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Encyclopedia > Loyola University New Orleans

Loyola University New Orleans

Motto Deo et Patriae -(For God and country) - Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam
Established 1904, chartered July 10, 1912
Type AJCU
Endowment US $326 million[1]
President Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J.
Staff 240
Undergraduates 3,000
Postgraduates 2,000
Location New Orleans, LA, USA
Campus Urban, 24 acres
Colors Maroon and Gold
Mascot The Wolfpack
Website www.loyno.edu
Logo of Loyola University New Orleans

Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). Loyola University New Orleans' main campus is located in the Uptown neighborhood, fifteen minutes from the historic French Quarter, across St. Charles Avenue from Audubon Park and coterminous to the main campus of Tulane University. Loyola University New Orleans is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and is the largest Catholic University in the southern United States. Loyola University New Orleans ranked seventh in the category of best South regional (master's) universities in the 2007 issue of the annual America's Best Colleges issue and guidebook published by U.S. News & World Report. Image File history File links Loyolaseal. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (Latin: For the greater glory of God), often abbreviated AMDG, is the motto of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Loyola University is located in north Chicagos Rogers Park neighborhood. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... One million (1,000,000), or one thousand thousand, is the natural number following 999,999 and preceding 1,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Reverend Kevin William Wildes, S.J., Ph. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Government  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area  - City  350. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible... This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Uptown is a large area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... St. ... Audubon Park entrance gates on the St. ... Tulane University is a highly selective, private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

History

Marquette Hall, Built 1910, as seen from the front of the campus on St. Charles Ave.
Marquette Hall, Built 1910, as seen from the front of the campus on St. Charles Ave.

Loyola’s history dates back to the early 18th century when the Jesuits first arrived among the earliest settlers in New Orleans and Louisiana.[2] Image File history File links Marquettehall. ... Image File history File links Marquettehall. ...


Loyola University New Orleans was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1904 as Loyola College on a section of the Foucher Plantation bought by the Jesuits in 1886. According to University lore, Fr. Albert Biever was given a nickel for street car fare and told by his Jesuit superiors to travel Uptown on the St. Charles Streetcar and found a college. As with many Jesuit schools, it contained both a college and preparatory academy. The first classes of Loyola College were held in a residence behind Most Holy Name of Jesus Church. Fr. Biever was the first president. The first of Loyola's permanent buildings was undertaken in 1907, with Marquette Hall completed in 1910. Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Uptown is a large area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Streetcars in New Orleans have been an integral part of the citys public transportation network since the first half of the 19th century. ... Most Holy Name of Jesus Church is a Catholic parish in New Orleans, Louisiana founded in 1886. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1911, the Jesuit schools in New Orleans were reorganized. The College of the Immaculate Conception, founded in 1847 in downtown New Orleans, split its high school and college divisions and became solely a secondary institution, now known as Jesuit High School. Loyola was designated as the collegiate institution and was chartered as Loyola University on 1912-07-10. Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The College of the Immaculate Conception in New Orleans, Louisiana was founded in 1847 as a collegium, a French form of school combining secondary and tertiary education. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Jesuit High School is an all-boys Jesuit high school in New Orleans, Louisiana founded in 1847. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Loyola grew steadily over the years on its uptown campus. For many years, the University consisted mainly of Marquette and Bobet Hall, with large athletic fields extending back towards the end of the campus at Freret St. Loyola has the distinction of transmitting the first radio broadcast in the Deep South, when WWL began operation as a laboratory experiment on March 31, 1922.[3] With the discontinuance of the football program in the 1930s, more space became available for construction of new facilities. Stallings Hall, built as a dedicated building for the College Of Business Administration, and the Library (now known as the "Old Library") were constructed in the post World War II years, accommodating the growth of the student population. WWL is a long-time radio station in New Orleans, Louisiana that began broadcasting in 1922. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


More expansion continued in 1964, with the addition of the Joseph F. Danna Student Center, Albert Biever Hall, a student residence hall named after the first university president, and a central heating/cooling plant. Built soon after in 1967 was Henrietta Buddig Hall, a student residence that is Loyola's tallest building at twelve stories. The last building to be added in the 1960s was the J. Edgar Monroe Science Building (now known as Monroe Hall), the largest academic building erected to date. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


In 1984 Loyola purchased the facilities of St. Mary’s Dominican College, a nearby Roman Catholic womens' college which was closing down, and transformed it into the Broadway campus (after the name of its street location). Today, the Broadway campus includes Loyola's School of Law, Cabra Residence Hall, and a Department of Visual Arts. St. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


Expansion in recent years has seen the addition of Mercy Hall, purchased in 1993, a former girl's preparatory academy; construction of Carrollton Hall, an upperclassman residence, and the J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library, both completed in 1999. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1996, the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities granted exclusive branding rights to Loyola University Chicago to call itself Loyola University. This resulted in Loyola New Orleans' current trademark, Loyola University New Orleans. Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ...


In August 2005, Loyola closed its campus and evacuated its students in anticipation of Hurricane Katrina. The campus sustained minimal wind damage including broken windows but floodwaters did not breach any buildings. Following cleanup, classes resumed on Monday, 2006-01-09. Despite the displacement of the entire student body during the fall 2005 semester, 91 percent of Loyola’s undergraduate students returned for the spring 2006 semester. Commencement ceremonies for the Class of 2006 took place April 28-29, the first New Orleans college to do so post-Katrina. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 2006-04-10, President Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J. unveiled PATHWAYS - Toward Our Second Century, Loyola's strategic plan. The plan restructured the University's colleges and eliminated several academic programs and faculty positions to reduce operating costs and revitalize the University. "PATHWAYS" was widely criticized by students and staff who felt uninvolved in the decision-making process. The Board of Trustees however unanimously approved and passed the plan on 2006-05-19. In response, the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences produced a vote of no-confidence in both the President and the Provost. For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reverend Kevin William Wildes, S.J., Ph. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Fall 2006, Loyola welcomed the class of 2010 with 555 new students.[4]


List of University Presidents

There have been sixteen presidents since the establishment of Loyola College in 1904.[5] 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...

President Years
Albert H. Biever, S.J. 1904-1913
Alphonse E. Otis, S.J 1913-1919
Edward A. Cummings, S.J. 1919-1924
Francis X. Twellmeyer, S.J. 1924-1925
Florence D. Sullivan, S.J. 1925-1931
John W. Hynes, S.J. 1931-1936
Harold A. Gaudin, S.J. 1936-1939
Percy A. Roy, S.J. 1939-1945
Thomas J. Shields, S.J. 1945-1952
W. Patrick Donnelly, S.J. 1952-1961
Andrew C. Smith, S.J. 1961-1966
Homer R. Jolley, S.J. 1966-1970
Michael F. Kennelly, S.J. 1970-1974
James C. Carter, S.J. 1974-1995
Bernard P. Knoth, S.J. 1995-2003
William J. Byron, S.J. 2003-2004 (acting)
Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J. 2004-Present

Rev. ... Reverend Kevin William Wildes, S.J., Ph. ...

The University

Bobet Hall, constructed in 1924, houses the majority of the liberal arts and humanities departments

Loyola is home to 5,000 students, including 3,000 undergraduates. The student faculty ratio is 12 to 1, far better than the national average of 45 to 1 among private institutions.[citation needed] Loyola's motto is "Thinking Critically, Acting Justly." Loyola New Orleans offers students an outstanding undergraduate education, stated the New York-based education services company, The Princeton Review. The Princeton Review features Loyola New Orleans in the new 2007 edition of its annual book, The Best 361 Colleges.[1] Image File history File links Bobethall. ... Image File history File links Bobethall. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, and GMAT. They also offer courses for the LSAT and MCAT, as well as many...


Almost all courses are taught by full-time faculty, and 91 percent hold doctoral or equivalent degrees in their area of expertise. Professors have been recognized nationally and internationally by the Pulitzer Committee, the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and by numerous other professional and scholarly associations.[2] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is an independent federal agency of the United States established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965 (Pub. ...


The seal, which was adopted by the university in 1929, reveals the coat of arms of the house of Loyola with the emblem of the Society of Jesus at the top. Central to the seal are two wolves and a golden pot, which come from St. Ignatius Loyola's family crest and symbolize generosity, having enough to give to the wolves. Above the figures of the wolves appear the fleur-de-lis, which represents the French origin of the city and state. Beneath it is a pelican feeding its young with her own blood; this ancient symbol of Christianity (Christ feeding the Church with his body and blood through the Eucharist) depicts Loyola as an institution of the state of Louisiana.[3] Ignatius of Loyola Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Íñigo López de Loyola (December 24, 1491? – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... Binomial name Pelecanus occidentalis Linnaeus, 1766 The Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) is the smallest of the eight species of pelican, although it is a large bird in nearly every other regard. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ...

Aerial view of the University

This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ...

Academics

Colleges

Loyola is organized into colleges specializing in the liberal arts, sciences and certain professions. The colleges at Loyola include: In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... A profession is a specialized work function within society, generally performed by a professional. ...

  • College of Humanities and Natural Sciences
  • College of Social Sciences
  • The Joseph A. Butt, S.J., College of Business
  • College of Music and Fine Arts
  • College of Law

College of Humanities and Natural Sciences

The College of Humanities and Natural Sciences focuses on areas concerning the natural sciences and liberal arts programs. It contains the departments of English, history, languages, philosophy, religious studies, psychology, biology, liberal studies, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Also under the college's supervision is the Loyola Institute for Ministry (LIM).[4]


College of Social Sciences

The College of Social Sciences specializes in areas that deal with the human condition. The College of Social Sciences contains the departments of counseling, criminal justice, human and organizational development, sociology, and political science. The college also includes the Schools of Nursing and Mass Communication.[5]


The Joseph A. Butt, S.J., College of Business

The College of Business began as an outgrowth of the College of Arts and Sciences and became a full fledged college in 1947. In 1983, the College of Business was renamed in honor of Joseph A. Butt, S.J., a longtime Jesuit professor in the business college. The College of Business is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), a prestigious honor awarded to only 450 business schools worldwide. The college offers programs in the fields of economics, finance, international business, management, marketing, and accountancy. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of degree programs delivered by business schools. ...


College of Music and Fine Arts

The College of Music was established when the New Orleans Conservatory of Music and Dramatic Art was incorporated into the university in 1932. The College of Music gives students the chance to combine liberal arts with professional music courses. It is the only Jesuit college of music in the United States. The college offers programs in Jazz Studies, Music Education, Music Therapy, Music Industry Studies, Instrumental Performance, Vocal Performance, Ballet, Theatre Arts, and Visual Arts. In April 2007, the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance announced its relocation to the College of Music and Fine Arts from the campus of the University of Southern California. New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan in June 2006. ...


College of Law

Loyola's law school opened in 1914. The School of Law was renamed the College of Law with the passage of the PATHWAYS Plan on May 19, 2006. Loyola University New Orleans College of Law is a law school in New Orleans, Louisiana affiliated with Loyola University New Orleans. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Libraries and Institutes

Libraries

J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library

J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library
J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library
The south-west side of J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library

Loyola’s J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library is the winner of the Association of College & Research Libraries’ 2003 "Excellence in Academic Libraries Award." The award, given to an outstanding community college, college, and university library each year, recognizes the accomplishments of librarians and other library staff as they come together as members of a team to support the mission of their institution. Loyola University New Orleans, the recipient in the university library division, now joins prior winners such as Cornell University and the University of Arizona. The Association of College and Research Libraries, the largest division of the American Library Association, is a professional association of academic librarians and other interested individuals. It is dedicated to enhancing the ability of academic library and information professionals to serve the information needs of the higher education community and to improve learning, teaching, and research.[6] Image File history File links Monroe_Library. ... Image File history File links Monroe_Library. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1235 KB) Monroe library August 2004 by Matt Lexcen I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1235 KB) Monroe library August 2004 by Matt Lexcen I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


Loyola’s J. Edgar and Louise S. Monroe Library has ranked 10th in the “Best College Library” category, according to The Princeton Review in its 2007 edition of The Best 361 Colleges. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, and GMAT. They also offer courses for the LSAT and MCAT, as well as many...


Law Library

Loyola University New Orleans' Law Library is located in the College of Law building on the Broadway Campus. It contains over 286,000 volumes and microfilm for the support of the students and faculty of the College of Law. Due to the unique tradition of civil law in Louisiana, the library has substantial collections from civil law jurisdictions from around the world, including France, Scotland, and Quebec. Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotland() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595...


Centers and Institutes

Student Life

Danna Center

The epicenter of Loyola's on-campus life is the Dr. Joseph A. Danna Center, built in 1969. The Danna Center houses many services, including dining facilities at the Orleans Room and the Underground, the campus bookstore, lounges, and student organization and university offices. For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


RecPlex

The Recreational Sports Complex, or RecPlex, houses all the athletic facilities on Loyola's campus. It was constructed in 1987 and paid for in full by Freeport McMoRan. The complex is situated on the fifth and sixth floors of the Freret Street parking garage. Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. ...


Student Government

Loyola is governed by the Student Government Association (SGA), which is divided in three branches- the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Each branch is run independent from each other, with each having a head of the branch. The executive branch is headed by the president and their cabinet, the legislative branch has the de facto congresspersons-at-large, and the judicial branch is headed by the chief justice. One of the greatest powers SGA holds is budget allocation, whereby each university sanctioned organization is allotted a certain amount of money for the upcoming year.


Campus Publications

The Maroon

The student-run weekly newspaper, The Maroon, was established in 1923. It is published weekly during the spring and fall semesters. "The Maroon" has been nominated for the Associated Collegiate Press' National Pacemaker Award six times and has won the award in 1983, 1986, 1998, 1999, and 2006. [7] [8] The Associated Collegiate Press (official site) is the largest and oldest national membership organization for college student media in the United States. ... The National Pacemaker Awards are awards for excellence in American student journalism, given annually since 1927. ...


Other Publications

Other student publications include The Wolf, Loyola's annual yearbook, ReVisions, the annual literary arts journal, and Reader's Response, which publishes the single best paper from each of the English Department's literature and theory courses.


Each semester, a small group of students intern for The New Orleans Review, an international journal of contemporary poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art, photography, film and book reviews, founded in 1968 and published by Loyola University.


Service Organizations

LUCAP

The Loyola University Community Action Program, commonly referred to as LUCAP, serves as an umbrella organization for community service, social justice, and advocacy work on the Loyola campus.


Others

Students at Loyola are involved in a number of campus community service organizations, the most prominent being the Loyola University Community Action Program (LUCAP). Other organizations include Circle K International, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Peers Advocating Wellness (PAWS), and many others. Many students took a lead in rebuilding New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina through these service organizations. Circle K International (CKI) is an international collegiate service organization associated with Kiwanis International. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


Greek Life

Loyola is home to 12 different social fraternities and sororities that encompass over 20 percent of the undergraduate population. Presently, none of the Greek organizations own official houses. The last Greek organization to own a house was Alpha Delta Gamma, whose house burned in January 2006. Loyola's Greek organizations are governed by three councils, the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Association, and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ...


Fraternities


Sororities This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Sigma Alpha Kappa (ΣΑΚ) is a local fraternity at Loyola University New Orleans. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ...

Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gamma Phi Beta (ΓΦΒ) is an international sorority that was founded on November 11, 1874 at Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Athletics

Athletic Logo of Loyola University New Orleans

Loyola's sports teams are nicknamed the Wolfpack, who participate in the NAIA's Gulf Coast Athletic Conference. Loyola's six intercollegiate teams are unique in the fact that they are almost wholly supported by students through a referendum passed in 1991. Since 2003, the athletic department has offered three athletic scholarships in basketball to attract talent. Locally, Loyola's biggest rival is adjacent Tulane University, and the annual basketball game between the two teams is one of biggest athletic events at Loyola. Spring Hill College is also another rival in conference play. A Pack Pride Committee has been founded in recent years to promote athletics and to encourage community members to be "Proud to be Part of the 'Pack". Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Tulane University is a highly selective, private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Spring Hill College is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic Jesuit college in the United States. ...

Notable Alumni

The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), serving as both a federal criminal investigative body and a domestic intelligence agency. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... General Name, Symbol, Number mendelevium, Md, 101 Chemical series actinides Group, Period, Block n/a, 7, f Appearance unknown, probably silvery white or metallic gray Atomic mass (258) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 5f13 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 31, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[5] is a public research university located in Tallahassee, the capital city of Florida. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... NY redirects here. ... The Right Honourable Manuel Esquivel was Prime Minister of Belize from 1984 to 1989, and then again from 1993 to 1998. ... Norman C. Francis (born March 20, 1931, Lafayette, Louisiana) is the president of Xavier University of Louisiana. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... City Green Bay, Wisconsin Team colors Dark Green, Gold, and White Head Coach Mike McCarthy Owner 111,967 stockholders (Green Bay Packers Foundation) Chairman Bob Harlan General manager Ted Thompson Fight song Go! You Packers! Go! League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919-1920) National Football League (1921–present) Western Division (1933... Charles Edward Ed Karst (ca. ... Alexandria is a city in Louisiana and is the parish seat of Rapides Parish. ... Maurice Edwin Moon Landrieu (born July 23, 1930) is a former judge, mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, and United States secretary of housing and urban development. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... Ellis Marsalis is the name of father and son jazz musicians, patriarchs of the Marsalis clan. ... The WB Shield, used from 2001 to late 2003. ... Sean OKeefe Sean OKeefe (born January 27, 1956) was the 10th Administrator of NASA, leading the space agency from December 2001 to February 2005. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States federal government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College at Baton Rouge, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States federal government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... Beth Patterson is an Irish folk and Celtic musician of some renown. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for medical research. ... Vance Gabriel Plauche (August 25, 1897 -- April 2, 1976) was a Lake Charles attorney and civic leader who represented the Seventh Congressional District of Louisiana in the United States House of Representatives as a Democrat for a single term from 1941 to 1943. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Daniel Wesley Dan Richey (born October 31, 1948) is a Baton Rouge-based political consultant for pro-family candidates and organizations, including Louisiana Family Forum[1]. In 2004, he directed the grassroots organization for the successful campaign to elect U.S. Representative David Vitter as the first Republican U.S... Tulane University is a highly selective, private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... MTV (abbreviation for Music Television) is a cable television network which was originally devoted to music videos, especially popular rock music. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network headquartered in New York City. ... NY redirects here. ... Norman Treigle (né Adanelle Wilfred Treigle, on 6 March 1927; died on 16 February 1975) was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the fifth and final child of a poor carpenter and his wife. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Bernard J. Ward (born on August 13, 1925, in New Orleans) was a legal educator and authority on the federal courts. ... Notre Dame Law School, or NDLS, is the professional graduate law program of its parent institution, the University of Notre Dame. ... The University of Texas School of Law is an ABA-certified American law school located on The University of Texas at Austin campus. ...

Prominent professors

  • Chase Distinguished Professor of International Business and Professor of Economics William Barnett II
  • Robert Hunter Distinguished Professor John Biguenet
  • Harold E. Wirth Eminent Scholar Chair in Economics and Professor of Economics Walter Block
  • Hilton/Baldridge Distinguished Chair in Music Industry Studies and Professor of Marketing Jerry R. Goolsby
  • Artists-in-Residence: Col. John R. Bourgeois USMC (Ret.), Ellis Marsalis, Nicholas Payton

Trivia

  • The second academic building at Loyola, Bobet Hall, was originally constructed to house the College of Pharmacy, and later the School of Dentistry, founded, respectively in 1919 and 1914. The fifth floor of Marquette Hall was used to store cadavers for the school of Dentistry. The Pharmacy Program was discontinued in 1965, while the school of Dentistry closed in 1970.
  • Loyola was home to the first night football game in the South.

Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...

References

  1. ^ US News and World Report
  2. ^ >French Jesuits, Missions in Louisiana (2005). Retrieved on 2007-06-13.
  3. ^ >Loyola and WWL Radio celebrate 80th anniversary (2002). Retrieved on 2007-05-04.
  4. ^ Loyola Welcomes Freshmen One Year After Katrina loyno.edu, retrieved on May 21, 2007.
  5. ^ >Chronology of Loyola's Presidents (2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-10.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Loyola University New Orleans: Information from Answers.com (2396 words)
Loyola University New Orleans' main campus is located in the Uptown neighborhood, fifteen minutes from the historic French Quarter, across St. Charles Avenue from Audubon Park and conterminous to the main campus of Tulane University.
Loyola University New Orleans is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and is the largest Catholic University in the southern United States.
Loyola University New Orleans was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1904 as Loyola College on a section of the Foucher Plantation bought by the Jesuits in 1886.
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