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Encyclopedia > Louise de Vilmorin

Louise de Vilmorin, also know as Loulou, was a minor poet.


Poulenc nearly literally sang her praises, considering her an equal to Paul Eluard and Max Jacob, find in her writing "a sort of sensitive impertinence, libertinage, and appetite which carried on into song [is] what I tried to express in my extreme youth with Marie Laurencin in Les Biches."


She was André Malraux's partner before her death, and had a limp but possessed an ethereal elegance. Evelyn Waugh described Loulou to Nancy Mitford as, "an Hungarian countess who pretended to be a French poet. An egocentric maniac with the eyes of a witch. She is the Spirit of France. How I hate the French." Mitford concurred, "Oh how glad I am you feel this about Lulu - I can't sit in a room with her she makes me so nervous. And vicious...She is much more like a middle European than a French woman."


References

  • Ivry, Benjamin (1996). Francis Poulenc, 20th-Century Composers series. Phaidon Press Limited. ISBN 071483503X.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Louise Leveque de Vilmorin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (505 words)
Louise Levêque de Vilmorin (4 April 1902-26 December 1969) was a French woman of letters: novelist, poet, journalist.
Her most famous novel was "Madame de", published in 1951, which was made into a celebrated film in 1953 starring Charles Boyer and Danielle Darrieux and directed by Max Ophüls.
Louise ended her life as the companion of the French statesman André Malraux.
Louise Leveque de Vilmorin - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (531 words)
Her most famous novel was "Madame de", published in 1951, which was made into a celebrated film in 1953 starring Charles Boyer and Danielle Darrieux and directed by Vittorio de Sica.
Her second husband was Count Paul Pálffy ab Erdöd (1890-1968), a much-married Austrian-born Slovakian playboy, who had been second husband to the Hungarian countess better known as Etti Plesch, owner of two Epsom Derby winners.
Louise Leveque de Vilmorin, Source, External links, 1902 births, 1969 deaths, French novelists and French journalists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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