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Encyclopedia > Ludwig von Pastor

Ludwig Pastor, created Freiherr von Campersfelden, (January 31, 1854, AachenSeptember 30, 1928, Innsbruck), was the great Catholic historian of the Papacy, who published his Geschichte der Päpste seit dem Ausgang des Mittelalters in sixteen volumes that appeared from 1886 to a last posthumous volume in 1933. It was translated into English and published as History of the Popes From the Close of the Middle Ages. January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Aachen, Dutch Aken, French Aix-la-Chapelle, Spanish Aquisgrán, Latin Aquisgranum, Ripuarian Oche) is a spa city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the federal state of Tyrol. ... This article refers to the history of the head of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


He was born in Aachen and educated at Frankfurt. A pupil of Johannes Janssen at the Frankfurter Gymnasium, Pastor studied 1875 at Leuven, 1875/76 at Bonn, where he became a member of K.St.V. Arminia, and 1877/78 at Vienna. Pastor taught at the University of Innsbruck, as a lecturer (1881), then as professor of modern history (1887). He later became director (1901) of the Austrian Historical Institute, Rome, and Austrian ambassador to the Holy See (1920). He was knighted by Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria-Hungary in 1908 and was created a baron in 1916. Aachen, Dutch Aken, French Aix-la-Chapelle, Spanish Aquisgrán, Latin Aquisgranum, Ripuarian Oche) is a spa city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany. ... Main Station Frankfurt Frankfurt International Airport For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Johannes Janssen (April 10, 1829 - December 24, 1891), German historian, was born at Xanten, and was educated as a Roman Catholic at Münster, Louvain, Bonn and Berlin, afterwards becoming a teacher of history at Frankfurt-am-Main. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Leuven   (French Louvain, German Löwen) is the capital of the province of Flemish Brabant in Flanders, Belgium, European Union. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Coat of Arms of the K.St. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Inhabitants according to official census figures: 1800 to 2005 Vienna in 1858 Vienna (German: Wien ) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... The Leopold-Franzens-Universität, more often simply called University of Innsbruck, is one of the major Austrian universities, offering a broad range of subjects. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... Franz Joseph I Franz Joseph (in English also Francis Joseph) (August 18, 1830 - November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria and King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and King of Hungary from 1867 until 1916. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


As a student Pastor's mentor Johannes Janssen made him aware of Leopold von Ranke's skeptical and critical history of the Papacy, which determined the field he would take for his own, becoming in a sense a Catholic anti-Ranke. Pastor made his start as lecturer in history at the University of Innsbruck; his approach was that the apparent shortcomings of the Papacy have simply reflected flaws of their times. At his first trip to Italy in 1876 his seriousness ensured the patronage of Pope Leo XIII, who opened the contents of the Vatican Library to him. Pastor was writing during the pontificates of Benedict XV and Pius XI, a reactive Catholic generation at odds with the modern world, and his conclusions and evasions sometimes betray the signs of his own generation. Johannes Janssen (April 10, 1829 - December 24, 1891), German historian, was born at Xanten, and was educated as a Roman Catholic at Münster, Louvain, Bonn and Berlin, afterwards becoming a teacher of history at Frankfurt-am-Main. ... Leopold Von Ranke in 1877. ... The Leopold-Franzens-Universität, more often simply called University of Innsbruck, is one of the major Austrian universities, offering a broad range of subjects. ... Pope Leo XIII, born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903. ... The Vatican Library (Latin: Bibliotheca Apostolica Vaticana) is the library of the Holy See, located in Vatican City. ... Benedict XV (Latin: ), born Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854 – January 22, 1922), reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from September 3, 1914 to January 22, 1922; he succeeded Pope Pius X (1903–14). ... Pope Pius XI (Latin: ) (May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ...


Pastor returned to historical documentation for his work, consulting archives throughout Catholic Europe. In 1881 he convinced Pope Leo XIII to open the Vatican archives, which had been held unavailable to scholars. He decided to begin his history in 1305, with the papacy of Pope Clement V and the onset of the Avignon Papacy, so that he could concentrate his research on surviving documents. His dispassionate and frank papal history concentrated on individual popes rather than on the developments of papal institutions. Pope Leo XIII, born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci (March 2, 1810 – July 20, 1903), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, having succeeded Pope Pius IX (1846–78) on February 20, 1878 and reigning until his death in 1903. ... Clement V, born Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was Pope from 1305 to his death. ... The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1309 to 1377 during which seven popes, all French, resided in Avignon: Pope Clement V: 1305–1314 Pope John XXII: 1316–1334 Pope Benedict XII: 1334–1342 Pope Clement VI...


He combined the ardent partisan Roman Catholic sympathies necessary for dealing with such a life's work with the most painstaking scholarship and erudition. He was granted privileged access to the Secret Vatican Archives, and his history, largely based on hitherto unavailable original documents, superseded all previous histories of the popes in the period he covered, which runs from the Avignon Papacy of 1305 to Napoleon's entrance in Rome, 1799. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Secret Vatican Archives contain the central repository of all the acts that have been promulgated by the Roman Catholic Churchs Papal See, as well as diplomatic materials and correspondence of the Papal See and other documents that have accumulated over the centuries. ... The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1309 to 1377 during which seven popes, all French, resided in Avignon: Pope Clement V: 1305–1314 Pope John XXII: 1316–1334 Pope Benedict XII: 1334–1342 Pope Clement VI... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


He headed the Austrian Historical Institute in Rome from 1901 (with an interruption, 1914-1919) and was the Austrian minister to the Vatican from 1921. He died in Innsbruck. Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the federal state of Tyrol. ...


The publication of his daybooks and correspondence in 1950 revealed less worthy aspects of a self-righteous, intolerant and argumentative temperament, with an aptitude for Christian apologetics.


Another major work is his edition of Janssen's Geschichte des deutschen Volkes, 8 vol. (1893–1926; “History of the German People”).


History of the Popes from the Close of the Middle Ages: Selected Volumes Online

These volumes, taken from Pastor's 40 volume "History of the Popes," were scanned by Google Books. Additional volumes, as they become available, will be added. // Google offers a variety of services and tools besides its basic web search. ...


Vol.I Vol.II Vol.III Vol IV Vol.V Vol.VI Vol.VII Vol.VIII


Reference

  • (Thomas Brechenmacher), Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon: "Ludwig Pastor" Detailed summary.

External links

  • Biografisch-Bibliographisches Lexikon biography (in German)
  • Pastor @ New Catholic Dictionary
  • Ludwig Pastor, the Great German Historian: Catholic world, Volume 67, Issue: 397, Apr 1898 @ the University of Michigan

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