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Encyclopedia > Ludlow
Ludlow


Dinham Bridge crossing the Teme near Ludlow Castle. The following locations are called Ludlow: Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1053x700, 528 KB) Summary Taken by myself in 2005. ... The River Teme rises in mid-Wales south of Newtown, Powys and flows through Ludlow in Shropshire on its way to join the River Severn south of Worcester. ... Ludlow Castles gatehouse Ludlow Castle is a large, now ruined castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ...


Ludlow shown within the United Kingdom
Population 10,500
OS grid reference SO517750
 - London 155.6mi
District South Shropshire
Shire county Shropshire
Region West Midlands
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LUDLOW
Postcode district SY8
Dialling code 01584
Police West Mercia
Fire Shropshire
Ambulance West Midlands
UK Parliament Ludlow
European Parliament West Midlands
List of places: UKEnglandShropshire

Coordinates: 52°22′17″N 2°42′36″W / 52.3713, -2.7101 Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... South Shropshire is a local government district in south west Shropshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The West Midlands is an official Region of England, covering the western half of the Midlands. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia[1]; the Soviet Union referring to the... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The SY postcode area, also known as the Shrewsbury postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Aberystwyth, Bishops Castle, Borth, Bow Street, Bucknell, Caersws, Church Stretton, Craven Arms, Ellesmere, Llanbrynmair, Llandinam, Llanfechain, Llanfyllin, Llanidloes, Llanon, Llanrhystud, Llansantffraid, Llanymynech, Ludlow, Lydbury North, Machynlleth, Malpas, Meifod, Montgomery, Newtown, Oswestry... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... West Mercia Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Shropshire (including Telford and Wrekin), Herefordshire and Worcestershire in England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The Shropshire Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering Shropshire in the West Midlands region of England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Herefordshire, Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin, Warwickshire, West Midlands, and Worcestershire in the West Midlands region. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Ludlow is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... West Midlands is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Shropshire, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Ludlow is a town in Shropshire, England situated close to the border with Wales in The Welsh Marches. It lies within a bend of the River Teme, on its eastern bank, forming an area of 350 acres (1.4 km²) about a small hill. The crest of this rise forms the site of Ludlow Castle and was the location of the market place of the original town, and from there the streets of the medieval town sloped downward to the Teme, or northward toward the Corve tributary. The town is in a sheltered spot beneath the Clee Hills which are clearly visible from the town[1]. Ludlow is the largest town in the South Shropshire district with a population of around 10,000, and home of the district council headquarters[2]. Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Welsh Marches is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ... The River Teme rises in mid-Wales south of Newtown, Powys and flows through Ludlow in Shropshire, then between Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire and Burford, Shropshire on its way to join the River Severn south of Worcester. ... Ludlow Castles gatehouse Ludlow Castle is a large, now ruined castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... Titterstone Clee Hill from Ludlow Castle The Clee Hills are a range of hills in Shropshire, England, consisting of Brown Clee Hill (540m), the highest peak in Shropshire, and Titterstone Clee Hill (533m). ... South Shropshire is a local government district in south west Shropshire, England. ...


Ludlow contains some fine examples of Tudor-style half-timbered buildings including the Feathers Hotel and has featured in movies and TV programmes including Tom Sharpe's Blott on the Landscape and 90s TV adaptations of The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling and Moll Flanders, as well as being featured in the 1950 movie version of Mary Webb's Gone To Earth. Its parish church, St Laurence Church, is the largest in the county[3]. Ludlow has nearly 500 listed buildings - many very popular with tourists[4]. Kings College Chapel outside view The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. ... Timber framing is the modern term for the traditional half-timbered construction in which timber provides a visible skeletal frame that supports the whole building. ... Blott on the Landscape is a novel written in 1975 by Tom Sharpe. ... The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (often known simply as Tom Jones) is a comic novel by Henry Fielding. ... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... Mary Webb (March 25, 1881 - October 8, 1927), was an English romantic novelist of the early 20th century, whose novels are set chiefly in the Shropshire countryside which she knew and loved well. ... This is an article about an album by David Sylvian. ... St Laurence Church: One of the large stained glass windows St Laurence Church, Ludlow was established as a Norman place of worship in association with the founding of Ludlow in the 11th century AD. This parish church in Shropshire, England contains an extensive set of misericords in the choir stalls...


In recent years Ludlow has become a gastronomic centre. At one point it was the only rural town in England with three Michelin-starred restaurants[5] (although this distinction has sinced passed to Bray-on-Thames in Berkshire) and also has an annual food festival. Ludlow is the first UK member of Cittaslow, the slow town movement related to the Slow Food movement[6], and has been charged with setting up the UK Cittaslow network. It supports four traditional butchers, regular local farmers markets and has been described by Country Life as the most vibrant small town in England[7]. New York City 2006 First Michelin Red Guide for North America The Michelin Guide (Le Guide Michelin) is a series of annual guide books published by Michelin for over a dozen countries. ... St. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Cittaslow, (literally Slow City in English) is a movement founded in Italy in October of 1999. ... A restaurant placard, Santorini The Slow Food movement was founded by Carlo Petrini in Italy as a resistance movement to combat fast food and claims to preserve the cultural cuisine and the associated food plants and seeds, domestic animals, and farming within an ecoregion. ...

Contents

History

The town is also very close to the border between Shropshire and Herefordshire, and was included in the latter in the Domesday Book. As a result of this location, it became important in medieval times and its large castle remains largely intact. Ludlow Castle was the seat of the Council of Wales and the Marches and a temporary home to several holders of the title Prince of Wales, notably Arthur Tudor, who died there in 1502. The town is now the headquarters of the South Shropshire district. Shropshire (pronounced /, -/), alternatively known as Salop[6] or abbreviated Shrops[7], is a county in the West Midlands of England. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Ludlow Castles gatehouse Ludlow Castle is a large, now ruined castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ... The Council of the Marches was an English regional administrative body (similar to the Council of the North) covering all of Wales and the English counties known as the Welsh Marches. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... Arthur, Prince of Wales Arthur Tudor (20 September 1486 _ 2 April 1502) was the eldest son of Henry VII of England. ... 1502 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... South Shropshire is a local government district in south west Shropshire, England. ...


The site features heavily in the semi-historical story of Fulk FitzWarin, outlawed Lord of Whittington, Shropshire and one of the greatest inspirations for the Robin Hood legend. Fulk is brought up in the castle of Joce De Dynan, and fights for his master against Sir Walter de Lacy – these battles are also the source of the famous story of Marion de la Bruyere, the betrayed lover whose ghost is still said to be heard crying "Goodbye, Cruel World!" as she plummets from the Castle's turrets. Fulk FitzWarin (also called Fulke or Fouke FitzWaryn or FitzWarren) was a medieval landed gentleman turned outlaw, from Whittington Castle in Shropshire. ... Whittington is a village in Shropshire, England. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Walter de Lacy (1180 – 1240) was Lord of Meath and Ludlow. ...


When the Domesday Book survey was performed subsequent to the Norman Conquest, this site was home to the unoccupied large Stanton Manor. Possession of this structure was granted to William the Conqueror's henchman Walter de Lacy. Walter's son Roger de Lacy, began the construction of a castle on the crest of the hill between about 1086 and 1094, forming what is now the inner bailey. Between c. 1090 and 1120, the Chapel of St. Mary Magdalene was built inside the walls, and by 1130 the Great Tower was added to form the gatehouse. The castle formed an important border fortification along the Marches of Wales, and played a significant role in local conflicts. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Walter de Lacy (1180 – 1240) was Lord of Meath and Ludlow. ... Roger de Lacy[1](died after 1106[2]) was a Norman nobleman, a Marcher Lord on the Welsh border. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... // May - El Cid completes his conquest of Valencia, Spain, and begins his rule of Valencia. ... Events Granada captured by Yusuf Ibn Tashfin, King of the Almoravides Beginnings of troubadours in Provence Bejaia becomes the capital of the Algeria Births William of Malmsbury Saint Bernard of Clairvaux Saint Famianus Eliezer ben Nathan of Mainz Deaths Saint Malcoldia of Asti Saint Adalbero Categories: 1090 ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... Events February 13 - Innocent II is elected pope An antipope schism occurs when Roger II of Sicily supports Anacletus II as pope instead of Innocent II. Innocent flees to France and Anacletus crowns Roger King. ... The Welsh Marches is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ...

Feathers Hotel, Ludlow
Feathers Hotel, Ludlow
A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurence's Church.
A view of Ludlow market, which is situated in Castle Square, taken from the tower of St Laurence's Church.

Records show that the name 'Lodelowe' was in use for this site by the year 1138. At the time this section of the Teme river contained rapids, and so the hlud of Ludlow came from 'the loud waters', while hlaw meant hill. Thus Ludlow meant a place on a hill by a loud river. Some time around the 12th century weirs were added along the river, taming these rapid flows. Later in the same century the larger outer bailey was added to the castle. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (683x1043, 595 KB) Summary Photograph of the Feathers Hotel in Ludlow. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (683x1043, 595 KB) Summary Photograph of the Feathers Hotel in Ludlow. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (632x991, 337 KB) Summary Taken by myself in 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (632x991, 337 KB) Summary Taken by myself in 2005. ... Events Robert Warelwast becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... The bridge and weir mechanism at Sturminster Newton on the River Stour, Dorset. ... Places In the United Kingdom: Bailey, Lancashire Bailey is the name of one of the British Sea Areas The Bailey, the historic centre of Durham, England In Canada: Bailey, New Brunswick Bailey Corners, Ontario Baileys Beach, Ontario Baileys Brook, Nova Scotia In the United States of America: Bailey...


About this time the locale began to form a town, part of a deliberate policy of pacification by the Normans. The community also provided a useful source of income for the lords, based on rents, fines, and tolls. The town layout was deliberately planned, so the streets formed a regular grid, although they were adapted somewhat to match the local geography. The first road was most likely High Street, which formed the wide market place to the east of the castle gates. The town continued to grow, joining an old north-south road, now called Corve Street to the north and Old Street to the south. Mill Street and Broad Street were added later. Norman conquests in red. ...


The growth of the town by settlement from the surrounding lands resulted in the repair and expansion of the parish church. The town continued to prosper, and reached a steady population of about 2,000 for several centuries thereafter. It became a significant market centre for the area, and market day was held on every Thursday up through the 15th century. The town was licensed to build a wall in 1233, and this was constructed about the central part of the community with four main gates and three postern gates. Elburg gets its city-rights. ...


The castle complex continued to expand, adding a Great Hall, kitchen, and living quarters. The castle gained a reputation as a fortified palace, and in 1306 it was acquired through marriage by the ambitious Earl of March Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore. Queen Isabella and her son, the young Edward III, were entertained at the castle in 1328. The title Earl of March has been created several times in the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of England. ... Roger Mortimer (1231-1282), 1st Baron Wigmore, was the son of Ralph de Mortimer and his wife, Gwladus Ddu - daughter of Llywelyn the Great. ... Isabella returns to England with her son, Edward III. Jean Fouquet, 1455x1460. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ...


During the Middle Ages the town served as a retail centre for the sale of wool and cloth. It was also home to various trades, and by 1372 it was known to have had 12 Trade Guilds. These included metal workers, shoemakers, butchers, drapers, mercers, tailors, cooks, and bakers. There were also merchants of moderate wealth in the town. But the collection and sale of wool and the manufacture of cloth continued to be the primary trades up until the 17th century. Flocks of sheep grazed locally and in nearby Wales provided the raw materials for this major business in the local economy. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... In this year, the city of Aachen, Germany begins adding a Roman numeral Anno Domini date to a few of its coins. ... A guild is an association of persons of the same trade or pursuits, formed to protect mutual interests and maintain standards of morality or conduct. ... Species See text. ... This article is about the country. ...


Some of this prosperity is visible in St. Laurence's parish church, the largest in Shropshire. Despite the presence of much Decorated work the overall architectural impression is Perpendicular. The West Front of Exeter Cathedral The West Front of Lichfield Cathedral The Decorated Period, in architecture (also known as the Decorated Gothic, or simply Decorated) period is a historical division of English Gothic architecture. ... Winchester Cathedral Sherborne Abbey The Perpendicular Gothic period (or simply Perpendicular) is the third historical division of English Gothic architecture, and is so-called because it is characterised by an emphasis on vertical lines; it is also known as the Rectilinear style, or Late Gothic. ...


The town also contained several pubs and ale-houses, leading to court records of some alcohol-induced violence and a certain reputation for excess. Several inns were constructed to accommodate travellers. (The oldest surviving inn today is the Bull Hotel, dating from the 15th century.)


During the War of the Roses, Richard, Duke of York, gained ownership of the castle and turned it into one of his main strongholds. The Lancaster forces captured Ludlow in 1459, but at the end of the conflict in 1461 the castle became property of the Crown and Richard's son, Edward IV. The town was then incorporated as a borough. The two Princes in the Tower were briefly held at Ludlow, on their final journey to London. The War or Wars of the Roses may refer to, or have been referred to by: The historical Wars of the Roses, the civil war that took place in Mediæval Britain between the House of York and the House of Lancaster. ... This article is about Richard, Duke of York, father of King Edward IV. For the article about Edward IVs son who was imprisoned in the Tower of London see: Richard, Duke of York (Prince in the Tower). ... Events September 23 - Battle of Blore Heath. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... The Two Princes Edward and Richard in the Tower, 1483 by Sir John Everett Millais, 1878, part of the Royal Holloway picture collection The Princes in the Tower, Edward V of England (November 4, 1470 – 1483?) and his brother, Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York (17 August 1473 – 1483...


Under Henry VII the castle became the headquarters of the Council of the Marches of Wales and served as the administration centre for Wales and the counties along the border. During this period, when the town served as a virtual capital of Wales, it was home to many messengers of the king, various clerks, and lawyers for settling disputes. The town also provided a winter home for local gentry, during which time they attended the Council court sessions. Henry also sent his sickly heir Prince Arthur to Ludlow, where he was joined briefly by his wife Catherine of Aragon – Ludlow Castle therefore became the site of perhaps the most controversial wedding night in history, when the question of whether their marriage was consummated or not became a crucial factor in Catherine's divorce from Henry VIII. Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... See also the Council of Wales for the advisory council established in 1948. ... This article is about the country. ... Arthur Tudor (20 September 1486 – 2 April 1502) was the eldest son of Henry VII of England. ... Katherine of Aragon (Alcalá de Henares, 16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536), Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla, also known popularly after her time as Catherine of Aragon, was the first wife and Queen Consort of Henry VIII of England. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ...


Starting in 1610, the cloth industry began to decline in Ludlow. The town economy continued unaffected until about 1640, when the activities of the Council were suspended for a time. This brought about a 20% reduction in the town's population, and accompanying economic difficulties. // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ...


Except for brief interludes, Ludlow continued to host the Council until 1689, when it was abolished by William and Mary. The castle then suffered a lengthy period of decay. The structure was poorly maintained and the castle suffered from some stone pillaging. In 1772 some consideration was given to demolition, but it was instead decided to lease the buildings. Later it was purchased by the Earl of Powis, and he and his wife directed the transformation of the castle grounds into a tourist attraction. Year 1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1772 (MDCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The title of Earl of Powis has been created several times in British history. ...


Starting around 1760, the town's population began to undergo a significant expansion. New structures were built along the outskirts that would become slums in the 19th century; later to be torn down.


In 1832 a doctor from Ludlow began studying the rock deposits to the south-west of the town, along the River Teme and on Whitcliffe and in Ludford. The bottom layer of the rocks forming the four divisions of the Silurian period became identified as the Ludlow Group Bone Bed. This was a thin layer of dark sand containing numerous remains of early fish, especially their scales, along with plant debris, spores and microscopic mites laid down as sediments in a shallow tropical sea some 400 Million years ago. Whitcliffian is a term used worldwide for rocks of this age. The site is now an SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest). The River Teme rises in mid-Wales south of Newtown, Powys and flows through Ludlow in Shropshire, then between Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire and Burford, Shropshire on its way to join the River Severn south of Worcester. ... Ludford could be Ludford, Lincolnshire Ludford, Shropshire This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Silurian is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Ordovician period, about 443. ... In geology, the Ludlovian or Ludlow Group is the name of the uppermost subdivision of the Silurian rocks in Great Britain. ... A bone bed is any stratum or deposit which contains bones of whatever kind; not a formal term, it tends to be used more of especially dense collections. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ...

A shopper buys some figs from one of the many traditional shops amidst Ludlow's narrow streets.
A shopper buys some figs from one of the many traditional shops amidst Ludlow's narrow streets.

By the 20th century, the town had seen a growth in tourism, leading to the appearance of many antique dealers, as well as art dealers and independent bookshops. Many of the traditional shops were acquired by retail chains, and a long battle of words between local activists and Tesco was eventually won by the retailer when it obtained planning permission to build a supermarket on Corve Street, but Bodenhams a clothing retailer survives and is one of the oldest shops in the country - it celebrated its 600th anniversary in 2005. Image File history File linksMetadata Ludlow_shopper. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ludlow_shopper. ... For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ...


In 2004 the council was granted funding from Advantage West Midlands to build a new Eco-Park on the outskirts of the town on the other side of the A49, with space for new 'environmentally friendly' office buildings and a park & ride facility.


More construction work began in 2006 on the same section of by-pass by Bennett's Development company on a much-debated piece of land known as The Foldgate. The land has now been drawn up for commercial use with a petrol filling station, hotel and pub / restaurant currently being constructed. The previous plans to include a number of 'high-street' stores was thrown out when an independent official branded it 'damaging' and 'out-of-place' with the character of the old town.


Transport and communications

In 1979 a modern by-pass was built to the east of the town, diverting the A49. This allowed heavy lorry traffic to avoid the town centre, significantly reducing noise levels. The town centre was built for the era of the horse and cart and there are long running problems with motor traffic and car parking. A number of proposals have been offered to remedy these problems. The A49 near Warrington The A49 is a major road in England. ...


Ludlow railway station is located about five minutes walk from the town centre. Ludlow Railway Station is a small railway station serving the town of Ludlow in South Shropshire, on the mainline between Manchester and Cardiff. ...


The new Ludlow Eco-Park situated on the outskirt of the town, along the A49, includes a new Park & Ride facility, with a frequent bus service to and from the town centre.


On 26 June 2007, rising flood water caused Burway Bridge in Ludlow to collapse, severing a gas main and causing 20 homes in nearby Corve Street to be evacuated.[8]


Population

The census of 2001 recorded 9,548 people living in Ludlow parish. A further 395 live in the neighbouring Ludford parish. Ludford is a village and parish immediately to the south of the town of Ludlow, in Shropshire, England on the south bank of the River Teme. ...

  • 1377 — 1,172
  • 1801 — 3,897
  • 1901 — 4,552
  • 1971 — 7,470
  • 1987 — 7,450
  • 2005 — 10,500

Famous People

  • Charles Badham, Victorian scholar and professor at Sydney University
  • Sir John Bridgeman, a Chief Justice of The Marches in the 17th Century is buried in St Laurence's church, within a tomb monument attributed to Francesco Fanelli.
  • Alfred Edward Housman, poet and author of "A Shropshire Lad", has his ashes buried in the graveyard of St. Laurence's Church and marked by a cherry tree.
  • John Marston the founder of the famous British Sunbeam racing car and motorcycle company, was born near the town in 1836.
  • Pictorialist photographer Henry Peach Robinson was born in the town in 1831.
  • Henry Hill Hickman a very early pioneer of anaesthetics was born at Lady Halton, near Bromfield in 1800.
  • Sir Charles Hastings pioneering Victorian Doctor and founder of the BMA, born at Ludlow but grew up in Worcestershire.
  • Baron Rees of Ludlow, the current Astronomer Royal bears the title Baron Ludlow.
  • Hollie Robertson, winner of the BBC's Strictly Dance Fever in 2006
  • Stanley J. Weyman, 1855 to 1928 the novelist known as the "Prince of Romance", was born in Ludlow.
  • Alan Stewart, Civil Engineer, World Traveller, owner of 2 sheds
  • Holly Davidson - actress, TV Star of Casualty and The Bill was born locally in 1980.
  • Anthony Howard senior British political journalist and commentator keeps a home in Ludlow.
  • John Challis a.k.a Boycie in Only Fools & Horses lives near Ludlow.
  • Pete Postlethwaite the actor also lives near Ludlow.

Charles Badham (July 19, 1813 - February 26, 1884), was an English scholar, born at Ludlow, Shropshire. ... John Bridgeman can refer to several people: Sir John Bridgeman (d. ... Francesco Fanelli (c 1590-1653) was an Italian sculptor, born in Florence. ... Alfred Edward Housman (March 26, 1859 - April 30, 1936), usually known as A.E. Housman, was an English poet and classical scholar, now best known for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. ... Explif neglight atio ninetit ennial zing cons attempti. ... Older Sunbeam badge Another Sunbeam badge BSA Sunbeam Scooter badge Sunbeam was a British motorcycle marque generally known for high quality. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pictorialism was a photographic movement in vogue from around 1885 following the widespread introduction of the dry-plate process, and reached its height in the early years of the 20th century and declined rapidly after 1914. ... Robinsons Fading Away Henry Peach Robinson (b. ... Henry Hill Hickman, 1800-1830 Hickman was born to tenant farmers in 1800. ... Sir Charles Hastings (1794 - 1866) was a medical surgeon and a founder of the British Medical Association, the BMA. He was also a notable lifelong philanthropist, investing his own money in new housing designed to improve public health and founding a natural history museum. ... Professor Martin Rees Martin John Rees, Baron Rees of Ludlow, FRS (born 23 June 1942) is a professor of astronomy. ... Hollie Victoria Robertson (born March 21, 1985) partnered Darrien Wright in the second series of BBC One show Strictly Dance Fever. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Strictly Dance Fever was a BBC One television series which is in many ways similar to the popular Strictly Come Dancing TV series. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stanley John Weyman (August 7, 1855 - April 10, 1928) was an English novelist sometimes referred to as the Prince of Romance. Weyman (pronounced why-man) was born at Ludlow, Shropshire, as the son of a solicitor. ... Holly Davidson is a British actress born in 1980 in Shropshire, England. ... Anthony Bourne Howard (b. ... John Challis (born August 16, 1942 in Bristol, England) is a British actor best known for his role as Aubrey Boycie Boyce in the long-running comedy show Only Fools and Horses, and its 2005 spin-off, The Green Green Grass. ... Boycie, seen here on the left with Trigger and Del Boy. ... Peter William Postlethwaite OBE (born February 7, 1945)[1] is an English actor. ...

Culture

The Ludlow Festival has been held annually since 1960, during the end of June and the start of July each year. An open area within the castle serves as the stage and backdrop for variousShakespearean plays, while a number of supporting events at various venues include classical and pop / rock concerts, varied musicians, talks from public figures, and entertainers. Shakespeare redirects here. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 Kasia Kowalska concert in Warsaw A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A lecture on linear algebra at the Helsinki University of Technology A lecture is an oral presentation intended to teach people about a particular subject, for example by a university or college teacher. ... An entertainer is someone who is hired to entertain people. ...


The annual Ludlow Marches Festival of Food and Drink takes place in September. Centred on Ludlow Castle, where over 150 local, small food producers showcase and sell their wares, the three-day event involves the whole town centre in food and drink trails including the famous 'Sausage Trail'. Ludlow Castles gatehouse Ludlow Castle is a large, now ruined castle which dominates the town of Ludlow in Shropshire, England. ...


The Medieval Christmas Fayre is another annual event in Ludlow taking place during late November, again centred on Ludlow Castle and the market square. This event is held over a whole weekend, with activities, food, and craft stalls being held in the castle. During Saturday evening, the castle is lit up with candles and torches and given a medieval feel, with costumed stall holders, historical re-enactors in armour etc and 'have-a-go' archery. For other uses, see Candle (disambiguation). ... This article is about portable open fires. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ...


The town is also home to an arts and cinema centre, The Ludlow Assembly Rooms, which hosts live music, theatre, and talks. It also acts as an arts community centre, has a visual arts gallery, and on most evenings, shows a film, from a wide variety of genres (including classic, arthouse, and blockbuster). For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... While there is no agreed upon greatest film of all time, it is possible to list films considered the greatest ever by a sizeable populace of the film-watching community in the English-speaking world. ... Art film is a film style that began as a European reaction to the classical Hollywood style of film making. ... Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. ...


From 1983 to 1991, the magazine publisher Newsfield Publications was based in the town. Newsfield Publications Ltd (also known as Newsfield) was a British magazine publisher during the 1980s and early 1990s. ...


External links

References

  1. ^ Ludlow. Retrieved on 2007-09-10.
  2. ^ South Shropshire District Council - Press release. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  3. ^ Telegraph.co.uk: Getting a Taste for Ludlow. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  4. ^ Ludlow's Buildings. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  5. ^ Ludlow Shropshire tourist and visitor information. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  6. ^ Woman's World - Going slow in Ludlow. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  7. ^ Ludlow Tourist Information. Retrieved on 2007-09-17.
  8. ^ Bridge collapse severs gas main.

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Ludlow, Shropshire - Tourism information, where to stay, accommodation, things to do, what's on, businesses...... (115 words)
Ludlow, Shropshire - Tourism information, where to stay, accommodation, things to do, what's on, businesses......
Ludlow and its castle are perched on a cliff above the picturesque River Teme: the town breathes history at every turn.
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It is surrounded by the unspoilt and beautiful hilly countryside of south Shropshire and the Welsh border country, known as the Welsh Marches.
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Ludlow has a wide range of shops, including many specialities, many of which are independently owned and often idiosyncratic.
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