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Encyclopedia > Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville, Kentucky

Seal
Nickname: Derby City, River City, Gateway to the South, Falls City, The 'Ville[1]
Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Coordinates: 38°15′15″N 85°45′37″W / 38.25417, -85.76028
Country United States
State Kentucky
County Jefferson
Government
 - Mayor Jerry E. Abramson (D)
Area
 - City 399 sq mi (1,032 km²)
 - Land 385 sq mi (997 km²)
 - Water 13 sq mi (35 km²)
Elevation 466 ft (142 m)
Population (2007)[2]
 - City 709,286 (consolidated)
554,496 (balance)
 - Density 4,124.8/sq mi (1,592.6/km²)
 - Metro 1,233,735
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 502
FIPS code 21-48000
GNIS feature ID 0509453
Website: www.louisvilleky.gov

Louisville (usually pronounced /ˈluːǝvǝl/ ; see Pronunciation below) is Kentucky's largest city. It is ranked as either the 17th or 27th largest city in the United States depending on how the population is calculated (see Nomenclature, population and ranking below). The settlement that became the City of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI of France. Louisville is famous as the home of "The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports": the Kentucky Derby, the widely watched first race of the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing. Louisville is the name of several places in the United States of America: Louisville, Colorado Louisville, Georgia (a former state capital, and pronounced like Lewisville) Louisville, Illinois Louisville, Kansas Louisville, Kentucky Home of the University of Louisville Louisville, Mississippi Louisville, Nebraska Louisville, New York Louisville, Ohio Louisville, Tennessee Louisville Township... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 338 pixelsFull resolution (1556 × 658 pixel, file size: 207 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brightened version of Image:LouisvilleDowntownSkyline. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Map of Kentuckys counties This is a list of the one hundred and twenty counties in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Jerry E. Abramson Jerry Edwin Abramson (born September 12, 1946) is a Democratic politician who is the longest serving Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Eastern Standard Time redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Standard Time redirects here. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 502 serves the state of Kentucky. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Image File history File links Loouhvull. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... The Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing (although sometimes shortened to Triple Crown, the full name is used to avoid possible confusion with other sports) consists of three races for three-year-old thoroughbred horses. ...


Louisville is situated in north-central Kentucky on the Kentucky-Indiana border at the only natural obstacle in the Ohio River, the Falls of the Ohio. Louisville is the county seat of Jefferson County, and since 2003, the city's borders are coterminous with those of the county due to merger. Because it includes counties in Southern Indiana, the Louisville metropolitan area is regularly referred to as Kentuckiana. A resident of Louisville is referred to as a Louisvillian. Although situated in a Southern state, Louisville is influenced by both Midwestern and Southern culture, and is commonly referred to as either the northernmost Southern city or the southernmost Northern city in the United States.[3][4] For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Southern Indiana, in the United States, is notable because it is culturally and geographically more similar to the South than it is to the rest of the state of Indiana. ... The Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 43rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. ...


Louisville has been the site of many important innovations through history. Notable residents have included inventor Thomas Edison, the first Jewish Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis, boxing legend Muhammad Ali, newscaster Diane Sawyer, and writer Hunter S. Thompson. Notable events occurring in the city include the first public viewing place of Edison's light bulb, the first library open to African Americans in the South,[5][6] and medical advances including the first human hand transplant,[7] the first self-contained artificial heart transplant,[8] and the development site of the first cervical cancer vaccine.[9] Edison redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Diane Sawyer is a television journalist for the U.S. network ABC News and co-anchor of ABCs Good Morning America, along with with Robin Roberts. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (18 July 1937 – 20 February 2005) was an American journalist and author, famous for his novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. ... Portion of advertisement for 1884 Southern Exposition The Southern Exposition was a five-year series of Worlds Fairs held in the city of Louisville, Kentucky from 1883 to 1887 in what is now Louisvilles Old Louisville neighborhood. ... The incandescent light bulb or incandescent lamp is a source of artificial light that works by incandescence, (a general term for heat-driven light emissions which includes the simple case of black body radiation). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Hand transplantation is a surgical procedure to transplant a hand from one human to another. ... An artificial heart is a device that is implanted into the body to replace the original biological heart. ... Gardasil (Merck & Co. ...

Contents

Nomenclature, population and ranking

City of Louisville
Population by year
(Pre-merger)[10][11]

2000 - 256,231
1990 - 269,063
1980 - 298,451
1970 - 361,472
1960 - 390,639
1950 - 369,129
1940 - 319,077
1930 - 307,745
1920 - 234,891
1910 - 223,928
1900 - 204,731
1890 - 161,129
1880 - 123,758
1870 - 100,753
1860 - 68,033
1850 - 43,194
1840 - 21,210
1830 - 10,341
1820 - 4,012
1810 - 1,357
1800 - 359
1790 - 200

As of the 2000 Census, Louisville had a population of 256,231; which for the first time since 1820 was less than the population of Lexington, a city with a consolidated city-county government. However, on November 7, 2000 voters in Louisville and Jefferson County approved their own ballot measure to merge into a consolidated city-county government named Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government (official long form) and Louisville Metro (official short form), which took effect January 1, 2003. The Jefferson County-Louisville merger has a population more than twice as large as Lexington-Fayette. 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural referendums or referenda), ballot question, or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The U.S. Census Bureau gives two different population figures for Louisville: for the consolidated Louisville-Jefferson County it lists the 2006 estimated population as 701,500 (17th largest in the nation and equal to that of Jefferson County);[12][13] for the Louisville-Jefferson County balance it lists the population as 554,496 (27th largest).[14] The "balance" is a designation created by the Census Bureau to describe the portion of Louisville-Jefferson County that does not include any of the semi-independent separately incorporated places located within Louisville Metro (such as Anchorage, Middletown or Jeffersontown).[15] Louisville-Jefferson County (balance) is a statistical entity defined by the United States Census Bureau to represent the portion of the consolidated city-county of Louisville-Jefferson County that does not include any of the 83 separate incorporated places (municipalities) located within the city and county. ... Anchorage is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Middletown is a city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Jeffersontown is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ...

Crescent Centre, a residential complex in Downtown
Crescent Centre, a residential complex in Downtown

Census methodology uses balance values in comparing consolidated cities to other cities for ranking purposes, so the lower ranking is the figure officially reported by the Census Bureau. Nevertheless, the higher ranking continues to be claimed by Louisville Metro government and business leaders, widely reported in the local media, and it has even been posted on road signs at the city limits.[16] The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Unused traffic signs in Austria Most countries post signage, known as traffic signs or road signs, at the side of roads to impart information to road users. ... City limits refers to the defined limits of a citys area. ...


The Louisville metropolitan area (MSA) (not to be confused with Louisville Metro), has a population of 1,233,735 ranking 42nd nationally. The metro area includes Louisville-Jefferson County and 12 surrounding counties, eight in Kentucky and four in Southern Indiana (see Geography below). The Louisville Combined Statistical Area includes the MSA and three additional counties. It has a total population of 1,369,049, which ranks 31st in the U.S.
The Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 43rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... There are two official definitions of metropolitan area used today in the United States, metropolitan statistical areas, and combined statistical areas, the former restrictive, the latter more extensive. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Southern Indiana, in the United States, is notable because it is culturally and geographically more similar to the South than it is to the rest of the state of Indiana. ... The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN CSA The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN Combined Statistical Area is the 31st largest Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of the United States. ... Map of the Core Based Statistical Areas of the United States and Puerto Rico (MSAs in red and μSAs in blue) Map of the Combined Statistical Areas of the United States and Puerto Rico // The following sortable table lists the 718 primary census statistical areas[1] of the United States...


Pronunciation

The Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau displays many of the common pronunciations of the city's name on its logo.
The Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau displays many of the common pronunciations of the city's name on its logo.

Most native residents pronounce the city's name /ˈluːǝvǝl/ (help:Pronunciation) — often this degrades further to /ˈlǝvǝl/ . The name is often pronounced far back in the mouth, in the top of the throat. The standard English pronunciation, however, is /ˈluːiːvɪl/ (referring to King Louis XVI, for whom the city is named), which is often utilized by political leaders and the media. No matter how Louisville is pronounced, the 's' is always silent. (This contrasts with the name of the following cities: Louisville, Colorado; Louisville, Georgia; Louisville, Mississippi; Louisville, Tennessee; and Louisville, Ohio, all of which are spelled the same, but are pronounced /ˈluːɪsvɪl/ .) Image File history File links As the city has a very active tourist industry, and is a popular for conventions and visitors, the Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau proudly displays several of the different and varying pronunciations of the city on one of its logos. ... Image File history File links As the city has a very active tourist industry, and is a popular for conventions and visitors, the Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau proudly displays several of the different and varying pronunciations of the city on one of its logos. ... Image File history File links Loouhvull. ... Image File history File links Luhvull. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Looeevil. ... Louisville (pronounced Lewisville) is a city in Boulder County, Colorado, United States. ... Louisville is a city located in Jefferson County, Georgia. ... Louisville is a city in Winston County, Mississippi, United States. ... Louisville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee. ... Louisville is a city located in Stark County, Ohio. ... Image File history File links Looisvil. ...


The variability of the local pronunciation of the city's name can perhaps be laid at the feet of the city's location on the border between the Northern and Southern regions of the United States. Louisville's diverse population has traditionally represented elements of both Northern and Southern culture. This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ...


Regional migration patterns and the homogenization of dialect due to electronic media also may be responsible for the incidence of native-born Louisvillians adopting or affecting the standard English pronunciation. Nevertheless, the ['luːǝvǝl] pronunciation is most popular among residents and is, with few exceptions, used by news and sports reporters. Net migration rates for 2006: positive (blue), negative (orange) and stable (green). ... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... A screenshot of a web page. ... English phonology is the study of the phonology (ie the sound system) of the English language. ...


History

See also: History of Kentucky, Louisville in the American Civil War, and The Filson Historical Society
Louisville's founder, George Rogers Clark
Louisville's founder, George Rogers Clark

The first European settlement made in the vicinity of modern-day Louisville was on Corn Island in 1778 by Col. George Rogers Clark. Today, Clark is recognized as the founder of Louisville, and several landmarks are named after him.[17] View of Main Street, Louisville, in 1846. ... The history of Kentucky spans hundreds of years, and has been influenced by the states diverse geography and central location. ... Louisville in the American Civil War was a major stronghold of Union forces, which kept Kentucky firmly in the Union. ... The Filson Historical Society building in Old Louisville The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... Corn Island is a now-vanished island in the Ohio River, at head of the Falls of the Ohio, just north of Louisville, Kentucky. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ...


Two years later, in 1780, the Virginia General Assembly approved the town charter of Louisville. The city was named in honor of King Louis XVI of France, whose soldiers at the time were aiding Americans in the Revolutionary War. Early residents lived in forts due to Indian raids, but were moving out by the late 1780s.[18] In 1803, explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark organized their expedition across America at the Falls of the Ohio in Louisville. The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774–October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition also known as the Corps of Discovery, with William Clark, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana... {{Infobox Person | name = William Clark | image = WilliamClark. ... Lewis and Clark redirects here. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ...

View of Main Street, Louisville, in 1846.
View of Main Street, Louisville, in 1846.

The city attributes its early growth to the fact that river boats had to be unloaded and moved downriver before reaching the falls. By 1828, the population had swelled to 7,000 and Louisville became an incorporated city. The city grew rapidly in its formative years.[19] Download high resolution version (1610x953, 470 KB)View of Main Street, Louisville, in 1846. ... Download high resolution version (1610x953, 470 KB)View of Main Street, Louisville, in 1846. ...


Louisville had one of the largest slave trades in the United States before the Civil War and much of the city's initial growth is attributed to that trade. Louisville was the turning point for many enslaved blacks since Kentucky, although it was to be a border state in the Civil War, was nevertheless a slave state and crossing the Ohio River could lead to freedom in the North. Slavery in the United States began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia and lasted until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... In this map:  Union states  Union territories  Bleeding Kansas  Union border states that permitted slavery  The Confederacy  Union territories that permitted slavery The term border states refers to the five slave states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, and West Virginia which bordered a free state and aligned with the Union... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...

Memorial to the 1890 tornado, on Main Street in Downtown

During the Civil War Louisville was a major stronghold of Union forces, which kept Kentucky firmly in the Union. It was the center of planning, supplies, recruiting and transportation for numerous campaigns. By the end of the war, Louisville itself had not been attacked even once, even though surrounded by skirmishes and battles. After 1865 returning Confederate veterans largely took control of the city, leading to the jibe that it joined the Confederacy after the war was over. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 466 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 772 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo snapped by Bryan S. Bush, given to me with permission to post on the Wikipedia under the GFDL. I reduced and cropped the image, and... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 466 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 772 pixel, file size: 125 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo snapped by Bryan S. Bush, given to me with permission to post on the Wikipedia under the GFDL. I reduced and cropped the image, and... Memorial to the 1890 tornado, on Main Street in downtown Louisville; images of the destruction, furnished by The Filson Historical Society, ring the structure at pedestrian level The Mid-Mississippi Valley Tornado Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak occurring in the middle United States on March 27, 1890. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia...

The first Kentucky Derby was held on May 17, 1875, at the Louisville Jockey Club track (later renamed to Churchill Downs). The Derby was originally shepherded by Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr., the grandson of William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. 10,000 spectators were present at the first Derby to watch Aristides win the race. Download high resolution version (912x393, 65 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (912x393, 65 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Composite image of Churchill Downs on Derby Day, 1901 Churchill Downs, located on Central Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky, is a thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Composite image of Churchill Downs on Derby Day, 1901 Churchill Downs, located on Central Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky, is a thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby. ... Colonel Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr. ... A horse named Aristides won the very first Kentucky Derby in 1875. ...


On March 27, 1890 the city was devastated and downtown nearly destroyed when an F4 tornado tore through the city at 8:30pm as part of the Mid-Mississippi Valley Tornado Outbreak of March 1890. An estimated 74 to 120 people were killed. The city quickly recovered and signs of the tornado were nearly totally absent within a year. is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... F-scale redirects here. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Memorial to the 1890 tornado, on Main Street in downtown Louisville; images of the destruction, furnished by The Filson Historical Society, ring the structure at pedestrian level The Mid-Mississippi Valley Tornado Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak occurring in the middle United States on March 27, 1890. ...

Louisville during the "Great Flood of '37"
Louisville during the "Great Flood of '37"

In late January and February of 1937, a month of heavy rain in which 19" fell prompted what became remembered as the "Great Flood of '37". The flood submerged about 70% of the city, power was lost, and it forced the evacuation of 175,000 residents, and also led to fundamental changes in where residents bought houses. Today, the city is protected by numerous flood walls. After the flood, the areas of high elevation in the eastern part of the city saw decades of growth. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... A floodwall gate at Harlan, Kentucky temporarily opening for train passage. ...


Similar to many other older American cities, Louisville began to experience a flight of people and businesses to the suburbs in the 1960s and 1970s. Newly built freeways and interstates helped facilitate this shift. The West End and older areas of the South End in particular began to decline economically as many local factories closed. In 1974 a major (F4) tornado hit Louisville as part of the Super Outbreak of tornadoes that struck 13 states. It covered 21 miles (34 km) and destroyed several hundred homes in the Louisville area but was only responsible for two deaths.[20] F-scale redirects here. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ...

Fourth Street Live! opened in Downtown in 2004
Fourth Street Live! opened in Downtown in 2004

Jefferson County had a population loss of 31,000 from 1970 to 1990, but has since gained 45,000. The population within the old city limits dropped by 134,000 from its peak in 1970, falling from 33rd nationally to 58th, although its population is now stabilizing.[21] The large Hard Rock Cafe sign greets visitors to Fourth Street Live! Fourth Street Live! is a major entertainment and retail district located on 4th Street, between Liberty and Muhammad Ali Boulevard, in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ...


Since the 1980s, many of the city's urban neighborhoods have been revitalized into areas popular with young professionals and college students. The greatest change has occurred along the Bardstown Road corridor, Frankfort Avenue, and the Old Louisville neighborhood. Downtown has also experienced a large amount of growth, including the tripling of its population since 1990, the conversion of waterfront industrial sites into Waterfront Park, and the refurbishing of the former Galleria into the bustling entertainment complex Fourth Street Live!. In San Francisco, during the mid-1960s, the bohemian center of the city shifted from the old Beat enclave of North Beach to Haight-Ashbury (pictured) as a response to gentrification. ... The Highlands is an area of Louisville, Kentucky which contains a high density of night clubs, ecclectic businesses, and many upscale and fast food restaurants. ... Clifton, a neighborhood east of downtown Louisville, Kentucky USA. Clifton was named because of its hilly location on the Ohio River valley escarpment. ... Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... The Louisville Waterfront Park provides a nice place to relax and have fun amidst the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. ... The large Hard Rock Cafe sign greets visitors to Fourth Street Live! Fourth Street Live! is a major entertainment and retail district located on 4th Street, between Liberty and Muhammad Ali Boulevard, in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ...


Geography

The 41 acre Beargrass Creek State Nature Preserve is located in the heart of the city
The 41 acre Beargrass Creek State Nature Preserve is located in the heart of the city

Louisville is located at 38°13′44″N, 85°44′58″W (38.228870, -85.749534)[22]. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Louisville Metro (in 2000 measurements for Jefferson County) has a total area of 399 square miles (1,032 km²), of which, 385 square miles (997 km²) of it is land and 13 square miles (35 km²) of it (3.38%) is water. Louisville is a city in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Footbridge over seasonal wetlands in the nature preserve Beargrass Creek State Nature Preserve is a 41-acre nature preserve in Louisville, Kentuckys Poplar Level neighborhood, in roughly the central portion of the city. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


Louisville is located in the Bluegrass region, but the city has a greater affinity for its location on the Ohio River, which spurred Louisville's growth from an isolated camp site into a major shipping port. Much of the city is located on a very wide and flat flood plain surrounded by hill country on all sides. Much of the area was swampland and had to be drained as the city grew. In the 1840s most creeks were rerouted or placed in canals to prevent flooding and subsequent disease outbreaks. Regions of Kentucky, with the bluegrass region in green and light green. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This picture shows the flood plain following a 1 in 10 year flood on the Isle of Wight. ...

New condominium construction along East Main Street
New condominium construction along East Main Street

Areas generally east of I-65 are above the flood plain, and are composed of gently rolling hills. The Southernmost parts of Jefferson County are in the scenic and largely undeveloped Knobs region home to Jefferson Memorial Forest. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 470 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) East Main in Lou. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 470 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) East Main in Lou. ... The Knobs is a narrow, horseshoe shaped region consisting of many small, zig zag shaped ridges that separates the Bluegrass region and Pennyroyal region of Kentucky. ... External links Jefferson Memorial Forest official site Categories: US geography stubs | Forests | Louisville, Kentucky ...


The Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), the 42nd largest in the United States, includes the Kentucky county of Jefferson (coterminous with Louisville Metro), plus twelve outlying counties — eight in Kentucky and four in Southern Indiana. Between the 1990 Census and 2000 Census, the Louisville MSA's population outgrew Lexington's by 149,415 and Cincinnati's by 23,278. This MSA is included in the Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which also includes the Elizabethtown, KY MSA as well as the Scottsburg, IN Micropolitan Statistical Area. The Louisville CSA ranks 39th in the U.S. in population.[23] The Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 43rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... There are two official definitions of metropolitan area used today in the United States, metropolitan statistical areas, and combined statistical areas, the former restrictive, the latter more extensive. ... Southern Indiana, in the United States, is notable because it is culturally and geographically more similar to the South than it is to the rest of the state of Indiana. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... The Lexington-Fayette, KY Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 109th largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky metropolitan area The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky____the worst place on the planet____ metropolitan area is a metropolitan area that includes 15 counties in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. ... The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN CSA The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN Combined Statistical Area is the 31st largest Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of the United States. ... Elizabethtown is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Scottsburg is a city in Scott County, Indiana, about 30 miles (47 km) north of Louisville, Kentucky. ... United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ... Map of the Core Based Statistical Areas of the United States and Puerto Rico (MSAs in red and μSAs in blue) Map of the Combined Statistical Areas of the United States and Puerto Rico // The following sortable table lists the 718 primary census statistical areas[1] of the United States...


Climate

Graph constructed from data located on the NOAA Website.[24]

Louisville is located on the northern limit of the humid subtropical climate. Summers are typically hot and humid with mildly warm evenings. The mean annual temperature is 56 °F (13 °C), with an average annual snowfall of 16.4 inches (41 cm) and an average annual rainfall of 44.53 inches (1131 mm). The wettest seasons are the spring and summer, although rainfall is fairly constant all year round. During the winter, particularly in January and February, several days of snow can be expected, allowing for winter sports. January is the coldest month with average highs of 41 °F (5 °C) and average lows of 25 °F (5 to −4 °C) and July the hottest month with average high and low temperatures from 87 to 69.8 °F (31 and 21 °C).[25] The highest recorded temperature was 105 °F (41 °C) on July 14, 1954, and the lowest recorded temperature was −22 °F (−30 °C) on January 19, 1994.[26] However, in any season, temperatures can vary widely day by day, because of Louisville's location where many fronts often converge. Severe weather is not uncommon; the area is prone to almost all types of non-tropical weather extremes, including tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, ice storms and extreme heat and cold. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 584 pixel Image in higher resolution (844 × 616 pixel, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: image/gif) This is a graph that I constructed and I am making available under a free license. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 584 pixel Image in higher resolution (844 × 616 pixel, file size: 11 KB, MIME type: image/gif) This is a graph that I constructed and I am making available under a free license. ... The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... NOAA scientists observe severe weather using a mobile doppler radar and a helicopter (in the distance) Severe weather phenomena are weather conditions that are hazardous. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ...


Much like the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, Louisville's Ohio River Valley location traps air pollution. The city is ranked by Environmental Defense as America's 38th worst city for air quality.[27] Louisville also often exemplifies the heat island effect. Temperatures in commercial areas and in the industrialized areas along interstates are often higher than in the suburbs, particularly the shaded areas, like Anchorage, where temperatures are often five degrees Fahrenheit (3 °C) cooler. San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... Environmental Defense (formerly known as the Environmental Defense Fund or EDF), is a US-based nonprofit environmental advocacy group. ... Tokyo, a case of Urban Heat Island. ... Anchorage is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ...


Cityscape

See also: Downtown Louisville, Louisville neighborhoods, and List of parks in Louisville, Kentucky
East Louisville's Highlands district
East Louisville's Highlands district

The downtown business district of Louisville is located immediately south of the Ohio River, and southeast of the Falls of the Ohio. Major roads extend outwards from the downtown area to all directions, like the spokes of a wheel. The airport is located approximately 6.75 miles (10 km) south of the downtown area. The industrial sections of town are located to the south and west of the airport, while most of the residential areas of the city are located to the southwest, south and east of downtown. The Louisville skyline is slated to be changed with the proposed 62-story Museum Plaza as well as a 22,000-seat waterfront arena. Louisville skyline at night Louisville, Kentucky is home to numerous structures that are noteworthy due to their architectural characteristics or historic associations, the most noteworthy being the Old Louisville neighborhood, the third largest historic preservation district in the United States. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... This is a list of official neighborhoods in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Following is a list of parks, forests and nature preserves in the metropolitan area of Louisville, Kentucky: // The Olmsted Park System in Louisville was the last of five such systems designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. ... Image File history File links LouisvilleNightSkyline2-small. ... Image File history File links LouisvilleNightSkyline2-small. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 426 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Scene along Bardstown Road in Louisville Kentucky File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 426 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Scene along Bardstown Road in Louisville Kentucky File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... For other uses, see South (disambiguation). ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Cardinal point redirects here. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... A residential area is a type of land use where the predominant use is residential. ... Museum Plaza is a planned 62-story skyscraper in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville waterfront arena is a proposed basketball and multipurpose arena slated to open in 2010 on the Ohio River Waterfront in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.. Its primary tenant will be the University of Louisville mens and womens basketball teams. ...


Another primary business and industrial district is located in the suburban area east of the city on Hurstbourne Parkway.[28] Louisville's late 19th and early 20th century development was spurred by three large suburban parks built at the edges of the city in 1890. Industrial district is a term used to describe an area where workers of a monolithic heavy industry (ship-building, coal mining, steel-working, ceramics, etc) live within walking-distance of their places of work. ...


The city's architecture contains a blend of old and new. The Old Louisville neighborhood is the largest historic preservation district solely featuring Victorian homes and buildings in the United States, it is also the third largest such district overall. There are many modern skyscrapers downtown, as well as older preserved structures. The buildings of West Main Street in downtown Louisville boast the largest collection of cast iron facades of anywhere outside of New York's SoHo district.[29] This article is about building architecture. ... Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... Demolition of the former Penn Station concourse raised public awareness about preservation Historic preservation is the act of maintaining and repairing existing historic materials and the retention of a propertys form as it has evolved over time. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Cast iron usually refers to grey cast iron, but can mean any of a group of iron-based alloys containing more than 2% carbon (alloys with less carbon are carbon steel by definition). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...

Werne's Row in Old Louisville
Werne's Row in Old Louisville
New construction in Downtown Louisville
New construction in Downtown Louisville

Since the mid-20th century, Louisville has in some ways been divided up into three sides of town: the West End, the South End, and the East End. In 2003, Bill Dakan, a University of Louisville geography professor, said that the West End, west of 7th Street and north of Algonquin Parkway, is "a euphemism for the African-American part of town" although he points out that this belief is not entirely true, and most Africans Americans no longer live in areas where more than 80% of residents are black. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x1011, 342 KB)[edit] Summary I took this picture in September 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x1011, 342 KB)[edit] Summary I took this picture in September 2006. ... Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... A euphemism is the substitution of an agreeable or less offensive expression in place of one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant to the listener;[1] or in the case of doublespeak, to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ...


Nevertheless, he says the perception is still strong.[30] The South End has long had a reputation as a white, working-class part of town, while the East End has been seen as middle and upper class.[31] The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Upper class is a concept in sociology that refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ...


According to the Greater Louisville Association of Realtors, the area with the lowest median home sales price is west of Interstate 65, in the West and South Ends, the middle range of home sales prices are between Interstates 64 and 65 in the South and East Ends, and the highest median home sales price are north of Interstate 64 in the East End.[32] Immigrants from Southeast Asia tend to settle in the South End, while immigrants from Eastern Europe settle in the East End.[33] Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ...


Government and politics

See also: List of mayors of Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville Metro is governed by an executive dubbed the Metro Mayor as well as a city legislature dubbed the Metro Council. The first and current Metro Mayor is Jerry E. Abramson (D), who was also the longest serving Mayor of the former City of Louisville's history, serving from 1985 to 1998. This has earned him the nickname "Mayor for Life"[34] Louisville City Hall in downtown, built 1870-1873, is a blend of Italianate styles characteristic of Neo-Renaissance Louisville Metro is governed by an executive dubbed the Metro Mayor as well as a city legislature dubbed the Metro Council. ... The history of Louisville, Kentucky as a city is considered to have started on February 13, 1828, the date of the first city charter. ... The Mayor of Louisville Metro (or Metro Mayor) is the current mayoral head of government for the consolidated city-county government of Louisville, Kentucky. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Louisville Metro Council District Map The Louisville Metro Council is the city legislature of Louisville, Kentucky (Louisville Metro). ... Jerry E. Abramson Jerry Edwin Abramson (born September 12, 1946) is a Democratic politician who is the longest serving Mayor of Louisville, Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The history of Louisville, Kentucky as a city is considered to have started on February 13, 1828, the date of the first city charter. ...

The Metro Council consists of 26 seats corresponding to 26 districts apportioned by population throughout the city and county. The residents of the semi-independent municipalities within Louisville Metro are apportioned to districts along with all other county residents. Half (13) of the seats come up for reelection every two years. The council is chaired by a Council President, currently Jim King (D), who is elected by the council members annually. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (743x1024, 190 KB) Summary City Hall, 601 West Jefferson Street, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY. The architecture is a blend of Italianate and French Second Empire. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (743x1024, 190 KB) Summary City Hall, 601 West Jefferson Street, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY. The architecture is a blend of Italianate and French Second Empire. ... Louisville City Hall was completed in 1873 to house the city government of Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Louisville Metro Council District Map The Louisville Metro Council is the city legislature of Louisville, Kentucky (Louisville Metro). ...


The Official Seal of the City of Louisville, no longer used following the formation of a consolidated city-county government in 2003, reflected its history and heritage in the fleur-de-lis representing French aid given during the Revolutionary War, and the thirteen stars signify the original colonies. The new seal of the consolidated government retains the fleur-de-lis, but has only two stars, one representing the city and the other the county. In American local government, a consolidated city-county, metropolitan municipality or regional municipality is a city and county that have been merged into one jurisdiction. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... This article is about military actions only. ...


Kentucky's 3rd congressional district is roughly coterminous with Louisville Metro, which is represented by Rep. John Yarmuth (D), though some of the southern areas of the city are in the 2nd congressional district, which is represented by Ron Lewis (R).[35] Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 3 is a district of the United States Congress centered in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, and encompassing nearly the whole of Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... John Yarmuth (born November 4, 1947) is the congressman for Kentuckys 3rd congressional district. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 2 is a district of the United States Congress in Western-central Kentucky. ... Ron Lewis (born September 14, 1946), an American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1994, representing the 2nd Congressional District of Kentucky. ... GOP redirects here. ...


Crime and public safety

See also: Louisville Metro Police Department

Louisville is consistently ranked as one of the safest cities in the country and has been ranked in the Top 10 safest large cities by Morgan Quitno in the past 4 years. In the 2005 Morgan Quitno survey, Louisville was rated as the seventh safest large city in the United States.[36] The 2006 edition of the survey ranked Louisville eighth.[37] The Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) began operations on January 6, 2003, as part of the creation of the consolidated city-county government in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) began operations on January 6, 2003, as part of the creation of the consolidated city-county government in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Morgan Quitno Press is an research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ...

Year Murders
2005 55
2006 50
2007 79
2008 17 (as of 4-21)

In 2006, Louisville-Jefferson County recorded only 50 murders, compared to over 100 murders in the similarly sized cities of Cincinnati, Columbus, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Memphis, and Nashville. Louisville's total crime rate was less than half of most surrounding cities.[38] Cincinnati redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Nashville redirects here. ... This graph shows the rate of non-fatal firearm-related crime in the United States from 1993 to 2003. ...


The Louisville Metro Area's overall violent crime rate was 412.6 per 100,000 residents in 2005, compared with a rate of 894.1 for Nashville, 575.4 for Indianapolis, and 544.4 for St Louis.[39] The Elizabethtown, Kentucky Metro Area, which is part of Louisville's Combined Statistical Area, was the 17th safest Metro in the U.S.[40] Kentucky has the 5th lowest violent crime rate out of the 50 States.[41] A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ... St. ...


Violent crime is most concentrated West of Downtown, especially in the Russell neighborhood. The West End, located north of Algonquin Parkway and West of 9th Street, had 32 of the city's 79 murders in 2007.[42] Russell is a neighborhood immediately west of downtown Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It was named for renowned African American educator and Bloomfield, Kentucky native Harvey Clarence Russell Sr. ...


Demographics

Note: All demographics are the same as that of Jefferson County, Kentucky, which merged with the former City of Louisville on January 6, 2003.

As of the census[43] of 2000, there were 693,604 people, 287,012 households, and 183,113 families residing in the city/county. The population density was 1,801 people per square mile (695/km²). There were 305,835 housing units at an average density of 794/sq mi (307/km²). The racial makeup of the city/county is 77.38% White, 18.88% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.68% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. 1.78% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race. Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... // Demographics in 2000 US Census Pacific Islander Americans represent the smallest group counted on the 2000 US Census. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ...


As of 2007, the demographics of the actual "city" of Louisville (which does not include the population of the county) puts Louisville at 245,315 people and 3,995 people per square mile. The racial makeup of the city is 60.05% white, 35.22% black, 1.86% Asian, 0.24% Native American, and 2.95% 'Other'. 2.42% of the people in Louisville, KY, claim hispanic ethnicity (meaning 97.58% are non-hispanic).


There were 287,012 households out of which 29.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.20% were married couples living together, 14.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.20% were non-families. 30.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.97. Matrimony redirects here. ...


The age distribution is 24.30% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 22.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.60 males.


The median income for a household is $39,457, and the median income for a family was $49,161. Males had a median income of $36,484 versus $26,255 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,352. About 9.50% of families and 12.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.10% of those under age 18 and 8.80% of those ages 65 or over. The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ... Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... The poverty threshold, or poverty line, is the minimum level of income deemed necessary to achieve an adequate standard of living. ...


17% of the state's population lives in Jefferson County and 25% live in counties in the Louisville CSA, and also Jefferson County has 2.5 times more people than Kentucky's second most populous county, Fayette County. 12 of the 15 buildings in Kentucky over 300 feet (91 m) are located in downtown Louisville. Over one-third of the population growth in Kentucky is in Louisville's CSA counties. The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ...


Religion

Religion is very prominent in Louisville which hosts several religious institutions of various faiths. There are 135,421 Catholic Louisvillians who are part of the Archdiocese of Louisville covering 24 counties in central Kentucky (consisting of 121 parishes and missions spread over 8,124 square miles).[44] The Cathedral of the Assumption located in downtown Louisville is the seat of the Archdiocese of Louisville. Our Lady of Gethsemani Abbey, the monastic home of Catholic writer Thomas Merton, is in nearby Bardstown, Kentucky and also located in the archdiocese. Louisville is also the home of Our Lady's Rosary Makers, the largest Catholic Rosary making group in the United States with 17,000 active members worldwide. The Cathedral of the Assumption is the cathedral motherchurch of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Cathedral of the Assumption is the cathedral motherchurch of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Louisville in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Archdiocese of Louisville The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Louisville consists of twenty-four counties in Central Kentucky covering 8,124 square miles. ... The Abbey of Gethsemani was founded in 1848 by monks from the Abbey of Melleray in Western France. ... Thomas Merton (January 31, 1915 – December 10, 1968) was one of the most influential Catholic authors of the 20th century. ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... Our Ladys Rosary Makers is a non-profit apostolate in Louisville, Kentucky dedicated to spreading devotion to the Blessed Mother and the Rosary. ... Our Lady of Lourdes appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ...


A sizable number of Louisvillians belong to a Protestant faith. One in three Louisvillians is Southern Baptist belonging to one of 147 local Southern Baptist Congregations.[45] Southeast Christian Church, a megachurch and one of the largest Christian churches in the United States, is located in Louisville. The city is home to The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary and the headquarters of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Additionally, Louisville is home to the oldest African American Seventh-day Adventist congregation, Magazine Street Seventh-day Adventist Church. The historic Christ Church Cathedral is the seat of the Episcopal Diocese of Kentucky. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Southeast Christian Church is an evangelical, Christian church in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The interior of Rev. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Athanasius · Augustine · Constantine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Arminius · Calvin · Luther · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... one of ten seminaries in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), is distinguished by its nationally recognized field education and marriage and family therapy programs, its focus on nurturing faith development within congregations, communities and families, the scholarship and church service among its faculty, and a commitment to training women... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[3]) Church is a Protestant Christian denomination which is distinguished mainly by its observance of Saturday, the original seventh day of the Judeo-Christian week, as the Sabbath. ... The Episcopal Diocese of Kentucky is a diocese of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, encompassing the western half of the state of Kentucky. ...


Louisville is home to three Eastern Orthodox parishes. Assumption Greek Orthodox Church, as well as two Antiochian parishes, St. George and St. Michael the Archangel serve the Orthodox of the area. Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ...


The Louisville Kentucky Temple, the 76th temple of the Latter Day Saints (Mormon) faith, is located in nearby Crestwood. The Louisville Kentucky Temple is the 76th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... A Latter Day Saint (LDS) is a person who identifies with the Latter Day Saint movement and is a follower of Mormonism. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Crestwood is a city located in Oldham County, Kentucky. ...


There is a Jewish population of around 8,500 in the city and five synagogues. Most Jewish families originally came from Eastern Europe at the turn of the 20th century, and around 800 Soviet Jews have moved to Louisville since 1991.[46] Jewish immigrants founded Jewish Hospital, which was once the center of the city's Jewish district. Jewish hospital recently merged with the Catholic healthcare system CARITAS. For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Eastern Europe is a concept that lacks one precise definition. ... The vast territories of the Russian Empire at one time hosted the largest Jewish population in the world. ... Map of countries with universal health care (click to enlarge) A health care system is an organization to deliver health care. ...


Kentucky's only Hindu temple opened in suburban Louisville in 1999, and had about 125 members and two full-time priests in 2000.[47] In 2001, there were an estimated four to ten thousand practicing Muslims in Louisville attending six local mosques.[48] The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ...


Economy

See also: Greater Louisville Inc.
Bourbon bottle, 19th century. One-third of all bourbon whiskey comes from Louisville.
Bourbon bottle, 19th century. One-third of all bourbon whiskey comes from Louisville.

Louisville's early economy first developed through the shipping and cargo industries. Its strategic location at the Falls of the Ohio, as well as its unique position in the central United States (within one day's road travel to 60% of the cities in the continental U.S.) make it an ideal location for the transfer of cargo along its route to other destinations.[49] The Louisville and Portland Canal and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad were important links in water and rail transportation. Louisville's importance to the shipping industry continues today with the presence of the Worldport global air hub for UPS at Louisville International Airport. Louisville's location at the crossroads of three major Interstate highways (I-64, I-65 and I-71) also contributes to its modern-day strategic importance to the shipping and cargo industry. As of 2003, Louisville ranks as the 7th largest inland port in the United States.[50] Bourbon bottle, 19th century. ... Bourbon-bottle from Gettysburg Bottle From http://www. ... Bourbon-bottle from Gettysburg Bottle From http://www. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Oak casks in ricks used store and age bourbon. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... McAlpine Locks and Dam, Louisville, Kentucky The McAlpine Locks and Dam refers to the series of locks and the hydroelectric dam in Louisville, Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. ... Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... UPS Worldport Air Hub at Louisville International Airport Worldport is the worldwide air hub for UPS (United Parcel Service) located at the Louisville International Airport in Louisville, Kentucky. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 71 (abbreviated I-71) is an Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes/Midwestern region of the United States. ... Inland ports are shipping, receiving and distribution centers designed to relieve the congestion in increasingly busy seaports. ...


Recently, Louisville has emerged as a major center for the health care and medical sciences industries. Louisville has been central to advancements in heart and hand surgery as well as cancer treatment. Some of the earliest artificial heart transplants were conducted in Louisville. Louisville's thriving downtown medical research campus includes a new $88 million rehabilitation center, and a health sciences research and commercialization park that, in partnership with the University of Louisville, has lured nearly 70 top scientists and researchers. Louisville is also home to Humana, one of the nation's largest health insurance companies. A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Cardiac surgery is surgery on the heart, typically to treat complications of ischemic heart disease (e. ... The field of hand surgery deals with both surgical and non-surgical treatment of conditions and problems that may take place in the hand or upper extremity (commonly from the tip of the hand to the shoulder). ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... An artificial heart is a device that is implanted into the body to replace the original biological heart. ... Look up Rehabilitation on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Rehabilitation is the restoration of lost capabilities, or the treatment aimed at producing it. ... Health Sciences are the group of disciplines of applied science dealing with human and animal health. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The term health insurance is generally used to describe a form of insurance that pays for medical expenses. ...


Louisville is home to several major corporations and organizations: For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...

Louisville for a long time was also home to Brown & Williamson, the third largest company in the tobacco industry before merging with R. J. Reynolds in 2004 to form the Reynolds American Company. Brown & Williamson, one of the subjects of the tobacco industry scandals of the 1990s, was the focus of The Insider, a 1999 film shot around the Louisville area. Also located in Louisville are two major Ford plants, and a major General Electric appliance factory. The Brown-Forman Corporation is one of the largest American-owned companies in the wine and spirits business, and is a diversified producer and marketer of fine quality consumer products. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ... Hillerich & Bradsby is a company located in Louisville, Kentucky that produces the famous Louisville Slugger baseball bat. ... This article is about the sport. ... PNC Financial Services (NYSE: PNC) is a U.S.-based financial services corporation, with assets of $92. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Kindred Healthcare Incorporated is a Fortune 500 company located in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Norton Healthcare is Kentuckys largest healthcare system with 40 locations in and around Louisville, Kentucky. ... Papa Johns Pizza (NASDAQ: PZZA) is the third largest carryout and delivery pizza restaurant in the United States behind Pizza Hut and Dominos Pizza; it is based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... PharMerica is a publicly-traded Fortune 1000 company formed in January 2007 from the merger of Kindred Healthcares pharmacy business with a subsidiary of AmerisourceBergen. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... Yum! Brands, Inc. ... KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ... Pizza Hut Inc. ... Taco Bell Corp. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the largest global American beverage and snack company. ... Long John Silvers is a United States-based fast-food restaurant that specializes in seafood and fish and chips. ... A&W restaurant in Page, Arizona A&W is a chain of fast food restaurants distinguished by their draft root beer and root beer floats, made on the premises from concentrate and served in large glass mugs. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Image File history File links Humana. ... Image File history File links Humana. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Brown & Williamson is an American tobacco company, which produces cigarette brands. ... The tobacco industry comprises those persons and companies engaged in the growth, preparation for sale, shipment, advertisement, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. ... Richard Joshua R.J. Reynolds (1850-1918) was an American businessman and founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. ... Reynolds American, Inc. ... A corporate scandal is a scandal involving allegations of unethical behavior by people acting within or on behalf of a corporation. ... The Insider is a 1999 film which tells the true story of a 60 Minutes television series exposé of the tobacco industry, as seen through the eyes of a real tobacco executive, Jeffrey Wigand. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... GE redirects here. ...


Additionally, one third of all of the bourbon whiskey comes from Louisville. The Brown-Forman Corporation is one of the major makers of bourbon, which is headquartered in Louisville. Other major distilleries of bourbon can be found both in the city of Louisville, and in neighboring cities in Kentucky. Bourbon bottle, 19th century Oak casks in ricks used store and age bourbon. ... The Brown-Forman Corporation is one of the largest American-owned companies in the wine and spirits business, and is a diversified producer and marketer of fine quality consumer products. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


Louisville also prides itself in its large assortment of small, independent businesses and restaurants, some of which have become known for their ingenuity and creativity. In 1926 the Brown Hotel became the home of the Hot Brown "sandwich". A few blocks away, the Seelbach Hotel, which F. Scott Fitzgerald references in The Great Gatsby, is also famous for a secret back room where Al Capone would regularly meet with associates during the Prohibition era. The Brown Hotel (formerly the Camberley Brown Hotel) is a historic 16-story hotel in downtown Louisville, Kentucky, located on the corner of Fourth and Broadway. ... A Hot Brown is a hot sandwich originally created at the Brown Hotel (now Camberley-Brown Hotel) in Louisville, Kentucky by Fred K. Schmidt in 1926. ... The Seelbach Hotel, now known as the Seelbach Hilton, was founded by Bavarian-born brothers Louis and Otto Seelbach. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... This article is about the novel. ... “Capone” redirects here. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...


Several major motion pictures have also been filmed in or near Louisville, including Goldfinger, Stripes, The Insider, Lawn Dogs, Nice Guys Sleep Alone, Keep Your Distance and Elizabethtown. Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... Stripes is a 1981 American comedy film starring Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, and Warren Oates. ... Lawn Dogs (1997) is a controversial film dealing with class relations, or possibly an even more controversial film dealing with pedophilia. ... Elizabethtown is a 2005 film written and directed by Cameron Crowe. ...


Culture

Annual festivals and other events

See also: List of attractions and events in Louisville, Kentucky
2006 Kentucky Derby Festival Thunder Over Louisville fireworks display as seen from the Kentucky side of the Ohio River
2006 Kentucky Derby Festival Thunder Over Louisville fireworks display as seen from the Kentucky side of the Ohio River

Louisville is home to a number of annual cultural events. Perhaps most well-known is the Kentucky Derby, held annually during the first Saturday of May. The Derby is preceded by a two-week long Kentucky Derby Festival, which starts with the annual Thunder Over Louisville, the largest annual fireworks display in the nation. The Kentucky Derby Festival also features notable events such as the Pegasus Parade, The Great Steamboat Race, Great Balloon Race, a marathon, and about seventy events in total. Esquire magazine has called the Kentucky Derby "the biggest party in the south." Statues of fancifully painted horses can currently be seen around Louisville. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A scene from Thunder Over Louisville 2006. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)A scene from Thunder Over Louisville 2006. ... The 2006 Kentucky Derby Festival poster. ... The 2nd Street Bridge during Thunder Over Louisville, from the Indiana side Thunder Over Louisville is an annual aircraft show and fireworks display in Louisville, Kentucky. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The 2006 Kentucky Derby Festival poster. ... The 2nd Street Bridge during Thunder Over Louisville, from the Indiana side Thunder Over Louisville is an annual aircraft show and fireworks display in Louisville, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... A balloon race A balloon flight contest (also called a balloon race in some places) is a competition wherein the competitors attempt to send unmanned balloons as far as possible. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ...


Usually beginning in late February or early March is the Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville, an internationally acclaimed new-play festival that lasts approximately six weeks. The internationally renowned Humana Festival of New American Plays celebrates the contemporary American playwright. ... Actors Theatre of Louisville is a performing arts theater located in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ...


On Memorial Day Weekend, Louisville hosts the largest annual Beatles Festival in the world, Abbey Road on the River. The festival lasts five days and is located on the Belvedere in downtown Louisville. This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Crowds watching Thunder Over Louisville gather in the plaza Riverfront Plaza/Belvedere is a public area on the Ohio River in Downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ...


The summer season in Louisville also features a series of cultural events such as the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival (commonly called Shakespeare in the Park), held in July of every year and features free Shakespeare plays in Central Park in Old Louisville. The Kentucky State Fair is held every August at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville as well, featuring an array of culture from all areas of Kentucky. The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival is a cultural event which features free Shakespeare performances every summer in Central Park in Old Louisville (in Louisville, Kentucky). ... Shakespeare in the Park is a concept used across the world, as a form of free public presentation of William Shakespeares works. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Central Park is a 17 acre park maintained by the city of Louisville, KY. Located in the Old Louisville neighborhood, it was first developed for public use in the 1870s and refered to as DuPont Square since it was at that time part of the DuPont family estate. ... Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... The Kentucky State Fair is the state fair of Kentucky, located at 937 Phillips Lane in Louisville. ... The Kentucky Exposition Center (KEC), formerly Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center, is a large multi-use facility in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...

In September is the Adam Matthews Balloon Festival, the fifth largest hot air balloon festival in the nation. The festival features early morning balloon races, as well as balloon glows in the evening. Also in September, in nearby Bardstown, is the annual Kentucky Bourbon Festival, which features some of the finest bourbon in the world. The suburb of Jeffersontown is also the home of the annual Gaslight Festival, a series of events spread over a week. Attendance is approximately 200,000 for the week. ImageMetadata File history File links BalloonRace_AdamMatthews_09232005. ... ImageMetadata File history File links BalloonRace_AdamMatthews_09232005. ... The Adam Matthews Balloon Festival is held annually in Louisville, Kentucky in the United States. ... The Adam Matthews Balloon Festival is held annually in Louisville, Kentucky in the United States. ... This article is about hot air balloons themselves. ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Oak casks in ricks used store and age bourbon. ... Jeffersontown is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ...


The month of October features the St. James Court Art Show in Old Louisville. Thousands of artists gather on the streets and in the courtyard to exhibit and sell their wares, and the event is attended by many art collectors and enthusiasts. The show is the second most attended event next to the Derby. Another art-related event that occurs every month is the First Friday Trolley Hop. A TARC trolley takes art lovers to many downtown area art galleries on the first Friday of every month. Each year, 600 artisans display their wares at the festival. ... The Transit Authority of River City (TARC) is the major public transportation provider for the Louisville Metro area, as well as the Kentucky suburbs of Oldham County, Bullitt County, and Clark County and Floyd County in southern Indiana. ...


Museums, galleries and interpretive centers

A giant baseball bat adorns the outside of Louisville Slugger Museum in downtown Louisville.
A giant baseball bat adorns the outside of Louisville Slugger Museum in downtown Louisville.
See also: Museums of Louisville, Kentucky and List of attractions and events in Louisville, Kentucky

The West Main District in downtown Louisville features what is locally known as "Museum Row". In this area, the Frazier International History Museum, which opened in 2004, features a collection of arms, armor and related historical artifacts spanning 1,000 years, concentrating on U.S. and UK arms. The building features three stories of exhibits, two reenactment arenas, a 120-seat auditorium, and a 48-seat movie theater. Also nearby is the Louisville Science Center, which is Kentucky's largest hands-on science center and features interactive exhibits, IMAX films, educational programs and technology networks. The Muhammad Ali Center opened November 2005 in "Museum Row" and features Louisville native Muhammad Ali's boxing memorabilia, as well as information on the core themes that he has taken to heart: peace, social responsibility, respect and personal growth. ImageMetadata File history File links LouisvilleSluggerMusem. ... ImageMetadata File history File links LouisvilleSluggerMusem. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Louisville Slugger Museum is a museum in Louisville, Kentucky showcasing the history of the Louisville Slugger brand of baseball bats made by Hillerich & Bradsby and baseball in general. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... This is a list of museums, galleries and interpretive centers in the Louisville, Kentucky area. ... Statues of fancifully painted horses can currently be seen around Louisville. ... Front facade of the Louisville Science Center in the West Main District of Downtown Louisville The West Main District is one of the five districts of downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... The Frazier International History Museum, formerly the Frazier Historical Arms Museum, is a historical arms museum located in Louisville, Kentucky, focusing on U.S. and UK arms, armor and various other historical objects from the last 1,000 years. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... The Louisville Science Center, previously known as the Louisville Museum of Science and Natural History, is Kentuckys largest hands-on science museum. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far greater size and resolution than conventional film display systems. ... The Muhammad Ali Center, a tribute to the man and his values, is scheduled to open in the Fall of 2005, in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Social responsibility is an ethical or ideological theory that an entity whether it is a government, corporation, organization or individual has a responsibility to society. ... Personal development (also known as self-development, self-improvement or personal growth) comprises the development of the self. ...

The Muhammad Ali Center, alongside Interstate 64 on Louisville's riverfront
The Muhammad Ali Center, alongside Interstate 64 on Louisville's riverfront

The Speed Art Museum opened in 1927 and is the oldest and largest art museum in the state of Kentucky. Located adjacent to the University of Louisville, the museum features over 12,000 pieces of art in its permanent collection and hosts regular temporary exhibitions. Multiple art galleries are located in the city, but they are especially concentrated in the East Market Street area of downtown. This row of galleries, plus others in the West Main District, are prominently featured in the monthly First Friday Trolley Hop. Image File history File links AliCenter. ... Image File history File links AliCenter. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... The Speed Art Museum is the oldest and largest museum of art in Kentucky. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ...

Historic Locust Grove, the final residence of Louisville founder George Rogers Clark
Historic Locust Grove, the final residence of Louisville founder George Rogers Clark

Several local history museums can be found in the Louisville area. The most prominent among them is The Filson Historical Society, founded in 1884, which has holdings exceeding 1.5 million manuscript items and over 50,000 volumes in the library. The Filson's extensive collections focus on Kentucky, the Upper South, and the Ohio River Valley, and contain a large collection of portraiture and over ten thousand museum artifacts. Other local history museums include the Portland Museum, Historic Locust Grove, Conrad-Caldwell House Museum, the Falls of the Ohio State Park interpretive center (Clarksville, Indiana), Howard Steamboat Museum (Jeffersonville, Indiana) and the Carnegie Center for Art and History (New Albany, Indiana). The Falls interpretive center, part of the Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area, also functions as a natural history museum, covering findings in the nearby exposed Devonian fossil bed. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Historic Locust Grove is an 18th century farm site situated in eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... Local history is the study of the history of a relatively small geographic area; typically a specific settlement, parish or county. ... The Filson Historical Society building in Old Louisville The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Upland South is defined by landform, history, and culture, and does not correspond well to state lines. ... The Ohio River is the largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi River. ... Historic Locust Grove is an 18th century farm site situated in eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Falls of the Ohio State Park is a state park in Indiana. ... Image:Louvre. ... Clarksville is a town in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Side view of Howard Steamboat Museum The Howard Steamboat Museum is located in Jeffersonville, Indiana, across from Louisville, Kentucky. ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Carnegie Center The Carnegie Center for Art and History, within the Downtown Historic District of New Albany, Indiana, is a local museum. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... For the Celtic language, see Southwestern Brythonic language; for the residents of the English county, see Devon. ... For other uses, see Fossil (disambiguation). ...

There are also several historical properties and items of interest in the area, including the Belle of Louisville, the oldest Mississippi-style steamboat in operation in the United States. The United States Marine Hospital of Louisville is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States. It was designed by Robert Mills, who is best known as the designer of the Washington Monument. Fort Knox, spread out among Bullitt, Hardin and Meade Counties (two of which are in the Louisville metropolitan area), is home to the U.S. Bullion Depository and the General George Patton Museum. The previously mentioned Locust Grove, former home of Louisville Founder George Rogers Clark, portrays life in the early days of the city. Other notable properties include the Farmington Historic Home (home of the famous Speed family), Riverside, The Farnsley-Moremen Landing, and the restored Union Station, which was opened in September 7, 1891. The Louisville area is also home to the Waverly Hills Sanatorium, a turn-of-the-century (20th) hospital that was originally built to accommodate tuberculosis patients, and is now listed as one of the nation's most haunted houses. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The Belle of Louisville. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The Belle of Louisville. ... The Belle of Louisville still serves as the symbol of Louisville in her 90th year. ... The Belle of Louisville still serves as the symbol of Louisville in her 90th year. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... The United States Marine Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, USA, is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect; Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. ... This article is about the monument in Washington, D.C. For other monuments dedicated to George Washington, see Washington Monuments (world). ... This article is about United States Army post. ... Bullitt County is a county located in the U.S. state, Kentucky6, just south of the city of Louisville. ... Hardin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Meade County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... The Louisville-Jefferson County, KY-IN Metropolitan Statistical Area is the 43rd largest Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in the United States. ... The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to, or entrusted to, the United States of America. ... The General George Patton Museum (formerly the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor) is a museum in Fort Knox, Kentucky dedicated to General George S. Patton, Jrs life and the history of armoured warfare, from World War I through the present day. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was a soldier from Virginia and the preeminent American military officer on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... Farmington house viewed from front Farmington in Louisville, Kentucky, was the home of the Speed family. ... The Farnsley-Moremen House Riverside, The Farnsley-Moremen Landing is a historic 300-acre farm and house in Southwest Louisville, Kentucky along the banks of the Ohio River. ... Louisville, Kentuckys Union Station has served as offices for the Transit Authority of River City since mid-April 1980. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Waverly Hills Sanatorium, located in Louisville, Kentucky, opened in 1910 as a two-story hospital to accommodate 40 to 50 tuberculosis patients. ... Fin de siècle is French for end of the century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Media

Louisville's newspaper of record is The Courier-Journal, and the alternative paper is the progressive alt-weekly Louisville Eccentric Observer (commonly called 'LEO'), which was founded by 3rd district U.S. Representative John Yarmuth (D). WAVE 3, an NBC affiliate, was Kentucky's first TV station. Another prominent TV station is ABC affiliate WHAS 11, formerly owned by the famous Bingham family (who also owned The Courier-Journal), which hosts the regionally notable annual fundraiser, the WHAS Crusade for Children. WDRB-FOX41/WMYO and CBS affiliate WLKY 32 round out the major television stations in the city. The most popular radio station is 84 WHAS 840 AM, designated by the FCC as a clear channel. This station was also formerly owned by the Binghams (now Clear Channel Communications), and is a talk radio station which also broadcasts regional sports. This article or section needs to be wikified. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... The Louisville Eccentric Observer (or LEO) is a free weekly newspaper (urban alternative weekly), distributed every Wednesday in over 800 locations throughout the Louisville, Kentucky area, including areas of southern Indiana. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 3 is a district of the United States Congress centered in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, and encompassing nearly the whole of Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... John Yarmuth (born November 4, 1947) is the congressman for Kentuckys 3rd congressional district. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other meanings, see wave (disambiguation). ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WHAS-TV, WHAS 11, is the ABC affiliated station in Louisville, Kentucky. ... George Barry Bingham, Jr. ... The WHAS Crusade for Children is an annual telethon broadcast by WHAS-TV and WHAS (AM) Radio in Louisville, Kentucky. ... WDRB is a television station in Louisville, Kentucky, broadcasting locally on channel 41 as a Fox affiliate. ... WMYO is a television station serving the Louisville, Kentucky market as a UPN affiliate on channel 58. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... WLKY-TV, WLKY 32 is a local CBS station in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It is owned by Hearst-Argyle Television. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... WHAS, Kentuckianas 24 Hour News, Weather and Traffic Station, is an AM radio station broadcasting in Louisville, Kentucky. ... A clear channel, in the general sense, is a communications channel (such as a radio frequency) on which only one transmitter operates at a time. ... Not to be confused with clear channel radio stations, which are AM radio stations with certain technical parameters. ... For other uses, see Talk Radio. ...


Parks and outdoor attractions

The Louisville Waterfront Park exhibits rolling hills, spacious lawns and walking paths on Louisville's waterfront in the downtown area.
The Louisville Waterfront Park exhibits rolling hills, spacious lawns and walking paths on Louisville's waterfront in the downtown area.
See also: List of parks in Louisville, Kentucky and List of attractions and events in Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville Metro has 122 city parks covering more than 14,000 acres (57 km²). Several of these parks were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, who also designed New York City's Central Park as well as parks, parkways, college campuses and public facilities in many U.S. locations. The Louisville Waterfront Park is prominently located on the banks of the Ohio River near downtown, and features large open areas, which often feature free concerts and other festivals. Cherokee Park, one of the most visited parks in the nation,[51] features a 2.6-mile (4.2 km) mixed-use loop and many well-known landscaping features. Other notable parks in the system include Iroquois Park, Shawnee Park and Central Park. The Louisville Waterfront Park provides a nice place to relax and have fun amidst the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Following is a list of parks, forests and nature preserves in the metropolitan area of Louisville, Kentucky: // The Olmsted Park System in Louisville was the last of five such systems designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. ... Statues of fancifully painted horses can currently be seen around Louisville. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... The Louisville Waterfront Park provides a nice place to relax and have fun amidst the hustle and bustle of the downtown area. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For other uses, see Concert (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... For the American former professional basketball player, see Cherokee Parks. ... Iroquois Park is a 739-acre municipal park in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Shawnee Park is a municipal park in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Central Park is a 17 acre park maintained by the city of Louisville, KY. Located in the Old Louisville neighborhood, it was first developed for public use in the 1870s and refered to as DuPont Square since it was at that time part of the DuPont family estate. ...


Going a bit further out from the downtown area is the Jefferson Memorial Forest which, at 6,057 acres (24.52 km²), is the largest municipal urban forest in the United States.[52] The forest is designated as a National Audubon Society wildlife refuge, and offers over 30 miles (50 km) of various hiking trails. External links Jefferson Memorial Forest official site Categories: US geography stubs | Forests | Louisville, Kentucky ... An urban forest is a forest or a collection of trees that grow within a city, town or a suburb. ... Headquarter of National Audubon Society in New York. ... A Wildlife refuge is a geographic territory within which wildlife is protected. ...


Otter Creek Park is another large park nearby. While actually in Brandenburg, Kentucky, Otter Creek Park is owned and operated by Louisville Metro government. The park's namesake, Otter Creek, winds along the eastern side of the park. A scenic bend in the Ohio River, which divides Kentucky from Indiana, can be seen from northern overlooks within the park. The park is a popular mountain biking destination, with trails maintained by a local mountain bike organization. Otter Creek Park is a 2,600 acre (11 km²) riverfront park in Meade County, Kentucky. ... Brandenburg is a city located in Meade County, Kentucky. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... A hardtail mountain bike. ...

A new section of the Louisville Loop Bike Trail
A new section of the Louisville Loop Bike Trail

Other outdoor points of interest in the Louisville area include Cave Hill Cemetery (the burial location of Col. Harland Sanders), Zachary Taylor National Cemetery (the burial location of President Zachary Taylor), the Louisville Zoo, Six Flags Kentucky Kingdom and the Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area. Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky. ... Harland David Sanders, better known as Colonel Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980) was the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). ... Zachary Taylor National Cemetery is a national cemetery in Louisville, Kentucky where President Zachary Taylor is buried. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... The Louisville Zoo, or the Louisville Zoological Garden, is located in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Six Flags Kentucky Kingdom, located in Louisville, Kentucky, is the ninth amusement park to use the Six Flags name. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ...


In development is the City of Parks, a project to create a continuous paved pedestrian and biking trail around Louisville Metro while also adding a large amount of park land. Current plans call for making basically the entire 1,600-acre (6 km²) Floyds Fork flood plain in eastern Jefferson County into park space, expanding area in the Jefferson Memorial Forest, and adding riverfront land and wharfs along the Riverwalk Trail and Levee Trail. City of Parks is a municipal project to create a continuous paved pedestrian and biking trail around the city of Louisville, Kentucky while also adding a large amount of park land. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Dedication plaque for the trail, located near the Belvedere The Riverwalk is a 6. ... The Levee Trail is a bike and pedestrian trail in southwestern Louisville, Kentucky. ...


Performing arts

See also: Theater in Kentucky and List of attractions and events in Louisville, Kentucky

The Kentucky Center, dedicated in 1983, located in the downtown hotel and entertainment district, features a variety of plays and concerts. This is also the home of the Louisville Ballet, Louisville Orchestra, Stage One, and the Kentucky Opera, which is the twelfth oldest opera in the United States. The statues Faribolus and Perceval, by Jean Dubuffet, stand at the entrance to the center. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Theater in Kentucky Theater venues in Kentucky include: In Louisville The Kentucky Center, the largest performing arts center in Kentucky The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival, presenting free Shakespeare performances every summer in Louisvilles Central Park Actors Theatre of Louisville The Louisville Palace The Kentucky Theater In Lexington The Kentucky Theatre... Statues of fancifully painted horses can currently be seen around Louisville. ... The statues Faribolus and Perceval, by Jean Dubuffet, stand at the entrance to the center. ... The Louisville Ballet is a ballet school and company based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville Orchestra is the primary orchestra in Louisville, Kentucky and has been called the cornerstone of the Louisville arts scene. ... The Kentucky Opera is the state opera of Kentucky, located in Louisville. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ...


Actors Theatre of Louisville, the centerpiece of the city's urban cultural district, has significant economic impact on a vital downtown life. Highly acclaimed for its artistic programming and business acumen, Actors Theatre hosts the Humana Festival of New American Plays each Spring. It also presents approximately six hundred performances of about thirty productions during its year-round season, composed of a diverse array of contemporary and classical fare. Actors Theatre of Louisville is a performing arts theater located in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... The internationally renowned Humana Festival of New American Plays celebrates the contemporary American playwright. ...


The Louisville Palace, the official venue for the Louisville Orchestra, is an elegant, ornate theatre in downtown Louisville's so-called theatre district. In addition to orchestra performances, the theatre also features an array of popular movies, old and new, as well as concerts by popular artists. The Louisville Palace is a theatre in downtown Louisville, Kentucky located in the citys so-called theater district on the east side of Fourth Street between Broadway and Chestnut Street. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


Iroquois Park is the home of the renovated Iroquois Amphitheater which hosts the productions of Music Theatre Louisville as well as a variety of musical concerts in a partially covered outdoor setting. Iroquois Park is a 739-acre municipal park in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Iroquois Park is a 739-acre municipal park in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Music Theatre Louisville is a non-profit organization in Louisville, Kentucky, dedicated to producing, presenting, and developing diverse and affordable entertainment. ...


Sports

College sports are very popular in the Louisville area, especially college basketball. The Louisville market has ranked first in ratings for the NCAA men's basketball tournament every year since 1999.[53] The University of Louisville men's basketball team, which won two national titles under coach Denny Crum, is the most profitable college basketball program in the country.[54] In 2001, Crum retired and was succeeded by Rick Pitino, former coach of the Boston Celtics and the Kentucky Wildcats. Pitino's hiring became a key event in the Kentucky-Louisville rivalry, which was renewed in 1983 and is considered one of the fiercest non-conference rivalries in college basketball.[55] Image File history File links Louisville_slugger_field_evening_2002. ... Image File history File links Louisville_slugger_field_evening_2002. ... Louisville Slugger Field is a baseball stadium in Louisville, Kentucky and is home to the Louisville Bats, the AAA affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds. ... Categories: Minor league baseball teams | Louisville sports | Baseball stubs ... Sports in Louisville, Kentucky // College College basketball and football, are the very popular here which prides itself on being one of the best college sports towns in America. ... College athletics refers to a set of physical activities comprising sports and games put into place by colleges. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... NCAA Tournament Champions 1980, 1986 NCAA Tournament Final Four 1959, 1972, 1975, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1986, 2005 NCAA Tournament Appearances 1951, 1959, 1961, 1964, 1967, 1968, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003... Denzil E. Denny Crum (born March 5, 1937 in San Fernando, California) is a former college mens basketball coach. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... Pitino coaching the Louisville Cardinals Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... Rivalry with Kentucky U of L has dominated the football rivalry UK has dominated the basketball rivalry The Louisville Cardinals are part of what is widely considered one of the most intense college rivalries in the U.S. Due to its intensity, the rivalry between the Wildcats in Cardinals is...


The Louisville Cardinals football team, which had produced talent like Johnny Unitas, Deion Branch, Sam Madison and Ray Buchanan, achieved national respect in the 1990s under coach Howard Schnellenberger when the team overwhelmingly defeated Alabama in the Fiesta Bowl. The program's stock continued to rise as it joined the Big East conference and won the FedEx Orange Bowl in 2007 under Bobby Petrino. The University of Louisville baseball team advanced to the College World Series in Omaha in 2007, as one of the final four teams to compete for the national championship. Head coach Steve Kragthorpe 1st year, 3–2 Home stadium Papa Johns Cardinal Stadium Capacity 42,000 - FieldTurf Conference Big East First year 1912 Website UofL Sports Team records All-time record 428–407–17 Postseason bowl record 6–7–1 Awards Conference titles 6 Pageantry Colors Red and... John Constantine Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933 – September 11, 2002), nicknamed The Golden Arm, was a professional American football player in the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Anthony Deion Branch, Jr. ... Samuel A. Madison (born April 23, 1974 in Monticello, Florida) is an NFL Football Pro Bowl cornerback who currently plays for the for the New York Giants of the NFL. Madison attended Florida A&M High School and won varsity letters in football, basketball, track, and baseball. ... Raymond Louis Buchanan (born September 29, 1971 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American football player, currently a free agent in the NFL. He plays the defensive back position. ... Howard Schnellenberger (born March 16, 1934) is an American football coach at both the professional and college level. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... Bernard Bobby Petrino (b. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ...

The Kentucky Derby in progress at Churchill Downs.
The Kentucky Derby in progress at Churchill Downs.

Horse racing is also a major attraction. Churchill Downs is home to the Kentucky Derby, the largest sporting event in the state, as well as the Kentucky Oaks which together cap the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. Churchill Downs has also hosted the renowned Breeders' Cup on six occasions, most recently in 2006. Image File history File links Derby. ... Image File history File links Derby. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Composite image of Churchill Downs on Derby Day, 1901 Churchill Downs, located on Central Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky, is a thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby. ... Composite image of Churchill Downs on Derby Day, 1901 Churchill Downs, located on Central Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky, is a thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... Sport from childhood. ... The Kentucky Oaks is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old Thoroughbred fillies staged annually in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The 2006 Kentucky Derby Festival poster. ... The Breeders Cup World Thoroughbred Championships is an annual series of thoroughbred horse races sponsored by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association. ...


Louisville is also the home of Valhalla Golf Club which hosted the 1996 and 2000 PGA Championships and the 2004 Senior PGA Championship, and will host the 2008 Ryder Cup. It is also home to Louisville Extreme Park, open since 2002, and which skateboarder Tony Hawk has called one of his top five skate parks.[56] Valhalla Golf Club, located in Louisville, Kentucky, is a private golf club designed by professional golfer Jack Nicklaus. ... The PGA Championship (often referred to as the U.S. PGA Championship outside of North America) is an annual golf tournament conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA Tour. ... The Senior PGA Championship is one of the major championships in mens senior golf. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... The Louisville Extreme Park is a 40,000 square foot (3,700 m²) public skatepark located in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... This article is about the American skateboarder. ...


Louisville has six professional and semi-professional sports teams. The Louisville Bats are a baseball team playing in the International League as the Class AAA affiliate of the nearby Cincinnati Reds. The team plays at Louisville Slugger Field at the edge of the city's downtown. The Louisville Fire play in af2, the minor league of the Arena Football League. The Louisville Chill are a minor league hockey team and play in the Midwest Hockey League. A semi-professional athlete is one who is paid money to play and thus is not an amateur, but for whom sport is not a full-time occupation, generally because the level of pay is too low to make a reasonable living based solely upon that source, thus making the... Categories: Minor league baseball teams | Louisville sports | Baseball stubs ... This article is about the sport. ... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... For other uses, see Cincinnati Reds (disambiguation). ... Louisville Slugger Field is a baseball stadium in Louisville, Kentucky and is home to the Louisville Bats, the AAA affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds. ... The Louisville Fire is an arena football team in af2. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... Minor leagues in the sense intended in this article are professional sports leagues which are not regarded as the premier leagues in those sports. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ...

The city of Louisville has made several unsuccessful bids in recent years to draw major league sports teams to the city, most notably when the Vancouver Grizzlies franchise was considering a move several years ago, as well as the Charlotte Hornets franchise, which ultimately ended up in New Orleans. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (960x1280, 176 KB) The Louisville, KY skatepark at night / 2002 Picture taken by Alan Blount in Louisville, Kentucky I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (960x1280, 176 KB) The Louisville, KY skatepark at night / 2002 Picture taken by Alan Blount in Louisville, Kentucky I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Louisville Extreme Park is a 40,000 square foot (3,700 m²) public skatepark located in downtown Louisville, Kentucky. ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ... The Memphis Grizzlies are a National Basketball Association team based in Memphis, Tennessee. ... The New Orleans Hornets are a professional basketball team based in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... NOLA redirects here. ...


High school sports are also popular. Louisville area high schools have been dominant in football for decades. Schools such as Butler, St. Xavier, Trinity and Male have won every state 4A football title except one since 1992 and have been 13 of the 15 finalists since 1997. Some fierce rivalries have developed over the years. The annual game between St. Xavier and Trinity draws over 35,000 fans and is the second largest attended high school sporting event in the country. The 2002 KY State 4A Football Championship between Male and Trinity, a showdown between future UofL teammates Brian Brohm (Trinity) and Michael Bush (Male) that ended with a 59-56 Trinity win, is listed as one of the top 50 sporting events of all time by many critics. The "Old Rivalry" between Male and Manual high schools is one of the nation's oldest, dating back to 1893, and was played on Thanksgiving Day through 1980, with Manual winning the final T-Day game by a score of 6-0 in overtime. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Butler is a High School in Louisville, Kentucky, it is involved with the Traditional program. ... St. ... Trinity High School, a high school in Louisville, Kentucky, first opened its doors in 1953, when Archbishop John Floersh anticipated the growth of Louisvilles eastern suburbs by choosing the site of Holy Trinity School, a former Catholic church and grade school in St. ... Established in 1856, Louisville Male High School in Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest public high school west of the Alleghenies. ... Brian Brohm (born September 23, 1985 in Louisville, Kentucky) is currently the starting quarterback for the University of Louisville, a member of the Big East Conference. ... Michael Bush (born June 16, 1984, in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American football running back player for the Oakland Raiders. ... Established in 1856, Louisville Male High School in Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest public high school west of the Alleghenies. ... duPont Manual High School is a secondary school located at 120 West Lee Street in the Old Louisville neighborhood of Louisville, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Thanksgiving (disambiguation). ...


Current professional teams

See also: Historical professional sports teams in Louisville
Club Sport Founded League Venue
Louisville Bulls Football 1988 Mid Continental Football League Various
Louisville Kings Australian rules football 1996 USAFL (USFOOTY) Hays-Kennedy Park
Louisville Fire Arena football 2001 af2 Freedom Hall
Louisville Bats Baseball 2002 International League Louisville Slugger Field
Kentucky Retros Basketball 2007 ABA
Louisville Chill Hockey 2008 Midwest Hockey League Alpine Ice Arena

Sports in Louisville, Kentucky // College College basketball and football, are the very popular here which prides itself on being one of the best college sports towns in America. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Mid Continental Football League (MCFL) is a semi-pro football league the currently consisting of ten teams in the Kentucky (1), Indiana (1), Ohio (3), and Michigan (5) areas. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... The United States Australian Football League (also known informally as the USAFL or US Footy) is the governing body for Australian rules football (or footy) in the United States. ... The Louisville Fire is an arena football team in af2. ... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ... Freedom Hall at a distance Freedom Hall is a multipurpose arena in Louisville, Kentucky on the grounds of the Kentucky Exposition Center, which is owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. ... Categories: Minor league baseball teams | Louisville sports | Baseball stubs ... This article is about the sport. ... The International League (IL) is a minor league baseball league which operates in the eastern United States and Canada. ... Louisville Slugger Field is a baseball stadium in Louisville, Kentucky and is home to the Louisville Bats, the AAA affiliate of the Cincinnati Reds. ... The Kentucky Retros is a professional basketball team based in Louisville, Kentucky[1] that is scheduled to begin play in the American Basketball Association (ABA) in 2007. ... This article is about the sport. ... For information on the original American Basketball Association that existed from 1967 through 1976, see American Basketball Association. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ...

Infrastructure

Education

Bellarmine University's Brown Library
Bellarmine University's Brown Library
See also: List of schools in Louisville, Kentucky and Louisville Free Public Library

Louisville is home to several institutions of higher learning, including the University of Louisville, Bellarmine University, Spalding University, Sullivan University and several other post-secondary schools. Indiana University Southeast is located across the Ohio River in New Albany, Indiana. Bellarmine University is a Roman Catholic liberal arts university located in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Here is a listing of public and private schools in Louisville, Kentucky USA. // See also Jefferson County Public Schools The Academy for Individual Excellence (Nonsectarian) (PK-12) Beth Haven Christian School (Baptist) (PK-12) Christian Academy of Louisville (Christian) (K-12) Covenant Christian Academy (Christian) (K-12) Evangel Christian School... The Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is the largest public library system in Kentucky. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Bellarmine University is a Roman Catholic liberal arts university located in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Spalding University is a private, non-profit career university in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Sullivan University is a university based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Indiana University Southeast (IUS) is a regional campus in the Indiana University system located in New Albany, Indiana in Floyd County, Indiana. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ...


According to the U.S. Census, of Louisville's population over twenty-five, 21.3% (the national average is 24%) hold a bachelor's degree or higher, and 76.1% (80% nationally) have a high school diploma or equivalent. The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by the United States Constitution. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... A high school diploma is a diploma awarded for the completion of high school. ...


The public school system, Jefferson County Public Schools, consists of more than 98,000 students in 89 elementary schools, 24 middle schools, 22 high schools and 22 other learning centers.[57] Due to Louisville's large Catholic population, there are 27 Catholic schools in the city. The Kentucky School for the Blind for all of Kentucky's blind and visually impaired students is located in Louisville. Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) is a school system located in Jefferson County, Kentucky, which is contiguous with present-day Louisville. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Catholic schools are education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Bryce McLellan Patten founded the Kentucky Institution for the Education of the Blind in 1839 in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Visual impairment is the functional loss of vision. ...


Transportation

The Toonerville II Trolleys provide transportation in downtown Louisville.
The Toonerville II Trolleys provide transportation in downtown Louisville.

Louisville's main airport is the centrally located Louisville International Airport, whose IATA Airport Code (SDF) reflects its former name of Standiford Field. The airport is also home to UPS's Worldport global air hub. UPS operates its largest package-handling hub at Louisville International Airport and bases its UPS Airlines division there. Over 3.5 million passengers and over 3 billion pounds (1,400,000 t) of cargo pass through the airport each year. Louisville International Airport is also the 4th busiest airport in the United States when in cargo passage, and it is the 11th busiest in cargo passage in the world. The historic but smaller Bowman Field is used mainly for general aviation. As with most American cities, Transportation in Louisville, Kentucky is based primarilly on automobiles. ... Image File history File links In addition to regular city buses, the Transit Authority of River City (TARC) also operates a series of motorized trolleys. ... Image File history File links In addition to regular city buses, the Transit Authority of River City (TARC) also operates a series of motorized trolleys. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Louisville International Airport (IATA: SDF, ICAO: KSDF) is a public airport centrally located in the city of Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA. The airport covers 1,200 acres and has three runways. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... UPS Worldport Air Hub at Louisville International Airport Worldport is the worldwide air hub for UPS (United Parcel Service) located at the Louisville International Airport in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Louisville International Airport (IATA: SDF, ICAO: KSDF) is a public airport centrally located in the city of Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA. The airport covers 1,200 acres and has three runways. ... For other uses, see Bowman Field. ... A general aviation scene at Kemble Airfield, England. ...


The McAlpine Locks and Dam is located on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River, near the downtown area. The locks were constructed to allow shipping past the Falls of the Ohio. In 2001 over 55 million tons of commodities passed through the locks. A new lock is currently being constructed to replace two of the auxiliary locks, with a projected completion date of 2008. McAlpine Locks and Dam, Louisville, Kentucky The McAlpine Locks and Dam refers to the series of locks and the hydroelectric dam in Louisville, Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ...


Public transportation consists mainly of buses run by the Transit Authority of River City (TARC). The city buses serve all parts of downtown Louisville and Jefferson County, as well as Kentucky suburbs in Oldham County, Bullitt County, and the Indiana suburbs of Jeffersonville, Clarksville and New Albany. A light rail system has been studied and proposed for the city, but no plan was in development as of 2007.[58] A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... The Transit Authority of River City (TARC) is the major public transportation provider for the Louisville Metro area, as well as the Kentucky suburbs of Oldham County, Bullitt County, and Clark County and Floyd County in southern Indiana. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Oldham County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Bullitt County is a county located in the U.S. state, Kentucky6, just south of the city of Louisville. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Jeffersonville is a city located in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Clarksville is a town in Clark County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... New Albany is a city in Floyd County, Indiana, situated along the Ohio River opposite Louisville, Ky. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...

Overhead view of the Kennedy Interchange ("Spaghetti Junction").
Overhead view of the Kennedy Interchange ("Spaghetti Junction").

Louisville has inner and outer interstate beltways, I-264 and I-265 respectively. Interstates I-64, I-65 pass through Louisville, and I-71 has its southern terminus in Louisville. Since all three of these highways intersect at virtually the same location on the east side of downtown, this spot has become known as "Spaghetti Junction". Two bridges carry I-64 and I-65 over the Ohio River, and a third automobile bridge carries non-interstate traffic. Plans for two more bridges to connect Louisville to Indiana, along with a reconfiguration of Spaghetti Junction, have been under consideration for years and some exploratory construction began in 2007. One bridge would be located downtown for relief of I-65 traffic. The other would connect the Indiana and Kentucky I-265's (via KY-841).[59] As with any major project, there are detractors and possible alternatives; one grassroots organization, 8664.org, has proposed options for downtown revitalization improvements, and a simpler and less expensive roadway design. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2200x800, 213 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Louisville, Kentucky Kennedy Interchange Transportation in Louisville, Kentucky Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2200x800, 213 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Louisville, Kentucky Kennedy Interchange Transportation in Louisville, Kentucky Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... The Kennedy Interchange, unofficially referred to as Spaghetti Junction, is the intersection of Interstates 64, 65 and 71 at the northeastern edge of downtown Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It has been a source of confusion to drivers, both locals and tourists, for decades, and is a major bottleneck in the Ohio... The Henry Watterson Expressway, also known as the Shawnee Expressway, is one of two Interstate Highways in the United States designated as Interstate 264 (abbreviated I-264). ... Interstate 265 (abbreviated I-265) is an Interstate Highway ringing the Louisville, Kentucky metropolitan area, which includes southern Indiana, although the Indiana and Kentucky segments remain separate at the present time. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Interstate 71 (abbreviated I-71) is an Interstate Highway in the Great Lakes/Midwestern region of the United States. ... The Kennedy Interchange, unofficially referred to as Spaghetti Junction, is the intersection of Interstates 64, 65 and 71 at the northeastern edge of downtown Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It has been a source of confusion to drivers, both locals and tourists, for decades, and is a major bottleneck in the Ohio... Dedication plaque on the bridge The Clark Memorial Bridge during Thunder Over Louisville The George Rogers Clark Memorial Bridge is a four-lane cantilever bridge crossing the Ohio River between Louisville, Kentucky and Jeffersonville, Indiana, that carries US 31. ... The Ohio River Bridges Project is a Louisville metropolitan area transportation infrastructure construction project involving the reconstruction of the Kennedy Interchange (locally known as Spaghetti Junction), the completion of two new Ohio River bridges and the reconstruction of ramps on I-65 between I-264 and downtown. ... 8664. ...

Louisville's Watterson Expressway
Louisville's Watterson Expressway

Louisville has historically been a major center for railway traffic. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad was once headquartered here, before it was purchased by CSX Transportation. Today the city is served by two major freight railroads, CSX (with a major classification yard in the southern part of the metro area) and Norfolk Southern. Five major main lines connect Louisville to the rest of the region. Two regional railroads, the Paducah and Louisville Railway and the Louisville and Indiana Railroad, also serve the city. With the discontinuance of the short-lived Kentucky Cardinal in 2003, Amtrak passenger trains no longer serve Louisville; it is thus the fifth-largest city in the country with no passenger rail service.[60] Interstate 264 is the name given to two completely separate intertstate highways in the United States, in Louisville, Kentucky and Hampton Roads, Virginia. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Chartered by the state of Kentucky in 1850, the L&N, as it was generally known, grew into one of the great success stories of American business. ... CSX redirects here. ... CSX redirects here. ... Chicago and North Western Railways Proviso Yard in Chicago, Illinois, December 1942. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... The Paducah and Louisville Railway (AAR reporting mark PAL) is a Class II railroad that operates freight service between Paducah and Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Louisville and Indiana Railroad (AAR reporting mark LIRC) is a Class III railroad that operates freight service between Indianapolis, Indiana and Louisville, Kentucky, with a major yard and maintrenance shop in Jeffersonville, Indiana. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ...


Utilities

Completed in 1860, the Louisville Water Tower is the oldest water tower in the U.S.
Completed in 1860, the Louisville Water Tower is the oldest water tower in the U.S.

Electricity is provided to the Louisville Metro area by LG&E, a subsidiary of E.ON U.S. and traces its roots back to 1838 as Louisville Gas. Louisville Gas and Electric was formed in 1913 by the merger of Louisville Gas, Louisville Lighting (founded in 1903) and Kentucky Heating. In 1998, LG&E merged with Kentucky Utilities (KU) to form LG&E Energy. In 2000, LG&E Energy was bought by British utility company Powergen. In 2002, Powergen was bought by the German company E.ON. Finally, on December 1, 2005, LG&E Energy changed its name to E.ON U.S. Today, LG&E serves over 350,000 electric and over 300,000 natural gas customers, covers an area of 700 square miles (1800 km²), and has a total regulated electric generation capacity of 3,514 megawatts.[61] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Louisville Water Tower in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Louisville Water Tower in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Water Tower of Louisville, Kentucky is a water tower. ... For delivered electrical power, see Electrical power industry. ... E.ON AG (ISIN: DE0007614406, NYSE: EON, LSE: EON) , based in Düsseldorf, Germany, is an energy corporation, one of the 30 members of the DAX stock index of major German companies. ... A public utility is a company that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. ... Powergen was an electric generating company in the United Kingdom. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ...


The current electric generating stations serving the city include three coal-fired plants (Trimble County, Mill Creek and Cane Run Stations), one natural gas/fuel oil combustion turbine, one hydroelectric plant (Ohio Falls Station), and two natural gas facilities (Muldraugh and Magnolia Compressor Stations).[62] Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... -1... This machine has a single-stage centrifugal compressor and turbine, a recuperator, and foil bearings. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... McAlpine Locks and Dam, Louisville, Kentucky The McAlpine Locks and Dam refers to the series of locks and the hydroelectric dam in Louisville, Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. ... For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ...


Water is provided by the Louisville Water Company, which provides water to more than 800,000 residents in Louisville as well as parts of Oldham and Bullitt counties. Additionally, they provide wholesale water to the outlying counties of Shelby, Spencer and Nelson.[63] Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Louisville Water Company is a municipal water company which provides water to the more than 800,000 people in Louisville, Kentucky as well as parts of Oldham and Bullit counties. ... Oldham County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Bullitt County is a county located in the U.S. state, Kentucky6, just south of the city of Louisville. ... Shelby County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Spencer County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Nelson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


The Ohio River provides for most of the city's source of drinking water. Water is drawn from the river at two points: the raw water pump station at Zorn and River Road, and the B.E. Payne Pump Station northeast of Harrods Creek. Water is also obtained from a riverbank infiltration well at the Payne Plant. There are also two water treatment plants serving the Louisville Metro area: The Crescent Hill Treatment Plant and the B.E. Payne Treatment Plant. View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Tap water Mineral Water Water of sufficient quality to serve as drinking water is termed potable water whether it is used as such or not. ... Raw water is water taken from the environment, and is subsequently treated or purified to produce potable water in a water purification works. ... Pumping station Van Sasse in Grave, the Netherlands Pumping station Van Sasse in Grave, the Netherlands Pumping stations are facilities including pumps and equipment for pumping fluids from one place to another. ... Water purification is the process of removing contaminants from a raw water source. ...


Sister cities

The distances to each of Louisville's sister cities are represented on this downtown light post.
The distances to each of Louisville's sister cities are represented on this downtown light post.

Louisville has seven sister cities:[64] Image File history File links Louisvilles sister cities are designated downtown with the distances to each city on this lightpost. ... Image File history File links Louisvilles sister cities are designated downtown with the distances to each city on this lightpost. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

In addition, Flag of the United Kingdom Leeds, United Kingdom is considered a "Friendship City". The two cities have engaged in many cultural exchange programs, particularly in the fields of nursing and law, and cooperated in several private business developments, including the Frazier International History Museum.[65] Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Jiujiang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city located on the southern shores of the Yangtze River (Changjiang) in northwest Jiangxi Province, China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... La Plata is the capital city of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, as well as of the partido of La Plata. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Location Position of Perm in Russia Government Country Federal district Federal subject Russia Volga Federal District Perm Krai Mayor Igor Nikolayevich Shubin Geographical characteristics Area  - City    - Land    - Water 799. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... For other uses, see Quito (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ghana. ... The bank in downtown Tamale (November 1999) Tamale (pronounced ) is the capital of the Northern Region of Ghana, with a population of 305,000 (2005). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Leeds Coat Of Arms Map sources for Leeds at grid reference SE297338 Leeds is a city in the county of West Yorkshire, in the north of England. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... The Frazier International History Museum, formerly the Frazier Historical Arms Museum, is a historical arms museum located in Louisville, Kentucky, focusing on U.S. and UK arms, armor and various other historical objects from the last 1,000 years. ...


On April 15, 2008, it was announced that Louisville would be twinned with the town of Bushmills in Northern Ireland. The two places share a tradition for the brewing of whiskey. The choice of Louisville came after a search of U.S. cities, followed by an online poll conducted for the public to decide between three finalists, which also included Boston and Portland, Maine.[66] is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Moyle District UK Parliament: North Antrim European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Bushmills Postal District(s): BT57 Population (2001) 1,319 Bushmills (in Irish: Muileann na Buaise) is a village on the north coast of County... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Boston redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ...


See also

This is a list of cities, towns and communities along the Ohio River in the United States. ... Following are notable people who were either born/raised or have lived for a significant period of time in the Louisville, Kentucky metropolitan area: Name Description Muhammad Ali Heavyweight Boxing Champion. ...

References

  1. ^ The term "The 'Ville" has been used in print in The Courier-Journal 60+ times since 1999 and appears to have been popularized by a 2003 billboard campaign promoting Louisville as "The best college sports town in America." See Forde, Pat. "UofL's bogus billboards don't impress experts", The Courier-Journal, 2003-09-10. 
  2. ^ See Nomenclature, population and ranking for explanation of consolidated vs. balance figures
  3. ^ Meyer, David R. (December 1989). "Midwestern Industrialization and the American Manufacturing Belt in the Nineteenth Century". The Journal of Economic History 49 (4): 921–937. 
  4. ^ Emporis:Louisville, KY. Retrieved on 6 February, 2007.
  5. ^ African Americans in Library Professions : The Kentucky Connection
  6. ^ Louisville Free Public Library - African-American Archives
  7. ^ Altman, Lawrence K.. "Doctors in Louisville Perform Nation's First Hand Transplant", The New York Times, 1999-01-26. Retrieved on 2007-09-08. 
  8. ^ Rowland, Rhonda. "Patient gets first totally implanted artificial heart", CNN, 2001-07-03. Retrieved on 2007-09-08. 
  9. ^ Brown Cancer Center News - Inventors Praise FDA Approval of Cervical Cancer Vaccine
  10. ^ Gibson, Campbell. "Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990." United States Census Bureau. June, 1998. Retrieved on July 10, 2006.
  11. ^ "Population". The Encyclopedia of Louisville (1). (2001). 
  12. ^ Census Population Estimates for 2006 (line 25213)
  13. ^ "Phoenix 5th largest city as Philly falls; Louisville is 17th if all are counted", The Courier-Journal, 2007-06-28. Retrieved on 2007-06-28. 
  14. ^ Census Population Estimates for 2006 - Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places Over 100,000 (line 31)
  15. ^ For what geographic areas does the Census Bureau produce estimates?
  16. ^ Green, Marcus. "Argh! City still No. 26; Census Bureau again clips Louisville's claim to No. 16", The Courier-Journal, 2006-06-23. Retrieved on 2006-06-23. 
  17. ^ George Rogers Clark: Kentucky Frontiersman, Hero, and Founder of Louisville. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  18. ^ Yater, George H. (1987). Two Hundred Years at the Fall of the Ohio: A History of Louisville and Jefferson County, 2nd edition, Louisville, KY: Filson Club, Incorporated, 9–10. ISBN 0-9601072-3-1. 
  19. ^ Yater, pp. 46–48
  20. ^ (2004) in Butler, William S.: Tornado: A Look Back at Louisville's Dark Day, April 3, 1974. Butler Books. 
  21. ^ "Population". The Encyclopedia of Louisville (1). (2001). 
  22. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  23. ^ Population in Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs) in Alphabetical Order and Numerical and Percent Change for the United States and Puerto Rico: 1990 and 2000
  24. ^ Climate information from NOAA
  25. ^ Climate information from NOAA
  26. ^ Maximum and minimum temperatures from Yahoo! Weather
  27. ^ Clean Air in your city. Environmental Defense. Retrieved on 2007-07-24.
  28. ^ Berzof, Ken. "Office space goes begging", The Courier-Journal, 2006-02-26. 
  29. ^ Louisville's Downtown Alive with Development
  30. ^ Pike, Bill. "Will old names work in 'new' city?", The Courier-Journal, 2003-01-23, p. 1N. 
  31. ^ Forde, Pat. "Read all about it: Valley has city united", The Courier-Journal, 2002-08-26. 
  32. ^ The Courier-Journal 2006–07 Kentuckiana Guide
  33. ^ Cummins, Peggy. "Continuity and Change in Louisville's Ethnic Communities", Jefferson Community College. 
  34. ^ Gerth, Joseph. "Abramson files to seek re-election", The Courier-Journal, 2006-01-25, p. 1B. 
  35. ^ Kentucky Congressional District Data and Maps. Kentucky State Data Center. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  36. ^ "America's Safest (and Most Dangerous) Cities." Morgan Quitno Press. November 21, 2005. Retrieved on July 8, 2006.
  37. ^ "Louisville among nation's safest cities", The Courier-Journal, 2006-10-31. 
  38. ^ The Urban Louisvillian - FBI Crime Statistics from 2006 Released.
  39. ^ Morgan Quitno - Violent Crime Rate in 2005 (ordered by metro area).
  40. ^ Morgan Quitno - Safest 25 Metropolitan Areas.
  41. ^ Infoplease - Crime Rate by State, 2004 (rate per 100,000 inhabitants).
  42. ^ courier-journal.com - Jefferson County homicide victims, 2007.
  43. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  44. ^ Data on Catholic residents from the Archdiocese of Louisville [1]
  45. ^ Data on Baptist Population from LRA websiteLong Run Baptist Association
  46. ^ Smith, Peter. "Some synagogues eye broader styles of worship", The Courier-Journal, 2003-09-28. 
  47. ^ Haukebo, Kirsten. "Hindu temple greets visitors", The Courier-Journal, 2000-12-03. 
  48. ^ Smith, Peter. "ISLAM IN AMERICA; Muslims a diverse presence in Kentucky", The Courier-Journal, 2001-11-18. 
  49. ^ Kramer, Carl (1978). Louisville Survey: Central Report, 32. 
  50. ^ . "Top 20 Inland U.S. Ports for 2003". . US Army Corps of Engineers
  51. ^ America's Most Visited City Parks. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  52. ^ "Jefferson Memorial Forest grows by 400 acres (1.6 km²)", Business First, 2005-12-27. Retrieved on 2007-04-03. 
  53. ^ "Louisville No. 1 in basketball TV ratings", The Courier-Journal, 2008-04-08. Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  54. ^ Isidore, Chris. "NCAA's bottom line winners", CNN/Money, 2004-03-18. 
  55. ^ Katz, Andy. "Best teams make today's best rivalries", ESPN.com, 2007-02-02. 
  56. ^ Template:Http://skateboardermag.com/Google-Earth/louisville-extreme-park/
  57. ^ JCPS at a Glance. Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  58. ^ Green, Marcus. "Mass transit plan still possible; Officials will look for financing options", The Courier-Journal, 2006-11-29. Retrieved on 2007-01-23. 
  59. ^ Green, Marcus. "Bridge project tunnels' cost rises; Exploratory shaft will plot path for two others", The Courier-Journal, 2007-07-16. Retrieved on 2007-07-16. 
  60. ^ Metropolitan Areas Served by Amtrak (2006-11-23).
  61. ^ Data from E.ON U.S. (formerly LG&E Energy)
  62. ^ LG&E Power Plant Information. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  63. ^ Data from Louisville Water
  64. ^ Sister cities designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI). Retrieved June 1, 2006.
  65. ^ "Friendship City Status." Sister Cities of Louisville. 2006. Retrieved on June 1, 2006.
  66. ^ "Louisville tastes victory in twin search", BBC, 2008-04-15. Retrieved on 2008-04-15. 

The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other places with the same name, see Louisville (disambiguation). ... The Filson Historical Society building in Old Louisville The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jefferson Community College could refer to: Jefferson Community College, a two-year Kentucky college comprised of four campuses, located in Louisville, Shelbyville, and Carrollton. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Morgan Quitno Press is an research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Business First of Louisville is a weekly business-oriented newspaper concentrating on the economy of the Louisville, Kentucky metropolitan area. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ESPN.com is the official website of ESPN and a division of ESPN Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-Journal, nicknamed the C-J, is the main newspaper for the city of Louisville, Kentucky, USA. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th largest daily paper in the United States and the single largest in Kentucky. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • (2006) Louisville Then and Now. Butler Books. ISBN 1-884532-68-3. 
  • Domer, Dennis; Gregory A. Luhan, and David Mohney (2004). The Louisville Guide. ISBN 1-56898-451-0. 
  • Kleber, John E., et al. (editor) (2000). The Encyclopedia of Louisville. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 1-56898-451-0. 
  • Lee, Gary. "Louisville Old and New: Either Way, It's a Knockout", The Washington Post, 2006-08-20. Retrieved on 2006-10-01. 
  • Nold, Chip; and Bob Bahr (1997). Insiders' Guide to Louisville, Kentucky & Southern Indiana. Globe Pequot. ISBN 1-57380-043-0. 
  • Sanders, David; and Glen Conner (2000). Fact Sheet: Ohio River Floods. Kentucky Climate Center. 
  • Yater, George H. (1987). Two Hundred Years at the Fall of the Ohio: A History of Louisville and Jefferson County, 2nd edition, Louisville, KY: Filson Club, Incorporated. ISBN 0-9601072-3-1. 

The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other places with the same name, see Louisville (disambiguation). ... The Filson Historical Society building in Old Louisville The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. ...

External links

Louisville Portal
Find more about Louisville, Kentucky on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
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Learning resources
  • Official Website of Louisville, Kentucky
  • Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Possibility City — Louisville's branding campaign
  • Louisville, Kentucky is at coordinates 38°15′14″N 85°45′36″W / 38.254, -85.760 (Louisville, Kentucky)Coordinates: 38°15′14″N 85°45′36″W / 38.254, -85.760 (Louisville, Kentucky)
  • Louisville/Jefferson County Information Consortium
    • LOJIC interactive maps
  • Metro Mapper - Interactive Maps for the Louisville Metro Area
  • City Mayors feature: "Louisville Metro has shown other regions how mergers can change balance of power"
  • Louisville travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Louisville Life — weekly broadcast on Kentucky Educational Television
  • State of Affairs — daily radio broadcast on WFPL that provides a public forum for discussion of the issues, people and events that impact the Louisville community

  Results from FactBites:
 
Louisville, Kentucky (535 words)
Louisville, the seat of Jefferson county, is located on the Ohio River at the Falls of the Ohio.
In 2000 voters in Louisville and Jefferson county approved a merged city-county government to be known as Louisville/Jefferson County Metro Government, or Louisville Metro for short, effective in 2003.
The state of Kentucky was the darling spot of many tribes of Indians, and was reserved among them as a common hunting-ground; it is said, that they cannot yet name it without emotion, and that they have a sad and wild lament that they still chant to its memory.
Louisville, Kentucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6603 words)
Louisville is situated on the Kentucky-Indiana border at the only natural obstacle in the Ohio River, the Falls of the Ohio.
Louisville is also home to the Callahan Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind, which features exhibits on the history of the education of the blind, as well as information on the printing process.
Louisville for a long time was also home to Brown and Williamson, one of the subjects of the tobacco industry scandals of the 1990s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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