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Encyclopedia > Ludwig von Mises
Western Economists
20th-Century Economists
(Austrian economics)

Name The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2181x2979, 3054 KB) http://www. ...

Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises

Birth

September 29, 1881 (Lemberg (now Lviv), Austria-Hungary) is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... “Lvov” redirects here. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...

Death

October 10, 1973 (New York City, New York, USA) is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ...

School/tradition

Austrian economics The Austrian School is a school of economic thought which rejects opposing economists reliance on methods used in natural science for the study of human action, and instead bases its formalism of economics on relationships through logic or introspection called praxeology. ...

Main interests

economics, political economy, philosophy of history, epistemology, rationalism, classical liberalism, paleolibertarianism, minarchism Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political economy was the original term for the study of production, the acts of buying and selling, and their relationships to laws, customs and government. ... Philosophy of History is an area of philosophy concerning the eventual significance, if any, of human history. ... Theory of knowledge redirects here: for other uses, see theory of knowledge (disambiguation) According to Plato, knowledge is a subset of that which is both true and believed Epistemology or theory of knowledge is the branch of philosophy that studies the nature, methods, limitations, and validity of knowledge and belief. ... In epistemology and in its broadest sense, rationalism is any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification (Lacey 286). ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal — only large enough to protect the liberty and property of each individual. ...

Notable ideas

praxeology, economic calculation problem, methodological dualism Praxeology is the science of human action. ... The economic calculation problem is a criticism of socialist economics. ...

Influences

Aristotle, Kant, Menger, Böhm-Bawerk, Brentano, Say, Bastiat, Turgot This article is about the philosopher. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... Austrian School economist Carl Menger Carl Menger Carl Menger (February 28, 1840 – February 26, 1921) was the founder of the Austrian School of economics. ... Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk (February 12, 1851 – August 27, 1914) made important contributions to the development of Austrian economics. ... · Franz Brentano Franz Clemens Honoratus Hermann Brentano (January 16, 1838 Marienberg am Rhein (near Boppard) - March 17, 1917 Zürich) was an influential figure in both philosophy and psychology. ... Jean-Baptiste Say (January 5, 1767 – November 15, 1832) was a French economist and businessman. ... Frédéric Bastiat Claude Frédéric Bastiat (June 30, 1801–December 24, 1850) was a French classical liberal theorist, political economist, and member of the French assembly. ... Anne Robert Jacques Turgot, Baron de Laune, often referred to as Turgot (May 10, 1727 ? March 18, 1781), was a French statesman and economist. ...

Influenced

Hayek, Rothbard, Kirzner, Hoppe, Schumpeter, Weber, Friedman, Buchanan, Robbins, Hülsmann, Allais, Lange, Simons, Hicks, Lachmann, Hutt, Rand, Rockwell, Hazlitt, Salerno, Resiman, Bauer, Paul, Smith Friedrich von Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an economist and social scientist of the Austrian School, noted for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against a rising tide of socialist and collectivist thought in the mid... Murray Newton Rothbard Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 - January 7, 1995) was an American economist and political theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism and anarcho-capitalism. ... Israel Meir Kirzner (Yisroel Mayer Kirzner) (born February 13, 1930) is a leading economist in the Austrian School. ... Hans-Hermann Hoppe (born September 2, 1949) is an Austrian school economist, an anarcho-capitalist (libertarian) philosopher, and a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. ... Joseph Schumpeter Joseph Alois Schumpeter (February 8, 1883 – January 8, 1950) was an economist from Austria and an influential political scientist. ... For the politician, see Max Weber (politician). ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... Lionel Charles Robbins, Baron Robbins (1898 - 1984) was a British economist of the 20th century who proposed one of the early contemporary definitions of economics, Economics is a science which studies human behavior as a relationship between ends and scarce means which have alternative uses. ... Jörg Guido Hülsmann Jörg Guido Hülsmann (b. ... Maurice Allais (born May 31, 1911) was the 1988 winner of The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel for his pioneering contributions to the theory of markets and efficient utilization of resources. ... Henry Calvert Simons was an American economist of the early 20th century. ... Sir John Richard Hicks (April 8, 1904 – May 20, 1989) was one of the most important and influential economists of the twentieth century. ... Ludwig Lachmann Ludwig Lachmann (1906 – 1990) was a German economist who became a passionate member of and important contributor to the Austrian School. ... William Harold Hutt William Harold Bill Hutt (3 August 1899–1988) was an English economist who described himself as a classical liberal, although some identify him more closely with the Austrian School. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] known for creating a philosophy she named Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the... Lew Rockwell Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr. ... Henry Hazlitt (November 28, 1894 - July 8, 1993) was a libertarian philosopher, economist and journalist for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and Newsweek, among other publications. ... Joseph T. Salerno Joseph T. Salerno is an Austrian School economist in the United States. ... George Reisman is Professor of Economics at Pepperdine University, and author of the massive 1,050-page volume Capitalism: A Treatise on Economics (ISBN 0915463733). ... Peter Bauer (born October 29, 1957) is perhaps best known as the Help Desk Director for the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP). ... Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises (September 29, 1881October 10, 1973) (pronounced [ˈluːtvɪç fɔn ˈmiːzəs] was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern libertarian movement. He has been called the "uncontested dean of the Austrian School of economics".[1] is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ... The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ...


The Ludwig von Mises Institute is named after him. Ludwig von Mises Institute for Austrian Economics, Auburn, Alabama The Ludwig von Mises Institute (LvMI), based in Auburn, Alabama, is a libertarian academic organisation engaged in research and scholarship in the fields of economics, philosophy and political economy. ...

Contents

Childhood and family background

Coat of arms of Ludwig von Mises' great-grandfather, Mayer Rachmiel Mises, awarded upon his 1881 ennoblement by Franz Joseph I of Austria

Ludwig von Mises was born in Lemberg, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and now the city of Lviv, Ukraine, to Jewish parents. His father was stationed there as a construction engineer. Physicist Richard von Mises was Ludwig's younger brother. Another sibling died in infancy. When Ludwig and Richard were small children, his family moved back to their ancestral home of Vienna. Image File history File links This is the Mises family crest. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Franz Joseph I (in Hungarian I. Ferenc József, in English Francis Joseph I) (August 18, 1830 – November 21, 1916) of the Habsburg Dynasty was Emperor of Austria, Apostolic King of Hungary, King of Bohemia from 1848 until 1916 and a German prince (Deutscher Fürst). ... Lviv ( Львів in Ukrainian; Львов, Lvov in Russian; Lwów in Polish; Leopolis in Latin; Lemberg in German—see also cities alternative names) is a city in western Ukraine with 830,000 inhabitants (an additional 200,000 commute daily from... Official languages Latin, German, Hungarian Established church Roman Catholic Capital & Largest City Vienna pop. ... “Lvov” redirects here. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Richard von Mises. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ...


In 1900, he attended the University of Vienna, becoming influenced by the works of Carl Menger. Mises' father died in 1903, and in 1906 Ludwig was awarded his doctorate. The University of Vienna (German: ) is a public university located in Vienna, Austria. ... Austrian School economist Carl Menger Carl Menger Carl Menger (February 28, 1840 – February 26, 1921) was the founder of the Austrian School of economics. ...


Professional life

In the years from 1904 to 1914, Mises attended lectures given by the prominent Austrian economist Eugen von Boehm-Bawerk. Mises taught at the Vienna University in the years from 1913 to 1934, while also serving as a principal economic adviser to the Austrian government during the Austrofascist regime of Engelbert Dollfuss. Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk (February 12, 1851 - August 27, 1914) made important contributions to the development of Austrian economics. ... Supporters of the Austrian Christian Social Party in 1934 Austrofascism is a term which is frequently used to describe the authoritarian rule installed in Austria between 1934 and 1938. ... Engelbert Dollfuss. ...


To avoid the influence of Nazis in his Austrian homeland, and fearing repression due to his Jewish ancestry[2] in 1934 Mises left for Geneva, Switzerland, where he was a professor at the Graduate Institute of International Studies until 1940. In 1940, he emigrated to New York City. He was a visiting professor at New York University from 1945 until he retired in 1969, though he was not salaried by the university. Instead, he earned his living from funding by businessmen such as Lawrence Fertig. For part of this period he worked on currency issues for the Pan-Europa movement led by a fellow NYU faculty member and Austrian exile, Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi.[3] He received an honorary doctorate from Grove City College. The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Graduate Institute of International Studies (HEI), based in Geneva in Switzerland, is one of the worlds leading graduate schools devoted to the study of international studies, most notably of their historic, judicial, economic, political and social aspects. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Lawrence Fertig Lawrence W. Fertig (b. ... The International Paneuropean Union claims to be the oldest European unification movement and is also referred to as the Paneuropean Movement and the Pan Europa Movement. ... Count Richard Nikolaus von Coudenhove-Kalergi, (Tokio, 17th November 1894 to Schrum, Voralberg, 27th July 1972) was the son of a Austro-Hungarian count and diplomat, and a Japanese mother. ...


Despite his growing fame, Mises listed himself plainly in the New York phone directory and he welcomed students freely to his home. Mises died at the age of 92 at St Vincent's hospital in New York. New York, New York redirects here. ...


Contributions to the field of economics

Part of a series on
Libertarianism
For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ...

Schools of thought

Agorism
Anarcho-capitalism
Geolibertarianism
Green libertarianism
Right-libertarianism
Left-libertarianism
Minarchism
Neolibertarianism
Paleolibertarianism
Progressive libertarianism
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Agorism is an anarchist political philosophy founded by Samuel Edward Konkin III and characterized by proponents as left-libertarian. ... Anarcho-capitalism refers to an anti-statist philosophy that embraces capitalism as one of its foundational principles. ... Geolibertarianism (also geoanarchism) is a liberal political philosophy that holds along with other forms of libertarian individualism that each individual has an exclusive right to the fruits of his or her labor, as opposed to this product being owned collectively by society or the community. ... Green-Libertarian describes a political philosophy that was established in the United States. ... Libertarianism is a political philosophy that holds that individuals should be allowed complete freedom of action as long as they do not infringe on the freedom of others. ... Left-libertarianism is a term that has been adopted by several different movements and theorists. ... In civics, minarchism, sometimes called minimal statism or small government, is the view that the size, role and influence of government in a free society should be minimal — only large enough to protect the liberty and property of each individual. ... Neolibertarianism is a political philosophy combining elements of libertarian and conservative thought that embraces incrementalism and pragmatism domestically, and a generally interventionist foreign policy based on self-interest, national defense and the expansion of freedom. ... Paleolibertarianism is a school of thought within American libertarianism founded by Lew Rockwell and Murray Rothbard, and closely associated with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. ... Progressive Libertarianism is a political or philosophy whose adherents promote social change through voluntarism rather than government laws and regulation. ...

Origins

Austrian School
Chicago School
Classical liberalism
Individualist anarchism
Libertarian theorists
The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... The Chicago School of Economics is a school of thought in economics; it refers to the style of economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago after 1946. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... Theory and practice Issues History Culture By region Lists Related Anarchism Portal Politics Portal ·        Individualist anarchism (also anarchist individualism, anarcho-individualism, individualistic anarchism) refers to any of several traditions that hold that individual conscience and the pursuit of self-interest should not be constrained by any collective body or public... This is a list of notable Libertarian theorists and authors. ...

Ideas

Civil liberties
Tax cuts
Free markets
Free trade
Humanism
Laissez-faire
Liberty
Individualism
Non-aggression
Private property
Self-ownership
Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... For other uses, see Liberty (disambiguation). ... Methodological individualism is a philosophical orientation toward explaining broad society-wide developments as the accumulation of decisions by individuals. ... The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, anticoercion principle, or zero aggression principle) is a deontological ethical stance associated with the libertarian movement. ... This page deals with property as ownership rights. ... Self-ownership or sovereignty of the individual or individual sovereignty is the condition where an individual has the exclusive moral right to control his or her own body and life. ...

Topics

Economic views
History
Movement
Parties
Theories of law
Views of rights
Criticism of libertarianism
Libertarian Republican
Libertarian Democrat
Economic libertarianism is the doctrine that government should not engage in economic interventionism, but only prohibit force and fraud. ... The history of libertarianism is closely related to the history of classical liberalism. ... The libertarian movement consists of the various individuals and institutions who have historically advanced the ideas and causes of libertarianism. ... Many countries and subnational political entities have libertarian political parties. ... Libertarian theories of law build on libertarianism or classical liberalism. ... Libertarians and Objectivists limit what they define as rights to variations on the right to be left alone, and argue that other rights such as the right to a good education or the right to have free access to water are not legitimate rights and do not deserve the same... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Libertarianism. ... A libertarian Republican is a person who subscribes to libertarian philosophy while typically voting for and being involved with the United States Republican Party. ... A libertarian Democrat is a person who subscribes to libertarian philosophy while typically voting for and being involved with the United States Democratic Party. ...

Portal:Politics Politics Portal
This box:  v  d  e 

Mises wrote and lectured extensively on behalf of classical liberalism and is seen as one of the leaders of the Austrian School of economics. In his treatise on economics, Human Action, Mises introduced praxeology as the conceptual foundation of the science of human action, establishing economic laws of apodictic certainty rejecting positivism and material causality. Many of his works, including Human Action, were on two related economic themes: Image File history File links Portal. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam... The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... Look up Treatise in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Human Action: A Treatise on Economics is the magnum opus of the Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises. ... Praxeology is the science of human action. ... Apodictic (Gr. ... // Positivism is a philosophy that states that the only authentic knowledge is scientific knowledge, and that such knowledge can only come from positive affirmation of theories through strict scientific method. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...

  1. monetary economics and inflation;
  2. the differences between government controlled economies and free trade.
Mises in his library
Mises in his library

Mises argued that money is demanded for its usefulness in purchasing other goods, rather than for its own sake and that any significant credit expansion causes business cycles. His other notable contribution was his argument that socialism must fail economically because of the economic calculation problem — the impossibility of a socialist government being able to make the economic calculations required to organize a complex economy. Mises projected that without a market economy there would be no functional price system, which he held essential for achieving rational allocation of capital goods to their most productive uses. Socialism would fail as demand cannot be known without prices, according to Von Mises. Mises' criticism of socialist paths of economic development is well-known. Central Bank or Finance Ministry based economics where the interest rate plays a pivotal role in the cost of money and the amounts banks must hold in their reserves. ... A command economy is a political system in which government decisions are made by central state economic managers who determine what sorts of goods and services to produce and how they are to be priced and allocated, and may include state ownership of the means of production. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Image File history File linksMetadata MisesLibrary. ... Credit as a financial term, used in such terms as credit card, refers to the granting of a loan and the creation of debt. ... An abstract business cycle The business cycle or economic cycle refers to the ups and downs seen somewhat simultaneously in most parts of an economy. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community[1] for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ... The economic calculation problem is a criticism of socialist economics. ... A market economy (also called a free market economy or a free enterprise economy) is an economic system in which the production and distribution of goods and services take place through the mechanism of free markets guided by a free price system. ...

The only certain fact about Russian affairs under the Soviet regime with regard to which all people agree is: that the standard of living of the Russian masses is much lower than that of the masses in the country which is universally considered as the paragon of capitalism, the United States of America. If we were to regard the Soviet regime as an experiment, we would have to say that the experiment has clearly demonstrated the superiority of capitalism and the inferiority of socialism.[4]

These arguments were elaborated on by subsequent Austrian economists such as Hayek. Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ...


In Interventionism, An Economic Analysis (1940), Ludwig von Mises wrote:

The usual terminology of political language is stupid. What is 'left' and what is 'right'? Why should Hitler be 'right' and Stalin, his temporary friend, be 'left'? Who is 'reactionary' and who is 'progressive'? Reaction against an unwise policy is not to be condemned. And progress towards chaos is not to be commended. Nothing should find acceptance just because it is new, radical, and fashionable. 'Orthodoxy' is not an evil if the doctrine on which the 'orthodox' stand is sound. Who is anti-labor, those who want to lower labor to the Russian level, or those who want for labor the capitalistic standard of the United States? Who is 'nationalist,' those who want to bring their nation under the heel of the Nazis, or those who want to preserve its independence? “Leftism” redirects here. ... “Right wing” redirects here. ... Hitler redirects here. ... (Russian, in full: Ио́сиф Виссарио́нович Ста́лин [Iosif Vissarionovich Stalin]; December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953) was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s to his death in 1953 and General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922-1953... Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. ... This article is about Progressivism. ... “Orthodox” redirects here. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ...

Bibliography

  • The Theory of Money and Credit (1912, 1953)
  • Nation, State, and Economy (1919)
  • Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis (online version) (1922, 1932, 1951)
  • Critique of Interventionism
  • Liberalism (1927, 1962)
  • Epistemological Problems of Economics
  • Notes and Recollections (1940)
  • Omnipotent Government: The Rise of Total State and Total War (1944)
  • Bureaucracy (1944)
  • Planning for Freedom
  • Human Action: A Treatise on Economics (1949, 1963, 1966, 1996)
  • Theory and History: An Interpretation of Social and Economic Evolution
  • The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality
  • The Ultimate Foundation of Economic Science
  • Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow

See also

Th analytic-synthetic distinction (or dichotomy) is a conceptual distinction, used primarily in philosophy to distinguish propositions into two types: analytic propositions and synthetic propositions. ... Contributions to liberal theory is a partial list of individual contributions on a worldwide scale. ... This article is part of or related to the Liberalism series Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | Liberalism by country | Austrian political parties ... For other uses, see Libertarianism (disambiguation). ... This is a list of Austrian scientists. ... The following list is a selection of famous Austrians. ... The Mont Pelerin Society (MPS) is an international organization composed of economists, intellectuals, business leaders, and others who favour economic liberalism. ... Karl Paul Polanyi (October 21, 1886 - Pickering, Ontario April 23, 1964) was a Hungarian intellectual known for his opposition to traditional economic thought and his influential book The Great Transformation. ... The Great Transformation is a phrase used to describe the sum total of a collection of changes, possibly connected in their origin, that occurred in Europe from about 1700 to about 1900. ...

Further reading

  • Brian Doherty. Radicals for Capitalism: A Freewheeling History of the Modern American Libertarian Movement (2007)

Brian Doherty is a Senior Editor at Reason Magazine. ...

Notes

  • Note regarding personal names: Edler is a title, (literary meaning noble) in rank similar to that of a baronet, not a first or middle name. The female form is Edle.
  1. ^ Who was Ludwig von Mises?. Ludwig von Mises Institute web site. Retrieved on 2006-04-08.
  2. ^ On Von Mises PDF, also see Richard von Mises article.
  3. ^ Coudenhove-Kalergi, Richard Nikolaus, Graf von (1953). An idea conquers the world. London: Hutchinson, p.247. 
  4. ^ Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis by Ludwig von Mises.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard von Mises. ... Count Richard Nikolaus von Coudenhove-Kalergi, (Tokio, 17th November 1894 to Schrum, Voralberg, 27th July 1972) was the son of a Austro-Hungarian count and diplomat, and a Japanese mother. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Murray Newton Rothbard (March 2, 1926 – January 7, 1995) was an influential American economist, historian and natural law theorist belonging to the Austrian School of Economics who helped define modern libertarianism. ...

Online e-books

  • The Free Market and Its Enemies: Pseudo-Science, Socialism, and Inflation Lecture Series, Volume 1, with an introduction by Richard Ebeling. Copyright 2004 Foundation for Economic Education. All rights reserved.
  • Nine Books by Mises, made available online by the Liberty Fund, publishers of the Complete Works of Ludwig von Mises
  • Human Action: A treatise on economics 1949 (4th edition, 1996). San Francisco: Fox & Wilkes. ISBN 0-930073-18-5. Made available online by The Ludwig von Mises Institute.
  • Human Action: The Scholars Edition Auburn, Alabama: Mises Institute, 1999. Re-issue of the classic 1949 Edition with new introduction and expanded index.
  • A Critique of Interventionism, The Ludwig von Mises Institute.
  • The Anti-Capitalistic Mentality, Libertarian Press 1990.
  • McCaine, Catamite. Von Mises, The Austrian School, and Class Struggle. Holland Revolutionary Press
  • Economic Freedom and Interventionism, The Ludwig von Mises Institute.
  • Economic Policy: Thoughts for Today and Tomorrow Second Edition, with a New Introduction by Bettina Bien Greaves, The Ludwig von Mises Institute.
  • The Historical Setting of the Austrian School of Economics, The Ludwig von Mises Institute.
  • Liberalism: In the Classical Tradition, English edition Copyright 1985 The Foundation for Economic Education, Irvington, NY. Translation by Ralph Raico. Online edition Copyright The Mises Institute, 2000.
  • The Theory of Money and Credit. 1912 integration of microeconomics and macroeconomics. ISBN 0-913966-71-1. Online edition Copyright The Mises Institute.
  • Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis Von Mises' critique of Socialism
  • Theory and History. 1957 treatise on social and economic evolution, with a preface by Murray N. Rothbard. Online edition Copyright The Mises Institute, 2000.
  • My Years With Ludwig von Mise by Margit von Mises. 1976. Memoir of their life together.

  Results from FactBites:
 
LUDWIG VON MISES (3906 words)
Ludwig von Mises was born in 1881, in Lemberg and grew up as a subject of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
Ludwig von Mises was therefore in the second generation of Austrian School economists.
Ludwig von Mises spent much if not most of his time speaking and writing in opposition to the statist trends that engulfed the world during his life-time.
LUDWIG VON MISES (1515 words)
Mises transformed his insights about forced saving and malinvestment into a theory of the business cycle by recognizing the unsustainability of production activities that are based upon a low bank rate.
Mises' formulation advanced the circulation-credit theory by showing that credit expansion is unsustainable even in a closed economy—or in an open one in which the banks of all countries expand together.
In sum, Mises saw the boom as a consequence of unenlightened bank policy, a period of artificial and unsustainable expansion, in which capital and other resources are committed to excessively roundabout production processes, and he saw the bust as the inevitable consequence of the credit-induced boom.
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