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Encyclopedia > Lowell High School (San Francisco)

Lowell High School (San Francisco)


This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ...

Motto Fiat Scientia
(Latin: "Let there be knowledge")
Established 1856
School type Public
Campus Urban
Principal Andrew W. Ishibashi
Location 1101 Eucalyptus Drive
San Francisco, California, United States
Faculty ~150
Enrollment 2,623
Sports teams Cardinals
Colors Red and White
Website http://www.sfusd.k12.ca.us/LowellHS/

Lowell High School, a public magnet school in San Francisco, is the oldest public high school west of the Mississippi. Lowell was ranked by Newsweek's Jay Mathews Challenge Index as the #60 high school of the United States in 2007.[1] Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country State City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country State City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...

Contents

History

Lowell High School traces its beginnings to 1856 as the Union Grammar School. In 1894, the school was renamed to honor the distinguished poet, James Russell Lowell, chiefly by Pelham W. Ames, a member of the school board and ardent admirer of James Russell Lowell. The school relocated in January 1913 to an entire city block on Hayes Street between Ashbury and Masonic. Lowell was to remain there a half century, during which time its position as the city's college preparatory high school was firmly established. In 1952, the drive accelerated for a new location near Lake Merced. Lowell opened at this new location in 1962 to complete the final move in its history. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... James Russell Lowell (b. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lake Merced Lake Merced is a freshwater lake located in the southwest corner of San Francisco, California. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Location

1101 Eucalyptus Drive, San Francisco, CA 94132-1401


The school is located north of Lake Merced, between San Francisco's Parkside and Sunset Districts. The school spans several blocks between Sylvan Ave. in the west and 25th Ave. in the east, and Eucalyptus Drive in the north to Winston Drive in the south. The school is accessible via the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni) K, M, 17, 18, 23, 28, 28L, and 29 lines. Hundreds of students walk up the sidewalk on Eucalyptus Drive towards 19th Ave. for the K, M, 28, and 28L lines during common start and end times. Lake Merced Lake Merced is a freshwater lake located in the southwest corner of San Francisco, California. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Sunset District is a neighborhood in the western half of San Francisco, California, USA that is primarily residential and is built along a grid pattern. ... Two forms of public transport operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni): on the left, a bus (the 38 Geary line) and, on the right, the F Market historic streetcar. ... The K Ingleside is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco. ... The San Francisco State University Station at the intersection of 19th Avenue and Holloway The M Ocean View is a Muni Metro line in San Francisco, California. ...


The campus is located next to Lakeshore Elementary School, a public school, and St. Stephen School, a private K-8 school. Because Lowell is an open-campus high school, many students choose to shop and eat lunch at the nearby Lakeshore Plaza or Stonestown Galleria malls during their free lunch periods ("mods," see below), despite rules against the latter (widely ignored even by staff). The Stonestown Galleria is a shopping mall in San Francisco, California, U.S. There are over 130 stores in the mall, including Macys and Nordstrom. ...


Facilities

Lowell's facilities include:

  • 3-story academic building with two extensions
  • 2-story science building
  • 10 "temporary" Bungalows (in actuality, they are among the oldest buildings on campus, though many of the worst condition were recently demolished)
  • 15 new bungalows in the old basketball courts near Lake Merced
  • 2-story visual and performing arts building with 1,000-seat auditorium
  • Library
  • Extensive art and science labs
  • 6 computer labs
  • Gymnasium
  • Dance studio
  • American football field
  • Soccer/multipurpose field with soccer kicking wall and baseball batting cage
  • 10 tennis courts
  • 4 basketball courts
  • 1/4 mile (400 m) dirt oval

Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ...

Academics and admissions

Overview

Lowell is one of the two public schools in the San Francisco Unified School District (the other being School of the Arts) that is permitted to admit only students who meet special admission requirements. The Lowell admission process is based on a combination of standardized test scores, GPA, a writing sample, and extracurricular activities. Lowell's academic success is due largely to this process, and at present, Lowell High School is ranked 3rd in terms of test scores among the Top 10 Public Schools in California, behind Gretchen Whitney High School and Oxford Academy.[citation needed] SFUSD logo San Francisco Unified School District, was Californias first public school district when it was established in 1851. ... School of the Arts High School (SOTA) is a public magnet high school in San Francisco, California, in the United States. ... A standardized test is a test administered and scored in a standard manner. ... In the United States, grading is done with several different systems. ... An extracurricular activity is any school-sanctioned activity in which students may participate for some form of credit or recognition. ... Whitney High School gymnasium Gretchen Whitney High School, known as simply as Whitney High School, is a public school in Cerritos, California, serving grades 7-12. ... Oxford Academy College Preparatory School is a college preparatory school serving 7th-12th grade in Cypress, California. ...


The school's modular scheduling system and self-scheduling "arena" program allow students freedom in course choice. Students also have the chance to take a large number of Advanced Placement courses. The school's graduation rate is nearly 100%, and is the largest feeder school to the University of California system, in particular to the Berkeley and Davis campuses. Many students also matriculate at other prestigious universities nationwide. Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and was established as the University Farm in 1905. ...


Lowell's academic instruction is considered far more rigorous than that offered at other San Francisco high schools, and it has been awarded the Blue Ribbon Academic Excellence Award three times[2].


San Francisco NAACP v. San Francisco Unified School District ('80s)

Beginning in 1983, the San Francisco Unified School District attempted to ensure racial desegregation at Lowell and other schools by instituting a race-based admissions policy as a result of San Francisco NAACP v. San Francisco Unified School District and the 1983 Consent Decree settlement. SFUSD logo San Francisco Unified School District, was Californias first public school district when it was established in 1851. ...


As a result of the Consent Decree, SFUSD attempted to create a more equal distribution of race at Lowell, which was predominantly Chinese-American, particularly attempting to introduce more African-American and Hispanic minorities into Lowell's population. As a result of this policy, for the freshman class entering in 1985 (the Class of 1989), Chinese-American applicants needed to score a total of 65 points out of a possible total of 69, whereas Caucasian and other East Asian candidates only needed to score a 61 out of 69, while candidates from statistically "underrepresented" groups, including African-Americans and Hispanics, were admitted with an even lower aggregate score. Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ...


Opponents of this admissions policy were dismayed because the policy was strictly based on race—-the policy did not take into account any candidate's socioeconomic background which had the arguably inequitable result of requiring some children from poor families to score higher than children from wealthy families. Many of these opponents felt that the strongest traditional argument in favor of differential admissions requirements based on race--i.e. to remedy past discrimination against members of the "under-represented" group(s)--was not applicable. Indeed, given the long history of discrimination against Chinese-Americans in education and other contexts, the suggestion that the academic success of Chinese-American candidates was somehow the result of historical legal inequities created by Chinese-Americans that needed to be remedied with a preference for non-Chinese candidates appeared ironic at best, and arguably, grotesquely perverse.


Proponents of the new admissions policy, however, believed that preserving the school's traditional racial diversity -- a tradition almost a hundred years old -- was of utmost importance, not just for traditionally disadvantaged minority groups, but for Chinese-American students as well because the increased diversity enabled students of Chinese ethnicity to better assimilate and achieve success in life beyond the narrow racially ghettoized confines of Lowell High School. Proponents also point out that the majority of volunteer work and fundraising is done by the parents of Caucasian students, and the school would suffer were these parents' children to leave Lowell. Moreover, proponents of desegregation at Lowell pointed to the absurdity of having only a 2.5 percent population of black students and 5 percent population of Latino students in a modern urban American high school, especially as students of these ethnicities would benefit greatly from Lowell's excellent academic programs, and that the only way to maintain diversity at Lowell is to use race as a factor.


Ho v. San Francisco Unified School District ('90s)

In 1994, a group of Chinese American community activists organized a lawsuit to challenge the 1983 Consent Decree race-based admissions policies used by SFUSD for its public schools. Ho v. ...


In 1999, both parties agreed to a settlement which modified the 1983 Consent Decree to create a new "diversity index" system which substituted race as a factor for admissions with a variety of factors such as socioeconomic background, mother's educational level, academic achievement, language spoken at home, and English Learner Status.


Expiration of the Consent Decree

Critics of the diversity index created by Ho v. San Francisco Unified School District point out that many schools, including Lowell, have become even less racially diverse since it was enacted.


In November 15, 2005, the United States District Court for the Northern District of California denied a request to extend the Consent Decree, which was set to expire on December 31, 2005 after it had been extended once before to December 31, 2002. The ruling claimed "since the settlement of the Ho litigation [resulting in the institution of the "diversity index"], the consent decree has proven to be ineffective, if not counterproductive, in achieving diversity in San Francisco public schools" by making schools more racially segregated. is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The expiration of the Consent Decree means that SFUSD's admissions policies, including the "diversity index" and the special admissions policies granted to Lowell, and many of its "Dream School" initiatives are no longer codified and mandated by the Consent Decree. As a result, these policies may be challenged at the community and local levels as well instead of just at the judicial level by filing a lawsuit.


Arena scheduling system

Lowell uses a class scheduling system once historically popular in most high schools and colleges, an "arena" in which students move from table to table signing up for classes, allowing students a degree of programming freedom almost unheard of in other high schools today.


While scheduling classes for the 2006 spring semester, members of Lowell's Shield and Scroll Honor and Service Society were caught abusing the scheduling system. They used early scheduling privileges, granted to the society by the administration, to let friends schedule before others.[3][4]


This documented abuse proved to be a catalyst for anti-arena faculty in the school. Five of six department chairs and dozens of teachers at Lowell filed a union grievance demanding an end to class imbalances. Citing these imbalances, they called to eliminate arena scheduling and to replace it with computerized scheduling used in all other SFUSD schools. Critics characterized arena scheduling as an antiquated and inefficient system, one which promotes inequities and abuses, and creates weeks of unnecessary work for teachers and counselors (the system tends to produce "incomplete" schedules which must be dealt with after the scheduling period).[5][6]


Proponents of arena argued that it distinguishes Lowell and gives students additional responsibility and flexibility with shaping their high school careers. As good and bad teachers distinguish themselves quite clearly at the school, and knowledge of teacher quality spreads through word of mouth and online means, it was argued that rotating priority of picking teachers and times would assure the fairest results for the greatest number of people.


After a student forum, countless committee meetings, several student petitions, and final deliberation by then principal Paul Cheng and the administration, it was decided that arena would remain in place, with modifications to address concerns about inequities and class imbalance, including the abolishment of early scheduling for Shield and Scroll and of "mini arena," which allowed people with incomplete schedules another chance to complete them by opening up all the classes again with a few slots.


Modular scheduling

Overview

Lowell has a unique scheduling system consisting of twenty 'modules.' (more commonly known as 'mods') Originally instituted to alleviate crowding of facilities by having a percentage of students out of class at any particular time, the system also allows a freedom of academic choice rare for a high school. Students can schedule classes around after-school activities, pick teachers conducive to their learning style (or desired workload), or simply arrange to sleep late or leave early. Flexible modular scheduling is a method of breaking the school day into many 10-20 minute modules or mods. This resembles college scheduling in many ways, and is unique to every different school that uses it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Some classes meet for 40 minutes daily, and some meet for 40 half the time, and 65 the other half. Students will typically have between 3 and 7 free (non-class) mods a day, reflecting, on average, 5-7 daily classes (Though some wily students have managed to schedule four or eight). Several resource centers are available for student use during free mods. Using that free time wisely is often touted as an important part of the college preparatory training students receive at Lowell.


Note: At Lowell, homeroom is called registry or "reg" except on attendance strips and on report cards, where it is called simply "homeroom."

Mods Time
1 7:35am - 7:55am
2 8:00am - 8:15am
3 8:20am - 8:40am
4 8:45am - 9:00am
5 9:05am - 9:25am
Registry 9:30am - 9:40am
6 9:50am - 10:10am
7 10:15am - 10:30am
8 10:35am - 10:55am
9 11:00am - 11:15am
10 11:20am - 11:40am
11 11:45am - 12:05pm
12 12:10pm - 12:25pm
13 12:30pm - 12:50pm
14 12:55pm - 1:10pm
15 1:15pm - 1:35pm
16 1:40pm - 2:00pm
17 2:05pm - 2:20pm
18 2:25pm - 2:45pm
19 2:50pm - 3:05pm
20 3:10pm - 3:30pm

Swing mods

Swing Mods are mods 3,8,13,18, which lie in-between popular class times. As a result, many students don't have class during these 20-minute swing mods. Mod 3 & 18 are usually canceled when there is a special schedule. On Mondays and Wednesdays, they add to the length of a B code class. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, they add to the length of a C code class. A-code classes leave swing mods free for students on all days.


Class configurations

  • A-code Class: 40 Min Long/day (MTWThF) - 2 mods/day
  • B-code Class: 65 Min and 40 Min Alternating Days (MW - 65 Min - 3 mods / TTh - 40 Min - 2 mods)
  • C-code Class: 65 Min and 40 Min Alternating Days (TTh - 65 Min - 3 mods / MW - 40 Min - 2 mods)

Fridays can be designated Mondays or Tuesdays (determining which classes are long), neutral (all B/C classes are 52 minutes) or special (all classes are shorter, and 3 and 18 are cancelled).


Many classes, including all science classes, most mathematics classes, Advanced Placement social studies and English classes, upper-level foreign language classes (with the exception of Hebrew), and advanced visual and performing arts (VPA) classes are B and C codes. Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ...


In fact, all Advanced Placement classes in Lowell are B/C code. Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ...


The D-code designation, which allotted 65 minutes (three mods) every day of the week for a class, has been gradually phased out due to the difficulties they caused in scheduling.


Special schedules

Every so often, usually every alternating Friday, a "special schedule" appears. On these days mods 3 and 18 are canceled. Students who normally have breaks during these times no longer have them. Students who have class during these times end up with a shorter class period. Each mod is cut back to 15-20 minutes long. The day is shorter, mod 1 begins at 9:20 and the last mod still ends at 3:30. The reason for these "special schedules" is due to faculty meetings and school rallies. Students are notified of such schedules on the weekly bulletin distributed to every "registry" (homeroom) Students in said registries are with each other throughout their high school career. Home room is a term used in schools across United States. ...


Piloted in the final months of the 2004 spring semester and implemented the following year, "neutral Friday" addressed the distribution of B and C type classes on Fridays. Before, there was a running tally of B and C alternations which would eventually be of an equal number at the end of the school year. However, some teachers felt that the distribution was not as equal as was purported. Therefore, the school reached a compromise where instead of switching between B and C type classes each week, they split the "swing mods" (mods 3, 8, 13, and 18), where the B and C difference would generally lie, in half. For example, mod 3 is normally from 8:20-8:40 is split in half so mod 3B is from 8:20-8:27 and mod 3C is from 8:33-8:40.


From time to time, extremely short class schedules are announced, usually because of a need for an extended staff meeting. These have occurred during periods such as Lowell's 2006 Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) accreditation process and currently on "Professional Development Meetings." On these days, mod 1 starts at 10:00 am. The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six official academic bodies responsible for the accreditation of public and private universities, colleges, secondary and elementary schools in the United States and foreign institutions of American origin. ...


Student/Teacher population

  • 2005-2006:
    • 2,623 students; 39.8% male, 60.2% female
    • Student demographics:
Latino White African-American Chinese Japanese Korean American Indian Filipino Other Non-White Declined to State
5.9% 15.4% 2.9% 52.6% 1.5% 1.5% 0.2% 5.6% 11.3% 3.1%
    • 146 certified teachers; 50.0% male, 50.0% female
    • Certificated teacher demographics
Latino White African-American Chinese Japanese Korean American Indian Filipino Other Non-White Declined to State
10.9% 58.9% 4.1% 10.9% 2.0% 0.6% 0.0% 2.0% 2.0% 8.2%

Extracurriculars

Overview

The Cardinals are one of the most active student bodies in San Francisco, with over 84 academic organizations, teams and student interest clubs.


Lowell also has academic teams which are exempt from volunteer hours in exchange for not being publicized as well as the clubs. The Mock Trial team is very accomplished, representing San Francisco County at the State Competitions in 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2007. In 2007, they finished in the Top Ten at State Finals and ended their season with a 7-1 record. A mock trial is a contrived or imitation trial. ...


Lowell Forensic Society

The Lowell Forensic Society, founded in 1892, is the oldest high school speech and debate team in the nation and also the largest on campus, with over 200 members. The team travels regularly to prestigious national invitationals, including Harvard, UC Berkeley, Stanford, City College, Long Beach, and Utah. Lowell Forensics has also competed in the National Speech and Debate Tournament under the National Forensic League for 40 years, making it one of the longest running national championship teams in the nation. Forensics alumni include Yale University President Richard Levin, Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, California Governor Edmund G. "Pat" Brown, actress Carol Channing, actor Benjamin Bratt, writer Naomi Wolf, actor Bill Bixby, PG&E CEO Frederick Mielke, author Daniel Handler of Series of Unfortunate Events fame and numerous academics, writers, and judges. The Lowell Forensic Society, founded in 1892, is the oldest high school speech and debate team in the nation and also the largest organization at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California. ... The Lowell Forensic Society, founded in 1892, is the oldest high school speech and debate team in the nation and also the largest organization at Lowell High School in San Francisco, California. ... National Competitors The National Speech and Debate Tournament is a week-long high school championship forensics competition hosted by the National Forensic League itself. ... The National Forensic League is one of two major U.S. national organizations which direct high school competitive speech events. ... Richard Charles Levin (b. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Edmund Gerald Pat Brown Sr. ... Carol Elaine Channing (born on January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is an American singer and actress. ... Benjamin Bratt (born December 16, 1963) is an American actor. ... Naomi Wolf (born 1962) is an American writer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Daniel Handler (born February 28, 1970), is an American author, screenwriter, and accordionist. ... A Series of Unfortunate Events is a childrens book series by Daniel Handler, writing under the pseudonym of Lemony Snicket. ...


Academic Decathlon

Among other academic organizations at Lowell, the Academic Decathlon remains at the top as 17-year State Championship county qualifier and has been undefeated as City Champions of San Francisco since the inception of the competition. The United States Academic Decathlon (USAD) is one of the premier academic competitions in the United States. ...


In 2003, the San Francisco Unified School District decided to cease the endorsement of the Academic Decathlon as a city-wide competition. Lowell High School attends the Contra Costa Regional Competition in order to obtain a regional score.


The official battlecry for Lowell's Academic Decathlon team continues to be "Hudaya".


The Lowell

The school's monthly student newspaper, The Lowell, has won numerous national-level awards, including the CSPA Gold and Silver Crown awards, the NSPA Pacemaker and the Northern California Society for Professional Journalists' James Madison Award, in recognition of their 2007-2008 school year battle to protect free speech.


JROTC

Lowell also has a distinguished Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps battalion. Lowell has been the leader in overall excellence in the San Francisco JROTC Brigade. The battalion has 8 special units: Lowell Drum Corps, Boys Drill Team, Girls Drill Team, Color Guard, Drill Platoon, Brigade Best Squad, Guidon, and Raiders. Every Fall, the Lowell Drum Corps, Color Guard, Guidon, and Brigade Best Squad compete in the Annual Fall Liberty Competition. In addition, every Spring, Lowell Girls Drill Team, Boys Drill Team, and Drill Platoon participate in the 91st Division Drill Competition. A Navy JROTC cadet salutes during the parading of the colors ceremony held at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ...

Annual Fall Liberty Bell Competition


Lowell Drum Corps
2005: First Place
2006: First Place


Lowell Brigade Best Squad
2005: Fourth Place
2006: First Place


Lowell Guidon
2005: First Place
2006: Third Place


Lowell Color Guard
2005: Second Place
2006: Second Place

Annual 91st Drill Competition


Lowell Girls Drill Team
2005: Third Place
2006: Third Place
2007: Second Place


Lowell Boys Drill Team
2005: First Place
2006: First Place
2007: Last Place


Lowell Drill Platoon
2005: First Place
2006: First Place
2007: First Place


Annual Raider Challenge


2005: First Place
2006: First Place
2007: First Place

Notable alumni from JROTC include William Hewlett, who was battalion commander during his years in Lowell in the 1930s. William Reddington Hewlett (May 20, 1913 – January 12, 2001) was the co-founder, with David Packard, of the Hewlett-Packard Company (HP). ...


Sports

Many students participate in a variety of athletic leagues and competitions. Lowell has competitive football, cross-country, soccer, tennis, volleyball, basketball, wrestling, badminton, gymnastics, softball, swimming, track and field, fencing, golf, dragonboat, and baseball teams.


Lowell's Boys Varsity Basketball has recently been very successful. In 2004, the cinderalla team captured its first AAA Championship since 1952. Following a runner-up finish in 2005, the 2006 squad went undefeated in league play and finished with an unprecedented 30-3 record and a city championship.


Lowell's Varsity Baseball team, led by coach John Donohue, won eight of ten championships from 1994 to 2004[7] while posting a regular season record of 185 wins and only 11 losses[8] during that span. Coach Donohue won his 300th AAA league game on March 7th, 2003 and tallied his 450th win overall just two weeks later on March 21, 2003.[9]


Lowell's track and field and cross country teams have also fared well in the past. The Lowell track and field team is led by Andy Leong. The track Team recently won the city championship in all four divisions for the seventh year in a row.[10] The cross country Team recently swept all three divisions at the city finals in Golden Gate Park, marking Lowell's 26th overall championship win in a row.[11] In recent years, the track and field team has attracted about 150 athletes each season, and the cross country Team has attracted nearly 100 runners each season.


The girls' varsity volleyball team has dominated the sport since its creation with the most city championships amongst other San Francisco public schools, and as of November 2006, is on an unprecedented streak of eleven consecutive volleyball city championships.[12] The girls' junior varsity volleyball team also owns all but one of the city titles.[12]


In April 2007, Lowell's varsity swim team won their 11th consecutive AAA Championship title, with an undefeated season and an undefeated girls' title, ever since girls have been admitted on the team. The close rivalry between the Cardinals' and the Washington Eagles ended with Lowell coming out on top of all the other SFUSD high schools participating, which included Balboa High, Lincoln High, and Wallenberg High School. Balboa High School (San Francisco) Balboa High School is an American public high school located in the Excelsior District of San Francisco, California. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In April 2007, Lowell's dragonboat team competed in the California Dragonboat Association Youth Race at Lake Merced in San Francisco, California. They brought home three golds and two silvers. The Lowellitas, the girl's team, won their seventh consecutive gold medal.


Historical milestones

  • 1856 Union Grammar School Founded
  • 1858 Name changed to San Francisco High School
  • 1864 Genders separated, name changed to Boy's High School
  • 1875 Moved within San Francisco to Sutter Street between Gough and Octavia
  • 1886 Girls (slowly) reintegrated into college prep program (thus, female graduates of Boy's High)
  • 1894 Name changed to Lowell High School in honor of poet James Russell Lowell
  • 1898 First issue of the school newspaper "The Lowell" published (spring)
  • 1908 Funds secured by bonds for new building
  • 1913 School moved to new, larger campus on Hayes and Ashbury
  • 1962 School moved to current campus to make room for future expansion and add a library, gymnasium and larger auditorium
  • 1966 Enrollment limited, school switched from neighborhood to GPA/test based admission
  • 1968 20-period modular schedule instated
  • 1981 125th anniversary celebrated at the San Francisco Hilton
  • 1996 Lowell ranked 6th nationally in AP exam scores
  • 2003 New academic/science wing opened on campus
  • 2004 Unit 6 building section renovation completed; roof replaced; "temporary" bungalows 14,15, and 16 relocated
  • 2006 150th anniversary of the school. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer (class of 1955) visited.

1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country State City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... James Russell Lowell (b. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A row of bungalows in Virginia A bungalow (Gujarati: , Hindi: ) is a type of single-story house. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ...

Notable alumni

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Smith Fight song San Diego Super Chargers League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960... For other persons named Alexander Calder, see Alexander Calder (disambiguation). ... Carol Elaine Channing (born on January 31, 1921 in Seattle, Washington) is an American singer and actress. ... Margaret Cho (born December 5, 1968) is an American comedian, fashion designer and actress. ... School of the Arts High School (SOTA) is a public magnet high school in San Francisco, California, in the United States. ... Carl Wieman (left) and Eric Cornell (right) on the University of Colorado at Boulder campus Eric Allin Cornell (born December 19, 1961) is a physicist who, along with Carl E. Wieman, was able to synthesize the first Bose-Einstein condensate in 1995. ... Dan the Automator Nakamura is a Japanese American, born in San Francisco, California, a hip-hop and rap producer most known for his work in the mid to late 1990s and early 2000s. ... 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References

  1. ^ Newsweek: 1,200 Top U.S. Schools
  2. ^ Lowell High School wins third Blue Ribbon. From the Lowell Alumni Association.
  3. ^ Honor society causes scheduling inequity. From The Lowell.
  4. ^ Shield and Scroll must maintain high moral standards. From The Lowell.
  5. ^ Class scheduling methods put Lowell High in a tizzy. From the San Francisco Chronicle.
  6. ^ Self-scheduling is fundamental to Lowell. From The Lowell.
  7. ^ AAA Baseball Annual Champions.
  8. ^ 3 teams have caught Lowell in race for baseball supremacy. From the San Francisco Chronicle.
  9. ^ Lowell baseball is amassing very big numbers. From the San Francisco Chronicle.
  10. ^ AAA Track and Field Annual Champions.
  11. ^ AAA Cross-country Annual Champions.
  12. ^ a b AAA Volleyball Girls Annual Champions.

See also

  • San Francisco County high schools

A request has been made on Wikipedia for this article to be deleted in accordance with the deletion policy. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lowell High School: Information from Answers.com (3296 words)
Lowell High School is the oldest public high school west of the Mississippi and traces its beginnings to 1856 as the Union Grammar School.
Lowell is one of the two public schools in the San Francisco Unified School District (the other being School of the Arts) that is permitted to admit only students who meet special admission requirements.
Lowell's academic success is due largely to this process, and at present, Lowell High School is ranked 3rd in terms of test scores among the Top 10 Public Schools in California, behind Gretchen Whitney High School and Oxford Academy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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