FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Lusatia" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Lusatia
Lusatia
Geograhic location of Lusatia

Lusatia (German: Lausitz, Upper Sorbian: Łužica, Lower Sorbian: Łužyca, Polish: Łużyce, Czech: Lužice) is a historical region between the Bóbr and Kwisa rivers and the Elbe river in the eastern German states of Saxony and Brandenburg, south-western Poland (Lower Silesian Voivodeship) and the northern Czech Republic. File links The following pages link to this file: Lusatia ... Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbšćina) is a Slavic minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... Bóbr (Czech Bobr, German Bober) is a river in the northern Czech Republic and southwestern Poland, a tributary of the Oder River, with a length of 272 kilometres (2 in Czech Republic, 270 in Poland, 10th longest Polish river) and the basin area of 5,876 sq. ... This article is about a river in Central Europe. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stat Sakska) has a land area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382... Lower Silesian Voivodeship. ...


The name derives from a Sorbian word meaning "swamps/water-hole". The Sorbian languages are classified under the West Slavic branch of the Indo-European languages. ...

Contents

Upper and Lower Lusatia

Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz or Hornja Łužica) is today part of the German state of Saxony; it consists of hilly countryside rising in the South to the Lausitzer Bergland (Lusatian hills) near the Czech border, and then even higher to form the Lusatian Mountains (Lužické hory/Lausitzer Gebirge) in the Czech Republic. The Lausitzer Bergland ist a mountanous region between Dresden the capital of Saxony and the german-polish border. ... Cross-counry skiing route on the main ridge, Luž/Lausche on the horizon. ...


Upper Lusatia is characterised by fertile soil and undulating hills as well as by historic towns and cities such as Bautzen, Görlitz, Zittau, Löbau, Kamenz, Lubań, Bischofswerda, Hoyerswerda, Bad Muskau. Many villages in the very south of Upper Lusatia contain a typical attraction of the region, the so-called Umgebindehäuser, half-timbered-houses representing a combination of Franconian and Slavic style. Among those villages are Niedercunnersdorf, Obercunnersdorf, Wehrsdorf, Jonsdorf, Sohland an der Spree, Taubenheim, Oppach, Varnsdorf or Ebersbach. Bautzen (pronounced , listen, until 1868: Budissin; Upper Sorbian: BudyÅ¡in; Lower Sorbian: BudyÅ¡yn; , listen; Polish: Budziszyn; Czech: Budyšín) is a city in eastern Saxony, Germany, and capital of the eponymous district. ... , House at Untermarkt (Lower Market) Görlitz ( , Upper Sorbian: , Czech: , Polish: ) is a town in Germany on the river Lusatian Neisse, in the Bundesland (Federal State) of Saxony, opposite the Polish town of Zgorzelec, which was a part of Görlitz until 1945. ... Zittau (Sorbian/Lusatian Žitawa, Czech Žitava) is a city in the south east of Saxony, Germany and capital of the Löbau-Zittau district close to the border triangle between Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic. ... Löbau (Upper Sorbian Lubij) is a city in the east of Saxony. ... Kamenz (Sorbian Kamjenc) is a Lusatian town in eastern Saxony, Germany, with a population of 18,243, and is the capital of the Kamenz district. ... LubaÅ„ (German Lauban) is a town in southwestern Poland (Lower Silesia), with 24,400 inhabitants (1995). ... Bischofswerda (Lusatian: Biskupicy) is a city in Germany. ... Hoyerswerda (Upper Sorbian Wojerecy, Lower Sorbian Wórjejce, Czech HojeÅ™ice) is a town in the German Bundesland of Saxony. ... Bad Muskau (Sorbian: Mužakow), formerly Muskau, is a small county town in Upper Lusatia, Germany, being the site of the famous Park von Muskau. ... Niedercunnersdorf is a municipality in the district Löbau-Zittau, in Saxony, Germany. ... Obercunnersdorf is a municipality in the district Löbau-Zittau, in Saxony, Germany. ... Wehrsdorf is a small village in a valley of the Lausitzer Bergland in the region of Upper Lusatia (Oberlausitz) in Saxony, Germany. ... Jonsdorf from Nonnenfelsen The community of Jonsdorf is located in the south of the Kreis Löbau-Zittau in the southeast of the German federal state of Saxony. ... Sohland an der Spree ist a big village in Saxony (Germany) near the border to the Czechs Republik ia a region called Lusatia. ... Oppach is a municipality in the district Löbau-Zittau, in Saxony, Germany. ... Ebersbach can refer to several places in Germany: Ebersbach an der Fils, a town in the district of Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg Ebersbach, Saxony, a town in the Löbau-Zittau district, Saxony several smaller municipalities and villages This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a...


Most of the portion belonging today to the German state of Brandenburg is called Lower Lusatia (Niederlausitz or Dolna Łužyca) and is characterised by forests and meadows. In the course of much of the 19th and the entire 20th century, it was shaped by the lignite industry and extensive open-cast mining. Important towns include Cottbus, Lübben, Lübbenau, Spremberg, Finsterwalde, and Senftenberg - Zły Komorow. Cottbus (Sorbian: ChoÅ›ebuz, archaic German: Kottbus) is a city in Brandenburg, Germany, situated around 125 km southeast of Berlin on the Spree river. ... ... ... Spremberg, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Brandenburg, situated partly on an island in the river Spree and partly on the west bank, 76 miles south-east of Berlin by the railway to Görlitz. ... FINSTERWALDE, a town of Germany, in the kingdom of Prussia, on the Schackebach. ... Senftenberg is a town in southern Brandenburg, Germany, capital of the Oberspreewald-Lausitz district. ...


Between Upper and Lower Lusatia is a region called Grenzwall, meaning something like "border-wall". In the Middle Ages this area had dense forests, so it represented a major obstacle to civilian and military traffic. Some of the regions villages were damaged or destroyed by the open-pit lignite mining industry managed by Communist East Germany. Some, now exhausted, former open-pit mines are now being converted into artificial lakes, with much hope to attract vacationers, and the area is now being referred to as Lausitzer Seenland (Lusatian Lakeland). The Lausitzer Seenland (German for Lusatian lakeland) is a district of several big lakes in the east of Germany. ...

Recultivation and flooding of a former lignite mine north of Klinge, near Cottbus
Recultivation and flooding of a former lignite mine north of Klinge, near Cottbus

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2660x518, 190 KB) Description: Tagebaurestloch nördlich von Klinge bei Cottbus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2660x518, 190 KB) Description: Tagebaurestloch nördlich von Klinge bei Cottbus. ...

Lusatian capitals

Lusatia is not and was never an administrative unit. Upper and Lower Lusatia have a different but in some aspects similar history. The city of Cottbus is the largest of the region. Historically, Luckau was Lower Lusatia's capital. Bautzen is the historical capital of Upper Lusatia. Cottbus (Sorbian: Chośebuz, archaic German: Kottbus) is a city in Brandenburg, Germany, situated around 125 km southeast of Berlin on the Spree river. ... Luckau (-German, Sorbian: Łuków) is a city in the Dahme-Spreewald District in Brandenburg, Germany. ... Bautzen (pronounced , listen, until 1868: Budissin; Upper Sorbian: Budyšin; Lower Sorbian: Budyšyn; , listen; Polish: Budziszyn; Czech: Budyšín) is a city in eastern Saxony, Germany, and capital of the eponymous district. ...


Sorbian-Lusatian people

The bilingual part of Lusatia, where the Sorbs make more than 10% of the population)
The bilingual part of Lusatia, where the Sorbs make more than 10% of the population)

More than 60,000 of the Sorbian Slavic minority continue to live in the region. Historically their ancestors are the Milceni and the Lusitzer, and not the Sorbs, that settled in the region between Elbe and Saale. Many still speak their language (though numbers are dwindling and Lower Sorbian especially is considered endangered), and road signs are usually bilingual. But note that the number of all the inhabitants of this part of east Saxony is fast declining, 20% in the last 10–15 years. Sorbians try to protect their typical culture shown in traditional clothes and styles of villages houses. The coal industry in the region, needing vast areas of land, destroyed dozens of Lusatian villages in the past and threatens some of them even now. The Sorbian language is taught in many primary and some secondary schools and at two universities (Leipzig and Prague). Project "Witaj" ("welcome!") is a project of eight kindergartens currently where Sorbian is the main language for a few hundred Lusatian children. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,779 × 2,134 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 500 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,779 × 2,134 pixels, file size: 1. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... The Milceni or Milzeni (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ) were a West Slavic tribe in Upper Lusatia. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbšćina) is a Slavic minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... The term bilingualism (from bi meaning two and lingua meaning language) can refer to rather different phenomena. ...


History

According to the earliest records, the area was settled by Celtic tribes. Later, around 100 BC, the Germanic tribe of the Semnones settled in that area. Around AD 600 the Slavic people known as the Milceni settled permanently in the region. In about 928, Germans and Poles began invading the region. Lusatia changed hands repeatedly, belonging in turn to Samo's Empire, Great Moravia, and Czech Kingdom of Bohemia. In 1002, the Poles took control of the region, and Lusatia became part of Poland in 1018 until it was absorbed by the German principalities of Meissen and Brandenburg less than twenty years later. In 1076 Emperor Henry IV of the Holy Roman Empire awarded Lusatia as a fief to the Bohemian duke Vratislav II. Around 1200 large numbers of German settlers came to Lusatia, settling in the forested areas yet not settled by the Slavs. Upper Lusatia remained under Bohemian rule until the Thirty Years' War when it became part of Saxony. In 1815 Upper Lusatia was divided, with the eastern part around Görlitz now belonging to Prussia. Following the Lutheran Reformation, Lusatia became Protestant but especially the Sorbs stayed mainly catholic till today. In 1945 the eastern part rejoined Saxony and in 1952, when the state of Saxony was divided into three administrative areas, Upper Lusatia became part of the Dresden administrative region. 1990 the state of Saxony was reestablished. The Semnones were a Germanic tribe which was settled between the Elbe and the Oder in the 1st century when they were described by Tacitus. ... The Milceni or Milzeni (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ) were a West Slavic tribe in Upper Lusatia. ... Events Dao Kang Di succeeds Gong Hui Di and is followed in the same year by Tai Zu, all of the Dali Gu Dynasty in southeast China. ... This biography does not cite any references or sources. ... Great Moravia was an empire existing in Central Europe between 833 and the early 10th century. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Events November 13 - English king Ethelred gives order to kill all Danes in England, leading to the St. ... // Team# 1018 Pike High School Robotics Team Team #1018 FIRST Logo Check Out Our FIRST WIKI Page Events Bulgaria becomes part of the Byzantine Empire. ... Old town of Meißen. ... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382... Henry IV (November 11, 1050–August 7, 1106) was King of Germany from 1056 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105. ... Vratislav II (died January 14, 1092) was the first king of Bohemia. ... Combatants Sweden (from 1630)  Bohemia Denmark-Norway (1625-1629) Dutch Republic France Scotland England Saxony  Holy Roman Empire ( Catholic League) Spain Austria Bavaria Denmark-Norway (1643-1645) Commanders Frederick V Buckingham Leven Gustav II Adolf â€  Johan Baner Cardinal Richelieu Louis II de Bourbon Turenne Christian IV of Denmark Bernhard of... , House at Untermarkt (Lower Market) Görlitz ( , Upper Sorbian: , Czech: , Polish: ) is a town in Germany on the river Lusatian Neisse, in the Bundesland (Federal State) of Saxony, opposite the Polish town of Zgorzelec, which was a part of Görlitz until 1945. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ...


Saxon rule

In 1635 most of Lusatia became a province of Saxony, except for a region around Cottbus possessed since 1462 by Brandenburg. After the Elector of Saxony was elected king of Poland in 1697, Lusatia became strategically important as the electors-kings sought to create a land connection between their Polish and Saxon realms. Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... Events Settlers from Portugal begin to settle the Cape Verde islands. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Events September 11 - Battle of Zenta, Prince Eugene of Savoy crushed Ottoman army of Mustafa II September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher...


The Congress of Vienna in 1815, awarded most of Lusatia the Kingdom of Prussia, except for the southern part that included Löbau, Kamenz, Bautzen and Zittau, all of which remained part of Saxony. The Lusatians in Prussia demanded that their land become a distinct administrative unit (province or region/Bezirk), but it was divided between several Prussian provinces instead. The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors, from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from November 1, 1814, to June 8, 1815. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Löbau could refer to: Lubawa, Poland Löbau (Saxony) The district of Löbau-Zittau in Saxony. ... Kamenz (Sorbian Kamjenc) is a Lusatian town in eastern Saxony, Germany, with a population of 18,243, and is the capital of the Kamenz district. ... Bautzen (pronounced , listen, until 1868: Budissin; Upper Sorbian: BudyÅ¡in; Lower Sorbian: BudyÅ¡yn; , listen; Polish: Budziszyn; Czech: Budyšín) is a city in eastern Saxony, Germany, and capital of the eponymous district. ... Zittau (Sorbian/Lusatian Žitawa, Czech Žitava) is a city in the south east of Saxony, Germany and capital of the Löbau-Zittau district close to the border triangle between Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic. ...


Prussian rule

The 19th and early 20th centuries, under Prussian rule, witnessed an era of cultural revival for Slavic Lusatians. The modern languages of Upper and Lower Lusatian (or Sorbian) emerged, national literature flourished, and many national organizations like Maćica Serbska and Domowina were founded. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Domowina is a political independent league of the Sorbian and Wendish people (Sorbs) and umbrella organization of Sorbian societies in Lower and Upper Lusatia (in Germany). ...


Third Reich

This era came to an end during the Nazi regime in Germany, when all Sorbian-Lusatian organizations were abolished and forbidden, the newspapers and magazines closed, and any use of the Sorbian-Lusatian languages was prohibited. During World War II, most Lusatian activists were arrested, executed, exiled or sent as political prisoners to concentration camps where most of them died. From 1942 to 1944 the underground Lusatian National Committee was formed and was active in Nazi-occupied Warsaw. After World War II, however, Lusatia was divided between East Germany and Poland along the Neisse River. Poland's communist government expelled all Germans and Sorbs from the area east of the Neisse River during 1945 and 1946. Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A political prisoner is someone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image are deemed by a government to either challenge or threaten the authority of the state. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state which existed from 1949 to 1990. ... The Lusatian Neisse (German Lausitzer Neiße, Polish Nysa Łużycka, Czech Lužická Nisa) is a river in the Czech Republic (54 km) and on Polish-German border (198 km), in total 252 km long. ...


Autonomy movement

There have been endeavours by Sorbs to create a Lusatian Free State in the past -- particularly after World War II, when the Sorbian National Committee demanded the attachment of Lusatia to Czechoslovakia and the Expulsion of the German majority. The Domowina however opposed this idea and favoured a future inside Germany. In 1950 the Sorbs obtained language and cultural autonomy within the then East German state of Saxony. Lusatian schools and magazines were launched and the Domowina association was revived, although under increasing political control of the ruling Communist Party. The local institutions supported the revival of regional Sorbian-Lusatian arts and culture. At the same time, the large German-speaking majority of the Upper Lusatian population kept up a considerable degree of local, 'Upper Lusatian' patriotism of its own. An attempt to establish a Upper Lusatian land within the Federal Republic of Germany failed after the German reunification in 1990. The constitutions of Saxony and Brandenburg guarantee cultural autonomy to the Slavic speaking communities. In 2005 Sorbian activists founded the Sorbian People's Party (Serbska Ludowa Strona - SLS). Germans expelled from the Sudetenland // The expulsion of Germans after World War II refers to the forced migration of people considered Germans (Reichsdeutsche and some Volksdeutsche) from various European states and territories during 1945 and in the first three years after World War II 1946-48. ... Domowina is a political independent league of the Sorbian and Wendish people (Sorbs) and umbrella organization of Sorbian societies in Lower and Upper Lusatia (in Germany). ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term minority rights embodies two separate concepts: first, normal individual rights as applied to members of racial, ethnic, class, religious or sexual minorities, and second, collective rights accorded to minority groups. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Germany is a Federal Republic made up of 16 States, known in German as Länder (singular Land). ... This article is about the 1990 German reunification. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... For the similarly spelled Brandenberg, see Brandenberg (Austria) or Brandenburg (disambiguation) Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE4 Capital Potsdam Minister-President Matthias Platzeck (SPD) Governing parties SPD / CDU Votes in Bundesrat 4 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  29,479 km² (11,382... The Serbska Ludowa Strona (Wendish Peoples Party) (SLS) was founded on 26 March 2005 in Cottbus to represent the Sorb/Wendish ethnic and linguistic minority (around 60,000 people) in the German Länders of Saxony and Brandenburg in the Lusatia region. ...


Demographics according to the 1900 census

Share of Sorbs: The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ...

  • Cottbus (Province of Brandenburg) 55,8%
  • Hoyerswerda (Province of Silesia) 37,8%
  • Bautzen (Kingdom of Saxony) 17,7%
  • Rothenburg i. d. Oberlausitz (Province of Silesia) 17,2%
  • Kamenz (Kingdom of Saxony) 7,1%

Total number: 93,032


The number of Slavs in Lusatia has substantially decreased since then, due to intermarriage, cultural assimilation, Nazi suppression and discrimination and the settlement of expelled Germans mainly from Lower Silesia and Northern Bohemia. The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ...


See also

The Sorbian languages are classified under the West Slavic branch of the Indo-European languages. ... Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. ... Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbšćina) is a Slavic minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... The Milceni or Milzeni (Czech: ; German: ; Polish: ) were a West Slavic tribe in Upper Lusatia. ... Vend redirects here. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the current German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... Ǎ ... Herrnhut (Sorbian: Ochranow) is a municipality in the district of Löbau-Zittau, in the state of Saxony, Germany. ... The Moravian Seal, as rendered by North Carolina artist Marie Nifong. ... Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, Count of Zinzendorf and Pottendorf, (May 26, 1700 – May 9, 1760), German religious and social reformer, was born at Dresden. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lusatia - LoveToKnow 1911 (769 words)
In the earliest times Lower Lusatia reached from the Black Elster to the Spree; its inhabitants, the Lusitzi, were conquered by the German king, Henry the Fowler, and by the margrave Gero in the 10th century.
From 1377 to 1396 Gorlitz was a separate duchy ruled by John, a son of the emperor Charles IV., and, like Lower Lusatia, Upper Lusatia owned the authority of Matthias Corvinus from 1469 to 1490, both districts passing a little later with the kingdoms of Hungary and Bohemia to the German king, Ferdinand I.
In 1900 Lower Lusatia contained 461,973 inhabitants, of whom 34,837 were Wends; the portion of Upper Lusatia belonging to Prussia had 305,080 inhabitants, of whom 24,361 were Wends.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m