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Encyclopedia > Louisville in the Civil War

Louisville in the Civil War


During the American Civil War, Louisville was a major stronghold of Union forces, which kept Kentucky firmly in the Union. It was the center of planning, supplies, recruiting and transportation for numerous campaigns, especially in the Western Theater. By the end of the war, Louisville itself had not been attacked even once, even though surrounded by various battles such as the Battle of Perryville and Battle of Corydon. The Civil War is by far the most common term for this conflict; see Naming the American Civil War. ... Louisville redirects here. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Western Theater Overview (1861 – 1865) This article presents an overview of major military and naval operations in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Perryville was an important but largely neglected encounter in the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Corydon took place July 9, 1863, in Harrison County, Indiana during Morgans Raid in the American Civil War. ...

Contents


Pre-war

In the November 1860 Presidential election, Kentucky gave native Kentuckian Abraham Lincoln less than one percent of the vote. Kentuckians did not like Lincoln, because he stood for the eradication of slavery and his Republican Party aligned itself with the North, but Kentuckians also did not vote for native son John C. Breckinridge and his Southern Democratic Party, which most of the country regarded as secessionists. Kentuckians owned 225,000 slaves, but Kentucky also loved the Union. Kentucky wanted to keep slavery and stay in the Union. Most Kentuckians, including residents of Louisville, voted for John Bell of Tennessee, of the Constitutional Union Party, which stood for preserving the Union and keeping the status quo on slavery or Stephen Douglas of Illinois, who ran for the Democratic Party ticket. Louisville cast 3,823 votes for John Bell. Douglas received 2,633 votes. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... It has been suggested that Abraham Lincoln in popular culture be merged into this article or section. ... This poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery in Britain and the United States. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... John Bell John Bell (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


1861

On December 20, 1860, South Carolina seceded from the Union. Other Southern states followed and by early 1861, eleven Southern states seceded from the Union, except Kentucky. Senator Henry Clay from Kentucky had worked for compromise and the state followed his lead. On April 12, 1861, Confederate Brigadier General Pierre G. T. Beauregard ordered his cannons to be fired on Fort Sumter, located in the Charleston, South Carolina harbor, starting the Civil War. The commander of Fort Sumter was Union Major Robert Anderson of Louisville. December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate of the United States of America is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia, USA – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina, harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... The Civil War is by far the most common term for this conflict; see Naming the American Civil War. ... Major Robert Anderson Robert Anderson (June 14, 1805 – October 26, 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, known for his command of Fort Sumter at the start of the war. ... Louisville redirects here. ...


After the firing upon Fort Sumter, President of the United States Abraham Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers, but Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin refused to send any men to act against the Southern states, and Unionists and secessionists both supported his position. On April 17, 1861, Louisville hoped to remain neutral and spent $50,000 for the defense of the city, naming Lovell Rousseau as brigadier general. Rousseau formed the Home Guard. Unionists asked Lincoln for help and he secretly sent arms to the Home Guard. The U. S. government sent a shipment of weapons to Louisville and kept the rifles hidden in the basement of the Court House. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... It has been suggested that Abraham Lincoln in popular culture be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: | | ... Beriah Magoffin (April 18, 1815 - February 28, 1885) was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


As with the rest of the state, Louisville residents were divided as to which side they should support. Prominent Louisville attorney James Speed strongly advocated keeping the state in the Union. Louisville Main Street wholesale merchants dealt with the South with steamboats traveling the Ohio River from Louisville to New Orleans and supported the Confederacy. Blue-collar workers, small retailers, and professional men, such as lawyers, supported the Union. On April 20, two companies of Confederate volunteers left by steamboat to New Orleans, and five days later, three more companies departed for Nashville on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Union recruiters raised troops at Eighth and Main, and the Union recruits left for Indiana to join other Union regiments. James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... Ohio River viewed from Liberty Hill in Ripley, Ohio. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot Location Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates , Government Country State Parish United States Louisiana Orleans Parish, Louisiana Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 350. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... A blue-collar worker performs manual, unskilled or halfskilled jobs, such as in a factory or maintenance trades in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Music City Location Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Tennessee Davidson County Founded: Incorporated: 1780 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 526. ... Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ...


On May 20, 1861, Kentucky declared its neutrality. An important state geographically, Kentucky had the Ohio River as a natural barrier. Kentucky's natural resources, manpower, and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad made both the North and South respect Kentucky's neutrality. President Lincoln and Confederate President Jefferson Davis kept a hands-off policy when dealing with Kentucky, hoping not to push the state into one camp or the other. The L&N's depot on Ninth and Broadway in Louisville and the steamboats at Louisville wharfs sent uniforms, lead, bacon, coffee and war material south, but Lincoln did not want to stop the city from sending goods south for the fear of upsetting Kentucky's delicate balance of neutrality, but on July 10, 1861, a federal judge in Louisville ruled that the United States government had the right to stop shipments of goods from going south over the L&N railroad. May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Neutral means balanced between two or more opposites. ... Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808–December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as the only President of the Confederate States, leading the Confederate States of America to defeat during the American Civil War, 1861-65. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A United States federal judge is a judge appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ...


On July 15, 1861, the War Department authorized U.S. Navy Lieutenant William "Bull" Nelson to establish a training camp and organize a brigade of infantry. Nelson commissioned William Landrum a colonel of cavalry, Theophilus Garrard, Thomas E. Bramlette, and Speed Fry colonels of infantry. Landrum turned his commission over to Lieutenant Colonel Frank Wolford. Garrard, Bramlette and Fry established their camps at Camp Dick Robinson in Garrard County, and Wolford erected his camp near Harrodsburg, effectively breaking Kentucky's neutrality.[1] Brigadier General Rousseau established a Union training camp opposite Louisville in Jeffersonville, Indiana, naming the camp after Joseph Holt. Governor Magoffin protested the establishment of the Union camps to Lincoln, but he ignored Magoffin, stating that the will of the people wanted the camps to remain in Kentucky.[2] July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... A Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary or police officer. ... William Bull Nelson (September 27, 1824 – September 29, 1862) was a Union general in the American Civil War who commanded the Army of Kentucky. ... Speed S. Fry, as Colonel of the 4th Kentucky Infantry Speed Smith Fry (September 9, 1817 – August 1, 1892) was a lawyer, judge, and a U.S. Army officer during the Mexican War and American Civil War. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Garrard County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Harrodsburg is a city located in Mercer County, Kentucky. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Joseph Holt (January 6, 1807–August 1, 1894) was U.S. Secretary of War and a U.S. Postmaster General under James Buchanan. ...


In August 1861, Kentucky held elections for the State General Assembly and Unionists won majorities in both houses, but the residents of Louisville continued to be divided on the issue of which side to join. The Louisville Courier was very much pro-Confederate, while the Louisville Journal was pro-Union. An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


On September 4, 1861, Confederate General Leonidas Polk, outraged by Union intrusions in the state, invaded Columbus, Kentucky, forever shattering Kentucky's neutrality policy. As a result of the Confederate invasion, Union General Ulysses S. Grant entered Paducah, Kentucky. President Jefferson Davis allowed Confederate troops to stay in Kentucky. General Albert Sidney Johnston, commander of all Confederate forces in the West, sent General Simon Bolivar Buckner of Kentucky to invade Bowling Green, Kentucky. Union forces in Kentucky saw Buckner's move toward Bowling Green as the beginning of a massive attack on Louisville, Kentucky. With twenty thousand troops, Johnston established a defensive line stretching from Columbus in western Kentucky to the Cumberland Gap, controlled by Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer. On September 7, the Kentucky State legislature, angered by the Confederate invasion, ordered the Union flag to be raised over the state capitol in Frankfort, declaring its allegiance with the Union. The legislature also passed the "Non-Partisan Act," which stated that "any person or any person's family that joins or aids the so-called Confederate Army was no longer a citizen of the Commonwealth."[3] The legislature denied any member of the Confederacy the right to land, titles or money held in Kentucky or the right to legal redress for action taken against them. September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Leonidas Polk, The Fighting Bishop Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general who was once a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a cousin of President James K. Polk. ... Columbus is a city located in Hickman County, Kentucky. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Paducah is a city located in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr. ... Bowling Green is a city located in Warren County, Kentucky. ... Cumberland Gap in winter The Cumberland Gap is a pass across the Cumberland Mountains region of the Appalachian Mountains, famous in American history for its role as the chief passageway through the mountains for early settlers. ... Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States Congressman from Tennessee, officer in the United States Army, and a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... The new, permenant Kentucky State Capitol building The Kentucky State Capitol is located in Frankfort and is the seat of the three branches (executive, legislative, judicial) of the state government of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Frankfort is the capital of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ...


With Confederate troops in Bowling Green, Union General Robert Anderson moved his headquarters to Louisville. Union General George McClellan appointed Anderson as military commander for the district of Kentucky on June 4, 1861, and on September 9, the Kentucky legislature asked Anderson to be made commander of the Federal military force in Kentucky. The Union army accepted the Louisville Legion at Camp Joe Holt in Indiana into the regular army. Major John M. Delph sent two thousand men to build defenses around the city of Louisville. On October 8, Anderson stepped down as commander of the Department of the Cumberland and Union General William Tecumseh Sherman took charge of the Home Guard, and Lovell Rousseau sent the Louisville Legion along with another two thousand men across the river to protect the city. Sherman wrote to his superiors that he needed two hundred thousand men to take care of Johnston's Confederates. The Louisville Legion and the Home Guard marched out to meet Buckner's forces, but Buckner did not approach Louisville. Buckner's men destroyed the bridge over the Rolling Fork River in Lebanon Junction and with the mission completed, Buckner's men returned to Bowling Green. George McClellan George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the American Civil War. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ... Rolling Fork can Refer to two things Rolling Fork a river in Southwest Arkansas Rolling Fork, Mississippi. ... Lebanon Junction is a city located in Bullitt County, Kentucky. ...


Louisville became a staging ground for Union troops heading south. Union troops flowed into Louisville from Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. White tents and training grounds sprang up at the Oakland track, Old Louisville and Portland. Camps were also established at Eighteenth and Broadway, along the Frankfort and Bardstown turnpikes. Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq. ... The fountain at St James Court Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Portland is a neighborhood two miles northwest of downtown Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Originally it was the largest of the five major settlements at the Falls of the Ohio River, the others being Shippingport and Louisville in Kentucky and New Albany, Clarksville, and Jeffersonville on the Indiana side. ...


1862

By early 1862, Louisville had eighty thousand Union troops throughout the city. With so many troops, entrepreneurs set up gambling establishments along the north side of Jefferson from 4th to 5th Street, extending around the corner from 5th to Market, then continuing on the south side of Market back to 4th Street. Photography studios and military goods shops, such as Fletcher & Bennett on Main Street, catered to the Union officers and soldiers. With so many Union troops, brothels also sprung up around the city. Louisville redirects here. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Slot machines in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... Photography is the process of making pictures by means of the action of light. ... It has been suggested that Mega-brothel be merged into this article or section. ...


In January 1862, Union General George Thomas defeated Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer at the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky. In February of 1862, Union General Ulysses Grant and Admiral Andrew Foote's gunboats captured Fort Henry and Fort Donelson on the Kentucky and Tennessee border. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston's defensive line in Kentucky crumbled before his eyes. Johnston had no other choice but to fall back to Nashville, Tennessee. No defensive preparations had been made at Nashville, so Johnson continued to fall back to Corinth, Mississippi. General George H. Thomas George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870), the Rock of Chickamauga, was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general during the American Civil War. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States Congressman from Tennessee, officer in the United States Army, and a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George H. Thomas George B. Crittenden Strength 4,400 (four brigades) 5,900 (two brigades) Casualties 232 439 The Battle of Mill Springs, also known as the Battle of Fishing Creek in Confederate terminology, and the Battle of Logans... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Andrew Hull Foote Andrew Hull Foote (September 12, 1806 – June 26, 1863) was an admiral in the United States Navy who served during the American Civil War. ... A gunboat is literally a boat carrying one or more guns. ... The Battle of Fort Henry was fought February 6, 1862, in western Tennessee, during the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Fort Donelson was fought February 12–16, 1862 in the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Music City Location Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Tennessee Davidson County Founded: Incorporated: 1780 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 526. ... Corinth is a city located in Alcorn County, Mississippi. ...


Although the threat of invasion by Confederates subsided, Louisville remained a staging area for Union supplies and troops heading south. Trains departed for the south along the L&N, but in July 1862, Confederate generals Braxton Bragg, commander of the Army of Mississippi, and Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of the Army of East Tennessee, planned an invasion of Kentucky. On August 13, Smith marched out of Knoxville with nine thousand men towards Kentucky and arrived in Barbourville, Kentucky. On August 20, Smith announced that he would take Lexington, Kentucky. On August 28, Bragg's army moved towards Kentucky. At the Battle of Richmond, Kentucky, on August 30, Smith's Confederate forces defeated Union General William "Bull" Nelson's troops, capturing the entire force, essentially leaving Kentucky with no Union support. Nelson managed to escape back to Louisville. Smith marched into Lexington and sent a Confederate cavalry force to take Frankfort: Kentucky's capitol. Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... Braxton Bragg Braxton Bragg (March 22, 1817 – September 27, 1876) was a career U.S. Army officer and a general in the Confederate States Army, a principal commander in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ... There were three organizations known as the Army of Mississippi in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Portrait of Edmund Kirby Smith during the Civil War Edmund Kirby Smith (May 16, 1824 – March 28, 1893) was a career U.S. Army officer, an educator, and a general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, notable for his command of the Trans-Mississippi Department of the... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... Nickname: The Marble City, K-Town, Big Orange Country, Knox Vegas Location Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee Coordinates , Government Cities in Tennessee Tennessee Mayor Bill Haslam (R) Geographical characteristics Area     City 254. ... Barbourville is a city located in Knox County, Kentucky. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... It has been suggested that Fayette County, Kentucky be merged into this article or section. ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William Bull Nelson E. Kirby Smith Strength 1st and 2nd Brigades, Army of Kentucky Army of Kentucky Casualties 4,900 750 The Battle of Richmond, Kentucky, the arguably most complete Confederate victory in the American Civil War, took place on... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... William Bull Nelson (September 27, 1824 – September 29, 1862) was a Union general in the American Civil War who commanded the Army of Kentucky. ... Kircholm, a 1925 painting by Wojciech Kossak. ... Frankfort is the capital of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... The new, permenant Kentucky State Capitol building The Kentucky State Capitol is located in Frankfort and is the seat of the three branches (executive, legislative, judicial) of the state government of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Union General Don Carlos Buell's army withdrew from Alabama and headed back to Kentucky. Union General Henry Halleck, commander of all Union forces in the West, sent two divisions from General Ulysses Grant's army, stationed in Mississippi, to Buell. Confederate General John Hunt Morgan, of Lexington, Kentucky, managed to destroy the L&N railroad tunnel at Gallatin, Tennessee cutting off all supplies to Buell's Union army. On September 5, Buell reached Murfreesboro, Tennessee and headed for Nashville, Tennessee. On September 14, Bragg reached Glasgow, Kentucky. On that same day, Buell reached Bowling Green, Kentucky. Bragg decided to take Louisville. On September 16, Bragg's army reached Munfordville, Kentucky. Col. James Chalmers attacked the Federal garrison at Munfordville, but he was in over his head and Bragg had to bail him out. Bragg arrived at Munfordville with his entire force and the Union force soon surrendered. Buell left Bowling Green and headed for Louisville. On September 25, Buell's tired and hungry men arrived in the city. Bragg moved his army to Bardstown, but did not take Louisville. Bragg urged General Smith to join his forces to take Louisville, but Smith told him to take Louisville on his own. Don Carlos Buell Don Carlos Buell (March 23, 1818 – November 19, 1898) was a career U.S. Army officer who fought in the Seminole War, the Mexican-American War, and the Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,423 sq mi (135,775 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Henry Wager Halleck Henry Wager Halleck (January 16, 1815 – January 9, 1872) was a U.S. Army officer, scholar, and lawyer. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Area  Ranked 32nd  - Total 48,434 sq mi (125,443 km²)  - Width 170 miles (275 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 3  - Latitude 30°13N to 35°N  - Longitude 88°7W to 91°41W Population  Ranked 31st... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Gallatin is a city located in Sumner County, Tennessee. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... Downtown Murfreesboro, Tennessee Murfreesboro is a city in Rutherford County, Tennessee, United States. ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... Glasgow is a city located in Barren County, Kentucky. ... Bowling Green is a city located in Warren County, Kentucky. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... Munfordville is a town located in Hart County, Kentucky. ... For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation) Garrison House, built by William Damm in 1675 at Dover, New Hampshire Garrison (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, to equip) is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but... September 25 is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years). ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ...


With the Confederate army under Bragg prepared to take Louisville, the citizens of Louisville panicked. With Frankfort in Confederate hands, for about a month, Governor Magoffin maintained his office in Louisville and the state legislature held their sessions in the Jefferson County Courthouse. Troops, volunteers and impressed labor worked around the clock to build a ring of breastworks and entrenchments around the city. New Union regiments flowed into the city. General William "Bull" Nelson took charge of the defense of Louisville. He sent Union troops to build pontoon bridges at Jeffersonville and New Albany to speed up the arrival of reinforcements, supplies and, if needed, the evacuation of the city. This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: | | ... Beriah Magoffin (April 18, 1815 - February 28, 1885) was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Breastwork may mean: A form of temporary fortification Breastwork (fortification). ... -1... Pontoon bridge across the James River at Richmond, Virginia, 1865. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... Evacuation can have several meanings: In wilderness first aid, evacuation is the transport of a seriously injured person out of the wilderness to the nearest point an ambulance can reach to take them to the hospital, or to the nearest emergency room. ...


Instead of taking Louisville, Bragg left Bardstown to install Confederate Governor Richard Hawes at Frankfort. On September 26, five hundred Confederate cavalrymen rode into the area of Eighteenth and Oak and captured fifty Union soldiers. The following night, a heavy skirmish occurred just beyond Middletown on the Shelbyville Pike and on September 30, Confederate and Union pickets fought at Gilman's Point in St. Matthews and pushed the Confederates back through Middletown to Floyd's Fork. A governor is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non-sovereign level of government, ranking under the head of state; furthermore the title applies to officials with a similar mandate as representatives of a chartered company which has... Kentuckys Provisinal Governor of the Confederates Richard Hawes (1797—1877) He was brother of Albert Gallatin Hawes, nephew of Aylett Hawes, and cousin of Aylett Hawes Buckner), a Representative from Kentucky. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ... Middletown is a city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Shelbyville is a city located in Shelby County, Kentucky. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... St. ...


The War Department ordered "Bull" Nelson to command the newly formed Army of the Ohio, but on the steps of the Galt House, Union General Jefferson C. Davis shot General Nelson over an insult, changing the command over to General Don Carlos Buell. On October 1, the Union army marched out of Louisville with sixty thousand men. Buell sent a small Federal force to Frankfort to deceive Bragg as to the exact direction and location of the Federal army. The ruse worked. On October 4, the small Federal force attacked Frankfort and Bragg left the city and headed back for Bardstown, thinking the entire Federal force was headed for Frankfort. Bragg decided that all Confederate forces should concentrate at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, ten miles northwest of Danville. On October 8, 1862, Buell and Bragg fought at Perryville, Kentucky. Bragg's sixteen thousand men attacked Buell's sixty thousand men. Federal forces suffered 845 dead, 2,851 wounded and 515 missing, while the Confederate toll was 3,396. Although Bragg won the Battle of Perryville tactically, he wisely decided to pull out of Perryville and link up with Smith. Once Smith and Bragg joined forces, Bragg decided to leave Kentucky and head for Tennessee. Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... The Army of the Ohio was the name of two Union armies in the American Civil War. ... The Galt House stands on Fourth Street, by the Ohio River The Galt House is a famous 25-story, 1300 room hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Don Carlos Buell Don Carlos Buell (March 23, 1818 – November 19, 1898) was a career U.S. Army officer who fought in the Seminole War, the Mexican-American War, and the Civil War. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Harrodsburg is a city located in Mercer County, Kentucky. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Perryville is a city located in Boyle County, Kentucky. ... The Battle of Perryville was an important but largely neglected encounter in the American Civil War. ...


1863

After the Battle of Perryville, the massive amount of wounded flooded into Louisville. Hospitals were set up in public schools, homes, factories and churches. Union surgeons erected the Brown General Hospital, located near the Belknap campus of the University of Louisville, and other hospitals were erected at Jeffersonville and New Albany, Indiana. By early 1863, the War Department and the U.S. Sanitary Commission erected nineteen hospitals. By early June 1863, 930 deaths had been recorded in the Louisville hospitals and Cave Hill Cemetery set aside plots for the Union dead. Louisville also had to contend with Confederate prisoners. The Battle of Perryville was an important but largely neglected encounter in the American Civil War. ... Louisville redirects here. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... The term public school has different (and in some cases contradictory) meanings due to regional differences. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Surgeon may refer to: a practitioner of surgery the moniker of British electronic music producer and DJ, Anthony Child; see Surgeon (musician) This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L, Louisville, or the Ville) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It is mandated [1] by the Kentucky General Assembly to be a Preeminent Metropolitan Research University. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Main entrance on Baxter Avenue Cave Hill Cemetery and Arboretum is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ...


On September 22, 1862, President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared on January 1, 1863, that all slaves in the rebellion states would be free. Some Kentucky Union soldiers, including officers such as Colonel Frank Wolford of the 1st Kentucky Cavalry, quit the army over the proclamation. The proclamation and the recruitment of slaves into the Union army ended the relationship between Lincoln and Kentucky. The controversy drove Kentucky into the hands of the Democrats, who stayed in power for a century. September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... It has been suggested that Abraham Lincoln in popular culture be merged into this article or section. ... The Emancipation Proclamation The Emancipation Proclamation was a presidential order in 1863 that freed most (but not all) of the slaves in the United States. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... This poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery in Britain and the United States. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


The Taylor Barracks at Third and Oak in Louisville recruited black soldiers. Black Union soldiers who died from wounds or disease were buried in the Louisville Eastern Cemetery. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


After the fall of New Orleans and the capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi on July 4, 1863, the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers were open to Union boats without harassment. On December 24, 1863, a steamboat from New Orleans reached Louisville. Flag Seal Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot Location Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates , Government Country State Parish United States Louisiana Orleans Parish, Louisiana Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 350. ... Vicksburg is a city located in Warren County, Mississippi, 234 miles (377 km) north by west of New Orleans on the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest river in the United States; the longest is the Missouri River, which flows into the Mississippi. ... Ohio River viewed from Liberty Hill in Ripley, Ohio. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ...


1864

By 1864, a dark period entered Louisville's history. Guerrilla warfare plagued the state, so the Radicals in Congress took a heavy hand to Kentucky. In Kentucky, a guerrilla was defined as any member of the Confederate army who destroyed supplies, equipment or money. Any returning Confederate was considered a guerrilla. On January 12, 1864, Union General Stephen Gano Burbridge of Kentucky succeeded General Jeremiah Boyle as Military Commander of Kentucky. In the midst of this turmoil, in March 1864, Generals Ulysses S. Grant and William Tecumseh Sherman met at the Galt House to plan the invasion that led to the successful capture of Atlanta, Georgia and Sherman's March to the Sea. Louisville redirects here. ... Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... Seal of the Congress. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ... The Galt House stands on Fourth Street, by the Ohio River The Galt House is a famous 25-story, 1300 room hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Palisades and chevaux-de-frise in front of the Potter House, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. ... Engraving by Alexander Hay Ritchie depicting Shermans March Shermans March to the Sea is the name commonly given to the Savannah Campaign, conducted in late 1864 by Major General William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ...


On July 5, President Abraham Lincoln suspended the writ of habeas corpus, which meant a person could be imprisoned without trial, their house could be searched without warrant, and the individual could be arrested without charge. Lincoln also declared martial law in Kentucky, which meant that elected officials were powerless to act on behalf of their constituents. Civilians accused of crimes would be tried not in a civilian court, but instead a military court, in which the citizen's rights may not be guaranteed under the Constitution. On this same day, General Burbridge became military governor of Kentucky with absolute authority.[4] July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... It has been suggested that Abraham Lincoln in popular culture be merged into this article or section. ... In common law jurisdictions, habeas corpus, or more precisely habeas corpus ad subjiciendum, is a prerogative writ which requires the addressee to produce in court a person in its custody and justify his or her imprisonment. ... Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice. ... A constituent is someone who can or does appoint or elect (and often by implication can also remove or recall) another as his agent or representative. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... What constitutes a military tribunal varies according to nation and sometimes even military branch and regional jurisdiction. ...


On July 16, 1864, General Burbridge issued Order No. 69 which declared: "Whenever an unarmed Union citizen is murdered, four guerrillas will be selected from the prison and publicly shot to death at the most convenient place near the scene of the outrages."[5] On August 7, Burbridge issued Order No. 240 in which Kentucky became a military district under his direct command. Burbridge could seize property without trial from persons he deemed disloyal. People he deemed disloyal could be shot without trial or question. July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ...


With Order No. 69 and Order No. 240, Burbridge began a reign of terror in Kentucky and Louisville. On August 11, Burbridge commanded Captain Hackett of the 26th Kentucky to select four men to be taken from prison in Louisville to Eminence, Henry County, Kentucky, to be shot for unknown outrages. On August 20, suspected Confederate guerrillas J. H. Cave and W. B. McClasshan were taken from Louisville to Franklin, Simpson County, to be shot for some unknown outrage. The commanding officer, General Ewing Bloom declared that Cave was innocent and sought a pardon from Burbridge, but he refused to give the pardon and both men were shot.[6] August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Eminence is a city located in Henry County, Kentucky. ... Henry County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Franklin is a city located in Simpson County, Kentucky. ... Simpson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ...


On October 25, Burbridge ordered four men, Wilson Lilly, Sherwood Hartley, Captain Lindsey Dale Buckner and M. Bincoe, to be shot by Captain Rowland Hackett of Company B, 26th Kentucky for the alleged killing of a postal carrier by guerrillas allegedly led by Captain Marcellus Jerome Clark (alleged to be Sue Munday) near Brunerstown, present day Jeffersontown, Jefferson County. On November 6, two men named Cheney and Morris were taken from the prison in Louisville and transported to Munfordville and shot in retaliation for the killing of Madison Morris, of Company A, 13th Kentucky Infantry. James Hopkins, John Simple and Samuel Stingle were taken from Louisville to Bloomfield, Nelson County, and shot in retaliation for the alleged guerrilla shooting of two black men. On November 15, two Confederate soldiers were taken from prison in Louisville to Lexington and hung at the Fair Grounds in retaliation. On November 19, eight men were taken from Louisville to Munfordville to be shot for retaliation for the killing of two Union men.[7] October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 67 days remaining. ... Jeffersontown is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Munfordville is a town located in Hart County, Kentucky. ... Bloomfield is a city in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... Nelson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... It has been suggested that Fayette County, Kentucky be merged into this article or section. ... Suicide by hanging. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Meanwhile, in November 1864, President Lincoln appointed James Speed as the U.S. Attorney General. James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...


By the end of 1864, Burbridge arrested twenty-one prominent Louisville citizens, plus the chief justice of the State Court of Appeals on treason charges. Many of the captured guerrillas were brought to Louisville and hanged on Broadway at 15th or 18th Streets. The Kentucky Court of Appeals is the lower of Kentuckys two appellate courts, under the Kentucky Supreme Court. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation or state. ...


By the November elections of 1864, Burbridge tried to interfere with the election for President. Despite military interference, Kentucky citizens voted overwhelmingly for Union General George B. McClellan over Lincoln. Twelve counties were not even allowed to post their returns.[8] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state) and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... George McClellan George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 – October 29, 1885) was a major general during the American Civil War. ...


1865

As the Confederacy began to fall apart in January 1865, Burbridge continued his reign of terror. On January 20, Nathaniel Marks, formerly of Company A, 4th Kentucky, C.S. was condemned as a guerrilla. He claimed he was innocent, but was shot by a firing squad in Louisville. On February 10, Burbridge's term as military governor came to an end. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton replaced Burbridge with Major General John Palmer. On March 1, Union forces captured the alleged Sue Munday (Clark) near Breckinridge County, and hanged him at the corner of 18th and Broadway in Louisville. During the three hour trial, Munday was not allowed to counsel or witnesses for his defense. January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up guerrilla in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Execution by firing squad is a method of capital punishment, especially in times of war. ... Louisville redirects here. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814 – December 24, 1869), was an American lawyer, politician, United States Attorney General in 1860-61 and Secretary of War through most of the American Civil War and Reconstruction era. ... John McAuley Palmer (September 13, 1817 – September 25, 1900) was a Union Major General during the American Civil War. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... Breckinridge County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Suicide by hanging. ...


On April 9, Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses Grant, and on April 14, Confederate General Joseph Johnston surrendered to Union General William T. Sherman, ending the Civil War. On December 18, the Kentucky legislature repealed the Expatriation Act of 1861, allowing all who served in the Confederacy to have their full Kentucky citizenship restored without fear of retribution. The legislature also repealed the law that any person who was a member of the Confederacy was guilty of treason. The Kentucky legislature also allowed former Confederates to run for office. On February 28, 1866, Kentucky officially declared the war over.[9] April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ... The Civil War is by far the most common term for this conflict; see Naming the American Civil War. ... December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Citizenship is membership in a political community (originally a city but now usually a state) and carries with it rights to political participation; a person having such membership is a citizen. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation or state. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Post-war

After the war, Louisville continued to grow with factories and transporting their goods by train. Foreign immigrants and blacks came to Louisville to work in the new factories. Ex-Confederate officers entered law, insurance, real estate and political offices, largely taking control of the city. This lead to the jibe that Louisville joined the Confederacy after the war was over. Louisville redirects here. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven southern states seceded from the United States (with four more to follow). ... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans...


In 1895, a Confederate monument was erected near the University of Louisville campus. The University of Louisville (also known as U of L, Louisville, or the Ville) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It is mandated [1] by the Kentucky General Assembly to be a Preeminent Metropolitan Research University. ...


References

  1. ^ Beach, Damian (1995). Civil War Battles, Skirmishes, and Events in Kentucky. Louisville, Kentucky: Different Drummer Books, 16-17.
  2. ^ Beach, p. 18.
  3. ^ Beach, p. 20.
  4. ^ Beach, pp. 154-156.
  5. ^ Beach, p. 177.
  6. ^ Beach, p. 184.
  7. ^ Beach, pp. 198, 201, 202.
  8. ^ Beach, p. 202.
  9. ^ Beach, p. 228.
  • Yater, George H. (1979). Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio: A History of Louisville and Jefferson County. Louisville, Kentucky: The Heritage Corporation, 82-96.
  • Bush, Bryan S. (1998). The Civil War Battles of the Western Theatre, 2000, Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing, Inc., 22-23, 36-41.
  • Street, James (1985). The Struggle for Tennessee: Tupelo to Stones River. Richmond, Virginia: Time-Life Books, Inc., 8-67.
  • Nevin, David (1983). The Road to Shiloh: Early Battles in the West. Alexandria, Virginia: Time-Life Books, Inc., 11-12, 42-103.

Louisville redirects here. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Paducah is a city located in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... Flag Seal Nickname: River City Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra Location Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates , Government Country State County United States Virginia Independent City Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 62. ... Location Location in Virginia Coordinates , Government Country State United States   Virginia Founded 1718 Mayor William D. Euille Geographical characteristics Area     City 39. ...

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