FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Louvre" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Shown within Paris
Established 1793
Location Palais Royal, Musée du Louvre,
75001 Paris, France
Visitor figures 8.3 million (2007)[1]
Director Henri Loyrette
Curator Marie-Laure de Rochebrune
Public transit access Metro, Palais Royal -- Musée du Louvre
Website www.louvre.fr

Coordinates: 48°51′37″N 2°20′15″E / 48.860395, 2.337599 The cour dhonneur looking west The palais du Louvre in Paris, on the Right Bank of the Seine is a former royal palace, situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain lAuxerrois. ... The Ecole du Louvre is an institution of higher education and French Grande École dedicated to the study of Archaeology, History of Art, Anthropology and Epigraphy. ... A louver (or louvre in British English, from French louvert; the open one) is a frame with horizontal and vertical slats, which are angled to admit light and air, but to keep out rain and sun shine. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


The Louvre (French: Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the world's most visited art museums.[2][3] The collection contains nearly 35,000 pieces displayed over the structure's 60,000 square metres (650,000 sq ft).[4] The museum is on the Right Bank, in the neighborhood referred to as the 1st arrondissement and lies between the Seine River and the Rue de Rivoli. The Louvre is slightly askew of the axe historique, a long architectural straightaway that cuts through the centre of Paris.[5] This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1er arrondissement is the least populated of the 20 arrondissements of Paris, France, though it is also one of the smallest by land area. ... This article is about the river in France. ... Nighttime view of Rue de Rivoli, Paris, France Rue de Rivoli as it runs along the north wing of the Musée du Louvre, Paris, France Rue de Rivoli as it runs through Le Marais, in Pariss 4th arrondissement Rue de Rivoli is one of the most famous streets... The Axe historique (historical axis) is a line of monuments, buildings and thoroughfares that extends from the centre of Paris, France, to the west. ...


The structure originated as a palace during the Capetian dynasty under the reign of Philip II and was gradually developed into the structure visible today.[6] It was used as an art depository from the time of François I, but it was not opened to the public until the French Revolution. At that time, the Louvre was intended to symbolize the progress of Liberty and was a destination for many of the spoils following Napoleon's victorious armies, which enriched the museum's collection. The cour dhonneur looking west The palais du Louvre in Paris, on the Right Bank of the Seine is a former royal palace, situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain lAuxerrois. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For other uses, see Liberty (disambiguation). ...


The museum's collection, divided among eight curatorial departments, contains some of the world's most celebrated artworks, such as Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa, The Virgin and Child with St. Anne, and Madonna of the Rocks; Jacques Louis David's Oath of the Horatii; Delacroix's Liberty Leading the People; and Alexandros of Antioch's Venus de Milo. “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... The Virgin and Child with St Anne is an oil painting by Leonardo da Vinci depicting St Anne, her daughter the Virgin Mary and the infant Jesus. ... The Virgin of the Rocks and Madonna of the Rocks are terms used to describe both of two different paintings with almost identical compositions. ... Self portrait Jacques-Louis David (August 30, 1748 - December 29, 1825), most usually known as David (pronounced Dah-veed rather than Day-vid), was a French painter. ... Oath of the Horatii (1784) is a painting by Jacques-Louis David, painted before the French Revolution, depicting the Roman salute. ... Liberty Leading the People (French: ) is a painting by Eugène Delacroix commemorating the July Revolution of 1830, which toppled Charles X. A woman personifying Liberty leads the people forward over the bodies of the fallen, holding the tricolore flag of the French Revolution in one hand and brandishing a... Alexandros of Antioch was an otherwise unknown master of the Hellenistic age who is most well known today for the Venus de Milo (Aphrodite of Milos) at the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ...

Contents

History

Le Palais du Louvre

The only portion of the medieval Louvre still visible today.
The only portion of the medieval Louvre still visible today.[5]
Main article: Palais du Louvre

The Louvre has grown through a series of building projects completed over the past 800 years.[7]A fortress was built under Philip Augustus from 1190 to 1202 to defend Paris from foreign attacks.[8][9] It is unknown whether this was the first building to be constructed on that spot, although contemporaries referred to the early Louvre as the "New Tower", indicating a predecessor.[6][8] The origin of the name Louvre is murky. The historian Mary Knight Potter contends that King Philip II of France referred to the structure as L'Œuvre (the masterpiece) because it was the largest building in 13th-century Paris. Henri Sauval proposes a derivation from a word leouar (castle, fortress) which he claims to have found in an "old Latin-Saxon glossary", but which has no independent verification, [5] while Henry Sutherland Edwards posits rouvre (oak), referring to the building's location in a forest.[8] The cour dhonneur looking west The palais du Louvre in Paris, on the Right Bank of the Seine is a former royal palace, situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain lAuxerrois. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Henri Sauval (1623 - 21 March 1676) was a French historian. ...


The only portion still extant from this period is the foundation of the southeast corner.[5] Additions were subsequently completed, notably by Charles V who, in 1358, built a defensive wall around the fortress and converted the Louvre into a royal residence, although later monarchs used it as a prison.[9] Louis IX (Saint-Louis) added a dungeon and François I an annex.[6] Additionally, François rebuilt the Louvre using plans of architect Pierre Lescot. Following François' death in 1547, his successor Henry II retained the architect, and the west and south sides of the Louvre were completed and Jean Goujon's bas-relief sculptures were added.[10] Lescot's renovations modified the Louvre from a fortress to the style visible today.[11] Charles V the Wise (French: Charles V le Sage) (January 21, 1338 – September 16, 1380) was king of France from 1364 to 1380 and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Louis IX of France, as painted by El Greco in the 16th Century. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Pierre Lescot (Paris c. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... The Four Seasons (c. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... Sculptor redirects here. ...


In 1594, King Henry IV united the Palais du Louvre with the Palais des Tuileries. This "Grand Design" called for a Grande Galerie to connect to the Pavillon de Flore on the southern end and the Pavillon de Marsan to the north. Louis XIII (1610–43) completed the Denon Wing, begun in 1560 by Catherine de Medici.[10][12] In 1624, the classical architects Le Vau and Lemercier completed the design of the Cour Carrée under Louis XIII and Louis XIV reigns, effectively quadrupling the size of the old courtyard.[13] Progress on the building halted after Louis XIV chose Versailles as his residence. The Louvre remained unchanged until the 18th century, when it began its transformation into a museum under Louis XV. However, the transformation did not accelerate until the French Revolution.[8][10] Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard The Tuileries Palace stood in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine until 1871, when it was destroyed. ... Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard The Tuileries Palace stood in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine until 1871, when it was destroyed. ... Louis Le Vau (1612 – 1670) was a French architect who worked for Louis XIV of France. ... Jacques Lemercier (c. ... Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 - May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... Louis XIV King of France and Navarre By Hyacinthe Rigaud (1701) Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638–September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), called the Well-Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 to 1774. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on...



== Headline text ==


French Revolution

The Richelieu Wing of the Louvre at night
The Richelieu Wing of the Louvre at night

The Louvre as a showplace for works of art dates from the time of François I. However it was not until the French Revolution that the royal Louvre collection became the "Muséum central des Arts" and opened to the public.[8] The public display of art in France began in Paris at the Luxembourg Palace. This museum was inaugurated in October 1750 after publication of an article by La Font de Saint-Yvenne, who called for a public gallery, arguing that the national art treasures were being overlooked. He wanted the work to be displayed in the Louvre structure, but the Luxembourg Palace was chosen instead.[14] This gallery contained about 99 works placed in two wings. The collection, open to all social classes, was an enormous success with French and foreign visitors alike. Despite this, Saint-Yvenne again criticized what he called the neglect of much of France's artistic treasures, and requests to make the Louvre a museum intensified. In 1780, the comte de Provence, the future Louis XVIII, began moving works from the Luxembourg Palace to the Palais de Louvre in response to these requests and to insinuations that the royal collection was not as grand as collections belonging to other members of the nobility.[8][14] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x3072, 3545 KB) Summary Aile Richelieu du Louvre 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Louvre Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x3072, 3545 KB) Summary Aile Richelieu du Louvre 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Louvre Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Luxembourg Palace The Luxembourg Palace in the VIe arrondissement of Paris, north of the Luxembourg Garden, is where the French Senate meets. ... The now-extinct title of Count of Provence belonged to local families of Frankish origin, to the House of Barcelona, to the House of Anjou and to a cadet branch of the House of Valois. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824. ...


On 10 August 1792, the Bourbon monarchy collapsed and Louis XVI was imprisoned. As part of the revolution, all art in the royal collection was declared to be national property (biens nationaux), and the National Assembly decided to turn the palace into a museum. The legislature declared that the collection was in disrepair from being "dispersed" and that the matter was "urgent".[14] The royal collection was combined with Church property, which had been appropriated by the State in 1789.[15] Further, the marquis de Marigny and his successor, the comte d'Angiviller began developing the Louvre's permanent collection, which was legally authorised on 6 May 1791.[14] is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Louis XVI Louis XVI (August 23, 1754 - January 21, 1793), was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... Abel-François Poisson de Vandières, marquis de Marigny and marquis de Menars, often referred to simply as the Marquis de Marigny (1727, Paris - May 1781, Paris) was a French nobleman who served as the director general of the Kings Buildings. ... Portrait by Jean-Baptiste Greuze, ca. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Opening to the public

The museum officially opened to the public on 10 August 1793, with much fanfare, because the display of the nation's artistic treasures was seen to be based on the ideals of the revolution. The notion that the works which had once been reserved for the ancien régime were now viewable by the public was important to the nascent republic as a "benefit of Liberty".[14] The name of the institution changed many times, from Muséum de la République, to Muséum Français, Muséum Central des Arts, and finally the Louvre.[5] Particularly significant additions to the young collection were masterpieces from Italy (including the Laocoon and his sons and the Apollo Belvedere, both from the papal collection), which arrived in Paris in July 1798 with much pomp and ceremony. A Sèvres vase was commissioned for the occasion.[8][14][15] Initially, the museum's opening was hectic as artists still lived in residence and works were placed randomly throughout the old palace. However, the republic dedicated a considerable sum, 100,000 livres per year, to help the institution expand its collection with works from abroad.[5] From 1794 onwards, France's victorious revolutionary armies brought back increasing numbers of artworks from across Europe, aiming to establish the Louvre as a major European museum and a symbol of revolutionary progress.[14] is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ancien Régime, a French term meaning Former Regime, but rendered in English as Old Rule, Old Order, or simply Old Regime, refers primarily to the aristocratic social and political system established in France under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties. ... Statue of Laocoön and his Sons, Vatican Museum, Rome The statue of Laocoön and his Sons, also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental marble sculpture, now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. ... The Apollo Belvedere, also called the Pythian Apollo, is a celebrated marble sculpture from Classical Antiquity. ... A stone grinder for turning quartz, feldspar, kaolin and other stones into fine powder for making ceramic paste Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Manufacture nationale de Sèvres The Manufacture nationale de Sèvres is a porcelain factory located in Sèvres, France. ... The livre tournois (or Tournoise pound) was a currency used in France, named after the town of Tours, in which it was minted. ...


Napoleon

Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss was commissioned in 1787, and the first version was donated to the Louvre after the reign of Napoleon I in 1824.
Antonio Canova's Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss was commissioned in 1787, and the first version was donated to the Louvre after the reign of Napoleon I in 1824.[16]

During Napoleon's conquests throughout Europe, the museum continued augmenting its collection. The building was redecorated and inaugurated in 1800. It was given its first director, Dominique Vivant, baron de Denon, by Napoléon after the Egyptian campaign of 1798–1801, and renamed the "Musée Napoléon" in 1803. Many works were added to its collection from countries such as Spain, Austria, Holland, and Italy. These were often met by gleeful Parisians, who escorted the works along the quais of the Seine to the museum.[5] Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ... Antonio Canovas statue Psyche Revived by Cupids Kiss, first commissioned in 1787, exemplifies the Neoclassical obsession with love and emotion. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Dominique Vivant, Baron de Denon (4 January 1747 - 27 April 1825) was a French artist and archaeologist. ... This article is about a region in the Netherlands. ... This article is about the river in France. ...


After the French defeat at Waterloo, the former owners of many acquisitions sought their return. The administrators of the Louvre were loathe to comply, and hid some of the works within their private collections. Many foreign states sent emissaries to London to seek help in requiring the French to comply. Eventually, many of the pieces were returned, and the diminished Louvre began adding articles from other Paris institutions such as the Luxembourg Palace, from which the Rubens' collection, the Life of St. Bruno, and works by Vernet were acquired.[5] Many things bear the name Waterloo. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Luxembourg Palace The Luxembourg Palace in the VIe arrondissement of Paris, north of the Luxembourg Garden, is where the French Senate meets. ...


19th century after Napoleon

The Venus de Milo was added to the Louvre's collection during the reign of Louis XVIII.
The Venus de Milo was added to the Louvre's collection during the reign of Louis XVIII.

After the fall of Napoleon, during the Restoration (1814-1830), the monarchies of Louis XVIII and Charles X together added 135 pieces at a cost of 720,000 francs. This was considerably less than the amount given for rehabilitation of Versailles and as a result the Louvre suffered relative to the rest of Paris. However, during the reign of Louis XVIII the Venus de Milo and Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss by Antonio Canova were added.[5] After the creation of the French Second Republic in 1848, the new government allocated two million francs for repair work neglected by the monarchy and ordered the completion of the Galerie d'Apollon, the Salon Carré, and the Grande Galerie, large additions facing the Seine river. During this period the museum's works, lacking order, were arranged chronologically.[5] Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824. ... The name Charles X is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles X of France Charles X of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This article is about the city of Versailles. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... Antonio Canovas statue Psyche Revived by Cupids Kiss, first commissioned in 1787, exemplifies the Neoclassical obsession with love and emotion. ... Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... This article is about the river in France. ...


On 2 December 1851, Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, who had been elected President of the Republic, staged a coup d'état by dissolving the National Assembly and ushering in what became the Second French Empire. Between 1852 and 1870, the French economy generally grew, and the museum added about 20,000 new pieces to its collections. Additionally, the link between the Tuileries and the museum was completed via the Pavillon de Flore.[15][5] is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Louis Bonaparte Louis Napoleon Bonaparte (September 2, 1779 - July 25, 1844) one of three younger brothers of the Emperor Napoleon I of France, who made him king of Holland in 1806. ... The Coup dÉtat of 2 December 1851 was the coup détat staged by Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, President of the French Republic, who was successful by this means in dissolving the French National Assembly without having the constitutional right to do so. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The National Assembly is either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... Map of the French Second Empire Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1852-1870 Napoleon III Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif History  - French coup of 1851 December 2 1851  - Established 1852  - Disestablished September 4, 1870 Currency French Franc The Second French Empire or... Up to 1871 the Tuileries Palace was a palace in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine. ...


Several thousand artworks, including 200 paintings and many bronzes and sculptures arrived after the acquisition of the Campana museum. These additions included the Sarcophagus of a Married Couple, jewellery, and various maiolicas.[15] Further purchases or gifts of 133 more works and 256 pieces given to the institution were styled the Collection Lacaze. These included works by Rembrandt such as Bathsheba at Her Bath.[15] This period of rapid growth continued into the early 20th century, when it became evident that the structure was too small for the amount of work displayed.[5] Majolica is earthenware with a white tin glaze, decorated by applying colorants on the raw glazed surface. ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ...


Third Republic to present

The Winged Victory of Samothrace arrived at the Louvre from an archaeological excavation in the Aegean Sea in 1863.
The Winged Victory of Samothrace arrived at the Louvre from an archaeological excavation in the Aegean Sea in 1863.

Following the demise of the Second Empire after the Franco Prussian War of 1870, the French Third Republic began. During this period, the Louvre acquired new pieces via donations. The institution received large gifts from Baron Devaillier and Madame Boucicaut, and the Société des Amis du Louvre donated the Pieta of Villeneuve lès Avignon. In 1863, the sculpture Winged Victory of Samothrace was uncovered in an archaeological expedition in the Aegean Sea. This particular piece, despite being heavily damaged, is considered one of the Louvre's most valuable pieces and has been on prominent display since 1884.[15][5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Winged Victory of Samothrace The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with south German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III Otto Von Bismarck, Helmuth von Moltke the Elder Strength 400,000 at the beginning of the war 1,200,000 Casualties 150,000 dead or wounded 284,000 captured 350,000 civilian... Motto Liberté, égalité, fraternité (Liberty, equality, brotherhood) Anthem La Marseillaise The French Third Republic, pre-World War I Capital Paris Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism, protestantism and judaism official religions (until 1905), None (from 1905 until 1940) (Law on the separation of Church and State of 1905) Government Republic... The Winged Victory of Samothrace The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


This period of rapid growth for the museum was disrupted by the First and Second World Wars. During both, many of the structure's most valuable pieces were hidden. As the Nazis advanced on Paris during the Second World War, the Venus de Milo, Mona Lisa, and other works were moved to safety. After the wars, the museum was unable to acquire many significant works, with exceptions of Georges de la Tour's Saint Thomas and the collection of prints and drawings given via the donation of Baron Edmond de Rothschild's (1845–1934) collection in 1935. This donation contained more than 40,000 engravings, nearly 3,000 drawings and 500 illustrated books.[15] Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... St Joseph, 1642, Louvre Georges de La Tour (March 13, 1593–1652) was a painter from the Duchy of Lorraine, now in France. ... Baron Edmond James de Rothschild (born August 19, 1845 - died November 2, 1934) was a philanthropist and activist for Jewish affairs and a member of the prominent Rothschild family. ...


Modern architectural developments

Axe historique

The Louvre is not aligned upon the axe historique.
The Louvre is not aligned upon the axe historique.
Main article: Axe historique

The destroyed Tuileries Palace, once connected to the Louvre, lay at the eastern end of the Axe historique (Historic Axis), an 8-kilometre (5 mi) long straightaway that begins at La Défense and includes the Champs Élysées and Arc de Triomphe. The axis was begun in 1572 when architect André Le Nôtre planted a line of trees from the Louvre courtyard to the Tuileries.[17] In 1871, when the Paris Commune burned the palace to the ground, it became possible to see that the Louvre was not aligned on the long axis. The museum had appeared to be along the same sight line as the Champs Élysées, but after destruction of the palace, it was clear that it was not.[18] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x763, 123 KB) A version of fr:Image:Plan louvre1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x763, 123 KB) A version of fr:Image:Plan louvre1. ... The Axe historique (historical axis) is a line of monuments, buildings and thoroughfares that extends from the centre of Paris, France, to the west. ... The Axe historique (historical axis) is a line of monuments, buildings and thoroughfares that extends from the centre of Paris, France, to the west. ... Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard The Tuileries Palace stood in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine until 1871, when it was destroyed. ... La Défense viewed across the Bois de Boulogne. ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  ) is the most prestigious and broadest avenue in Paris. ... This article is about the monument in Paris. ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of King Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of...


Pyramid

Main article: Louvre Pyramid

The central courtyard of the museum, slightly askew of the Champs-Élysées, is occupied by the Louvre Pyramid, which serves as the main entrance to the museum. The pyramid, made of glass, was commissioned by former French president François Mitterrand and designed by I. M. Pei, a Chinese-American architect. The construction work on the pyramid base and underground lobby was carried out by Dumez and inaugurated in 1989.[19] This was the most famous renovation of the Grand Louvre Project, part of Mitterand's Grands Projets to create monuments to the role of France in art, politics, and the world economy.[20] The Carre Gallery, where the Mona Lisa was exhibited, was also renovated. The pyramid covers the Louvre entresol and forms part of the new entrance to the museum.[21] The large glass pyramid of le musée du Louvre The Louvre Pyramid is a large metal and glass pyramid which serves as the main entrance to the Musée du Louvre and has become a landmark for the city of Paris. ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  ) is the most prestigious and broadest avenue in Paris. ... The large glass pyramid of le musée du Louvre The Louvre Pyramid is a large metal and glass pyramid which serves as the main entrance to the Musée du Louvre and has become a landmark for the city of Paris. ...   IPA: (October 26, 1916 – January 8, 1996) served as President of France from 1981 to 1995, elected as representative of the Socialist Party (PS). ... Ieoh Ming Pei (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; b. ... Vinci (Euronext: DG) is a French construction company, formerly called Société Générale dEnterprises. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... Renovation is the process of restoring or improving a structure. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... View of the ground floor of the Glaspaleis from the mezzanine View of the mezzanine in the lobby of the former Capitol Cinema, Ottawa, Canada In architecture, a mezzanine or entresol is an intermediate floor between main floors of a building, and therefore typically not counted among the overall floors...

Courtyard of Museum of Louvre, at night, with the Pyramid prominently displayed at centre
Courtyard of Museum of Louvre, at night, with the Pyramid prominently displayed at centre

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 317 pixelsFull resolution (3048 × 1209 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 317 pixelsFull resolution (3048 × 1209 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Lens

Main article: Louvre-Lens
View of the outside from inside the Louvre Pyramid
View of the outside from inside the Louvre Pyramid

To relieve the crowded Paris Louvre, increase total museum visits, and improve the economy of the industrial north, French officials decided in 2004 to build a satellite museum on the site of an abandoned coal pit in the former mining town of Lens.[22] Six cities were considered for the project: Amiens, Arras, Boulogne-sur-Mer, Calais, Lens, and Valenciennes. In 2004, French Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin chose Lens, Pas-de-Calais, to be the site of the new building, to be called Le Louvre-Lens. Museum officials predicted that the new building, capable of receiving about 600 works of art, would attract as many as 500,000 visitors a year when it opened in 2009.[22] The architectural joint-venture team of Sanaa of Tokyo and the New York-based Imrey Culbert LP were awarded the project in 2005 after an international competition for the work.[23] The Louvre-Lens is a new museum which will open in 2010 in the industrial French city of Lens, Pas-de-Calais. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,204 × 2,136 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,204 × 2,136 pixels, file size: 3. ... Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... Arras (Dutch: ) is a town and commune in northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Lens is commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département. ... Valenciennes (Dutch: Valencijn, Latin: Valentianae) is a town and commune in northern France in the Nord département on the Escaut river. ... Jean-Pierre Raffarin Jean-Pierre Raffarin   listen? (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ... Lens is commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département. ...


Louvre Abu Dhabi

Main article: Louvre Abu Dhabi

In March 2007, the Louvre announced that a Louvre museum would be completed by 2012 in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. A 30-year agreement, signed by French Culture Minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres and Sheik Sultan bin Tahnoon Al Nahyan, will establish a Louvre museum in downtown Abu Dhabi in exchange for €832,000 (US$1.3 billion). The Louvre Abu Dhabi, designed by the French architect Jean Nouvel and engineers Buro Happold, will occupy 24,000 square metres (260,000 sq ft) covered by a roof in the shape of a flying saucer. France has agreed to rotate between 200 and 300 artworks through the Louvre Abu Dhabi during a 10-year period, to provide management expertise, and to provide four temporary exhibitions a year for 15 years. The art will come from multiple French museums, including the Louvre, the Georges Pompidou Centre, the Musée d'Orsay, Versailles, the Musée Guimet, the Musée Rodin, and the Musée du Quai Branly.[24] Model of the future Louvre Abu Dhabi In March 2007, the Louvre announced that a Louvre museum would be completed by 2012 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The thirty-year agreement, signed by French Culture Minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres and Sheik Sultan bin Tahnoon Al Nahyan, will prompt the construction... Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres is Frances Minister of Culture since 2003. ... Jean Nouvel (born August 12, 1945) is a French architect. ... // View of the Great Court Buro Happold is a professional services firm providing engineering consultancy, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of buildings, infrastructure and the environment. ... Centre Georges Pompidou (constructed 1971–1977 and known as the Pompidou Centre in English) is a complex in the Beaubourg area of the IVe arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles and the Marais. ... , The Musée dOrsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine, housed in the former railway station, the Gare dOrsay. ... The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ... Guimet in his museum. ... The Musée Rodin in Paris, France, is a museum that was opened in 1919 in the Hôtel Biron and surrounding grounds. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Departments

The Musée du Louvre's collection contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art drawn from eight curatorial departments. More than 60,600 square metres (652,000 sq ft) of exhibition space is dedicated to the permanent collection.[25] According to the 2005 annual report, the collection includes 11,900 paintings, the second largest holding of western pictorial art in the world after the State Hermitage in Russia. Six thousand paintings are on permanent display, and 5,900 are in storage. Besides paintings, the Louvre exhibits include sculptures, objets d'art, and archaeological finds.[5][15] The State Hermitage Museum (Russian: ) in Saint Petersburg, Russia is one of the largest museums in the world, with 3 million works of art (not all on display at once), [1] and one of the oldest art galleries and museums of human history and culture in the world. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... In the English language the term Art object may also be encountered in its French form Objet DArt. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ...


Decorative arts

The decorative arts department contains jewelry, ceramics, furniture, and tapestries. The collection began through appropriation of royal property during the 18th century after the fall of the Ancien regime. Acquisitions continued through the 19th century as pieces were moved from Sainte-Chapelle and Saint-Denis. In modern times, the apartments of Napoléon were added to the collection. The department formerly included the Bureau du Roi, completed by Jean Henri Riesener in the 18th century, but it was later returned to the Palace of Versailles.[26] Jewelry (the American spelling; spelled jewellery in Commonwealth English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ... This article is about artwork made out of clay. ... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... There is an album by Carol King called Tapestry A tapestry cushion, depicting pansies Tapestry is a form of textile art. ... Ancien R gime means Old Regime or Old Order in French; in English, the term refers primarily to the social and political system established in France under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties, and secondarily to any regime which shares the formers defining features: a feudal system under the control... La Sainte-Chapelle (French for The Holy Chapel) is a Gothic chapel on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of Paris, France. ... Saint Denis can refer to: a Christian saint: see Denis Seine-Saint-Denis a département of France Several communes in France: Saint-Denis,in the Aude département Saint-Denis, in the Gard département Saint-Denis, in the Seine-Saint-Denis département, home of Saint Denis Basilica Saint-Denis, in the... Bonaparte as general, by Antoine-Jean Gros. ... The Bureau du Roi (Kings desk), known in France as the Secrétaire à cylindre de Louis XV (Louis XV roll-top secretary), is the name given to the richly ornamented royal Cylinder desk whose construction was started under Louis XV and finished under France. ... Jean-Henri Riesener (1734 - 1806) was born in Gladbeck in Germany and became a master cabinet maker at the court of France. ... The Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ...


Egyptian antiquities

The Seated Scribe, a piece added to the Louvre's collection from the findings of Auguste Mariette
The Seated Scribe, a piece added to the Louvre's collection from the findings of Auguste Mariette

The Louvre contains a large collection of art from the Nile civilizations, dating from around 4000 BCE to the 4th century CE. The collection is not rooted directly in Napoléon's expeditionary trip to Egypt, which occurred between 1798 and 1801. Egyptian artifacts taken from the royal collections were displayed before the department existed. The department opened in 1826 following a decree by King Charles X, impressed by the collection of Jean-François Champollion, who was appointed director. The department grew with acquisitions by Auguste Mariette, founder of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Mariette, after being dispatched to Egypt, sent back crates of archaeological finds, including the Seated Scribe.[27] A statue of Auguste Mariette in his home city of Boulogne-sur-Mer. ... For other uses, see Nile (disambiguation). ... The name Charles X is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles X of France Charles X of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For the Champollion comet rendezvous spacecraft, see Champollion (spacecraft). ... A statue of Auguste Mariette in his home city of Boulogne-sur-Mer. ... Main entrance of the Egyptian Museum The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to the most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities in the world. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ...


The collection includes art, papyrus scrolls, mummies, and artifacts. During the Grand Louvre renovation project, the collection was reorganized and split between two floors. The ground floor consists of 20 rooms dedicated to the time period and arranged chronologically. The Denon Wing houses a funerary display, including mummies.[27] For other uses, see Papyrus (disambiguation). ...


Greek, Etruscan, and Roman

This department displays pieces coming from throughout the Mediterranean Basin and dating from the Neolithic to the 6th century. As with the Egyptian collection, the Greek, Etruscan, and Roman collections began with appropriated royal art. Initially, the collection focused on marble sculptures, such as the Venus de Milo. However, in the 19th century the Louvre acquired vases from the Durand collection, bronzes such as the Borghese Vase from the Bibliothèque nationale, and work from other mediums. The Mediterranean Basin refers to the lands around and surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... Chinese vase A vase with a sunflower pattern A modern designed vase The vase is an open container, often used to hold cut flowers. ... Bronze figurine, found at Öland Bronze is the traditional name for a broad range of alloys of copper. ... The Borghese Vase is a monumental krater sculpted in Athens from Pentelic marble in the second half of the 1st century AD as a garden ornament for the Roman market. ... The new buildings of the library. ...


From 1975 the department underwent a reorganization during which much of the Roman sculpture was placed in the Salle d'Auguste and the Petite Galerie. Roman copies were ordered into galleries paralleling the Seine . Notable pieces in the department include the Winged Victory of Samothrace, the Kore of Samos, the Lady of Auxerre, and the Venus de Milo.[28] This article is about the river in France. ... The Winged Victory of Samothrace The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ...


Islamic art

The Islamic art collection, the youngest department in the museum, contains works spanning "thirteen centuries and three continents".[29] The collection was originally part of the decorative arts department but became a separate department in 2003. The holdings include the Pyxide d'al-Mughira, an ivory box dating from 968 CE from Andalusia, and a basin named the Baptistry of Saint-Louis that was transferred to the museum from the royal collection in 1793.[29] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Andalusia (disambiguation). ...

Khorsabad (Khursabad), village in Iraq, 15 km northeast of Mosul, with well-preserved ruins of the large, rectangular Dur-Sharrukin. ... For the town in Pakistan, see Shedu (town). ...

Paintings

The paintings department currently comprises more than 6,000 works from 13th century through 1848. The 12 curators of the paintings department oversee the arrangement and display of the collection, which predates the Louvre as a museum. The use of the museum structure as a depository for painted works began with François I, who envisioned a collection that would rival those in Italy. To achieve this, the king acquired works from Italian masters such as Raphael and Michelangelo. Additionally, others such as Leonardo Da Vinci were asked to attend to his court.[30] Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ...


After the French Revolution, these works formed the nucleus of the nascent Louvre. The collection continued to grow throughout the years of the First French Empire during Napoleon's European Wars. When the d'Orsay train station was converted into the Musée d'Orsay in 1986, the painting collection was split, and the pieces completed after the 1848 Revolution were moved to the newly formed museum. French works and art from Northern Europe are in the Richelieu wing and Cour Carrée, while Spanish and Italian paintings are on the first floor of the Denon wing.[30] The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Constitutional Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... , The Musée dOrsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine, housed in the former railway station, the Gare dOrsay. ... (Redirected from 1848 Revolution) —Alexis de Tocqueville, Recollections The European Revolutions of 1848, in some countries known as the Spring of Nations, were the bloody consequences of a variety of changes that had been taking place in Europe in the first half of the 19th century. ...


Prints and drawings

This collection is dedicated to the museum's compilation of works upon a paper medium. The first showing of the young collection occurred on 5 August 1797, when the department was opened for public viewing. Originally, the majority of pieces came from the Cabinet du Roi. As with the paintings department, the collection grew from military campaigns during Napoleon's reign. In 1806, the department was enriched with the addition of 1,200 new works from Fillipo Baldinucci's collection. The drawings have been subject to frequent moves throughout their history and reside in the Pavillon de Flore. Although the collection was initially a department in its own right, it was merged with the paintings department for a time. However, prints and drawings are once again autonomous and compromise the seventh department of the Louvre.[31] For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


Sculptures

The sculpture curatorial department contains "modern" sculpture.[32] The Louvre has been a repository of sculpted material since its time as a palace; however, the first display of medieval, Renaissance, and modern works did not occur until 1824. Initially, the collection was relatively small, with about 100 works and, because of government focus on Versaille, it remained so until 1847 when Léon Laborde was given control of the department. By 1855 there were 388 pieces on display. Initially, the collection was organized under the department of antiquities but was given autonomy in 1871, and in 1986 all works from after 1850 were relocated to the new Musée d'Orsay. As part of the Grand Louvre project, the sculpture department was separated into two exhibition spaces. The French collection is on display in the Richelieu wing, while foreign works are located throughout the Denon wing.[32] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Versailles in 1789. ... , The Musée dOrsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine, housed in the former railway station, the Gare dOrsay. ...


Location and access

A map of the Louvre in the Ier arrondissement or Paris. Metro Lines serving the area are shown, with stations colored red. Note that the RER is not shown. Landmarks are in black.
A map of the Louvre in the Ier arrondissement or Paris. Metro Lines serving the area are shown, with stations colored red. Note that the RER is not shown. Landmarks are in black.

The museum lies in the heavily-visited centre of Paris on the Right Bank. The neighborhood, known as the Ier arrondissement, is home to the destroyed Palais des Tuileries and the Tuileries Gardens. These gardens, created in 1564 by Catherine de Medici and reorganized in 1664 by André Le Nôtre, house the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, a contemporary art museum that was used to store Jewish cultural property from 1940 to 1944.[33] The 1er arrondissement is the least populated of the 20 arrondissements of Paris, France, though it is also one of the smallest by land area. ... The RER (Réseau Express Régional, IPA , Regional Express Network) is an urban rail network in the ÃŽle-de-France région, notably Paris and its agglomeration. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1er arrondissement is the least populated of the 20 arrondissements of Paris, France, though it is also one of the smallest by land area. ... Up to 1871 the Tuileries Palace was a palace in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519–January 5, 1589), born in Italy as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici, and later queen of France under the French name Catherine de M dicis, was the wife of King Henry II of France, of the Valois branch of the kings of... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of King Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... The Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume is a museum of contemporary art in the north-west corner of the Tuileries Gardens in Paris. ... Contemporary art can be defined variously as art produced at this present point in time or art produced since World War II. The definition of the word contemporary would support the first view, but museums of contemporary art commonly define their collections as consisting of art produced since World War... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


The Pavillon de Flore and Denon Wing, parallel to the Seine River, are at 36 Quai du Louvre. From the Left Bank the museum is across the Pont du Carrousel or the Pont des Arts. The museum is bounded on the north by Napoleon's Rue de Rivoli and Cardinal Richelieu's former residence, the Palais Royal. To the east is the Place du Louvre.[33] This article is about the river in France. ... The Quai du Louvre is by the River Seine where the Louvre is located in Paris, France. ... The left bank of a river is the bank on the left when looking in the direction of flow towards the sea. ... The Pont des Arts (Bridge of the Arts) is a pedestrian bridge in Paris, France, crossing the Seine. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Nighttime view of Rue de Rivoli, Paris, France Rue de Rivoli as it runs along the north wing of the Musée du Louvre, Paris, France Rue de Rivoli as it runs through Le Marais, in Pariss 4th arrondissement Rue de Rivoli is one of the most famous streets... Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. ... Gardens of the Palais-Royal: The illustration, from an 1863 guide to Paris, enlarges the apparent scale. ... The Place du Louvre is immediately to the east of the Louvre in Paris, France. ...


The Louvre can be reached by the Palais Royal – Musée du Louvre Métro or the Louvre-Rivoli station. The stations are named after the nearby Palais Royal, the Louvre, and the Rue de Rivoli. List of stations of the Paris Métro Palais Royal - Musée du Louvre is a station of the Paris Métro. ... Paris Art Nouveau Metro sign The Paris Métro is the metro (underground) system in Paris, France. ... List of stations of the Paris Métro Louvre Rivoli is a station of the Paris Métro. ... Gardens of the Palais-Royal: The illustration, from an 1863 guide to Paris, enlarges the apparent scale. ...


Notable works

Sculpture
Egyptian sculpture
The Seated Scribe
Greek sculpture
Venus de Milo, Winged Victory of Samothrace, Apollo of Piombino, Diana of Versailles
Ivory sculpture
Virgin and Child from the Sainte-Chapelle
Roman sculpture
Apollo Sauroctonos (Apollo Lizard-killer), Marcellus as Hermes Logios
Painting
Hieronymus Bosch
Ship of Fools
Antonio Canova
Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio
Death of the Virgin, Portrait of Alof de Wignacourt and his Page, The Fortune Teller
Antonio Allegri da Correggio
Venus and Cupid with a Satyr
Jacques-Louis David
Oath of the Horatii
Leonardo Da Vinci
Bacchus, Mona Lisa, St. John the Baptist, Virgin of the Rocks, The Virgin and Child with St. Anne
Eugène Delacroix
Liberty Leading the People, The Women of Algiers, Death of Sardanapalus
Antoine-Jean Gros
Bonaparte Visiting the Plague-Victims of Jaffa
Théodore Géricault
The Charging Chasseur, Raft of the Medusa
Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres
Grande Odalisque
Antonello da Messina 
Christ at the Column
Andrea Mantegna
Triumph of the Virtues, St. Sebastian
Michelangelo
Dying Slave
Raphael
La belle jardinière, Self-portrait with a friend, St. George, St. Michael, St. Michael Vanquishing Satan, Portrait of Balthasar Castiglione
Johannes Vermeer
The Astronomer
Paolo Veronese
The Wedding at Cana
Other
Babylon bas relief law code
The Code of Hammurabi
Basalt inscription
Mesha Stele
Byzantine diptych
Barberini ivory
Egyptian bas relief
Dendera zodiac
Byzantine ivory triptych
Harbaville Triptych
Greek krater
Borghese Vase

See also


The sculpture of the Seated Scribe is one of most important examples of ancient Egyptian art. ... Not to be confused with the group of prehistoric statuettes known as Venus figurines. ... The Winged Victory of Samothrace The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called Nike of Samothrace, is a marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory), discovered in 1863 on the island of Samothrace (Greek: Σαμοθρακη, Samothraki) by the French consul and amateur archaeologist Charles Champoiseau. ... The Diana of Versailles in the Louvre Galerie des Caryatides that was designed for it The Diana of Versailles is a slightly over lifesize[1] marble statue of the Greek goddess Artemis (latin: Diana), with a deer, located in the Musée du Louvre, Paris. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Marcellus as Hermes Logios in the Louvre, Paris Marcellus as Hermes Logios, sculpture of Marcellus the Younger as Hermes Logios, the god of eloquence. ... Hieronymus Bosch, (latinized, actually Jheronimus Bosch; his real name Jeroen van Aken) (c. ... Ship of Fools (painted c. ... Self-portrait by Canova, 1792. ... Antonio Canovas statue Psyche Revived by Cupids Kiss, first commissioned in 1787, exemplifies the Neoclassical obsession with love and emotion. ... Caravaggio re-directs here; for alternate uses see Caravaggio (disambiguation) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610), often short Caravaggio after his hometown, was an Italian Baroque painter, whose large religious works portrayed saints and other biblical figures as ordinary people. ... The Death of the Virgin (1606) is a masterwork completed by Caravaggio. ... Portrait of Alof de Wignacourt with his Page (c. ... The Fortune Teller is a painting by Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. ... Venus and Cupid with a Satyr (c. ... Jacques-Louis David (August 30, 1748 – December 29, 1825) was a highly influential French painter in the Neoclassical style, considered to be the prominent painter of the era. ... Oath of the Horatii (1784) is a painting by Jacques-Louis David, painted before the French Revolution, depicting the Roman salute. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... Bacchus is a painting often said to be by Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... The Virgin of the Rocks and Madonna of the Rocks are terms used to describe two different paintings with almost identical compositions. ... The Virgin and Child with St Anne is an oil painting by Leonardo da Vinci depicting St Anne, her daughter the Virgin Mary and the infant Jesus. ... Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (April 26, 1798 – August 13, 1863) was one of the most important of the French Romantic painters. ... Liberty Leading the People (French: ) is a painting by Eugène Delacroix commemorating the July Revolution of 1830, which toppled Charles X. A woman personifying Liberty leads the people forward over the bodies of the fallen, holding the tricolore flag of the French Revolution in one hand and brandishing a... Eugène Delacroix. ... Napoleon on the battlefield of Preussisch-Eylau (detail), 1808. ... Monument at Gericaults tomb. ... The Charging Chasseur is an oil painting on canvas by the French painter, Théodore Géricault, and portrays Napoleons cavalry officer on a horse, ready to attack. ... The Raft of the Medusa is the name applied to an infamous catastrophic shipwreck of the French ship Medusa in 1816 in the Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa. ... Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (pronounced (Ang, rhymes with bang, with a hint of the r, but the final es is not pronounced) (August 29, 1780 - January 14, 1867) was a French Neoclassical painter. ... Portrait, called the Condottiero, dated 1475 (Louvre). ... Christ at the Column is a small painting by the Italian Renaissance artist Antonello da Messina, finished around 1475. ... The Agony in the Garden (1455) is the pinnacle of Mantegnas early style. ... St. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Dying Slave The Dying Slave is a famous sculpture by the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... La belle jardinière is a painting by the Italian High Renaissance artist Raphael. ... The Self-Portrait with a friend (also known as Double Portrait) is a painting by the Italian High Renaissance painter Raphael. ... St. ... Michael Raphael is a painting by the Italian High Renaissance painter Raphael (c. ... St. ... Portrait of Balthasar Castiglione is an oil painting attributed to the Italian High Renaissance painter Raphael, circa 1514-1515. ... Vermeer redirects here. ... The Astronomer is a painting finished about 1668 by the Dutch painter Jan Vermeer. ... The Feast in the House of Levi (1573), one of the largest canvases of the 16th century. ... The Wedding at Cana (or The Wedding Feast at Cana) is a massive painting by the Italian painter, Paolo Veronese. ... For other uses, see Babylon (disambiguation). ... Bas-relief (pronounced bah-relief, French for low relief) is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal creating a sculpture portrayed as a picture. ... An inscription of the Code of Hammurabi. ... For the cities, see Basalt, Colorado and Basalt, Idaho. ... The stele as photographed circa 1891 The Mesha Stele (popularized in the 19th century as the Moabite Stone) is a black basalt stone, bearing an inscription by the 9th century BC Moabite King Mesha, discovered in 1868. ... The most famous of the surviving Byzantine mosaics of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople - the image of Christ Pantocrator on the walls of the upper southern gallery. ... Ivory consular diptych of Areobindus, Byzantium, 506 AD, Louvre museum A diptych is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. ... Barberini Ivory on display at the Louvre. ... Bas-relief (pronounced bah-relief, French for low relief) is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal creating a sculpture portrayed as a picture. ... Entrance to the Dendera Temple Complex Dendera Temple complex, (Ancient Egyptian: Iunet or Tantere). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychē fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... Middle leaf, top panel: Deesis, Christ, Mary and John the Baptist Recto, full view. ... A krater (Greek κρατηρ, from the Greek verb κεραννυμι, to mix. ... The Borghese Vase is a monumental krater sculpted in Athens from Pentelic marble in the second half of the 1st century AD as a garden ornament for the Roman market. ... The museums of Paris can be sorted into 3 categories: National museums - (N) Museums of the City of Paris - (VP) The private museums - (P) Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V... The American Friends of the Louvre (AFL) is an organisation which seeks to raise awareness of the Louvre’s collections and museum expertise and helps to make the Louvre’s exhibitions and permanent collection more accessible to all English-speaking visitors. ...

References

  1. ^ Sandler, Linda (February 25, 2008). Louvre's 8.3 Million Visitors Make It No. 1 Museum Worldwide. Retrieved on 2008-04-17.
  2. ^ Top 5 Most Visited Museums. Time magazine for kids (October 1, 2004). Retrieved on 2008-01-10.
  3. ^ Exhibition attendance figures 2007 (pdf). The Art Newspaper (March 2008). Retrieved on 2008-04-17.
  4. ^ Thirty-Five Thousand Works of Art. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Potter, Mary Knight (1904). The Art of the Louvre. Boston: L.C. Page and Company, 1–30, Chapter 1. 
  6. ^ a b c Francis Miltoun (1910). Royal Palaces and Parks of France. L.C. Page & Co, pp. 114,  115, 76. 
  7. ^ Delia Gray-Durant (2004). Art/Shop/Eat Paris. London: A&C Black, pp.p. 7. ISBN 0-393-32595-4. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Edwards, Henry Sutherland (1893). Old and New Paris: Its History, Its People, and Its Places. Paris: Cassell and Co., 194. Retrieved on 2008-04-30. 
  9. ^ a b Alexandre Gady; Pitt, Leonard (2006). Walks Through Lost Paris: A Journey Into the Heart of Historic Paris. Shoemaker & Hoard, pp. 112, 113. ISBN 1-59376-103-1. 
  10. ^ a b c Structurae [fr: Palais du Louvre (1993)]. Structurae Database. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  11. ^ The project is analyzed in the context of Parisian urbanism. Thomson, David (1984). Renaissance Paris: Architecture and Growth, 1475-1600. Berkeley: University of California, 60–70.. 
  12. ^ Sutcliffe, Anthony (1993). Paris: An Architectural History. Yale University Press, p. 31. ISBN 0300068867. 
  13. ^ Baedeker, Karl (1891). Paris and Environs: With Routes from London to Paris; Handbook for Travellers. K. Baedeker, pp. 87–89. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g McClellan, Andrew (1999). Inventing the Louvre: Art, Politics, and the Origins of the Modern Museum.... Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 14–20, 95–110. ISBN 0520221761. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Nave, Alain (1998). Treasures of the Louvre. Barnes & Noble Publishing. ISBN 0760710678. 
  16. ^ Monaghan, Sean M.; Rodgers, Michael (2000). French Sculpture 1800-1825, Canova. 19th Century Paris Project. School of Art and Design, San Jose State University. Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  17. ^ Bowkett, Stephen; Porter, Tom (2004). Archispeak: an illustrated guide to architectural terms. London: Spon Press. ISBN 0-415-30011-8. 
  18. ^ Rogers, Elizabeth A. (2001). Landscape design: a cultural and architectural history. New York: Harry N. Abrams, p. 159. ISBN 0-8109-4253-4. 
  19. ^ The Grand Louvre Museum. Vinci. Retrieved on 2008-04-26.
  20. ^ Le Grand Louvre, Paris. Galinsky (1998–2006). Retrieved on 2008-04-26.
  21. ^ Williams, Nicola; Berry, Oliver. Lonely Planet France. Lonely Planet Publications, pp. 126–28. ISBN 1-74104-233-X. 
  22. ^ a b Gentleman, Amelia. "Lens puts new angle on the Louvre", Guardian, December 1, 2004. Retrieved on 2008-02-27. 
  23. ^ Imrey Culbert and Sanaa Win Louvre Lens Competition. Dexigner (September 30, 2005). Retrieved on 2008-04-27.
  24. ^ The Louvre’s Art: Priceless. The Louvre’s Name: Expensive.. The New York Times (March 6, 2007). Retrieved on 2008-04-24.
  25. ^ Œuvres. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-27.
  26. ^ Decorative Arts. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  27. ^ a b Egyptian Antiquities. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  28. ^ Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  29. ^ a b Islamic Art. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-30.
  30. ^ a b Paintings. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  31. ^ Prints and Drawings. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  32. ^ a b Sculptures. Musée du Louvre. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  33. ^ a b Mroue, Haas H.. Frommer's Paris from $90 a day. Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c 2004., p. 176. ISBN 0-7645-5806-4. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Adobe Flash - previously called Shockwave Flash and Macromedia Flash - is a set of multimedia technologies developed and distributed by Adobe Systems and earlier by Macromedia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Paris. ... This article is about the monument in Paris. ... The Sacré-CÅ“ur Basilica (French: Basilique du Sacré-CÅ“ur, Basilica of the Sacred Heart) is a Roman Catholic basilica and popular landmark in Paris, France, dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Notre Dame. ... Centre Georges Pompidou (constructed 1971–1977 and known as the Pompidou Centre in English) is a complex in the Beaubourg area of the IVe arrondissement of Paris, near Les Halles and the Marais. ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  ) is the most prestigious and broadest avenue in Paris. ... The Palais de Justice, the Conciergerie and the Tour de lHorloge, after 1858 - by Adrien Dauzats The Conciergerie (French: La Conciergerie) is a former prison in Paris, located on the west of the ÃŽle de la Cité, near the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. ... The Eiffel Tower (French: , ) is an iron tower built on the Champ de Mars beside the Seine River in Paris. ... Grand Palais in 2004 The Grand Palais (Grand Palace) is a large glass exhibition hall that was built for the Paris Exhibition of 1900. ... People relaxing in front of the Luxembourg Palace The Jardin du Luxembourg (familiar nickname Luco) is a 224,500 m² public park and the largest in the city located in the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France. ... , The church at the Invalides Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the buildings original purpose. ... , The Musée dOrsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine, housed in the former railway station, the Gare dOrsay. ... The Palais Garnier, Paris The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris or Opéra Garnier or Grand Opera House[1], but more commonly as the Paris Opéra, is a 2,200 seat opera house in Paris, France. ... Looking down the hill at Père-Lachaise. ... Image File history File links Paris-metropolitan-area-symbol. ... The State Hermitage Museum (Russian: ) in Saint Petersburg, Russia is one of the largest museums in the world, with 3 million works of art (not all on display at once), [1] and one of the oldest art galleries and museums of human history and culture in the world. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The gallery is located in a section of Buda Castle The museum displays the works of Hungarian artists and sculptors such as Béni Ferenczy The Hungarian National Gallery is the national art museum located in Buda Castle in Budapest, Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... The National Museum (Serbian: Народни музеј/Narodni Muzej) in Belgrade, Serbia was founded in 1844. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Anthem:  Serbia() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn 1 Albanian 2 Demonym Serbian Government Parliamentary Democracy  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica    -  First state 7th century   -  Serbian Kingdom3 1217   -  Serbian Empire 1345   -  Independence lost... The Rijksmuseum Rembrandt van Rijn: The Night Watch 1642 Johannes Vermeer: Milkmaid 1658-1660 Frans Hals: Portrait of a Young Couple The Rijksmuseum (IPA: ; Dutch for National Museum) is a national museum of the Netherlands, located in Amsterdam on the Museumplein. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... Musée dOrsay Exterior view in the afternoon Musée dOrsay Inside the main hall The Musée dOrsay is a museum in Paris, situated on the left bank of the River Seine. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Uffizi Gallery (Italian Galleria degli Uffizi) is a palace or palazzo in Florence, holding one of the most famous museums in the world. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... The logo of Tate, used in different colours for the 4 galleries. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The Neue Pinakothek (New Pinakothek) is an art museum in Munich, Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... The Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen (English: The Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp), founded in 1810, houses a collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings from the fourteenth to the twentieth centuries. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Bold text The Museo del Prado is a famous museum and art gallery located in Madrid; the capital of Spain. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The museums entrance The Museum of Fine Arts (Hungarian: Szépművészeti Múzeum) is a museum in Heroes Square, Budapest, Hungary, facing the Palace of Art. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... The Städel, officially the Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie, is an art museum in Frankfurt am Main with one of the most important collections in Germany. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... This article is about the state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The Yale Center for British Art is an art museum associated with Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut in the United States. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The front view of the Accademia Carrara The Accademia Carrara (pron. ... Small street (via della Noca) leading to città alta. ... Ashmolean Museum main entrance. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ... Boston redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... The Liechtenstein Museum is in Vienna, Austria, named after the House of Liechtenstein, one of Europes oldest noble families. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Madonna in Green by Raffaello Tower of Babel by Pieter Brueghel. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The main entrance to the Fitzwilliam Museum, facing Trumpington Sreet. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The Fogg Art Museum is the oldest of Harvard Universitys art museums. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Cleveland Museum of Art, South View from Wade Lagoon Located in the University Circle neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio, the Cleveland Museum of Art has a permanent collectionof more than 40,000 objects in 70 galleries. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... Self portrait, 1895 Edvard Munch (Løten, December 12, 1863 - Ekely (near Oslo), January 23, 1944) was a Norwegian Expressionist painter and printmaker. ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... The Wadsworth Atheneum is the oldest public art museum in the United States and largest in the state of Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Minneapolis Institute of Arts is an art museum located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The front entrance and courtyard at the Château de Chantilly The Château de Chantilly is a historic château located in the town of Chantilly, France. ... Chantilly is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. ... The Alte Pinakothek (Old Pinakothek) is an art museum situated in the Kunstareal in Munich, Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ... Mauritshuis The Mauritshuis is a museum in The Hague, the Netherlands. ... Hague redirects here. ... 1650 portrait of Pope Innocent X, a member of the Pamphilj family, whose portrait by Velázquez is in the Doria Pamphilj collection The Doria Pamphilj Gallery, in Rome is a large privately owned art collection housed in the Palazzo Doria Pamphilj. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Barnes Foundation is an educational art institution in Lower Merion Township, a suburb of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Aerial view of the the Museum at Zwinger Palace The Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister (Old Masters Picture Gallery) is an art gallery locate in the Zwinger Palace and Semper Building in Dresden, Germany. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... The Wallace Collection across Manchester Square gardens The Wallace Collection is a museum in London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Dulwich Picture Gallery is an art gallery in Dulwich, London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... Early, tinted 20th-century photograph of the Palazzo Pitti, then still known as La Residenza Reale following the residency of King Emmanuel II between 1865–71, when Florence was the capital of Italy. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Entrance to the museum Staircase of the Vatican Museum The Vatican Museums (Musei Vaticani) are the public art and sculpture museums in the Vatican City, which display works from the extensive collection of the Roman Catholic Church. ... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Hôtel Salé This article refers to the museum in Paris. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Van Gogh Museum is a museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, featuring the works of the Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh and his contemporaries. ... For other uses, see Amsterdam (disambiguation). ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Phillips Collection is an art museum located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. founded by Duncan Phillips in 1918 as the Phillips Memorial Gallery. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Art Institute of Chicago is a fine art museum located in Chicago, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Claude Monet: Nymphéas, 1920-26 The Musée de lOrangerie is an art gallery of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings located on the Place de la Concorde in Paris. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Musée Jacquemart-André is a privately owned house museum located at 158 Boulevard Haussmann in Paris. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Musée Marmottan-Monet is located at 2, rue Louis Boilly in the 16th arrondissement of Paris (phone: +33-1-44-96-50-33, fax: +33-1-40-50-65-84). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Schloss Wilhelmshöhe is a palace near Kassel. ... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ... The Villa Borghese Pinciana (begun 1605) houses the Galleria Borghese. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Bernardino Cardinal Spada (April 21, 1594 – November 10, 1661) was a Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church and a great patron of the arts, whose collection may be seen at Palazzo Spada, Rome. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... The Accademia di Belle Arti is Venice’s school of art and is uniformly known throughout Venice as the Accademia. ... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos David in the Tribuna that was built especially to house it The Accademia dell Arte del Disegno (Academy of Design) of Florence was the first academy of drawing in Europe. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... The Pinacoteca Brera (Brera Art Gallery) in Milan contains one of the foremost collections of Italian paintings, an outgrowth of the cultural program of the Accademia di Belli Arte (Academy of Fine Arts or Accademia Brera), which shares the site in the Palazzo Brera. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Entrance to the Ambrosian Library. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Lamentation over the Dead Christ, by Sandro Botticelli. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... Palazzo Capodimonte. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... Installation art by architect Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum Castelvecchio (old castle) was built from 1354-1356 as a fortification against threats from outside of Verona, and from insurgents within. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... View of Urbino with the Ducal Palace and the Cathedral. ... Urbino is a walled city in the Marche region in Italy, south-west of Pesaro, a World Heritage Site notable for a remarkable historical legacy of independent Renaissance culture, especially under the patronage of Federico da Montefeltro, duke of Urbino from 1444 to 1482. ... This article is about the Italian city. ... Location of Perugia in Italy Coordinates: , Country Region Province Province of Perugia Government  - Mayor Renato Locchi Area  - City 449 km²  (1,165 sq mi) Elevation 493 m (1,617 ft) Population (July 2006)[1]  - City 161,390  - Density 359/km² (929. ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... Museu de Arte de São Paulo The Museu de Arte de São Paulo (Portuguese for São Paulo Museum of Art, or MASP, was inaugurated in 1962, by Assis Chateaubriand and Pietro Maria Bardi. ... This article is about the city. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Louvre Atlanta Exhibition at the High Museum of Art (285 words)
Louvre Atlanta Exhibition at the High Museum of Art
The Louvre Atlanta exhibition at the High Museum of Art is a unique three-year partnership with the Paris museum and Atlanta's best known museum.
Louvre Atlanta Exhibition Sign- Anne Cox Chambers Wing at the High Museum of Art
Louvre - MSN Encarta (706 words)
Louvre, (properly, Musée du Louvre), national art museum of France and the palace in which it is housed, located in Paris, on the right bank of the Seine River.
The building of the Louvre was begun in 1546 in the reign of Francis I, according to the plans of the French architect Pierre Lescot.
In 1793 the Louvre was opened as a public museum, and the French painter Jacques-Louis David was appointed head of a commission to administer it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m