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Encyclopedia > Louis the German
Carolingian Dynasty
Pippinids
Arnulfings
Carolingians
After the Treaty of Verdun (843)
Seal with Louis' inscription and effigy.
Seal with Louis' inscription and effigy.
Carolingian Dynasty
(Kings of East Francia)

Louis the German
Children
   Carloman of Bavaria
   Louis the Younger
   Charles the Fat
Carloman of Bavaria
Children
   Arnulf of Carinthia
Louis the Younger
Charles the Fat
Arnulf of Carinthia
Children
   Louis the Child
   Zwentibold,
   King of Lotharingia
Louis the Child

Louis the German (also known as Louis II or Louis the Bavarian or German Ludwig der Deutsche) (804August 28, 876), the third son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his first wife, Ermengarde of Hesbaye, was the king of Bavaria from 817, when his father partitioned the empire, and king of East Francia from the Treaty of Verdun in 843 until his death. Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... Pippinid are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose eldest scion served as major-domo, de facto ruler, of the Frankish Kingdom nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Pippin of Landen, also known as Pippin the Elder (580 - 640), was the Frankish Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia under the Merovingian kings Clotaire II, Dagobert I and Sigebert III from 615 or 623 to 629. ... Grimoald the Elder or Grimaud (d. ... When King Sigebert III died in 656, Grimoald had Sigeberts son Dagobert II shorn of hair and packed off to an Irish monastery and then proclaimed his own son, Childebert the Adopted, king of Austrasia. ... The Pippinids or Arnulfings are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose select scions served as major-domos, de facto rulers, of the Frankish kingdoms of Neustra and Austrasia that were nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... Arnulf of Metz (August 13, 582 – August 16, 640) was a Frankish noble who had great influence in the Merovingian kingdoms as a bishop and was later canonized as a saint. ... Chlodulf was bishop of Metz approximately from 657 to 697. ... Ansegisel, or Duke Angiese, was the son of Arnulf of Metz and his wife Doda. ... Pippin of Herstal (or Pepin; Pépin), also known as Pippin the Middle, Pippin the Younger (as with his grandson), or Pippin II, (635 or 640–December 16, 714, Jupille) was the grandson of Pippin (I) the Elder through the marriage of Ansegisel and Begga, the daughter of the Elder. ... Grimoald II (d. ... Drogo (670-708), son of Pepin the Middle and Plectrude, was the duke of Champagne by appointment of his father in 690 and duke of Burgundy from the death of Nordebert in 697. ... Theudoald or Theodald was the mayor of the palace, briefly unopposed in 714 until Ragenfrid was acclaimed in Neustria and Charles Martel in Austrasia by the nobles, after the death of his grandfather, Pepin of Heristal. ... The Carolingians were a dynasty of rulers that eventually controlled the Frankish realm and its successors from the 8th to the 10th century, officially taking over the kingdom from the Merovingian dynasty in 751. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Carloman (716–754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia and Chrotrud. ... Pippin the Younger (714-September 24, 768) often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine, Pippin der Kurze, Pippin der Jüngere), was a King of the Franks (751-768). ... Carloman (751 - December 4, 771) was a King of the Franks (768 - 771). ... Charlemagne, portrait by Albrecht Dürer. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... In the Treaty of Verdun of 843 the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious divided his territories, the Carolingian Empire, into three kingdoms. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... Image File history File links Louis_the_German. ... Image File history File links Louis_the_German. ... Also see: France in the Middle Ages. ... The following list of German Kings and Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Carloman (830-880) was the eldest son of Louis the German, king of East Francia (Germany), and Emma, daughter of the count Welf. ... For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Charles the Fat in the Grandes Chroniques de France. ... Carloman (830-880) was the eldest son of Louis the German, king of East Francia (Germany), and Emma, daughter of the count Welf. ... For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Charles the Fat in the Grandes Chroniques de France. ... Arnulf of Carinthia (German Arnulf von Kärnten, Slovenian Arnulf Koroški) (850 – December 8, 899) was one of the last ruling members of the Carolingian house in the Eastern part of the Frankish Kingdom, which had been split in the Treaty of Verdun in 843. ... Zwentibold (870 – August 13, 900) was the illegimate son of the Emperor Arnulf of Carinthia. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I... This title could also refer to Louis of Sicily. ... Events March 25 - The Inscription of Sukabumi from Eastern Java marks the beginning of the Javanese language. ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Events Seiwa is succeeded by Yozei as emperor of Japan. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Ermengarde, or Irmengarde de Hesbaye (born about 778) was the daughter of Ingerman, Count of Hesbania (Hesbaye, now in Liège, Belgium) and Hedwig of Bavaria. ... The following is a list of rulers of Bavaria: Dukes of Bavaria, 889-1623 Liutpolding Dynasty Liutpold 889-907 Arnulf the Bad 907-937 Eberhard 937 Berthold 938-947 Liudolfing (Ottonian) Dynasty Henry I 947-955 Henry II the Quarrelsome 955-976 Otto I 976-982 Liutpolding Dynasty Henry III... Events Louis the Pious divides his empire among his sons. ... Eastern Francia were the lands of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843. ... In the Treaty of Verdun of 843 the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious divided his territories, the Carolingian Empire, into three kingdoms. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ...


His early years were partly spent at the court of his grandfather, Charlemagne, whose special affection he is said to have won. When the emperor Louis divided his dominions between his sons in 817, Louis received Bavaria (formerly his brother Lothair's) and the neighbouring lands, but did not undertake the governing of such until 825, when he became involved in wars with the Wends and Sorbs on his eastern frontier. In 827, he married Emma, sister of his stepmother Judith, and daughter of Welf, whose possessions ranged from Alsace to Bavaria. Louis soon began to interfere in the quarrels arising from Judith's efforts to secure a kingdom for her own son Charles (later known as Charles the Bald) and the consequent struggles of his brothers with their father. Charlemagne, portrait by Albrecht Dürer. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... Lothair I Lothair I (German: Lothar, French: Lothaire, Italian: Lotario) (795 – 2 March 855), king of Italy (818 – 855) and Holy Roman Emperor (840 – 855), was the eldest son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his wife Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingerman, duke of Hesbaye. ... Events Egbert of Wessex defeats Beornwulf of Mercia at Ellandun. ... Wends (German: Wenden, Latin: Venedi) is the English name for some Slavic people from north-central Europe particularly the Sorbs living in modern-day Germany. ... The Sorbs are a Slavic minority indigenous to the region known as Lusatia in the German states of Saxony and Brandenburg (in former GDR territory). ... Events Succession of Pope Valentine, then Pope Gregory IV. Arabs invade Sicily. ... Queen Judith or Iudit (died 19 April 843) was the second wife of Louis the Pious, Holy Roman Emperor and King of the Franks. ... Welf or Hwelf was a 9th century Frankish count. ... Location Administration Capital Strasbourg Regional President Adrien Zeller (UMP) (since 1996) Départements Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ...


His involvement in the first civil war of his father's reign was limited, but in the second, his elder brothers, Lothair, then king of Italy, and Pepin, king of Aquitaine, induced him to invade Alemannia — which their father had given to their half-brother Charles — by promising to give him the land in the new partition they would make. In 832, he led an army of Slavs into Alemannia and completely subjugated it. Louis the Pious disinherited him, but to no effect; the emperor was captured by his own rebellious sons and deposed. Upon his swift reinstatement, however, the Emperor Louis made peace with his son Louis and restored Bavaria (never actually lost) to him (836). King of Italy is a title adopted by many rulers after the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Pepin I (797-November 13 or December 13, 838) was King of Aquitaine. ... The persons who held the title of Duke of Aquitaine (French: Duc dAquitaine}, which became part of France in 1449 but was an independent duchy before that date, with the years they held it, were: // Dukes of Aquitaine Edward III claimed the title of King of France in 1339... Alemannia (red) and Upper Burgundy (green) around AD 1000. ... Events Theophilus forbids the usage of icons, establishing strict punishments. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Events Abbasid caliph al-Mutasim establishes new capital at Samarra, Iraq. ...


In the third civil war (began 839) of his father's ruinous final decade, Louis was the insitgator. A strip of his land having been given to the young Charles, Louis invaded Alemannia again. His father was not so sluggish in responding to him this time and soon the younger Louis was forced into the far southeastern corner of his realm, the Ostmark. Peace had been made by force of arms. Events Louis the Pious attempts to divide his empire among his sons. ... Ostmark (Eastern March) is a modern German term to translate the term Ostarrîchi a vernacular for marcia orientalis that appears in a single later 10th century document. ...


When the elder Louis died in 840 and Lothair claimed the whole Empire, Louis allied with the half-brother, Charles the Bald, and defeated Lothair and their nephew Pepin II of Aquitaine, son of Pepin, at the Battle of Fontenay-en-Puisaye in June 841. In June 842, the three brothers met on an island in the Saône to negotiate a peace, and each appointed forty representatives to arrange the boundaries of their respective kingdoms. This developed into the Treaty of Verdun, concluded in August 843, by which Louis received the bulk of the lands lying east of the Rhine (East Francia), together with a district around Speyer, Worms, and Mainz, on the left bank of the river. His territories included Bavaria, where he made Regensburg the centre of his government, Thuringia, Franconia, and Saxony. He may truly be called the founder of the German kingdom, though his attempts to maintain the unity of the Empire proved futile. Having in 842 crushed a rising in Saxony, he compelled the Obotrites to own his authority, and undertook campaigns against the Bohemians, Moravians, and other tribes, but was not very successful in freeing his shores from the ravages of the Vikings. Events After the death of Louis the Pious, his sons Lothar, Charles the Bald and Louis the German fight over the division of the empire, with Lothar succeeding as Emperor. ... Pepin II, called the Younger (823-after 864, Senlis), was King of Aquitaine from 838 as the successor upon the death of his father, Pepin I. Pepin II was eldest son of Pepin I and Ingeltrude (also called Engelberga, Hringard, or Ringart), daughter of the count of Madrie, Theodobert. ... Contention over the division of the Holy Roman Empire between the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious culminated in the decisive Battle of Fontenay fought at Fontenay on the June 25, 841. ... Events June 25: Battle of Fontenay _ Louis the German and Charles the Bald defeat Lothar. ... Events Oaths of Strasbourg — alliance of Louis the German and Charles the Bald against emperor Lothar — sworn and recorded in vernacular languages. ... The Saône is a river of eastern France. ... In the Treaty of Verdun of 843 the three surviving sons of Louis the Pious divided his territories, the Carolingian Empire, into three kingdoms. ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Loreley At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (Dutch Rijn, French Rhin, German Rhein, Italian: Reno, Romansch: Rein, ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... Eastern Francia were the lands of Louis the German after the Treaty of Verdun of 843. ... Speyer (English formerly Spires) is a city in Germany (Rhineland-Palatinate) with approx. ... // Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Regensburg (English formerly Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 129,175 in 2005) in Bavaria, south-east Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. ... The Republic of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) lies in central Germany and is among the smaller of the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), being eleventh in size with an area of 16,200 km² and twelfth most populous with 2. ... The Franconian Rake is originally is a heraldic symbol of the bishops of Würzburg, who - though nominally Dukes of Franconia - only ruled in parts of Franconia. ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stata Sakska) is at a land area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... The Obotrites (sometimes Abodrites, Obodrites) were a group of Slavic peoples who had in the 6th century settled in the regions later known as Mecklenburg and Schleswig-Holstein in what is now north-eastern Germany. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Great Moravia (Old Church Slavonic approximately Велья Морава, Czech Velká Morava, Slovak Veľká Morava, Latin Magna Moravia) was a Slav state existing on the territory of present-day Moravia and Slovakia between 833 and the early 10th century. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...


At his instance, synods and assemblies were held where laws were decreed for the better government of church and state. In 852, he had sent his son Louis the Younger to Aquitaine, where the barons had grown resentful of Pepin's lifestyle. The younger Louis did not set out until 854, but he returned the following year. In 853 and the following years, Louis made more than one attempt to secure the throne of West Francia, which, according to the Annals of Fulda (Annales Fuldenses), the people of that country offered him in their disgust with the cruel misrule of Charles the Bald. Encouraged by his nephews Pepin II and Charles, king of Provence, Louis invaded in 858; Charles the Bald could not even raise an army to resist the invasion and fled to Burgundy; in that year, Louis issued a charter dated "the first year of the reign in West Francia." Treachery and desertion in his army, and the loyalty to Charles of the Aquitanian bishops brought about the failure of the enterprise, which Louis renounced by a treaty signed at Coblenz on June 7, 860. A synod (also known as a council) is a council of a church, usually a Christian church, convened to decide an issue of doctrine, administration or application. ... Events Boris I Michael succeeds the duumvirate of Malamir and Presian as monarch of Bulgaria. ... For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Events Charles the Bald, Louis the German and Lothar meet at Attigny. ... Events A Byzantine fleet destroys Damiette (in Egypt) Births Deaths Categories: 853 ... Western Francia was the land under the control of Charles the Bald after the Treaty of Verdun of 843, which divided the Carolingian Empire of the Franks into an East, West, and Middle. ... Fulda is a city in Hesse, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... The Annales Fuldenses or Annals of Fulda is a medieval chronicle compiled at the Abbey of Fulda. ... Charles was the Carolingian King of Provence from 855 until his early death in 863. ... The following is a list of the Kings of Burgundy // Kings of the Burgundians Gebicca (late 4th century–407) Godemar Giselcar Gundicar (413–436) Aetius moves the Burgundians into Sapaudia (Upper Rhone Basin) Gunderic/Gundioc (436–473) opposed by Chilperic I (443–c. ... Events Patriarch Ignatius is imprisoned and (December 25) deposed to be succeeded by patriarch Photius I. Louis the German invades West Francia, hoping to secure Aquitaine from his brother Charles the Bald, but fails. ... Coat of arms of the 2nd duchy of Burgundy and later of the French province of Burgundy Burgundy (French: Bourgogne) is a historic region of France, inhabited in turn by Pre-Indo-European people, Celts (Gauls), Romans (Gallo-Romans), and various Germanic peoples, most importantly the Burgundians and the Franks. ... This article is about the German city Koblenz. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Events First attack on Constantinople by Swedish Vikings (the Rus, see Varangians). ...


In 855, the emperor Lothair died, and Louis and Charles for a time seem to have cooperated in plans to divide Lothair's possessions among themselves — the only impediments to this being Lothair's sons: Lothair II (who received Lotharingia), Louis II (who held the imperial title and the Iron Crown), and the aforementioned Charles. In 863, on the death of Charles, they divided Provence and Burgundy between them. In 868, at Metz they agreed definitely to a partition of Lotharingia; but when Lothair II died in 869, Louis the German was lying seriously ill, and his armies were engaged with the Moravians. Charles the Bald accordingly seized the whole kingdom; but Louis the German, having recovered, compelled him by a threat of war to agree to the Treaty of Mersen, which divided it between the claimants. Events Louis II succeeds Lothar as western emperor. ... Lothair (825 - August 8, 869), was the second son of the emperor Lothair I. On his fathers death in 855, he received for his kingdom a district lying west of the Rhine, between the North Sea and the Jura mountains, which was called Regnum Lotharii and early in the... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I... Louis II, (825 – 875), Holy Roman Emperor (sole ruler 855 – 875), eldest son of the emperor Lothair I, became the designated king of Italy in 839, and taking up his residence in that country was crowned king at Rome by Pope Sergius II on June 15, 844. ... The Iron Crown of Lombardy (Corona Ferrea) is both a reliquary and one of the most ancient royal insignia of Europe. ... Events Constantine I succeeds as king of Scotland. ... Events 11 May: Printing of The Diamond Sutra, the oldest dated printed book. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Lotharingia (yellow), as established by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, and reduced by the Treaty of Mersen, 870 Lotharingia was a short-lived kingdom in western Europe, the aggregate of territories belonging to Lothair, King of Lotharingia (reigned 855–869), who received it in 855 from his father, Lothair I... Events Western Emperor Louis II allies with eastern Emperor Basil I against the Saracens. ... The Treaty of Mersen (870 AD) was an agreement of the division of the Carolingian Empire by the sons of Louis I, Charles II of the West Franks (France) and Louis the German of East Franks (Germany), signed at the town of Meerssen, which is now in the Netherlands. ...


The later years of Louis the German were troubled by risings on the part of his sons, the eldest of whom, Carloman, revolted in 861 and again two years later; an example that was followed by the second son Louis, who in a further rising was joined by his brother Charles. In 864, Louis was forced to grant Carloman the kingdom of Bavaria, which he himself had once held under his father. The next year (865), he divided the remainder of his lands: Saxony he gave to Louis the Younger (with Franconia and Thuringia) and Swabia (with Rhaetia) to Charles, called the Fat. A report that the emperor Louis II was dead led to peace between father and sons and attempts by Louis the German to gain the imperial crown for Carloman. These efforts were thwarted by Louis II, who was not in fact dead, and Louis' old adversary, Charles the Bald. Carloman (830-880) was a member of the Eastern Frankish Carolingian ruling house. ... Events Carloman revolts against his father Louis the German. ... Charles the Fat in the Grandes Chroniques de France. ... Events Khan Boris I of Bulgaria is baptized an Orthodox Christian. ... Events Ethelred succeeds as king of Wessex (or 866). ... The Free State of Saxony (German: Freistaat Sachsen; Sorbian: Swobodny Stata Sakska) is at a land area of 18,413 km² and a population of 4. ... The Franconian Rake is originally is a heraldic symbol of the bishops of Würzburg, who - though nominally Dukes of Franconia - only ruled in parts of Franconia. ... The Republic of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) lies in central Germany and is among the smaller of the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), being eleventh in size with an area of 16,200 km² and twelfth most populous with 2. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Raetia as province of the Roman Empire, ca. ...


Louis was preparing for war when he died on August 28, 876 at Frankfurt. He was buried at the abbey of Lorsch, leaving three sons and three daughters. His sons, unusually for the times, respected the division made a decade earlier and each contented himself with his own kingdom. Louis is considered by many to be the most competent of the grandsons of Charlemagne. He obtained for his kingdom a certain degree of security in face of the attacks of Norsemen, Magyars, Slavs, and others. He lived in close alliance with the Church, to which he was very generous, and entered eagerly into schemes for the conversion of his heathen neighbours. August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Events Seiwa is succeeded by Yozei as emperor of Japan. ... Main Station Frankfurt Frankfurt International Airport For other uses, see Frankfurt (disambiguation). ... An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... Lorsch is a small town in southwest germany ( 60 kilometers in the south of frankfurt). ... Norsemen (the Norse) is the indigenous or ancient name for the people of Scandinavia, including (but not limited to) the Vikings. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Heathen is a term used both to describe a person who does not follow an organized religion, and also a modern practitioner of Heathenry. ...


He was married to Emma of Altdorf (died 31 January 876). They had seven children: January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Seiwa is succeeded by Yozei as emperor of Japan. ...

Events Egbert became first King of England Alcamo was founded by the Muslim commander al-Kamuk. ... Events Year of the Fire Rat begins in January. ... Carloman (830-880) was a member of the Eastern Frankish Carolingian ruling house. ... Events Egbert of Wessex conquers Mercia and is recognized as Bretwalda. ... For other uses, see number 880. ... Events Fujiwara no Yoshifusa becomes regent of Japan, starting the Fujiwara regentship. ... For the King of France known as Louis the Younger, see Louis VII of France. ... Events Christian missionary Ansgar visits Birka, trade city of the Swedes. ... Events Carloman, King of the West Franks becomes sole king upon the death of his brother. ... Events The Danes take Exeter Indravarman II succeeds Jayavarman III as ruler of the Khmer Empire. ... Charles the Fat in the Grandes Chroniques de France. ... Events Louis the Pious attempts to divide his empire among his sons. ... Events January 13: With the death of Charles the Fat, the Frankish kingdom is split again, and this time permanently. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
Carolingian Dynasty
Born: 804; Died: 876
Preceded by:
Lothair I
King of Bavaria
817843
Vacant
Title next held by
Carloman
Preceded by:
created from Francia
King of East Francia (Germany)
843876
Succeeded by:
Carloman, King of Bavaria
Succeeded by:
Louis, King of Saxony
Succeeded by:
Charles, King of Swabia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Louis the German - LoveToKnow 1911 (925 words)
LOUIS (804-876) surnamed the "German," king of the East Franks, was the third son of the emperor Louis I.
The later years of Louis were troubled by risings on the part of his sons, the eldest of whom, Carloman, revolted in 861 and again two years later; an example that was followed by the second son Louis, who in a further rising was joined by his brother Charles.
Louis was preparing for war when -he died on the 28th of September 876 at Frankfort, and was buried at Lorsch, leaving three sons and three daughters.
Louis the German - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1031 words)
Louis soon began to interfere in the quarrels arising from Judith's efforts to secure a kingdom for her own son Charles (later known as Charles the Bald) and the consequent struggles of his brothers with their father.
The later years of Louis the German were troubled by risings on the part of his sons, the eldest of whom, Carloman, revolted in 861 and again two years later; an example that was followed by the second son Louis, who in a further rising was joined by his brother Charles.
A report that the emperor Louis II was dead led to peace between father and sons and attempts by Louis the German to gain the imperial crown for Carloman.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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