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Encyclopedia > Lowell House
The sky-blue bell tower of Lowell House
The sky-blue bell tower of Lowell House

Lowell House is one of the twelve undergraduate residential houses at Harvard University for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Named for the prominent Lowell family, it was built in 1930 as part of Harvard President Abbott Lawrence Lowell's drive to provide housing for all Harvard students. Prior to his tenure, most students were housed in privately run dormitories; these became so competitively lavish that the area between Mt. Auburn Street and Massachusetts Avenue, just south of Harvard Yard, was once known as the Gold Coast. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1438 KB) Summary I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1438 KB) Summary I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Harvard University campus (old map) Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Abbott Lawrence Lowell, portrait by John Singer Sargent U.S. educator, historian, and President of Harvard University (1909–33), Abbott Lawrence Lowell (January 1, 1856–January 6, 1943) was born to Augustus Lowell and his wife Katherine Bigelow Lowell at the families 10 acre estate in Brookline, MA. The Lowell...


Lowell House is home to a number of curious and longstanding traditions, including Thursday Teas at the Masters' Residence, a May Day Waltz at dawn on Weekes Footbridge, a yearly opera held in the dining hall, and the annual playing of the 1812 Overture in the House courtyard during Arts First weekend. During the latter, students who do not play orchestral instruments are encouraged to contribute on kazoos, and in lieu of cannons, the House chemistry tutor explodes hydrogen gas-filled balloons. May Day refers to any of several holidays celebrated on May 1 or in the beginning of May. ... The waltz is a ballroom and folk dance in 3/4 time, done primarily in closed position. ... The 1812 overture complete with cannon fire was performed at the 2005 Classical Spectacular. ... Two examples of the kazoo A metal kazoo The kazoo is a simple musical instrument (membranophone) that adds a buzzing timbral quality to a players voice when one hums into it. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... Chemistry (derived from alchemy) is the science of matter at or near the atomic scale. ... General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ...


Lowell House's Sister College at Yale is Pierson College. Pierson College is a residential college at Yale University, founded in 1932. ...


The current Masters of Lowell House are Diana L. Eck and Dorothy Austin. The acting Allston Burr Senior Tutor is Ryan Spoering. The Assistant Senior Tutors are Debbie Sorenson, Luis Campos, and Rebecca Schoff Erwin. The Co-Chairs of the Lowell House Committee are Jon Brewer and Julia Chandler. Diana L. Eck is Professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies at Harvard University and the Director of the Pluralism Project. ... The Allston Burr Senior Tutor, or simply the Senior Tutor, is the highest-ranking academic officer of an undergraduate House at Harvard College. ...


Notable Lowell alumni include John Berendt, Harry Blackmun, Michael Crichton, Matt Damon, Walter Isaacson, Tom Lehrer, Alan Jay Lerner, Robert Lowell, Nicholas Kristof, Anthony Lewis, Crown Princess Masako, Natalie Portman, Frank Rich, David Souter, John Updike, David Vitter, and Andrew Weil. John Berendt is the author of the best-selling non-fiction book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. ... Justice Harry Blackmun Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ... Michael Crichton John Michael Crichton (born October 23, 1942, pronounced // [1]) is an American author, film producer and television producer. ... Matt Damon at the Incirlik hospital, Incirlik Air Base, December 7, 2001. ... Walter Isaacson Walter Isaacson is the President and CEO of the Aspen Institute. ... Tom Lehrer in 1960. ... Alan Jay Lerner was a Jewish-American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, Jr. ... Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times whose specialty is East Asian affairs, especially those of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Anthony Lewis (born March 27, 1927, New York City) is a prominent liberal intellectual, writing for the New York Times op-ed page and the New York Review of Books, among other publications. ... ... Natalie Hershlag (Hebrew: נטלי הרשלג) (born June 9, 1981), better known by her stage name, Natalie Portman (Hebrew :נטלי פורטמן), is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning Israeli-American actress. ... Image:Frank Rich. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1990. ... John Updike John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932) is an American writer born in Reading, Pennsylvania. ... David Bruce Vitter (born May 3, 1961), American politician, is a Senator from Louisiana. ... Dr. Andrew Weil (born December 19, 1941) is a world-famous United States physician. ...


The bells

One of the more unique features of Lowell House is the presence of a set of Russian bells in a tower above the House, one of only five complete sets of pre-revolutionary Russian bells left in the world. The set was bought around 1930 by Chicago industrialist Charles R. Crane in order to save the bells from melting by the Communists. When Lowell House was built, Crane gave the set of 18 bells as a gift (only 17 are in the House today; the 18th was thought to be too close in tone to one of the others, and it now hangs in the tower of Harvard Business School's Baker Library). The bells, originally from the Danilov Monastery in Moscow, the seat of the Patriarch of the Russian Orthodox Church, range in weight from 22 pounds (10 kg) to a whopping 26,700 pounds (12,100 kg) (the largest bell is known as "Mother Earth"). The bells are consecrated, and are of great significance to the Russian orthodox church, where bells are regularly rung as part of religious services. At Harvard, the bells are rung every Sunday from 1:00 to 1:15 pm, and on certain special occasions, by an interested group of Lowell residents known as the Klappermeisters. Visitors are welcome. They can also be heard on the Lowell House Virtual Bell Tower. 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Charles Richard Crane or Charles R. Crane (1858-1939) of Chicago was a wealthy American Arabist, a philanthropist who had business knowledge of Eastern Europe and the Middle East. ... HBS, as seen from across the Charles River. ... Danilov Monastery, in full Svyato-Danilov Monastery or Holy Danilov Monastery (Данилов монастырь, Свято-Данилов монастырь in Russian), is a male monastery on the right bank of the Moskva River in Moscow, Russia. ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA: ) is the capital of Russia and the countrys principal political, economic, financial, educational and transportation center, located on the river Moskva. ...


With the revival of Christianity in Russia and the reopening of the Danilov Monastery, a request has been made for the return of the bells to Moscow. Although the bells belong in law to Harvard, Lowell House and the Danilov Monastery have been involved in negotiations for the past few years, and a transfer of ownership (with replacement Russian bells to be cast for Harvard) is being planned. The ongoing negotiations have brought about a new and friendly relationship between the House and the Monastery (and their respective bellringers), with exchange trips taking place in December 2003 and May 2004. Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA: ) is the capital of Russia and the countrys principal political, economic, financial, educational and transportation center, located on the river Moskva. ...


Recent changes

Due to the upcoming noisy remodeling of the Hasty Pudding building adjacent to Apley Court, a freshman dorm, Lowell will lose some of its overflow space for at least the 2005-2006 academic year. Because some of the rooms in Apley Court will be uninhabitable, Lowell's overflow rooms in Claverly Hall will become housing for freshmen, and Lowell residents who cannot be accommodated within Lowell proper will be housed in now-smaller Apley Court as well as in DeWolfe housing. The Crimson explained the housing adjustments in detail in March. The article is available at: here. The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals. ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lowell House - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (752 words)
Lowell House is one of the twelve undergraduate residential houses at Harvard University for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.
Lowell House is home to a number of curious and longstanding traditions, including Thursday Teas at the Masters' Residence, a May Day Waltz at dawn on Weeks Footbridge, a yearly opera held in the dining hall, and the annual playing of the 1812 Overture in the House courtyard during Arts First weekend.
When Lowell House was built, Crane gave the set of 18 bells as a gift (only 17 are in the House today; the 18th was thought to be too close in tone to one of the others, and it now hangs in the tower of Harvard Business School's Baker Library).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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