FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Luck" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Luck

Luck is a chance happening, or that which happens beyond a person's control. Luck can be good or bad. Lutsk (Луцьк in Ukrainian, Łuck in Polish) is the capital of the Volyn region, Ukraine. ... Luck is a village located in Polk County, Wisconsin. ...

A four-leaf clover is often considered to bestow good luck
A four-leaf clover is often considered to bestow good luck

Contents

Download high resolution version (1024x768, 123 KB)Photograph of Oxalis in Deerpark. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 123 KB)Photograph of Oxalis in Deerpark. ... A four-leaf clover The four-leaf clover is an uncommon variation of the common three-leaf clover. ...

Luck as lack of control

Luck refers to that which happens beyond a person's control. This view incorporates phenomena that are chance happenings, a person's place of birth for example, but where there is no uncertainty involved, or where the uncertainty is irrelevant. Within this framework one can differentiate between three different types of luck:

  1. Constitutional luck, that is, luck with factors that cannot be changed. Place of birth and genetic constitution are typical examples.
  2. Circumstantial luck, that is, luck with factors that are haphazardly brought on. Accidents and epidemics are typical examples.
  3. Ignorance luck, that is, luck with factors one does not know about. Examples can be identified only in hindsight.

Another explanation of luck could be given as when preparation meets destiny . Hindsight bias, sometimes called the I-knew-it-all-along effect, is the inclination to see events that have occurred as more predictable than they in fact were before they took place. ...


Luck as a fallacy

Another view holds that "luck is probability taken personally". A rationalist approach to luck includes the application of the rules of probability, and an avoidance of unscientific beliefs. The rationalist feels the belief in luck is a result of poor reasoning or wishful thinking. To a rationalist, a believer in luck commits the post hoc logical fallacy which argues that because something is sequentially connected it is connected otherwise as well: This article is not about continental rationalism. ... Probability is the likelihood that something is the case or will happen. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... In epistemology and in its broadest sense, rationalism is any view appealing to reason as a source of knowledge or justification (Lacey 286). ... Wishful thinking is the formation of beliefs and making decisions according to what might be pleasing to imagine instead of by appealing to evidence or rationality. ... The West Wing, see Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc (The West Wing). ...

A happens (luck-attracting event or action) and then B happens;
Therefore, A caused B.

In this particular perspective, probability is only affected by confirmed causal connections. A brick falling on a person walking below, therefore, is not a function of that person's luck, but is instead the result of a collection of understood (or explainable) occurrences. Statistically, every person walking near the building was just as likely to have the brick fall on them. This article is about the field of statistics. ...


The gambler's fallacy and inverse gambler's fallacy both explain some reasoning problems in common beliefs in luck. They involve denying the unpredictability of random events: "I haven't rolled a six all week, so I'll definitely roll one tonight". The gamblers fallacy is a logical fallacy which encompasses any of the following misconceptions: A random event is more likely to occur because it has not happened for a period of time; A random event is less likely to occur because it has not happened for a period of... The inverse gamblers fallacy is a tempting mistake in judgments of probability, comparable to the gamblers fallacy whence its name derives. ... Random redirects here. ...


Luck is merely an expression noting an extended period of noted outcomes, completely consistent with random walk probability theory. Wishing one "good luck" will not cause such an extended period, but it expresses positive feelings toward the one -- not necessarily wholly undesirable. Example of eight random walks in one dimension starting at 0. ...


Luck as an essence

There is also a series of spiritual, or supernatural beliefs regarding fortune. These beliefs vary widely from one to another, but most agree that luck can be influenced through spiritual means by performing certain rituals or by avoiding certain circumstances. // By 1853, when the popular song Spirit Rappings was published, Spiritualism was an object of intense curiosity. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ...


One such activity is prayer, a religious practice in which this belief is particularly strong. Many cultures and religions worldwide place a strong emphasis on a person's ability to influence their fortune by ritualistic means, sometimes involving sacrifice, omens or spells. Others associate luck with a strong sense of superstition, that is, a belief that certain taboo or blessed actions will influence how fortune favors them for the future. Mary Magdalene in prayer. ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... Marcus Aurelius and members of the Imperial family offer sacrifice in gratitude for success against Germanic tribes: contemporary bas-relief, Capitoline Museum, Rome For other uses, see Sacrifice (disambiguation). ... Omens or portents are signs encountered fortuitously that are believed to foretell the future. ... The spell is a magical act intended to cause an effect on reality using supernatural means of liturgical or ritual nature. ...


Luck can also be a belief in an organization of fortunate and unfortunate events. Luck is a form of superstition which is interpreted differently by different individuals. Carl Jung described synchronicity: the "temporally coincident occurrences of acausal events". He described coincidences as an effect of a collective unconscious. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... “Jung” redirects here. ... Synchronicity is the experience of two or more events which occur in a meaningful manner, but which are causally inexplicable to the person or persons experiencing them. ... Coincidence literally describes two or more events or entities occupying the same point in space or time, but colloquially means two or more events or entities possessing unexpected parallels, such as thinking about someone and then receiving an unexpected phone call from that person, when it is clear that there... Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology originally coined by Carl Jung. ...


Christian and Islamic religions believe in the will of a supreme being rather than luck as the primary influence in future events. The degrees of this Divine Providence vary greatly from one person to another; however, most acknowledge providence as at least a partial, if not complete influence on luck. These religions, in their early development, accommodated many traditional practices. Each, at different times, accepted omens and practiced forms of ritual sacrifice in order to divine the will of their supreme being or to influence divine favoritism. The concept of "Divine Grace" as it is described by believers closely resembles what is referred to as "luck" by others. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... In theology, Divine Providence, or simply Providence, is the sovereignty, superintendence, or agency of God over events in peoples lives and throughout history. ... Examples of omens from the Nuremberg Chronicle (1493): natural phenomena and strange births. ... Marcus Aurelius and members of the Imperial family offer sacrifice in gratitude for success against Germanic tribes: contemporary bas-relief, Capitoline Museum, Rome For other uses, see Sacrifice (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Mesoamerican religions, such as the Aztecs, Mayans and Inca, had particularly strong beliefs regarding the relationship between rituals and luck. In these cultures, human sacrifice (both of willing volunteers and captured enemies) was seen as a way to please the gods and earn favor for the city offering the sacrifice. The Mayans also believed in blood offerings, where men or women wanting to earn favor with the gods, to bring about good luck, would cut themselves and bleed on the gods' altar. Mesoamerica is the region extending from central Mexico south to the northwestern border of Costa Rica that gave rise to a group of stratified, culturally related agrarian civilizations spanning an approximately 3,000-year period before the European discovery of the New World by Columbus. ... The word Aztec is usually used as a historical term, although some contemporary Nahuatl speakers would consider themselves Aztecs. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ...


Many traditional African practices, such as voodoo and hoodoo, have a strong belief in superstition. Some of these religions include a belief that third parties can influence an individual's luck. Shamans and witches are both respected yet feared, based on their ability to cause good or bad fortune for those in villages near them. World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Voodoo (Vodou, Vodoun, Vudu, or Vudun in Benin, Togo, southeastern Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal; also Vodou in Haiti) is a name attributed to a traditionally uten West African spiritual system of faith and ritual practices. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A shaman doctor of Kyzyl. ... “Witch” redirects here. ...


Luck as a placebo

Some encourage the belief in luck as a false idea, but which may produce positive thinking, and alter one's responses for the better. Others, like Jean Paul Sartre and Sigmund Freud, feel a belief in luck has more to do with a locus of control for events in one's life, and the subsequent escape from personal responsibility. According to this theory, one who ascribes their travails to "bad luck" will be found upon close examination to be living risky lifestyles. On the other hand, people who consider themselves "lucky" in having good health may be actually reaping the benefits of a cheerful outlook and satisfying social relationships, both of which are well known statistically to be protective against many stress-related diseases[citation needed]. If "good" and "bad" events occur at random to everyone, believers in good luck will experience a net gain in their fortunes, and vice versa for believers in bad luck. This is clearly likely to be self-reinforcing. Thus, although untrue, a belief in good luck may actually be an adaptive meme. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Placebo. ... Attitude is a key concept in social psychology. ... Jean Paul Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre (June 21, 1905–April 15, 1980) was a French existentialist philosopher, dramatist, novelist and critic. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Lets talk about risk control strategies, anyone with more information and willing to share, please do so. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... For other uses, see Meme (disambiguation). ...


Numerology

Most cultures consider some numbers to be lucky or unlucky. This is found to be particularly strong in Asian cultures, where the obtaining of "lucky" telephone numbers, automobile license plate numbers, and household addresses are actively sought, sometimes at great monetary expense. Numerology, as it relates to luck, is closer to an art than to a science, yet numerologists, astrologists or psychics may disagree. It is interrelated to astrology, and to some degree to parapsychology and spirituality and is based on converting virtually anything material into a pure number, using that number in an attempt to detect something meaningful about reality, and trying to predict or calculate the future based on lucky numbers. Numerology is folkloric by nature and started when humans first learned to count. Through human history it was, and still is, practiced by many cultures all over the world from traditional fortunetelling to on-line psychic reading. Numerology is any of many systems, traditions or beliefs in a mystical or esoteric relationship between numbers and physical objects or living things. ... A telephone number is a sequence of decimal digits that uniquely indicates the network termination point. ... // Introduction A license plate, number plate or registration plate (often referred to simply as a plate, or colloquially tag) is a small metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle for official identification purposes. ... An address is a code and abstract concept expressing the fixed location of a home, business or other building on the earths surface. ... For other uses, see Money (disambiguation). ... Numerology is any of many systems, traditions or beliefs in a mystical or esoteric relationship between numbers and physical objects or living things. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... Early parapsychological research employed the use of Zener cards in experiments designed to test for possible telepathic communication. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... In dimensional analysis, a dimensionless quantity (or more precisely, a quantity with the dimensions of 1) is a quantity without any physical units and thus a pure number. ... Folklore is the ethnographic concept of the tales, legends, or superstitions current among a particular ethnic population, a part of the oral history of a particular culture. ...


Luck in scripture

  • The bearing that Isaiah 65:11 has on beliefs concerning luck is a matter of controversy ("But you who forsake Yahweh, who forget my holy mountain, who prepare a table for Fortune, and who fill up mixed wine to Destiny").
  • The lot is cast into the lap, but its every decision is from the Lord (Proverbs 16:33 NIV)
  • I have seen something else under the sun: The race is not to the swift or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all. (Ecclesiastes 9:11 NIV)

Superstition and Luck

  • "Lucky in Love not lucky in cards" is long held Russian superstition. There is a caveat to this expression however: it applies to a man only before marriage. The reason for this delineation is that marriage in the Russian Orthodox Church, just as it is in the Catholic Church, is a sacrament before God. Once the marriage bonds have been made sacred before God the concept of luck can no longer apply as God's will transcends all concepts of "luck." Thus, the man who has met his true love prior to marriage and experiences the corresponding "bad luck" in cards must either marry his true love or depart from her. Either of these actions will ensure that his "bad luck" in cards will no longer apply. Among professional poker players, Robert Varkonyi is an example of this phenomenon. Mr. Varkonyi while married to his Russian wife, Olga, whom by all accounts is his true love, won the 2002 World Series of Poker main event for a total purse of two million dollars. This was an unprecedented event as Mr. Varkonyi was an amateur player at the time playing against poker's greats. It is generally accepted that although Mr. Varkonyi was a skilled poker player, such a victory could not have been possible without some "luck in cards." Thus, not only may a man be married to his true love, but he may also be "lucky in cards." Events such as Mr. Varkonyi's improbable 2002 victory even suggest that the saying may be revised after marriage: "lucky in marriage lucky in cards."

Lucky objects or occurrences


  Results from FactBites:
 
Luck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2559 words)
Luck is often regarded as a superstition, but it can be interpreted in many ways.
Circumstantial luck, that is, luck with factors that are haphazardly brought on.
Luck is a form of superstition which is interpreted differently by different individuals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m