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Encyclopedia > Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University Chicago

Motto: Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam
Established: June 30, 1870
Type: Private Jesuit Catholic
Endowment: $373,200,000[1]
President: Michael J. Garanzini, S.J.
Faculty: 1,100 full time
Students: 15,545[2]
Undergraduates: 9,729[3]
Postgraduates: 5,816 graduate
Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
Campus: 45 acre (182,000 m²) Lake Shore Campus,
70 acre (283,000 m²) Maywood Campus,
5 acre (20,234 m²) Rome Center
Athletics: 11 NCAA Division I teams
Colors: Black, Gold and Maroon                  
Nickname: Ramblers
Mascot: LU Wolf
Website: http://www.luc.edu/
A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago.
A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago.
A statue of Ignatius of Loyola was dedicated in 2000.
A statue of Ignatius of Loyola was dedicated in 2000.
Mundelein Hall, also called the Skyscraper building, was once the tallest building in the Rogers Park neighborhood.
Mundelein Hall, also called the Skyscraper building, was once the tallest building in the Rogers Park neighborhood.

Loyola University Chicago is a private co-educational Jesuit university established in Chicago in 1870 as Saint Ignatius College. It was founded by the Roman Catholic religious order of the Society of Jesus and bears the name of the Jesuit patron, Saint Ignatius of Loyola. Loyola is one of twenty-eight member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and, with its current enrollment of more than 15,500 students, is the largest Jesuit University in the United States. [4] Loyola is considered one of the 262 "national universities" by U.S.News & World Report, with a ranking of 112. Loyola also was ranked as the 49th best value in the country by U.S.News & World Report[5]. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (Latin: For the greater glory of God), often abbreviated AMDG, is the motto of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Reverend Michael J. Garanzini, S.J. (born September 24, 1948 in Saint Louis, Missouri) is an American priest of the Society of Jesus religious order of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... NCAA redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article is about the color. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1614 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of the entrance to Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1614 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of the entrance to Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 980 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of the statue of Ignatius of Loyola at Loyola University Chicago, Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 980 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of the statue of Ignatius of Loyola at Loyola University Chicago, Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 206 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of Mundelein College at Loyola University Chicago in Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 206 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas taken on July 14, 2006 of Mundelein College at Loyola University Chicago in Rogers Park, Chicago, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... A Taoist monk playing an instrument. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Ignacio (Íñigo) López de Loyola (December 24, 1491 – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope in terms of mission. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine from Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1933 as United States News, which in 1948 merged with World Report. ...

Contents

Beginnings and expansions

Founded in 1870 as the St Ignatius College on Chicago's West Side. In 1908 the School of Law was established as the first of the professional programs. St Ignatius College changed its name to Loyola University in 1909, while also adding the Stritch School of Medicine. 1923 saw the affiliation of the Chicago College of Dental Surgery with Loyola University, later to be known as Loyola University School of Dentistry (no longer open). In 1934 West Baden College affiliates itself with Loyola University, later to be known as the Bellarmine School of Theology then the Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago. Loyola established the Loyola University Chicago School of Nursing in 1935, the first fully accredited collegiate school of nursing in the state of Illinois. Loyola then opened the Rome Center for Liberal Arts in 1962, the first American university sponsored program in Rome. 1969 saw the establishment of the Loyola University Chicago School of Education and the opening of the Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood. In 1979 the School of Nursing is renamed the Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing. The most recent expansion was the 1991 acquisition of neighboring Mundelein College from the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Loyola University Chicago School of Law is a college of Loyola University Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. ... Stritch School of Medicine is affiliated with Loyola University of Chicago, Illinois. ... Loyola University Chicago Rome Center is a campus of Loyola University Chicago in Rome, Italy. ... Loyola University Medical Center, founded in 1979 by Loyola University, is located in Maywood, Illinois, west of Chicago. ... Maywood is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Mundelein College was the first college to be housed in a modern urban skyscraper. ... BVM Sisters Logo Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, known by their initials BVM, is a Roman Catholic religious order founded in the United States by Mother Mary Frances Clarke. ...


Main campuses

Loyola University Chicago is anchored at the Lake Shore Campus (on the shore of Lake Michigan) in Rogers Park, the northernmost neighborhood of the city of Chicago. Loyola has developed a ten-year master plan that is designed to revitalize the community by adding an updated arts center as well as a retail district called "Loyola Station" near the CTA's Loyola 'L' stop. Among many others, the science departments are located on this campus. Loyola also has a Water Tower Campus in downtown Chicago on the Magnificent Mile of North Michigan Avenue, steps away from such landmarks as the Water Tower (one of the few structures to survive the Great Chicago Fire) and the John Hancock Center (one of the tallest buildings in the United States). The School of Business Administration, Graduate School of Business, School of Social Work, School of Continuing and Professional Studies, School of Communication, and the Law School are located at the Water Tower Campus, and many other classes are held at this campus. Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... Mundelein College at Loyola University Chicago was once the tallest building in Rogers Park. ... Loyola University Chicago intends on a total redevelopment of their Lakeshore Campus, to be finished by its centennial in 2009. ... Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ... Loyola is an station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, served by the Red Line. ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ... Magnificent Mile looking south View north from the foot of the Magnificent Mile The Magnificent Mile is the portion of Michigan Avenue in Chicago, Illinois extending from the Chicago River to Oak Street in Near North Side community area. ... The Chicago Water Tower is a contributing property in the Old Chicago Water Tower District landmark district. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... Several buildings bear this name, all built by John Hancock Insurance and named after John Hancock. ... Loyola University Chicago School of Law is a college of Loyola University Chicago in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Chicago's Jesuit university also boasts a campus in Rome, Italy. The John Felice Rome Center was established in 1962 on the site of the 1960 Summer Olympics grounds. It moved to several locations in Rome until finally settling in Monte Mario on the Via Massimi, one of the most affluent districts of the Italian capital. The campus offers a full academic year for Chicago-based Loyola students wishing to study abroad. For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVII Olympiad, were held in 1960 in Rome, Italy. ...


Loyola University Chicago also has a medical school, the Stritch School of Medicine, and a hospital and medical center associated with them, all located on a campus in Maywood, Illinois, a western suburb of Chicago. Stritch School of Medicine is affiliated with Loyola University of Chicago, Illinois. ... Maywood is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. ...


Religious education

Religious education is still one of Loyola's hallmarks as it is home to Saint Joseph College Seminary as well as the Jesuit First Studies program. Saint Joseph College Seminary is a college of Loyola University Chicago and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago. ...


Loyola's First Studies Program is one of three in the country, with Fordham University and Saint Louis University housing the other two. During this three-year period, Jesuit Scholastics and Brothers generally study philosophy and some theology. First Studies is one part of an eleven-year formation process toward the Jesuit priesthood. This program is administered by the Chicago Province Society of Jesus. Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


Saint Joseph College Seminary serves the Archdiocese of Chicago and provides vocational training to candidates of diocesan priesthood. Loyola University also provides rigorous religious education for those seeking careers in lay ministry with the Loyola University Pastoral Institute as well as degree opportunities in interdisciplinary Catholic studies Holy Name Cathedral is the motherchurch of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago. ... Interdisciplinary work is that which integrates concepts across different disciplines. ...


Athletics

Loyola Ramblers A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ...


Buildings

Lake Shore Campus

  • Alumni Gym
  • Arrupe House
  • Athletic Field & Stevens Building
  • Campion Hall & St. Joseph Seminary
  • Centennial Forum Student Union
  • Coffey Hall
  • Creighton Hall
  • Crown Center
  • Cudahy Library
  • Cudahy Science Hall
  • Dumbach Hall (Formerly "Loyola Academy")
  • Fairfield Hall
  • Fine Arts / Root Building
  • Fine Arts Annex
  • Flanner Hall
  • Fordham Hall
  • George Halas, Jr. Sports Center
  • Georgetown Hall
  • Gonzaga Hall
  • Granada Center (Part of Fordham Hall, formerly the site of the Granada Theatre)
  • Hamilton's
  • Holy Cross Hall
  • Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons
  • Loyola University Jesuit Residence
  • Madonna della Strada Chapel
  • Marquette Hall
  • Mertz Hall
  • Mundelein Center (Formerly "Skyscraper Building", "Mundelein College")
  • Piper Hall
  • The Quinn Quadrangle
  • The Quinlan Life & Science Center
  • Regis Hall
  • Rockhurst Hall
  • Santa Clara Hall
  • Seattle Hall
  • Simpson Living-Learning Center
  • Sullivan Center for Student Services (Formerly "Sullivan Science Library")
  • Wright Hall (BVM Residence)
  • The Yellow House
  • Xavier Hall

Alumni Gym is a 2,000 capacity structure on the campus of Loyola University Chicago. ... George Stanley Halas, Jr. ... The Granada Theatre, 6427-41 North Sheridan Road (in the Rogers Park neighborhood of Chicago) was a movie theatre constructed for the Marks Brothers, who, in 1926, were major theatre operators in Chicago. ... Madonna Della Strada, patroness of the Society of Jesus and revered by Jesuits throughout the world. ... Mundelein College was the first college to be housed in a modern urban skyscraper. ...

Water Tower Campus

  • 25 E. Pearson Loyola Law Center
  • Rev. Raymond C. Baumhart, S.J. Residence Hall and Terry Student Center
  • The Clare (Building currently under construction)
  • Loyola University Museum of Art
  • Lewis Towers
  • Maguire Hall

The Clare at Water Tower. ...

Student Life

Sports

LU Wolf is the mascot for the University. He was inspired by the coat-of-arms of St Ignatius of Loyola, from whom Loyola derives its name, which depicts two wolves standing over a kettle. He is ever-present at Loyola's basketball games, encouraging fans to show their support for the Ramblers. A coat of arms or armorial bearings (often just arms for short), in European tradition, is a design belonging to a particular person (or group of people) and used by them in a wide variety of ways. ... Ignatius of Loyola Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Íñigo López de Loyola (December 24, 1491? – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Roman Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope. ...


Greek Life

Loyola University Chicago also houses Greek life on its Lake Shore Campus. These Greek organizations include the social fraternities Sigma Pi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, and Alpha Delta Gamma;as well as the social sororities Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Sigma Alpha, Phi Sigma Sigma and Kappa Kappa Gamma. Alpha Delta Gamma remains the only private school-sanctioned fraternity house on campus. In 2005 Loyola got its first black Sorority, Zeta Phi Zeta. U.S. News & World Report Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Sigma Alpha (ΑΣΑ) is a US national sorority founded on November 15, 1901 at Longwood College (now University) in Farmville, Virginia. ... Phi Sigma Sigma (ΦΣΣ) was the first collegiate nonsectarian sorority, meaning that there was to be no judgment regarding religion or background. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ...



Loyola is also home to the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO) co-ed fraternity Alpha Psi Lambda, and sororities Gamma Phi Omega (The first Latina-oriented sorority at Loyola) and Sigma Lambda Gamma (the largest Latina-oriented sorority in the U.S.) as well as several co-ed business fraternities such as Alpha Kappa Psi, Delta Sigma Pi, Kappa Psi, and Sigma Tau Delta. Loyola also has a co-ed service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega. The National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO) is an umbrella council for 23 Latino Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ... Alpha Psi Lambda Fraterntiy(ΑΨΛ), is the first co-ed Latino oriented Greek letter intercollegiate fraternity founded for Hispanic students in the United States. ... Category: ... ΔΣΠ (Delta Sigma Pi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity in the United States of America. ... Kappa Psi (ΚΨ) is the oldest and largest professional pharmaceutical fraternity in the world. ... Sigma Tau Delta is an international honor society for collegiate students of English. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ...


Notable Alumni

Business

Mr. ... The Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) NYSE: BOT, established in 1848, is the worlds oldest futures and options exchange. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Brenda C. Barnes is the president, chairman and chief executive of Sara Lee. ... Sara Lee Corporation (NYSE: SLE) is an American consumer-goods company based in Chicago, Illinois, as well as the brand name of a series of frozen and packaged foods. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the second largest global American beverage and snack company. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Borders Group (NYSE: BGP) is an international bookseller based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Harpo Productions is an incorporated United States multimedia production company founded by television talk show host and philanthropist Oprah Winfrey. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Michael OBrien (born 19 June 1954) is a Labour politician in the United Kingdom. ... Baxter, Incorporated NYSE: BAX, is a global Medical Instruments & Supplies company, with headquarters in Deerfield, IL. // 1931 - The company is founded as the first manufacturer of commercially prepared intravenous solutions. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Michael R. Quinlan is a graduate of Loyola University Chicago and became the chairman of the McDonalds Corporation. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants[1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Thomas M. Schoewe (born 1952 or 1953) is currently the chief financial officer and executive vice president of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Vanee Foods Company, Inc. ... Winston & Strawn LLP is a large international law firm headquartered in Chicago. ... Novatel Wireless, Inc. ...

Education

Saint Louis University President Penis Biondi, S.J., has been a professor, a department chair, and a dean. ... Saint Louis University (SLU) is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... A board of education or a school board or school committee is the title of the board of directors of a school, local school district or higher administrative level. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... The University of San Diego, frequently referred to as USD, is a Catholic university in San Diego, California. ... J. Dennis OConnor is an American academic administrator. ... The University of Pittsburgh is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... Sho Timothy Yano (矢野 祥, born c. ...

Entertainment

The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... Philip Caputo (born (1941 June 10) is an American author and journalist. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... WBBM-TV, officially branded as CBS2 Chicago, is an American television station in Chicago, Illinois owned and operated by CBS. Currently broadcasting from 630 North McClurg Court in downtown Chicago near The Loop, WBBM-TV transmits from the John Hancock Center. ... Sandra Cisneros (born December 20, 1954 in Chicago) is an American author and poet best known for her novel The House on Mango Street. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Karla DeVito was born in 1953 in Mokena, Illinois, a small farming town southwest of Chicago, At Loyola University, she majored in theater. ... David Michael Draiman (born March 13, 1973 in Flatbush, New York)[1] is the lead singer for the band Disturbed, which hails from Chicago, Illinois. ... Look up disturbed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stuart Dybek (b. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... James Yoshinobu Iha (Japanese: 井葉吉伸, Iha Yoshinobu or ジェームス・イハ, Jēmusu Iha) born March 26, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American rock musician. ... The Smashing Pumpkins are an American alternative rock band that formed in Chicago in 1988. ... A Perfect Circle (often referred to as APC) was an alternative rock supergroup, formed by guitarist Billy Howerdel. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... A promotional shot of Ernie Manouse Ernie Manouse (b. ... Anchorman redirects here. ... The primary role of a television producer is to coordinate and control all aspects of production, ranging from show idea development and cast hiring to shoot supervision and fact-checking. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... James McManus is an American poker player, novelist and poet from Chicago, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Jennifer Marie Morrison (born April 12, 1979) is an American actress, model and film producer. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... House, M.D. (commonly promoted as just House) is an American television series aired by the Fox Broadcasting Company. ... George Robert Bob Newhart (born September 5, 1929 in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... David Pasquesi is a comedian and actor living in Chicago. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Bill Plante (January 14, 1938- ) is a veteran journalist and correspondent for CBS News, having joined the network in 1964. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... David Rindner is a visual effects artist, technical director, and visual effects consultant with multiple credits in advertising, film, and television digital visual effects. ... For other uses, see Daniel Quinn (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... William Bill Rancic (born May 16, 1971) is an American entrepreneur who was the first candidate hired on national television by The Trump Organization at the conclusion of the first season of Donald Trumps reality business show, The Apprentice. ... The Apprentice is a television franchise that originated in 2004 in the United States. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Leslie David Baker playing the role of Stanley Hudson in the Office (US). ... The Office is an Emmy Award-winning American television comedy that debuted on NBC as a midseason replacement on March 24, 2005. ... John R. Powers is an American novelist and playwright. ... Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up? is a musical with a book by John R. Powers and music and lyrics by James Quinn and Alaric Jans. ...

Government & Politics

Hon. ... The United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties, divided into two divisions: The eastern division: Cook, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kendall, La Salle, Lake, and Will counties. ... William Daley was United States Secretary of Commerce under President Bill Clinton. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Howard Thomas Markey (November 10, 1920 – May 3, 2006) was an American jurist who served as the first chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, or simply the Federal Circuit, was founded in 1982 to combine similar federal cases to a specialized appellate court. ... Richard A. Dick Devine (born July 5, 1943 in Chicago, Illinois) is the current Cook County (IL) States Attorney. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The State Attorney (also called States Attorney or District Attorney or D.A.) is an appointed or elected official who is often the chief law enforcement officer of his or her respective county circuit or district. ... Jerald B. Jerry Harkness (born May 7, 1940 in Harlem, New York) is a retired American basketball player. ... This article is about the sport. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Neil F. Hartigan is an Illinois Democrat who has served as Illinois Attorney General, Lieutenant Governor, and Justice of the Appellate Court. ... The Illinois Attorney General is the highest legal officer of the state of Illinois in the United States. ... For other persons named Henry Hyde, see Henry Hyde (disambiguation). ... Lisa Madigan (born July 30, 1966 in Chicago) is the current and 41st Attorney General of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... The Illinois Attorney General is the highest legal officer of the state of Illinois in the United States. ... Dr. Vincent A. Mahler was born on 26 November 1949 and is a professor of Political Science at Loyola University in Chicago. ... See also: Political Science Notable political scientists Kenneth Arrow - Nobel Memorial Prize winning economist who published influential paper on his widely cited Arrows Impossibility Theorem Robert Axelrod Duncan Black - Responsible for unearthing the work of many early political scientists, including Charles Dodgson Jean-Charles de Borda - 18th century mathematician... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... Supreme Court of Illinois is the apex court of judicature of the state of Illinois, United States of America. ... James Michael Slattery (July 29, 1878 - August 28, 1948 was a United States Senator from Illinois. ... Mary Morello (born in 1924 in Marseilles, Illinois) founded in 1987 the anti-censorship group Parents For Rock And Rap. ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Daniel David Dan Rostenkowski served in the U.S. Congress as a U.S. Representative for Illinois from 1959 to 1995. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Edith S. Sampson Edith Spurlock Sampson (13 October 1901?-8 October 1979) was a lawyer and judge, and the first Black U.S. delegate to the United Nations. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Thomas R. Fitzgerald is a member of the Illinois Supreme Court. ... Robert R. Thomas (born August 7, 1952 in Rochester, NY) is Chief Justice on the Supreme Court of Illinois for the Second District as of 2006. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... Edward Joseph Derwinski (b. ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Tom Dart is a former Member of the Illinois House of Representatives and is currently the Democratic nominee for Cook County Sheriff. ... Michael J. Madigan (born April 19, 1942) is a politician in the U.S. state of Illinois, serving as a Democratic member of the Illinois General Assembly. ... The Democratic Party of Illinois is a political party and affiliate of the United States Democratic Party in Illinois. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Lt. ... The Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, is a major producer and manager of military intelligence for the United States Department of Defense. ... The United States Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) is a U.S. military command that provides professional investigative service to commanders of all United States Air Force activities. ... Arthur Wilhelmi is a Democratic member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 43rd District since he was appointed in 2005. ... Martin A. Sandoval is the Illinois State Senator for the 12th District, which he has served since 2003. ... Ira I. Silverstein is a Democratic member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 8th district since 1999. ... John J. Cullerton is a Democratic member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 6th district since his appointment in 1991. ... Christine Radogno is a Republican member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 41st District since 1997. ... Dan Cronin (born November 7, 1959 in Elmhurst, Illinois) is a Republican Illinois State Senator and the chairman of the Republican Party in DuPage County. ... Donald Lee Hollowell was a venerable civil rights attorney who sprang Rev. ... Donne Trotter is a Democratic member of the Illinois Senate, representing the 17th district since 1993. ... Daniel W. Hynes (born July 20, 1968 in Chicago, Illinois) is currently the Comptroller of the State of Illinois. ... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Corrine Wood is a former Lieutenant Governor of Illinois. ... John Neal Erlenborn (born February 8, 1927) is a lawyer and a former Republican member of the U.S. Congressional Delegations from Illinois, representing the 14th (then after 1980s redistricting the 13th) district. ... Michael Dennis Patrick Flanagan (born November 9, 1963) is an Illinois politician. ... Charles A. Boyle was a U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1955-1959. ... Edward Rowan Finnegan of Chicago was a U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1961-1962. ... James Thomas Igoe (October 23, 1883 - December 2, 1971) was a United States Representative from Illinois. ... William T. Murphy of Chicago was a U.S. Representative from Illinois, 1959-71. ...

Religion

Francis Cardinal George is the current Archbishop of Chicago. ... Dr. Norman L. Geisler is a scholar, contributor to the field of Christian apologetics, and the author or coauthor of some sixty books defending the Christian faith. ...

Sports

John Egan may refer to: John Egan (1811-1857), a Canadian businessman and politician John Egan, General Superintendant during the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway Sir John Egan, (1939-) former chief executive of the Jaguar car company Johnny Egan, former basketball player and coach This is a disambiguation page... This article is about the sport. ... Leslie Big Game Hunter (born August 16, 1942 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a former professional basketball player. ... LaRue Martin (born March 30, 1950 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American former professional basketball player, widely considered to be the worst first overall draft pick in NBA history [1]. Martin was taken first overall out of Loyola University Chicago by the Portland Trail Blazers in 1972, drafted ahead of... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... Michael D. Novak (April 23, 1915-August 15, 1978) was an American basketball player who played in the NBL, BAA, NBA from 1939 to 1954. ... øTom OHara is the awesomest guy in the wolrd. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Leonard David Sachs (August 7, 1897-October 27, 1942) was a college basketball coach, high school football coach, and professional football player and coach born in Chicago, Illinois. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Phil Weintraub (Born October 12, 1907 in Chicago, IL, died June 21, 1987 in Palm Springs, CA) was an American baseball player who had, as of July 2006, the second most runs batted in in a single game (11, on April 30, 1944). ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Notable professors

Sergio Balanzino was born on 20th June 1934 in Bologna, Italy. ... Mark Bosco, S.J. is a professor of Theology and English studies at Loyola University Chicago, in Chicago, Illinois, as well as the Director of the Honors Program. ... Reverend Michael J. Garanzini, S.J. (born September 24, 1948 in Saint Louis, Missouri) is an American priest of the Society of Jesus religious order of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Dr. Vincent A. Mahler was born on 26 November 1949 and is a professor of Political Science at Loyola University in Chicago. ... T. Jerome Overbeck, a Jesuit priest, is a noted author and theologian. ... Michael Quigley is a United States politician sitting on the Cook County Board of Commissioners in Chicago, Illinois representing Chicagos northside neighborhoods of Lakeview, Uptown and Rogers Park. ... David Schweickart is an American mathematician and philosopher. ... Dr. Louis W. Tordella (May 1, 1911–January 10, 1996) was the longest serving deputy director of the NSA. Dr. Tordella was born in Garrett, Indiana, on May 1, 1911 and grew up in the Chicago environs. ... Franz Jozef Van Beeck is a prominent Jesuit theologian. ... Jon Wilson was born in Tyler, Texas. ... Joshua Marie Wilkinson is an American poet. ...

In popular culture

  • The Lakeshore Campus of Loyola University Chicago was one of the shooting locations of the motion picture "Flatliners", and "Unborn"(2009).
  • In the Fox television series Prison Break, the protagonist, Michael Scofield, was a graduate of Loyola University Chicago, as mentioned on multiple occasions in the first season.

Flatliners is a 1990 movie starring Kiefer Sutherland, Julia Roberts, Kevin Bacon, William Baldwin and Oliver Platt as medical students experimenting with near-death experiences. ... Unborn is an Alternative band out of Baker, West Virginia. ... This article is about the animal. ... This article is about a television series. ... Michael Scofield is the fictional main protagonist in the American television series, Prison Break. ...

See also

Loyola Phoenix serves Loyola University Chicago and the northside Chicago neighborhoods of Edgewater and Rogers Park. ...

External links

Loyola University campuses

Loyola University Museum of Art

Loyola University athletics

Loyola University media

Loyola Related

References

  1. ^ http://www.nacubo.org/documents/research/2006NES_Listing.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.luc.edu/undergrad/academics/factsheets/facts_at_a_glance.pdf
  3. ^ http://www.luc.edu/undergrad/academics/factsheets/facts_at_a_glance.pdf
  4. ^ Loyola University Chicago- Loyola Facts: Fact Sheet 2007/2008
  5. ^ USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2008: National Universities
  6. ^ patrickarbo.com » About Us, PatrickArbor.com
  7. ^ The Chicago Network - Member Profiles - Brenda C. Barnes, The Chicago Network
  8. ^ Lawrence Biondi, S.J. | Saint Louis University, Saint Louis University
  9. ^ http://www.luc.edu/law/admission/jd/pdfs/alumni.pdf Distinguished Alumni"], Loyola University Chicago School of Law
  10. ^ CNN Programs - Anchors/Reporters - Susan Candiotti, CNN
  11. ^ Philip Caputo - "The American Novel", Key West Literary Siminar
  12. ^ cbs2chicago.com - Susan Carlaon", CBS 2 Chicago
  13. ^ http://tanzania.usembassy.gov/hhm-sandracisneros.html Hispanic Heritage Month 2007 - Sandra Cisneros], Tanzanian Embassy of the United States
  14. ^ Library of the U.S. Courts Seventh Circuit - Nudicial Biographies, Library of the U.S. Courts
  15. ^ http://www.archchicago.org/pdf/bishops/conway_vita_04.pdf MOST REVEREND EDWIN M. CONWAY, D.D.], Archdiocese of Chicago
The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Education in Boston, MA. Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... Creighton University is a Jesuit, Catholic university located in Omaha, Nebraska, United States of America. ... University of Detroit Mercy is the largest and most comprehensive Catholic University in Michigan. ... Fairfield University is a private, co-educational undergraduate and masters level university located in Fairfield, Connecticut, in the New England region of the United States. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Bishop John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Gonzaga University is a private Catholic university located in Spokane, Washington. ... John Carroll University is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area in the United States. ... Le Moyne College is a four-year Jesuit college of approximately 2,300 undergraduate students that uniquely balances a comprehensive liberal arts education with preparation for specific career paths or graduate study. ... Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... Loyola Marymount University (LMU) is a comprehensive co-educational private Roman Catholic Jesuit university in Los Angeles, California, USA. The University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and one of five Marymount institutions of higher education. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... This article is about Rockhurst University. ... This article is about the university in the United States. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Saint Peters College is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic college in the United States. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... The Santa Clara Mission is a notable on-campus landmark. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ... Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. ... Spring Hill College is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic Jesuit college in the United States. ... Wheeling Jesuit University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... For the school in New Orleans, see Xavier University of Louisiana. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Loyola University (Chicago) (191 words)
Loyola University is the outgrowth of St. Ignatius College, founded by the Jesuits in 1869 for the higher education of the Catholic youth of Chicago, and empowered by the Legislature of
On 21 November, 1909, Loyola University was chartered and St. Ignatius College became the department of
The private library of the institution, consisting of 47,000 volumes, is meant primarily for the use of the faculty and the allied schools.
College Profile of Loyola University Chicago (868 words)
Loyola University Chicago was founded in 1870 by the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and carries the namesake of the Society's founder, St. Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556), who devoted his life to God through his quest for knowledge and the rigors of scholarship.
Loyola nurtures the Jesuit tradition with a mission that is academically challenging and strives to develop the whole student by promoting compassion for others and a consciousness of justice and ethics.
Loyola's students ranked the university among the best for fostering a challenging academic program and nurturing a supportive campus environment in the National Survey of Student Engagement in each of the first two years the survey was taken in 2000 and 2001.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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