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Encyclopedia > Luas
Luas
Type Public Private Partnership
Founded 2004
Headquarters Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Area served Republic of Ireland
Industry Infrastructure & Public Transportation State Administrator
Parent Department of Transport
Website Luas

Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for 'speed'), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. It is one of 450 light rail systems operating in cities around the world. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Public-private partnership (PPP) is a variation of privatization in which elements of a service previously run solely by the public sector are provided through a partnership between the government and one or more private sector companies. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A holding company is a company that owns part, all, or a majority of other companies outstanding stock. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Originally under the organisation of Córas Iompair Éireann, the project was moved to the Railway Procurement Agency upon that body's inception, while it is operated by Veolia Transport Ireland (formerly known as Connex). The system is also often called a tram network. The Luas is a major part of the Dublin Transportation Office's strategy (2000-2016).[1] It is estimated that around 80,000 people use the Luas daily; and, as of November 2006, over 50 million journeys have been made on the system.[2] The Luas is also one of the safest transport systems in the world. [1] Córas Iompair Éireann[1] (CIÉ) is a statutory authority which is owned by the Irish Government. ... Railway Procurement Agency (Irish: An Ghníomhaireacht um Fháil Iarnród) is a state board in the Republic of Ireland charged with the development of light railway and metro infrastructure. ... Veolia Transportation is a brand name of the international transport services division of the French-based multinational company Veolia Environnement before known as Connex. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... The Dublin Transportation Office (DTO) is a government agency, formed in 1996, which provides transport and land use advise to organisations operating in the Greater Dublin Area. ...

Luas tram crossing the Liffey
Luas tram crossing the Liffey

Contents

Download high resolution version (1635x1200, 750 KB)Photograph by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005. ... Download high resolution version (1635x1200, 750 KB)Photograph by Colin Gregory Palmer in 2005. ...

Operation

Services commenced on the Green Line on Wednesday 30 June 2004, with free fares for the first five days of operation. The Red Line opened on 28 September 2004, almost a month behind schedule. It remains to be seen whether the Luas will prove effective in combating Dublin's traffic congestion problems. is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


The Red and Green Lines are separate lines, with separate depots and facilities, and fixed allocations of trams; there is no simple method to transfer trams between the two lines.


Viability

Luas daily passenger use rose to 80,000 by November 2006. Luas operates without a State subvention. The service recorded a surplus of €985,000 (€680,000 in 2004) - an achievement well ahead of an anticipated deficit of €2.5 million.[3].


Network

A map of the network shows the Red and Green Lines and stopping points
A map of the network shows the Red and Green Lines and stopping points

The system runs off a 750 V DC overhead power supply, and one two-unit tram can carry 235 people. The international standard rail gauge of 1435mm is used, rather than the Irish 1600mm . Image File history File links Luas_network_map. ... Image File history File links Luas_network_map. ... Josephson junction array chip developed by NIST as a standard volt. ... Direct current (DC or continuous current) is the continuous flow of electricity through a conductor such as a wire from high to low potential. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... The dominant rail gauge in each country shown Rail gauge is the distance between the inner sides of the two parallel rails that make up a railway track. ...


The system was built comprising two lines:

In the original plans, the Red Line was divided into Line A from Tallaght to Abbey Street and Line C from Abbey Street to Connolly Station, whilst Line B was the alternative name for the Green Line. This terminology, which split the network into three lines, is not currently used. Early reports also discussed a Line D from Broadstone to Ballymun and Dublin Airport and an underground Line E from St Stephen's Green to Broadstone - these would have formed a third line, from St Stephen's Green to Dublin Airport. However no firm details were set, though several proposed routes were investigated with a completion date of 2005 envisioned at the time. (One early configuration of the proposed route to Ballymun had a road-bound alignment following Drumcondra Road, Collins Avenue Extension and Ballymun Road.) Connolly Station is one of the main railway stations in Dublin, Ireland, and is a focal point in the Irish route network. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... St. ... Sandyford Industrial Estate is an industrial estate to the south of Dublin, Ireland in Sandyford. ... Broadstone (An Clochán Leathan in Irish), is an area of the inner city on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... Ballymun (Irish:Baile Munna), nicknamed The Mun, is an area on Dublins Northside close to Dublin Airport. ... Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ...

Sandyford Green Line Terminus

The Red Line runs in an east-west direction through Dublin's Northside, then crosses the Liffey and travels south-west to the town of Tallaght. The Green Line is entirely in the south side of Dublin city. Apart from the city-centre section, where it runs down Harcourt Street to St. Stephen's Green, it follows the route of the old Harcourt Street railway line, which was reserved for possible re-use when it closed in 1958. The Red Line and Green Line are not connected to each other, with a 15 minute walk between the two closest points. Services run at regular intervals, from every three minutes during peak times to every 15 minutes late at night. The last tram leaves the terminus at 00:30 (23:30 on Sundays and public holidays). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1471 KB) Sandyford Station - end of the Green Line I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1471 KB) Sandyford Station - end of the Green Line I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Traffic passing the Independent Bridge at Drumcondra The harbour at Howth The Northside (Taobh Ó Thuaidh in Irish) is the area in Dublin City, Ireland bounded to the south by the River Liffey, to the east by Dublin Bay and to the north and west by the M50 motorway. ... The Liffey in West Wicklow The Liffey (An Life in Irish) is a river in the Republic of Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. ... The Harcourt Street railway line was a railway line in Dublin, Ireland; running from Harcourt Street (south of St. ... See also: 1957 in Ireland, other events of 1958, 1959 in Ireland and the list of years in Ireland. // Events February 6 - Dublins Liam Whelan is among the dead when a plane carrying the Manchester United team crashes in Munich. ...


Features

Yellow tram signs warn pedestrians and motorists of Luas track ahead.
Yellow tram signs warn pedestrians and motorists of Luas track ahead.

The silver Citadis trams, manufactured in La Rochelle by Alstom, reach a top speed of 70 km/h on off-road sections, but travel at a slower speed where conflicts with other vehicles or pedestrians can occur. Interestingly, the Red Line trams, despite operating on a busier line with a higher population and intersecting three transport interchanges and two major hospitals, were delivered at only 30m long with a capacity of 235. The Green Line trams, at 40m each, have a capacity of 358 including two wheelchairs. Red line tramsets are being gradually upgraded to 40m by inserting two more articulated sections. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A Citadis 202 tram in Melbourne, Australia The Citadis is a low-floor tram built by Alstom in La Rochelle, France, and Barcelona, Spain. ... La Rochelle is a city and commune of western France, and a seaport on the Atlantic Ocean (population 78,000 in 2004). ...


In other aspects, the two lines are identical except that the clearance between the lines on the Green Line is slightly wider than on the Red Line. Note that this does not relate to the track gauge of 1435mm, which is identical on both lines, contrary to an urban myth which has gained wide currency in Dublin. This will allow wider metro trains be run on the same tracks if a proposed upgrade to full metro service is implemented. This is possible because the route uses an old railway line and as such has few interactions with vehicular or pedestrian traffic. The Red Line was constructed largely on or beside public roads and is not suited to wider and faster metro trains. However both existing sets of tramcars are fully compatible with both the Red and the Green Lines. A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ...

Stigh Lorgan (Stillorgan) LUAS stop with the ticket machine and CCTV warning

The main engineering structures on the Green Line at present are Milltown Viaduct, also known as The Nine Arches, a large stone viaduct dating from 1854, and the William Dargan Bridge, a large new cable-stayed suspension bridge at Taney Cross, near Dundrum town centre. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1632 × 1224 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... William Dargan Mural in Bray railway station William Dargan (1799-1867), an engineer, often seen as the father of Irish railways came from County Carlow, Ireland. ... This article is about the edifice (including an index to articles on specific bridge types). ... Dundrum (Dún Droma in Irish, the ridge fort), originally a town in its own right, is now a suburban village and district in the county of Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Ireland. ...


Future

On 26 February 2007 pre-construction works began on the Green Line extension (Line B1) which will take the line from the current terminus at Sandyford to Cherrywood. Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Metrobudowa. ... Cherrywood Business Park Cherrywood is one of Dublins newest suburbs; as of 2007 it is largely still under construction. ...


The Transport 21 plan[4] covering the period 2005-2015 announced by the Minister for Transport on 1 November 2005 envisages the following Luas line extensions: The Minister for Transport is the chief person at the Department of Transport in the Irish Government. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • 2009
    • Line C1 – Connolly to Docklands extension (Red Line) - The Report of Public Inquiry recommended that this 1.7 km (1.1 mi) extension proceed subject to certain conditions concerning effective risk management to avoid potential services disruption. The extension will run along Mayor St, Upper and Lower. There will be 4 stops: George's Dock, Mayor Square, Spencer Dock (serving the new Docklands railway station, approximately 500 metres away) and terminating at the Point Depot. Construction started at the beginning of June 2007.[5]
  • 2010
    • Line A1 – Tallaght to Citywest link (Subject to developer contribution). This will be a 4 km (2.5 mi) extension. Construction has not yet started.
    • Line B1 – Sandyford to Cherrywood extension (Green Line). This line may be converted to a metro at a later stage. This extension of the Green Line will be 7.2 km (4.5 mi) long. Construction commenced on 26 February 2007. The planned route leaves the old railway alignment after Sandyford to Central Park stop, crosses the M50 and runs down Ballyogan Rd. with stops at Glencairn, The Gallops, Leopardstown Valley and Ballyogan Wood. It then crosses the M50 again, re-joining the alignment at Racecourse stop, west of Glenamuck Rd. Continuing along the original alignment it passes by the original Carrickmines station to Carrickmines stop and Brennanstown stop. The Carrickmines stop will incorporate Park and Ride facilities; both it and Brennanstown will be accessed by new roads from the M50 side, not from the Brennanstown Rd. side. Beyond Brennanstown the route crosses open countryside, diverging slightly from, but paralleling the old alignment to Laughanstown stop, Cherrywood stop and ending at Bride’s Glen stop, adjacent to Dell.
Red Cow Luas Depot
  • 2012
    • Line D – City Centre to Liffey Junction. This will serve Grangegorman, the site of the new DIT campus. This line will link with the Maynooth line. Construction has not yet started.
    • Line BX – City Centre link for Red and Green Lines. The route has not yet been decided, so construction has not yet started.
  • 2013
    • Line F – City Centre to Lucan. On Thursday 27 September 2007, Noel Dempsey (Minister for Transport) launched the public consultation process for the planned Luas line to Lucan. It is expected that it will link with Metro West. Construction has not yet started.
  • 2015
    • Line B2 – Cherrywood to Bray environs extension (Green Line). This is an extension of 6.8 km (4.2 mi). On 6 June 2007, the route of this Luas extension was announced. It will run from Cherrywood to Fassaroe, and will run very close to the M11 motorway, eventually crossing it near the Wilford interchange. Construction has not yet started.

There are also plans for a new line from the City Centre to Rathfarnham, Terenure and Harold's Cross. However, the feasibility study has yet to be carried out, so construction has not yet commenced. It is unknown when the project will be completed. Spencer Dock (Irish: Duga Spencer) is a location in Dublin, Ireland. ... Docklands Station is a new railway station serving the Dublin Docklands area in Ireland owned by Córas Iompair Éireann. ... The Point Theatre (originally dubbed The Point Depot) is a concert venue on the North Wall Quay in Dublin, Ireland. ... The M50 motorway is a motorway and National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland running in a C-shaped ring around the northern, western and southern sides of the capital city, Dublin. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ... This article is about the corporation Dell, Inc. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 394 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 1916 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 394 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 1916 pixel, file size: 1. ... Liffey Junction is a former railway station and junction on the erstwhile Midland Great Western Railway in Dublin, Ireland. ... Grangegorman is on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... The Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) was established officially in 1992 under the Dublin Institute of Technology Act but had been previously set up in 1978 on an ad-hoc basis. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Lucan redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O144289 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 54 m Population (2006) 17,333  Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O143301 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 54m Population (2002) Approx. ... Harolds Cross (Crois Araild in Irish) is a suburb on the southside of Dublin, Ireland. ...


For the very distant future there have been proposals to link the Red and Green Lines via the southern suburbs of Dublin. This idea involves routing the Luas from Tallaght through Firhouse and Knocklyon and Ballinteer, then to Dundrum or perhaps Sandyford. There is sufficient space for such a tram line alongside the M50 motorway, which runs more or less along this route. Firhouse (pronounced Fear-house or Fur-house) is a small village, surrounded by housing estates. ... Knocklyon (IPA pronunciation: ) is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland. ... Ballinteer (Baile na tSaoir in Irish) is a suburb of Dublin in the postal district Dublin 16 in Ireland. ...


With the success of the Luas system in Dublin, there is very strong support for bringing light rail to other Irish cities, including Belfast, Cork, Limerick, Galway and Waterford. [2][3][4][5] This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the city in the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the capital of County Limerick in Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference S604123 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 41. ...

Sign welcoming the Luas to South Dublin in 2004

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (924x551, 81 KB) Taken by myself in 2004 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (924x551, 81 KB) Taken by myself in 2004 I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Ticketing

Most Luas tickets are purple in colour and credit-card sized. They bear a magnetic stripe on the back although this is not used on Luas itself. Uniquely among Dublin's public transport, tickets are not checked upon boarding trams and an honour system, combined with random inspections, is used. Marcus Boltonas (Mark Boltan) Marcus Boltonas Brief history The magnetic stripe which is often reffered to as the Bolton is derived from the Marcus Boltonas from the Jurassic period. ... The Honor System is a philosophical way of running a variety of endeavors based on trust and honor. ...


Ticket machines

Ticket machines operate at every Luas stop and these are the only source of single-journey and return tickets. They also sell 1-day, 7-day and 30-day tickets, valid in either some or all the fare zones, for adults, children and students. It is also possible to purchase tickets valid on Luas and Dublin Bus. Certain ticket combinations are not possible (for example a one-day student ticket), and tickets can only be valid from the stop at which they are purchased and must commence their validity immediately. Certain tickets require the user to hold an ID card and write the number on the ticket, to prevent the ticket from being transferred to another person.


Ticket agents

Luas tickets are sold at local shops, mostly in the vicinity of Luas stops. Certain tickets are slightly cheaper in shops than at ticket machines. Dublin Bus and Luas tickets can also be purchased from shops, although these must be used on a bus before they are valid for use on a Luas.


Fare zones

The red line is divided into four zones, and the green line into three zones. Fares are calculated based on how many zones a journey is taken through. There is a stop on the border of each zone, which is considered to be in whichever zone is more beneficial to the traveller. The central zone is common to both lines.


Smartcard

Balally Luas stop

In March 2005 the Luas smartcard was launched. This allows travellers to pay for travel on the Luas network. Credit is pre-loaded onto the smartcard at ticket machines by cash, debit card or credit card, with a minimum top-up of €5 and a maximum credit on the card of €100, and the customer must validate the card using readers on the platform before boarding the tram and then again after exiting the tram. This is referred to as 'tag-on' and 'tag-off'. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1474 KB)LUAS station Balally (Dundrum) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1474 KB)LUAS station Balally (Dundrum) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... A smart card, or integrated circuit(s) card (ICC), is defined as any integrated circuitry embedded into a flat, plastic body. ...


A smartcard can be purchased at a Luas ticket agent or online.[6] The card costs €10, which includes a €3 non-refundable charge for the card, €3 of credit and €4 for a fully refundable 'reserve fund' which allows travel even if there is insufficient credit on the card for the journey. However, the card must then be topped up before another journey can be taken.


Smartcard fares are slightly cheaper than standard single and return fares from ticket machines. For example, a journey within a single zone costs €1.25 with the card, compared to €1.40 (€1.50 during peak time) single with a paper ticket, or €2.60 return. However, daily, 7-day and 30-day tickets generally work out cheaper, unless used only rarely. Unlike London's Oyster card, Luas smartcards are unable to store multiple-journey tickets and these tickets are issued on paper only. Front and back of an early Oyster card. ...


The Smartcard project is part of the Railway Procurement Agency's integrated ticketing system, which, when completed, should allow travellers to use the one card to pay for travel on all public transport in Ireland.


Popular Culture

The Luas became the subject of a spoof rap song in 2007 entitled "The Luas Rap". The accompanying music video directed by Liam Geraghty as well as the raps creators Dr. Stu and Keith O'Neill became a hit on social networking site BEBO which led to clips of it being broadcast on RTE's The Podge and Rodge Show. The Podge and Rodge Show (also known as The Podge and Rodge Show with Lucy Kennedy) is an Irish television show, broadcast and produced by RTÉ, featuring the two puppets Podge and Rodge as the hosts of the chatshow, with Lucy Kennedy as a co-host. ...


References

  1. ^ Dublin Transportation Office. DTO strategy (2000-2016). Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  2. ^ RTÉ News. 50 million journeys made on Luas. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  3. ^ Railway Procurement Agency. 2005 Annual Report. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  4. ^ FinFacts Ireland (1 November 2005). Government launches €34bn '21st century transport plan for 21st century Ireland'. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  5. ^ Inquiry backs extension of Luas Red Line - RPA website
  6. ^ Luas Smart Card.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Most of the transport system in Ireland rests in public hands, both north and south of the border. ... The following page lists Irish companies or subsidiaries according to their sector. ... A large number of companies operate public transport services in Dublin. ... Europe, particularly Germany,France,Italy, Finland, Austria, Switzerland, Netherlands, Sweden and Belgium, has an extensive number of tramway networks. ... The Harcourt Street railway line was a railway line in Dublin, Ireland; running from Harcourt Street (south of St. ... An 8200 Class DART unit, Iarnród Éireann 8203, at Grand Canal Dock station in 2001 Some DART trains feature these LED route describers - green indicates the route which has already been travelled, orange the route expected to be followed and flashing red the next station. ... The DUTCs logo, used from 1941 The Dublin United Transport Company (DUTC) operated trams and buses in Dublin, Ireland until 1945. ...

External links

  • Luas
  • Luas Smartcard
  • ALSTOM website - French manufacturer of Trams, metros and Trains
  • Photos of Luas Green line(Harcourt Street)
  • Platform 11 Ireland's National Rail Users Group
  • [6] Photos of Luas construction
  • [7] Music video for "The Luas Rap"

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Ultimate Luas Dog Breeds Information Guide and Reference (1302 words)
Luas (from the Irish for 'speed') — also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System — currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail transit systems in Dublin, Ireland.
Originally under the organisation of Córas Iompair Éireann, the project was moved to the Railway Procurement Agency upon that body's inception, whilst it is operated by Connex.
The Luas is a major part of the Dublin Transportation Office [1] 'DTO strategy (2000-2016)'.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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