rule and Reconquista First County of Portugal Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal Second County of Portugal Establishment of the Monarchy Consolidation of the Monarchy 1383–1385 Crisis Discoveries Portuguese Empire 1580 Crisis Iberian... Ajuda Library, created in the 15th century as Royal Library. Mother of the Portuguese and Brazilian National Libraries. ... // In the early days of the Catholic Church, several local liturgies developed, such as the Gallican in France, the Sarum in England, the antique Roman in Rome, the Ambrosian rite in Milan. ... This is a historical timeline of Portugal. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... The Douro or Duero (Latin: Durius, Spanish: Duero, Portuguese: Douro, pron. ... Capital Mérida Official languages Spanish; Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 5th  41,634 km²  8. ... Salamanca province. ... The Lusitanians (or Lusitani in Latin) were a tribe, or various tribes, from the western Iberian peninsula (province of Lusitania), who spoke a Lusitanian language until the conquest of their territory by the Romans. ... For the language group, see Indo-European languages. ... The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the putative ancestor of all the known Celtic languages. ... This article is about the European people. ... Roman Theater Mérida is the capital of the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain. ... Mérida is the capital of the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ... During the Roman Republic, Hispania Ulterior was a region of Hispania roughly located in Baetica and in the Guadalquivir valley of modern Spain. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Pre-Roman Lusitania

Strabo in his Geography mentions that the ancient people called Lusitania to the lands north of river Douro, the land that in his own time was known as Gallaecia.[1] The Greek geographer Strabo in a 16th century engraving. ... The Douro or Duero (Latin: Durius, Spanish: Duero, Portuguese: Douro, pron. ... Gallaecia or Callaecia (from Gaulish *gal-laikos smoke?-hero/warrior) was the name of a Roman province that comprised a territory in the north-west of Hispania (approximately the current Galicia of Spain and the north of Portugal). ...


Origin of the name

The etymology of Lusitania, like the origin of the Lusitani who gave the province their name, is unclear. The name may be of Celtic origin: Lus and Tanus, "tribe of Lusus". The name may derive from Lucis, an ancient people mentioned in Ora Maritima and Tan, from celtic Tan (Stan), or Tain , meaning a region or implying a country of waters, a root word that formerly meant a prince or sovereign governor of a region. [2] [3] [4] The name has been connected with the personal celtic name Luso and with the god Lugh.[5] Avienus was a Latin writer of the 4th century. ... For other subjects with similar names, see Lug. ...


Ancient Romans, such as Pliny the Elder (Natural History, 3.5) and Varro (cited by Pliny), speculated that the name Lusitania was of Roman origin, as when Pliny says lusum enim liberi patris aut lyssam cum eo bacchantium nomen dedisse lusitaniae et pana praefectum eius universae: that Lusitania takes its name from the lusus associated with Bacchus and the lyssa of his Bacchantes, and that Pan is its governor. Lusus is usually translated as 'game' or 'play', while lyssa is a borrowing from the Greek λυσσα, 'frenzy' or 'rage', and sometimes Rage personified; for later poets Lusus and Lyssa become flesh-and-blood companions of Bacchus. Luís de Camões' Os Lusíadas, which portrays Lusus as the founder of Lusitania, extends these ideas, which have no connection with modern etymology. Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... Marcus Terentius Varro ([[116 BC]–27 BC), also known as Varro Reatinus to distinguish him from his contemporary Varro Atacinus, was a Roman scholar and writer, who the Romans came to call the most learned of all the Romans. ... In Greek mythology, Maenads [MEE-nads] were female worshippers of Dionysus, the Greek god of mystery, wine and intoxication. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ... Monument to Luís de Camões, Lisbon Luís Vaz de Camões (pron. ... Front of the first edition of Os Lusíadas Os Lusíadas, pron. ...


Lusitanians

Main article: Lusitanians

The Lusitani, who were Indo-Europeans and may have come from the Alps, established themselves in the region in the 6th century BC, but historians and archeologists are still undecided about their origins. Some modern authors consider them to be an indigenous people who were celticized culturally and possibly genetically through intermarriage. This hypothesis is also backed by Avienus, who wrote ORA MARITIMA, inspired by documents from 6th century BC. The Lusitanians (or Lusitani in Latin) were a tribe, or various tribes, from the western Iberian peninsula (province of Lusitania), who spoke a Lusitanian language until the conquest of their territory by the Romans. ... Indo-Europeans are speakers of Indo-European languages. ... Alp redirects here. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time...


The investigator Lambrino defended the position that the Lusitanians were a tribal group of Celtic origin related to the Lusones (a tribe that inhabited the east of Iberia). Possibly, both tribes came from the Swiss mountains. But some prefer to see the Lusitanians as a native Iberian tribe, resulting from intermarriage between different tribes. The Lusones were an ancient Celtiberian (Pre-Roman) people of the Iberian peninsula (the Roman Hispania). ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ...


The first area colonized by the Lusitani was probably the Douro valley and the region of Beira Alta (present day Portugal); in Beira they stayed until they defeated the Celts and other tribes, then they expanded to cover a territory that reached Estremadura before the arrival of the Romans. The Douro or Duero (Latin: Durius, Spanish: Duero, Portuguese: Douro, pron. ... Beira Alta is a Portuguese province in the Northern Part of the country. ... Beira (pron. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... Estremadura Estremadura is a historical province of Portugal. ... This article is about the state which existed from the 6th century BC to the 1st century BC. For the state which existed in the 18th century, see Roman Republic (18th century). ...


War against Rome

Main article: Lusitanian War

The Lusitani are mentioned for the first time in Livy (218 BC) and are described as Carthaginian mercenaries; they are reported as fighting against Rome in 194 BC, sometimes allied with other Celtiberian tribes. Peoples of the Iberian peninsula just before the Roman process of conquest The Conquest of Hispania was a historical period that began with the Roman landing at Empúries in 218 B.C. and ended with the conclusion of the Roman conquest of the Iberian Peninsula (or Hispania) by Caesar... Combatants Roman Republic Carthage Commanders Publius Cornelius Scipio†, Tiberius Sempronius Longus Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Gaius Flaminius†, Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus†, Lucius Aemilius Paullus†, Gaius Terentius Varro, Marcus Livius Salinator, Gaius Claudius Nero, Gnaeus Cornelius Scipio Calvus†, Masinissa, Minucius†, Servilius Geminus† Hannibal Barca, Hasdrubal Barca†, Mago Barca†, Hasdrubal Gisco†, Syphax... The First Celtiberian War was the first of a series of three wars known as the Celtiberian Wars. ... The Lusitanian War, called the Purinos Polemos (meaning Fiery War),[1] was a war of resistance fought between the advancing legions of the Roman Republic and the Lusitani tribes of Hispania Ulterior from 155 to 139 BC. The Lusitani revolted on two separate occassions (155 and again 146 BC) and... The Numantine War[1] (from Bellum Numantinum in Appians Roman History) was the last conflict of the Celtiberian Wars fought by the Romans to subdue those people along the Ebro. ... Quintus Sertorius (died 72 BC), Roman statesman and general. ... The Cantabrian Wars (29 BC-19 BC) occurred during the Roman conquest of the ancient province of Cantabria. ... The Lusitanian War, called the Purinos Polemos (meaning Fiery War),[1] was a war of resistance fought between the advancing legions of the Roman Republic and the Lusitani tribes of Hispania Ulterior from 155 to 139 BC. The Lusitani revolted on two separate occassions (155 and again 146 BC) and... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... The Roman empire in 218 BC (in dark red) A Carthaginian army under Hannibal attacks Romes Spanish allies. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC - 190s BC - 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC Years: 199 BC 198 BC 197 BC 196 BC 195 BC - 194 BC - 193 BC 192 BC... The Celtiberians dwelt in the Iberian Peninsula and spoke a Celtic language. ...


In 179 BC the praetor Lucius Postumius Albinus celebrated a triumph over the Lusitani, but in 155 BC, on the command of Punicus (perhaps a Carthaginian general) first and Cesarus after, the Lusitani reached Gibraltar. Here they were defeated by the praetor Lucius Mummius. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC - 170s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 184 BC 183 BC 182 BC 181 BC 180 BC - 179 BC - 178 BC 177 BC 176... Lucius Postumius Albinus (2nd century BC), Roman Praetor who celebrated an important triumph over the Lusitanians in 179 BC. ... A Roman Triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome, held to publicly honour the military commander (dux) of a notably successful foreign war or campaign and to display the glories of Roman victory. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC - 150s BC - 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC Years: 160 BC 159 BC 158 BC 157 BC 156 BC - 155 BC - 154 BC 153 BC... Lucius Mummius (2nd century BC), surnamed Achaicus was a Roman statesman and general. ...


Servius Sulpicius Galba organized a false armistice, but while the Lusitani celebrated this new alliance, he massacred them, selling the survivors as slaves; this caused a new rebellion led by Viriathus, who was soon killed by traitors paid by the Romans, after having led a successful guerrilla campaign against Rome and their local allies. Romans scored other victories with proconsul Decimus Junius Brutus Callaicus and Gaius Marius (113 BC), but still the Lusitani resisted with a long guerilla war; they later joined Sertorius' (a renegade Roman General) troops and were finally defeated by Augustus. Servius Sulpicius Galba (December 24, 3 BC - January 15, 69) was Roman Emperor from June AD 68 until his death. ... Statue of Viriathus, at Viseu, Portugal Viriathus (known as Viriato in Portuguese and Castilian) (? - 139 BC) was the most important leader of the Lusitanian people that resisted Roman expansion into the regions of Western Iberia, where the Roman province of Lusitania would be established (in the areas comprising Portugal, south... Decimus Junius Brutus Callaicus was a Roman politician and general of the 2nd century BC. Decimus Junius Brutus lead the Roman legions in the conquest of western Iberia after the death of Viriathus, chieftain of the Lusitanians. ... So-called “Marius”, Munich Glyptothek (Inv. ... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC - 110s BC - 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC Years: 118 BC 117 BC 116 BC 115 BC 114 BC - 113 BC - 112 BC 111 BC... Quintus Sertorius (died 72 BC), Roman statesman and general. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


152 BC - From this date onwards the Roman Republic has difficulties in recruiting soldiers for the wars in Hispania, deemed particularly brutal.


Read more at Timeline of Portuguese history (Pre-Roman). This is a historical timeline of Portugal. ...


Roman province

Roman Hispania under Diocletian 293 BCE; Lusitania found in the extreme west
Roman Hispania under Diocletian 293 BCE; Lusitania found in the extreme west
And yet the country north of the Tagus, Lusitania, is the greatest of the Iberian nations, and is the nation against which the Romans waged war for the longest times.[6]

With Lusitania (and Asturia and Gallaecia), Rome had completed the conquest of the Iberian peninsula, which was then divided by Augustus (25-20 BC) into the eastern and northern Hispania Tarraconensis, the southwestern Hispania Baetica and the western Provincia Lusitana. Originally Lusitania included the territories of Asturia and Gallaecia, but these were later ceded to the jurisdiction of the new Provincia Tarraconensis and the former remained as Provincia Lusitania et Vettones. Its northern border was along the Douro, while on its eastern side its border passed through Salmantica and Caesarobriga to the Anas (Guadiana) river. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (882x667, 143 KB) Summary Iberian Peninsula under Dioclecian, 260 AD. Original image Hispania2. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (882x667, 143 KB) Summary Iberian Peninsula under Dioclecian, 260 AD. Original image Hispania2. ... Capital Oviedo Area  - total  - % of Spain Ranked 10th 10 604 km² 2,1% Population  - Total (2003)  - % of Spain  - Density Ranked 12th 1 056 789 2,5% 99,65/km² Demonym  - English  - Spanish Asturian asturiano/a, astur Statute of Autonomy January 11, 1982 ISO 3166-2 O Parliamentary representation  Congress seats... Gallaecia or Callaecia (from Gaulish *gal-laikos smoke?-hero/warrior) was the name of a Roman province that comprised a territory in the north-west of Hispania (approximately the current Galicia of Spain and the north of Portugal). ... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... Roman Imperial province of Hispania Tarraconensis, 120 AD Hispania Tarraconensis was one of three Roman provinces in Hispania. ... Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 CE In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ... The Vettones were one of the pre-Roman peoples of Iberia, dwelling in the northwestern part of the meseta— the high central upland plain of the Iberian peninsula, the region where the Spanish provinces of Avila and Salamanca are today, as well as parts of Zamora, Toledo and Cáceres. ... Guadiana (Latin Anas, Spanish Guadiana, Portuguese Guadiana) - one of the major rivers of Spain, part of it is the border with Portugal, ends in the Atlantic Ocean. ...

Elaborate geometrically patterned mosaic floors survive at Conímbriga
Elaborate geometrically patterned mosaic floors survive at Conímbriga

The capital of Lusitania was Augusta Emerita (currently Mérida) in Spain. Modern Coimbra, was the Roman city of Aeminium, and near modern Condeixa-a-Nova, was the Roman city of Conímbriga. Conímbriga was not the largest city of Lusitania, but it is the best preserved. Built on a long-inhabited site, it was sacked by the Suevi in 468, and its inhabitants fled to Aeminium, which inherited its name and is nowadays known as Coimbra. Conimbriga's city walls are largely intact, and the mosaic floors (illustration, left) and foundations of many houses and public buildings remain. In the baths, visitors can view the network of stone heating ducts (the hypocaust) beneath the now-missing floors. Archaeologists estimate that, though excavations began in 1898, only 10 percent of the city has been excavated. ~Photo by: João Miranda (Portuguese Wikipedia) File links The following pages link to this file: Lusitania Portugal History of Portugal Categories: GFDL images ... ~Photo by: João Miranda (Portuguese Wikipedia) File links The following pages link to this file: Lusitania Portugal History of Portugal Categories: GFDL images ... Mérida is the capital of the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain. ... Location    - Country  Portugal  - Region Centro  - Subregion Baixo Mondego  - District or A.R. Coimbra Mayor Carlos Encarnação  - Party PSD Area 319. ... Aeminium was the ancient name of the current city of Coimbra, in Portugal. ... Condeixa-a-Nova, also known as Condeixa, is a town and a municipality in the district of Coimbra, Portugal. ... Conímbriga is one of the largest Roman settlements in Portugal, and is classified as a National Monument. ... The Suebi or Suevi were a Germanic people whose origin was near the Baltic Sea . ... Aeminium was the ancient name of the current city of Coimbra, in Portugal. ...


Under Diocletian, Lusitania kept its borders and was ruled by a praeses, later by a consularis; finally, it was united with the other provinces to form the Diocesis Hispaniarum ("Diocese of Hispania"). Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ...


References

  1. ^ Strabo, Geography, Book III, Chapter 4
  2. ^ An Universal History From the Earliest Account of Time, 1747, p. 22.
  3. ^ Charles Vallancey, Collectanea de Rebus Hibernicis, V.6, pt.1, 1786, p.279.
  4. ^ Edward Lhuyd & John O'Brien, Focalóir gaoidhilge-sax-bhéarla, or An Irish-English dictionary, 1768, p. 464.
  5. ^ Room,Adrian. Placenames of the World. pg 228
  6. ^ Strabo.Geography
  • An etymological lexicon of Proto-Celtic

See also

The Lusitanians (or Lusitani in Latin) were a tribe, or various tribes, from the western Iberian peninsula (province of Lusitania), who spoke a Lusitanian language until the conquest of their territory by the Romans. ... Lusitanian (or Ancient Portuguese) Gods were later related with the Celtic and Roman invaders. ... The Lusitanian language (so named after the Lusitani or Lusitanians) was a paleo-Iberian Indo-European language known by five inscriptions and numerous names of places (toponyms) and of gods (theonyms). ... Ophiussa is the ancient name given by the ancient Greeks to the Portuguese territory. ... Portugal is a European nation whose origins go back to the Early Middle Ages. ... This is a historical timeline of Portugal. ... This is a historical timeline of Portugal. ... This is a historical timeline of Portugal. ... Main language areas in Iberia circa 250 BC. This is a list of the Pre-Roman people of the Iberian peninsula (the Roman Hispania - modern Andorra, Portugal and Spain). ...

External links

  • Detailed map of the Pre-Roman Peoples of Iberia (around 200 BC)
Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus The Western Roman Empire in 395. ... The Praetorian Prefecture of Gaul (Latin: Praefectura Praetorio Galliarum) was one of four large Praetorian prefectures into which the Late Roman Empire was divided. ... Capital Augusta Treverorum Historical era Late Antiquity  - Establishment 314  - last Roman territory overrun by Franks 486 The Diocese of Gaul (Latin: Dioecesis Galliarum, diocese of the Gaul [province]s) was a diocese of the later Roman Empire, under the praetorian prefecture of Gaul. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica in 58 BCE The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica around 120 CE Gallia Belgica was a Roman province located in what is now the southern part of the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, northeastern France, and western Germany. ... The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica in 58 BCE The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica around 120 CE Gallia Belgica was a Roman province located in what is now the southern part of the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, northeastern France, and western Germany. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces | German history | Germany | History of the Germanic peoples ... The Roman province of Germania Inferior, 120 AD Germania Inferior was a Roman province located on the left bank of the Rhine, in todays southern and western Netherlands, the whole of Belgium and Luxembourg, parts of north-eastern France, and western Germany. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... A map of Gaul in the 1st century BC, showing the relative position of the Sequani tribe. ... Capital Burdigala Historical era Late Antiquity  - Establishment 314  - Disestablished unknown The Diocese of the Seven Provinces (Latin: Dioecesis Septem Provinciarum), originally called the Diocese of Vienne (Latin: Dioecesis Viennensis) after the city of Vienna (modernVienne), was a diocese of the later Roman Empire, under the praetorian prefecture of Gaul. ... Capital Burdigala Historical era Late Antiquity  - Establishment 314  - Disestablished unknown The Diocese of the Seven Provinces (Latin: Dioecesis Septem Provinciarum), originally called the Diocese of Vienne (Latin: Dioecesis Viennensis) after the city of Vienna (modernVienne), was a diocese of the later Roman Empire, under the praetorian prefecture of Gaul. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Gallia Aquitania, a province of The Roman Empire Gallia Aquitania, in ancient geography, was a province of the Roman Empire, located in present-day southwest France and bordered by the provinces of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis. ... Gallia Aquitania, a province of The Roman Empire Gallia Aquitania, in ancient geography, was a province of the Roman Empire, located in present-day southwest France and bordered by the provinces of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis. ... Map of the historical and cultural area of Gascony. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 AD In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ... Capital Palma de Mallorca Official language(s) Spanish and Catalan Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 17th  4,992 km²  1. ... Roman Imperial province of Hispania Tarraconensis, 120 AD Hispania Tarraconensis was a Roman province in what is known today as modern Spain. ... Gallaecia or Callaecia (from Gaulish *gal-laikos smoke?-hero/warrior) was the name of a Roman province that comprised a territory in the north-west of Hispania (approximately the current Galicia of Spain and the north of Portugal). ... In the first century A.D., the Emperor Claudius divided the Roman province of Mauretania into Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Tingitana. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Maxima Caesariensis was the name of one of the four provinces of Roman Britain, as named in the Verona List, dated AD 312 - 314. ... Britannia Prima was one of the provinces of Roman Britain created c. ... Britannia Secunda was one of the provinces of Roman Britain created c. ... Flavia Caesariensis was one of the provinces of Roman Britain. ... Valentia was the name of a consular northern province of Roman Britain. ... Capital Ravenna from 476 Historical era Late Antiquity  - Establishment 318  - End of Western Empire 476  - Ostrogothic conquest 493  - Start of Gothic War 535  - Lombard invasion of Italy 568  - Foundation of Exarchate of Ravenna 584 The Praetorian Prefecture of Italy (Latin: Praefectura Praetorio Italiae, in its full form Praefectura Praetorio Italiae... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... A portion of the Tabula Peutingeriana, a Roman map of the 4th century, depicting the southern part of Italia. ... Samnium (Oscan Safinim) was a region of the southern Apennines in Italy that was home to the Samnites, a group of Sabellic tribes that controlled the area from about 600 BC to about 290 BC. Samnium was delimited by Latium in the north, by Lucania in the south, by Campania... For other uses, see Corsica (disambiguation). ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... Emilia is an Italian historical region which approximately corresponds to modern Emilia-Romagna regions western and north-eastern portion. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Diocese of Africa (Latin: Dioecesis Africae) was a diocese of the later Roman Empire, incorporating the provinces of North Africa. ... Africa Province, Roman Empire ... At the end of the third century A.D., the Emperor Diocletian divided the great Roman province of Africa Proconsularis into smaller provinces, including Byzacena, corresponding now to the modern Sahel, region of Tunisia. ... In Antiquity, Mauretania was originally an independent Berber kingdom on the Mediterranean coast of north Africa (named after the Maure tribe, after whom the Moors were named), corresponding to western Algeria, and northern Morocco. ... In the first century A.D., the Emperor Claudius divided the Roman province of Mauretania into Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Tingitana. ... Numidia was an ancient Berber kingdom in North Africa that later alternated between a Roman province and a Roman client state, and is no longer in existence today. ... Tripolitania is a historic region of western Libya, centered around the coastal city of Tripoli. ... The Diocese of Pannonia (Latin: Dioecesis Pannoniarum), later known as Diocese of Illyricum, was a diocese of the Late Roman Empire. ... The Diocese of Pannonia (Latin: Dioecesis Pannoniarum), also known as Diocese of Illyricum, was a diocese of the Late Roman Empire. ... Dalmatia province, Roman Empire Roman Dalmatia and surrounding areas Dalmatia was an ancient Roman province. ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... The Pannonia Prima was ancient Roman province. ... Pannonia Secunda map The Pannonia Secunda was ancient Roman province. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Pannonia Valeria or simply Valeria was an ancient Roman province. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... map of the Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum, before 379 AD The Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum (Latin: Praefectura Praetorio per Illyricum, also termed simply the Prefecture of Illyricum) was one of four large Praetorian prefectures into which the Late Roman Empire was divided. ... Emperor Aurelian (270-275), confronted with the secession of Gallia and Hispania from the empire since 260, with the advance of the Sassanids in Asia, and the devastations that the Carpians and the Goths had done into Moesia and Illyria, abandoned the province of Dacia created by Trajan and withdrew... The provinces of the Roman Empire in 120, with Dacia highlighted. ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Praevalitana (also Praevaliana or Prevalis) was an ancient Roman province. ... Ancient Dardania Dardania (Albanian: Dardania;) was an ancient country encompassing southern parts of present-day Kosova (including the area of the modern-day province of Kosovo, since 1999 under UN administration), mostly, but not entirely, western parts of the present-day Republic of Macedonia, and parts of present-day north... Dacia ripensis (Greek: Ρειπήσιος, English: from the banks of the Danube[1]) was the name of a Roman province (part of Dacia Aureliana) first established by Aurelian (circa 283 AD when the boundary stones were set by him and one of them was restored by Gaianus[2]) after he withdrew from... The Diocese of Macedonia included the provinces of Macedonia Prima, Macedonia Salutaris, Thessalia, Epirus Vetus, Epirus Nova, Achaea, and Creta. ... Macedonia province within the Roman Empire, c. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Epirus vetus was a province in the Roman Empire. ... The name Epirus may refer to: Geographical Epirus (region) - a historical and geographical region of the southwestern Balkans, straddling modern Greece and Albania Northern Epirus - the name given by Greeks to the region that is now southern Albania Political Epirus (periphery) - one of the thirteen peripheries (administrative divisions) of Greece... The Roman Empire in 120, with the province of Achaea highlighted. ... Crete or Candia in 1861 // Little is known about the rise of ancient Cretan society, because very few written records remain, and many of them are written in the undeciphered script known as Linear A. This contrasts with the superb palaces, houses, roads, paintings and sculptures that do remain. ... The Praetorian prefecture of the East or of Oriens (Latin: Praefectura Praetorio Orientis, Greek: ) was one of four large Praetorian prefectures into which the Late Roman Empire was divided. ... The Diocese of Thrace ca. ... Thrace is a historical and geographic area in south-east Europe spread over southern Bulgaria, north-eastern Greece, and European Turkey. ... Moesia (Greek: , Moisia; Bulgarian: Мизия, Miziya; Serbian: Мезија, Mezija) is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Major ancient towns and colonies in Schythia Minor Scythia Minor (Greek: Μικρά Σκυθία, Mikrá Scythia) was in ancient times the region surrounded by the Danube at the north and west and the Black Sea at the east, corresponding to todays Dobruja (a large part in Romania and a smaller part in... The Diocese of Asia ca. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Pamphylia, in ancient geography, was the region in the south of Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia, extending from the Mediterranean to Mount Taurus. ... Location of Caria Photo of a 15th century map showing Caria. ... Lydia (Greek ) is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycia (in Lycian, Trm̃misa (see List of Lycian place names); in ancient Greek, Λυκία and in modern Turkish, Likya) is a region in the modern-day provinces of Antalya and MuÄŸla on the southern coast of Turkey. ... In ancient geography, Lycaonia was a large region in the interior of Asia Minor, north of Mount Taurus. ... Pisidia was an inland region in southern Anatolia. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... In antiquity, Phrygia (Greek: ) was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolia. ... Remains of the top floors of an insula near the Capitolium and the Aracoeli in Rome. ... The Diocese of Pontus ca. ... Bithynia was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine (today Black Sea). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Paphlagonia was an ancient area on the Black Sea coast of north central Anatolia, situated between Bithynia and Pontus, and separated from Phrygia (later, Galatia) by a prolongation to the east of the Bithynian Olympus. ... For other uses, see Cappadocia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cappadocia (disambiguation). ... Traditional rural Pontic house A man in traditional clothes from Trabzon, illustration Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... Roman province of Sophene, 120 CE Armenia Sophene was a short-lived (c. ... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... The Diocese of the East ca. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... Isauria, in ancient geography, is a rugged isolated district in the interior of South Asia Minor, of very different extent at different periods, but generally covering much of what is now Antalya province of Turkey, or the core of the Taurus Mountains. ... For other uses, see Syria (disambiguation). ... Osroene (also: Osrohene, Osrhoene; Syriac: ܡܠܟܘܬܐ Ü•Ü’ܝܬ Ü¥Ü£ÜªÜ Ü¥ÜÜ¢Ü¶Ü), also known by the name of its capital city, Edessa (modern Sanli Urfa, in Syriac: ܐܘܪܗܝ), was one of several kingdoms arising from the dissolution of the Seleucid Empire. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... This article is about the geographical area known as Palestine. ... Arabia Petraea Arabia Petraea, also called Provincia Arabia or simply Arabia, was a frontier province of the Roman Empire beginning in the second century; it consisted of the former Nabataean kingdom in modern Jordan, southern modern Syria Sinai, and northwestern Saudi Arabia. ... The Diocese of Egypt ca. ... The Roman Empire 120, with Aegyptus province highlighted See Egypt Province for the province of the Ottoman Empire. ... The Roman Empire 120, with Aegyptus province highlighted See Egypt Province for the province of the Ottoman Empire. ... Augustamnica or Avgoustamnikai was a Roman province of Egypt created during the 5th century and extending over the eastern part of the Nile delta. ... Augustamnica or Avgoustamnikai was a Roman province of Egypt created during the 5th century and extending over the eastern part of the Nile delta. ... Arcadia or Arcadia Ægypti was an ancient region in Roman controlled Egypt. ... The Thebaid is the region of ancient Egypt containing the thirteen southernmost nomes of Upper Egypt, from Abydos to Aswan. ... The Thebaid is the region of ancient Egypt containing the thirteen southernmost nomes of Upper Egypt, from Abydos to Aswan. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Chersonesus Tauricus of Antiquity, shown on a map printed in London, ca 1770 Taurica (Greek: , Latin: ) also known as Tauris, Taurida, Tauric Chersonese, and Chersonesus Taurica was the name of Crimea in Antiquity. ... Egrisi (Georgian: ) known to the ancient Greeks and Romans as Lazica and to Persians as Lazistan was an early western Georgian [1]kingdom in South Caucasus, which flourished between the 6th century BC and the 7th century AD. It covered the territory of the former kingdom Kolkha (Colchis) and the... The Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent under Justinian I. Justinians inherited empire in pink with his conquests, including Spania, in orange. ... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (c. ... The division of the Roman Empire into four Praetorian prefectures originated in the age of the Tetrarchy yet outlived that period. ... Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus[2] (27 February c. ... The Exarchate of Ravenna was a center of Byzantine power in Italy, from the end of the 6th century to 751 A.D., when the last Exarch was put to death by the Emperors enemies in Italy, the Lombards. ... // Introduction Exarch is from the Latin; Exarchus, Greek; Exarchon; Meaning Leader, from the word exarchein to lead, to begin, to rule. ... The themata circa 950. ... Capital Carthage Historical era Late Antiquity  - conquest of Vandal Kingdom 534  - Moorish revolt defeated 548  - reorganization into Exarchate 584 The Praetorian prefecture of Africa (Latin: Praefectura praetorio Africae) was a major administrative division of the Eastern Roman Empire, established after the reconquest of northwestern Africa from the Vandals in 533... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... The Roman Empire in 120, with the province of Achaea highlighted. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Arabia Petraea Arabia Petraea, also called Provincia Arabia or simply Arabia, was a frontier province of the Roman Empire beginning in the second century; it consisted of the former Nabataean kingdom in modern Jordan, southern modern Syria Sinai, and northwestern Saudi Arabia. ... Map of Armenia under Roman rule, with Greater Armenia in red and Lesser Armenia in blue. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Roman province of Assyria, 120 CE Assyria was a province of the Roman Empire, roughly situated in modern-day northern Iraq. ... Bithynia was an ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor, adjoining the Propontis, the Thracian Bosporus and the Euxine (today Black Sea). ... Traditional rural Pontic house A man in traditional clothes from Trabzon, illustration Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... For other uses, see Cappadocia (disambiguation). ... The Kingdom of Cilician Armenia, 1199-1375. ... 60 BC Kingdom of Corduene Corduene (also known as Cordyene, Cardyene, Gordyene, Gordyaea, Korduene, Korchayk and Girdiyan) was an ancient region located in northern Mesopotamia, known today as Kurdistan. ... Corsica et Sardinia was an ancient Roman province including the islands of Corsica and Sardinia. ... For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... The Roman Empire ca. ... The provinces of the Roman Empire in 120, with Dacia highlighted. ... Dalmatia province, Roman Empire Roman Dalmatia and surrounding areas Dalmatia was an ancient Roman province. ... Epirus, spanning Greece and Albania. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gallia Aquitania, a province of The Roman Empire Gallia Aquitania, in ancient geography, was a province of the Roman Empire, located in present-day southwest France and bordered by the provinces of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis. ... The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica in 58 BCE The Roman Province of Gallia Belgica around 120 CE Gallia Belgica was a Roman province located in what is now the southern part of the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, northeastern France, and western Germany. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. ... The Roman province of Germania Inferior, 120 AD Germania Inferior was a Roman province located on the left bank of the Rhine, in todays southern and western Netherlands, the whole of Belgium and Luxembourg, parts of north-eastern France, and western Germany. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces | German history | Germany | History of the Germanic peoples ... Roman province of Hispania Baetica, 120 CE In Hispania, which in Greek is called Iberia, there were three Imperial Roman provinces, Hispania Baetica in the south, Lusitania, corresponding to modern Portugal, in the west, and Hispania Tarraconensis in the north and northeast. ... Roman Imperial province of Hispania Tarraconensis, 120 AD Hispania Tarraconensis was one of three Roman provinces in Hispania. ... A portion of the Tabula Peutingeriana, a Roman map of the 4th century, depicting the southern part of Italia. ... Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea (Hebrew: יהודה, Standard Yehuda Tiberian , praise God; Greek: Ιουδαία; Latin: Iudaea) was a Roman province that extended over the region of Judea proper, later Palestine. ... Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycian rock cut tombs of Dalyan Lycia (in Lycian, Trm̃misa (see List of Lycian place names); in ancient Greek, Λυκία and in modern Turkish, Likya) is a region in the modern-day provinces of Antalya and MuÄŸla on the southern coast of Turkey. ... Pamphylia, in ancient geography, was the region in the south of Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia, extending from the Mediterranean to Mount Taurus. ... In the first century A.D., the Emperor Claudius divided the Roman province of Mauretania into Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Tingitana. ... In the first century A.D., the Emperor Claudius divided the Roman province of Mauretania into Mauretania Caesariensis and Mauretania Tingitana. ... Moesia is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Moesia is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... Lower Pannonia (Pannonia Inferior) map The Lower Pannonia or Pannonia Inferior was an ancient Roman province. ... Upper Pannonia (Pannonia Superior) map The Upper Pannonia or Pannonia Superior was ancient Roman province. ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Sicilia (Latin) was the name given to the first province acquired by the Roman Republic in its rise to Empire, organised in 241 BCE as a proconsular governed territory in the aftermath of the First Punic War with Carthage. ... The Chersonesus Tauricus of Antiquity, shown on a map printed in London, ca 1770 Taurica (Greek: , Latin: ) also known as Tauris, Taurida, Tauric Chersonese, and Chersonesus Taurica was the name of Crimea in Antiquity. ... Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak  Thrace (Bulgarian: , Greek: , Attic Greek: ThrāíkÄ“ or ThrēíkÄ“, Latin: , Turkish: ) is a historical and geographic area in southeast Europe. ... Image File history File links RomanEmpire_117. ...

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RMS LUSITANIA (0 words)
Like the Titanic, the Lusitania followed the tradition of having a smoking room for the gentlemen to use after dinner to be parted from their respective partners to discuss the meaning of life.
The Post points out that the Lusitania case indicated the the steamer was hot by a torpedo, the explosion of which caused another explosion of war material in the cargo, wrecking the vessel and causing it to sink in less than half an hour.
During Lusitania 's construction the architects decided that the keel just forward of the rudder would be cut away to form an arch between the two after propellers.
home (171 words)
HAS PLACED GREAT BRITAIN FIRMLY AT THE FOREFRONT OF MARINE ARCHITECTURE."
Sir Charles McLaren, Chairman of John Brown and Co. at the launching of the Lusitania.
Is the Title of a new Discovery Channel (U.S.) Special
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