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Encyclopedia > Louis XVIII of France
Louis XVIII
King of France and Navarre
Reign De jure 8 June 179516 September 1824
De facto 6 April 181420 March 1815; 8 July 181516 September 1824
Coronation None
Full name Louis-Stanislas-Xavier
Titles Count of Provence (175595)
Duke of Anjou etc (177190)
Duke of Vendome
Born 17 November 1755(1755-11-17)
Palace of Versailles, France
Died 16 September 1824 (aged 68)
Paris, France
Buried Saint Denis Basilica, France
Predecessor De jure Louis XVII
De facto Emperor Napoleon I; Emperor Napoleon II
Successor Charles X
Consort Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy (17531810)
Royal House House of Bourbon
Father Louis, Dauphin of France (172965)
Mother Marie-Josèphe of Saxony (173167)

Louis XVIII (17 November 175516 September 1824), was a King of France and Navarre. The brother of Louis XVI, and uncle of Louis XVII, he ruled the kingdom from 1814 (although he dated his reign from 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleon's return in the Hundred Days. He was a member of the House of Bourbon. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 452 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1119 × 1484 pixel, file size: 240 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Luís XVIII da França, Hotel de Beauharnais, Paris-França séc. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The now-extinct title of Count of Provence belonged to local families of Frankish origin, to the House of Barcelona, to the House of Anjou and to a cadet branch of the House of Valois. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Counts of Anjou, c. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis Joseph, 3rd Duke of Vendôme, was born in 1654 and became a soldier while still an adolescent. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832) was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy, engraving by an anonymous artist, around 1775 Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy (2 September 1753 - 13 November 1810), titular Queen consort of France, wife of Louis XVIII of France, princess of Sardinia and of Piedmont, was born in Turin and died at Hartwell House, English... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Marie-Josèphe de Saxe Princess Maria Josepha Carolina of Saxony, Dauphine of France, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), was the daughter of Frederick Augustus II, Prince-elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Maria Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Events 10 Downing Street becomes the official residence of the United Kingdoms Prime Minister when Robert Walpole moves in. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Navarre since 1212. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly refers to the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 8 July 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ...

Contents

Early life

Louis-Stanislas-Xavier was born on 17 November 1755 in the Palace of Versailles in France, the fourth son of Louis, Dauphin of France, and his wife, Marie-Josèphe of Saxony. His paternal grandparents were King Louis XV of France and his consort, Queen Maria Leszczyńska. His maternal grandparents were King Augustus III of Poland, also the Elector of Saxony, and his wife, the Archduchess Maria Josepha, daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I. At birth, he received the title of Comte de Provence, but after the death of his two elder brothers and the accession of his remaining elder brother as Louis XVI of France in 1774, he became heir presumptive and was generally known as Monsieur, the traditional title of the eldest brother of the King. The later birth of two sons to Louis XVI left him third in line to the throne of France. 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Marie-Josèphe de Saxe Princess Maria Josepha Carolina of Saxony, Dauphine of France, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), was the daughter of Frederick Augustus II, Prince-elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Maria Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents Stanislaw LeszczyÅ„ski Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska Consorts Louis XV of France Children with Louis XV of France Louise-Elisabeth Henriette-Anne Marie-Louise Louis (dauphin) Philippe Adélaïde Victoire-Louise Sophie-Philippine Thérèse-Félicité Louise-Marie Date... Reign From 1734 until October 5, 1763 Elected In 1734 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On January 17, 1734 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents August II Mocny ? Consorts Marie Josepha Children Frederick Christian Date of Birth October 7, 1696 Place of... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony comprised lands in the north-westen part of present-day Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and to Westphalia. ... Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria, Queen of Poland. ... Joseph I. Joseph I (July 26, 1678 – April 17, 1711), Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia, Archduke of Austria, was the elder son of the emperor Leopold I and his third wife, Eleanora, Countess Palatine, daughter of Philip William of Neuburg, Elector Palatine. ... The now-extinct title of Count of Provence belonged to local families of Frankish origin, to the House of Barcelona, to the House of Anjou and to a cadet branch of the House of Valois. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Monsieur means My Lord in French, and is now generally used as an honorific for all men, the equivalent to the English Mister. ...


Marriage

On 14 May 1771, Louis married Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy, princess of Sardinia and of the Piedmont (17531810), third child and second daughter of Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia and Maria Antonieta of Bourbon, Infanta of Spain. Her maternal grandparents were Philip V of Spain and Elizabeth Farnese. Marie Josephine suffered two miscarriages, in 1774 and 1781. After this, the couple remained childless. May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy, engraving by an anonymous artist, around 1775 Marie Josephine Louise of Savoy (2 September 1753 - 13 November 1810), titular Queen consort of France, wife of Louis XVIII of France, princess of Sardinia and of Piedmont, was born in Turin and died at Hartwell House, English... For the place in the United States, see Sardinia, Ohio. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia. ... In the Spanish and former Portuguese monarchies, Infante (masc. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Elizabeth Farnese, queen of Spain Elizabeth Farnese (October 25, 1692 – July 11, 1766), Queen consort of Spain, also known as Isabel de Farnesio or Isabella Farnese, was the only daughter of Odoardo II Farnese, Duke of Parma. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


During the Revolution

During the events leading up to the French Revolution, the Comte de Provence initially took a moderately liberal line opposing his brother, but the increasing radicalism of the Revolution very soon alienated him. In 1789, he initiated a plan to save the King and end the French Revolution. In order to finance this venture, the Comte de Provence (using one of his gentlemen, the Comte de la Châtre, as an intermediary) commissioned the Marquis de Favras to negotiate a loan of two million francs from the bankers Schaumel and Sartorius. Unfortunately, Favras took into his confidence certain officers by whom he was betrayed. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Thomas de Mahy, marquis de Favras (March 26, 1744 – February 19, 1790) was a French aristocrat and supporter of the House of Bourbon during the French Revolution. ...


It was stated in a leaflet circulated throughout Paris on 23 December 1789 that Favras had been hired by the Comte de Provence to organize an elaborate plot against the people of France. In this plot, the King, Queen and their children were to be rescued from the Tuileries Palace and spirited out of the country. Then the Comte de Provence was to be declared regent of the kingdom with absolute power. is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard The Tuileries Palace stood in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine until 1871, when it was destroyed. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ...


Simultaneously, a force of 30,000 soldiers was to encircle Paris. In the ensuing confusion, the city's three main liberal leaders (Jacques Necker, the popular Finance Minister of France, Jean Sylvain Bailly, the mayor of Paris, and the Marquis de La Fayette, the commander of the city's new National Guard), were to be assassinated. Jacques Necker Jacques Necker (September 30, 1732 – April 9, 1804) was a French statesman of Swiss origin and finance minister of Louis XVI. // Necker was born in Geneva, Switzerland. ... This page is a list of French finance ministers. ... Jean Sylvain Bailly Jean-Sylvain Bailly (September 15, 1736 – November 12, 1793), French astronomer and orator, was one of the leaders of the early part of the French Revolution. ... This is a list of mayors of Paris (maire de Paris). ... Lieutenant General & National Guard Commander-in-Chief Lafayette in 1792 at ~35yrs. ... Founded in Paris after the fall of the Bastille in July 1789, the National Guard passed from the historical stage in the wake of the destruction of the Paris Commune in May 1871. ...


Afterwards, the revolutionary city was to be starved into royal submission by cutting off its food supplies. As a consequence of the leaflet, Favras and his wife were arrested the next day, and imprisoned in the L'Abbaye Prison. Terrified of the consequences of the arrest, the Comte de Provence hastened to publicly disavow Favras, in a speech delivered before the Commune of Paris, and in a letter to the National Constituent Assembly. Favras was eventually executed in February, 1790. The Paris Commune during the French Revolution was the government of Paris from 1789 until 1795, and especially from 1792 until 1795. ... The National Constituent Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale constituante) was formed from the National Assembly on 9 July 1789, during the first stages of the French Revolution. ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In coordination with his brother's unsuccessful flight to Varennes, the Comte de Provence fled France in 1791. He was living in exile in Westphalia when King Louis XVI was guillotined in 1793. On the king's death, the Comte de Provence declared himself regent for his nephew Louis XVII, although the boy never actually reigned. The Flight to Varennes (June 20-21, 1791) was a significant episode in the French Revolution during which the French royal family attempted unsuccessfully to escape from the radical agitation of the Jacobins in Paris disguised as a Russian aristocratic family. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Westphalia (German: Westfalen) is a region in Germany, centred on the cities of Bielefeld, Dortmund, Gelsenkirchen, Münster, and Osnabrück and included in the states of North Rhine-Westphalia and Lower Saxony. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis...


On the 10-year-old king's death in prison on 8 June 1795, the Comte de Provence proclaimed himself King Louis XVIII, despite claims that Louis XVI had written papers shortly before his execution and given them to his lawyer, Malesherbes, accusing his brother of having betrayed the royal cause out of personal ambition and barring him from the succession to the throne. is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes Guillaume-Chrétien de Lamoignon de Malesherbes, often referred to as Malesherbes or Lamoignon-Malesherbes (December 6, 1721–April 23, 1794) was a French statesman, minister, and afterwards counsel for the defence of Louis XVI. Born at Paris from a famous legal family...

Gold 20-franc coin of Louis XVIII from 1815
Gold 20-franc coin of Louis XVIII from 1815

In 1794, the Comte de Provence had established a court-in-exile in the Italian town of Verona, which at the time was controlled by the Republic of Venice. There, he issued a declaration, written in part by Louis-Alexandre de Launay, comte d'Antraigues, that he rejected all the changes that had been made in France since 1789, which effectively destroyed the position of moderate constitutional monarchists in France, who had hoped to restore the monarchy under a limited constitution which would codify most of the changes since the Revolution began. This prompted the famous remark that the exiled Bourbons had learned nothing and forgotten nothing. Due to complaints from the French Directory, the Venetians expelled the pretender to the French throne from their territories in 1796. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Emmanuel Henri Louis Alexandre de Launay, comte dAntraigues (December 25, 1753—July 22, 1812) was a French pamphleteer, diplomat, spy and political adventurer during the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Executive Directory (in French Directoire exécutif), commonly known as the Directory (or Directoire) held executive power in France from November 2, 1795 until November 10, 1799: following the Convention and preceding the Consulate. ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

House of Bourbon

Henri IV
Sister
   Catherine of Navarre, Duchess of Lorraine
Children
   Louis XIII
   Elisabeth, Queen of Spain
   Christine Marie, Duchess of Savoy
   Nicholas Henri
   Gaston, Duke of Orléans
   Henriette-Marie, Queen of England and Scotland
Louis XIII
Children
   Louis XIV
   Philippe, Duke of Orléans
Louis XIV
Children
   Louis, Dauphin
   Marie-Anne
   Marie-Therèse
   Philippe-Charles, Duc d'Anjou
   Louis-François, Duc d'Anjou
Grandchildren
   Louis, Dauphin
   King Felipe V of Spain
   Charles, Duke of Berry
Great Grandchildren
   Louis, Dauphin
   Louis XV
Louis XV
Children
   Louise-Elisabeth, Duchess of Parma
   Madame Henriette
   Louis, Dauphin
   Madame Marie Adélaïde
   Madame Victoire
   Madame Sophie
   Madame Louise
Grandchildren
   Marie Clotilde, Queen of Sardinia
   Louis XVI
   Louis XVIII
   Charles X
   Madame Élisabeth
Louis XVI
Children
   Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, Duchess of Angouleme
   Louis-Joseph, Dauphin
   Louis XVII
   Sophie-Beatrix
Louis XVII
Louis XVIII
Charles X
Children
   Louis XIX
   Charles, Duke of Berry
Grandchildren
   Henri V
   Louise, Duchess of Parma

In the years that followed, Louis XVIII moved all over Europe, living for a time in Russia, before he settled in England. By this time, the conquests and success of Napoleon, who had established himself as Emperor of the French, made any Bourbon restoration seem unlikely. Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x840, 192 KB) Royal Arms of France Drawn by Theo van der Zalm I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... Henry I (November 8, 1563 – July 31, 1624), was Duke of Lorraine from 1608 until his death. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Philip IV of Spain Elisabeth of France, portrait by Diego Velázquez Élisabeth de Bourbon (November 22, 1602 - October 6, 1644), was the eldest daughter of King Henry IV of France and his second Queen Marie de Medici. ... Victor Amadeus I (May 8, 1587 – October 7, 1637) was the Duke of Savoy from 1630 to 1637. ... Gaston Jean-Baptiste, duc dOrléans (April 25, 1608, Fontainebleau – February 2, 1660, Blois), was the third son of the French king Henry IV and of his wife Marie de Medici. ... Queen Henrietta Maria (November 25, 1609 – September 10, 1669) was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (June 13, 1625 - January 30, 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland (in Latin, Terra Mariae) was so named in her honour by Cæcilius Calvert, son... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Louis XIV” redirects here. ... Philippe I, Duc dOrléans (September 21, 1640 – June 8, 1701) was the son of the Louis XIII of France and Anne of Austria, and younger brother of Louis XIV of France. ... “Louis XIV” redirects here. ... Louis, Dauphin of France (known as The Great Dauphin, le Grand Dauphin in French) (1 November 1661 - 14 April 1711) was the eldest son and heir of King Louis XIV of France and Queen Maria Theresa of Spain. ... Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Burgundy (August 16, 1682 - February 18, 1712) was the son of Louis, le Grand Dauphin, and Maria Anna of Bavaria. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Louis as Duke of Brittany Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Brittany (8 January 1707–8 March 1712) was the second son of Louis, duc de Bourgogne and Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Louise-Élisabeth of France and her daught y su hija Luisa Isabel de Borbón-Parma. ... Madame Henriette jouant de la basse viole (Madame Henriette playing the bass viol) by Jean-Marc Nattier Henriette-Anne of France (14 August 1727 at Versailles—-10 February 1752 at Versailles), was the twin sister of Princess Louise-Élisabeth, the eldest child of King Louis XV of France and his... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Marie Adélaïde (23 March 1732 - 27 February 1800) was a French princess. ... Victoire Louise Marie Thérèse (May 11, 1733 - June 7, 1799) was the seventh child and fifth daughter of King Louis XV of France and his Queen consort Maria LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Sophie Philippine Elisabeth Justine (27 July 1734 - 2 March 1782) was a French princess. ... Portrait of the young Marie-Louise by Jean-Marc Nattier. ... Charles Emmanuel IV. Charles Emmanuel IV (May 24, 1751 – October 6, 1819) was King of Sardinia from 1796 to 1802. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Élisabeth Philippine Marie Hélène of France (May 3, 1764 – May 10, 1794), commonly called Madame Élisabeth, was the youngest sister of King Louis XVI of France. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Louis de France. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Princess Sophie died as a baby, much to the grief of her parents. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) technically reigned as Henry V, King of France and Navarre from August 2 to August 9, 1830. ... Louise Marie Thérèse of France (Louise Marie Thérèse dArtois; born September 21, 1819, Élysée-Bourbon, Paris, France; died February 1, 1864, Palazzo Giustiniani, Venice, Austrian Empire) was the eldest daughter of Charles Ferdinand, Duke of Berry, younger son of King Charles X of France... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from...


Louis in fact corresponded with Napoleon during the Consulate, offering to renounce the declaration he had made in Verona, to pardon all regicides, to give titles and ennoblements to Bonaparte and his family, and even not to rescind any of the changes made since 1789. Napoleon's response was that the return of any Bourbon king to France would be accompanied by another civil war with at least another 100,000 dead bodies. With the army solidly behind him, Bonaparte likely could have restored the Bourbon monarchy while still being the power behind the throne. However, he preferred to rule in name as well as substance. As he put it, "I will not play the role of Monck, nor will I let anyone else play it. Nor will I be a second Washington." To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Reign

"Robe à dix-huit Remplis" (dress with 18 tucks) worn by supporters of Louis XVIII in 1815

However, in 1814, following the defeat of Napoleon, Louis XVIII was finally able to secure the French throne, thanks to the support of the Allied Powers and, within France, Napoleon's old foreign minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand. Louis was forced by Talleyrand and the Napoleonic elites to grant a written constitution, the Charter of 1814, which would guarantee a bicameral legislature. The Charter created a hereditary/appointive Chamber of Peers and an elected Chamber of Deputies, although the franchise was extremely limited. Louis's regime also allowed much greater freedom of expression than the Napoleonic regime which had preceded it. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 344 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (371 × 647 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Chapeau de Paille. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 344 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (371 × 647 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/gif) Chapeau de Paille. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Charles Maurice de Talleyrand Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord (February 2, 1754 - May 17, 1838) was a French diplomat. ... The French Charter of 1814 was a constitution granted by King Louis XVIII of France shortly after his restoration. ... The Peerage of France (French: ) was a distinction within the French nobility which appeared in the Middle Ages. ... Chamber of Deputies (French: ) was the name given to several parliamentary bodies in France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: 1814 - 1848 during the Bourbon Restoration and the July Monarchy, the Chamber of Deputies was the Lower chamber of the French Parliament, elected by census suffrage. ...

Monarchical Styles of
Louis XVIII
Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France et Navarre
Reference style His Most Christian Majesty
Spoken style Your Most Christian Majesty
Alternative style Monsieur Le Roi

Louis's (largely symbolic) efforts to reverse the results of the French Revolution quickly made him unpopular. Within a year, he fled from Paris to Ghent on the news of the return of Napoleon, of whom he held a modest opinion, from Elba, but returned after the Battle of Waterloo brought Napoleon's Hundred Days of renewed rule to an end. This Second Restoration led to the atrocities of the White Terror, largely in the south, when supporters of the monarchy murdered many who had supported Napoleon's return. Although the King and his ministers opposed the violence, they were ineffectual in taking active steps to stop it. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Main articles: France in the Middle Ages and Early Modern France The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... This article is about the capital of France. ... Geography Country Belgium Community Flemish Community Region Flemish Region Province East Flanders Arrondissement Ghent Coordinates , , Area 156. ... Elba (bottom centre) from space, February 1994. ... Combatants First French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of the United Netherlands Kingdom of Hanover Duchy of Nassau Duchy of Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Prince William of Orange Strength 73,000 67,000 Coalition 60,000 Prussian... The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly refers to the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 8 July 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into White Terror. ...


Louis's chief ministers were at first politically moderate, including Talleyrand, the Duc de Richelieu, and Élie Decazes, and Louis himself followed a cautious, moderate policy, hoping that moderation would ensure the continuation of the dynasty. The parliament elected in 1815, dominated by ultraroyalists (or Ultras) was dissolved by Richelieu for being impossible to work with, and electoral gerrymandering resulted in a more liberal chamber in 1816. However, the liberals ultimately proved just as unmanageable, and by 1820 Decazes and the King were looking to revise the electoral laws again to ensure a more conservative majority. However, the assassination in February 1820 of the Duc de Berry, the ultrareactionary son of Louis's equally ultrareactionary brother (and heir presumptive) the Comte d'Artois, led to Decazes's fall from power and the Triumph of the Ultras. After an interval in which Richelieu returned to power from 1820 to 1821, a new Ultra ministry was formed, headed by the Comte de Villèle, a leading Ultra. Soon, however, Villèle proved himself to be nearly as cautious as his master, and, so long as Louis lived, overtly reactionary policies were kept to a minimum. Armand_Emmanuel du Plessis, Duc de Richelieu, French statesman Armand Emmanuel Sophie Septemanie du Plessis, duc de Richelieu (September 25, 1766 - May 17, 1822) was a French statesman. ... Élie, duc Decazes, French statesman Elie, Comte (later Duc) Decazes (1788 - October 24, 1860), was a French statesman. ... The term Ultra-Royalists or simply Ultras refers to a reactionary faction which sat in the French parliament from 1815 to 1830. ... Redrawing electoral districts in this example creates a guaranteed 3-to-1 advantage for Party 1. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Jean-Baptiste Guillaume Joseph Marie Anne Seraphin, comte de Villèle (April 14, 1773 - March 13, 1854), was a French statesman. ...


Louis XVIII suffered from a severe case of gout, which worsened with the years. At the end of his life, the King was wheelchair-bound most of the time. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Louis XVIII died on 16 September 1824, and was interred in the Saint Denis Basilica. His brother, the Comte d'Artois, succeeded him as Charles X. It was to be the only fully regular transfer of power in France from one head of state to another of the entire 19th century. (Charles X, Louis Philippe, and Napoleon III were ousted by revolution, while the French Second Republic ended with a presidential coup d'état. No Third Republic President would serve out his whole term until Émile Loubet finished his term in 1906 and was succeeded by Armand Fallières.) is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... // A coup dÉtat (pronounced ), or simply coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, often through illegal means by a part of the state establishment — mostly replacing just the high-level figures. ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... Painting of French statesman Émile Loubet by Fernand-Anne Piestre Émile François Loubet (December 30, 1838 - December 20, 1929) was a French politician, 7th president of the French republic. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Clément Armand Fallières (November 6, 1841 – June 22, 1931) was a French politician, president of the French republic from 1906 to 1913. ...


Ancestors

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Louis, Dauphin of France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Burgundy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Maria Anna of Bavaria
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Louis XV of France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Princess Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Anne Marie of Orléans
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Louis, Dauphin of France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Rafał Leszczyński
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Stanisław Leszczyński
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Anna Jabłonowska
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Maria Leszczyńska
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Jean-Charles Opaliński
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Katarzyna Opalińska
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Catherine-Sophie-Anne Czarnkowska
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Louis XVIII of France
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. John George III, Elector of Saxony
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. Augustus II of Poland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Princess Anne Sophie of Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Augustus III of Poland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Christian Ernst, Margrave of Brandenburg-Bayreuth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Christiane Eberhardine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Sofie Luise of Württemberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Princess Marie-Josèphe of Saxony
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Eleonore-Magdalena of Neuburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Wilhelmina Amalia of Brunswick
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Benedicta-Henrietta of Simmern
 
 
 
 
 
 

Louis, Dauphin of France (known as The Great Dauphin, le Grand Dauphin in French) (1 November 1661 - 14 April 1711) was the eldest son and heir of King Louis XIV of France and Queen Maria Theresa of Spain. ... Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Burgundy (August 16, 1682 - February 18, 1712) was the son of Louis, le Grand Dauphin, and Maria Anna of Bavaria. ... Marie-Anne Christine Victoire de Bavière Maria Anna of Bavaria (28 November 1660, Munich - 20 April 1690, Versailles), Dauphine of France, was also known as Dauphine Victoire. ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Victor Amadeus II. Victor Amadeus II, Italian Vittorio Amedeo II (May 14, 1666 - October 31, 1732) was the Duke of Savoy (1675-1730). ... Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy (December 6, 1685-February 12, 1712) was the mother of King Louis XV of France. ... Anne Marie of Orléans (Saint Cloud, August 27, 1669 - Turin, August 26, 1728), was a Queen of Savoy and Sardinia and maternal grandmother of Louis XV of France. ... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents BogusÅ‚aw LeszczyÅ„ski Anna Denhoff Consorts Anna JabÅ‚onowska Children with Anna JabÅ‚onowska StanisÅ‚aw LeszczyÅ„ski Date of Birth 1650 Place of Birth  ? Date of Death January 31, 1703 Place of Death PleÅ›nica RafaÅ‚ LeszczyÅ„ski (1650... Reign From 1704 until 1709 and from 1733 until 1736 Elected In 1704 and 1733 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On October 4, 1705 in the St. ... Noble Family JabÅ‚onowski Coat of Arms Prus III Parents StanisÅ‚aw Jan JabÅ‚onowski Marianna Kazanowska Consorts RafaÅ‚ LeszczyÅ„ski Children with RafaÅ‚ LeszczyÅ„ski StanisÅ‚aw LeszczyÅ„ski Date of Birth 1660 Place of Birth  ? Date of Death August 29, 1727 Place of Death  ? Princess Anna JabÅ‚onowska... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents Stanislaw LeszczyÅ„ski Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska Consorts Louis XV of France Children with Louis XV of France Louise-Elisabeth Henriette-Anne Marie-Louise Louis (dauphin) Philippe Adélaïde Victoire-Louise Sophie-Philippine Thérèse-Félicité Louise-Marie Date... Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska (1682 - 1747) was the daughter of Magnate Jean-Charles OpaliÅ„ski and his wife Catherine-Sophie-Anne. ... Army of Saxony John George III, Elector of Saxony (20 June 1647 - 12 September 1691) was born into the house of Wettin. ... Reign From 1697, until 1706 and from 1709, until February 1, 1733 Elected In 1697 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On September 15, 1697 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents John George III Wettin Anne Sophie Consorts  ? Children August III Sas Maurice... Reign From 1734 until October 5, 1763 Elected In 1734 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On January 17, 1734 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents August II Mocny ? Consorts Marie Josepha Children Frederick Christian Date of Birth October 7, 1696 Place of... Christiane Eberhardine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth (Bayreuth, December 19, 1671 - Pretzsch (Elbe), September 4, 1727) was the wife of Augustus II the Strong. ... Marie-Josèphe de Saxe Princess Maria Josepha Carolina of Saxony, Dauphine of France, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), was the daughter of Frederick Augustus II, Prince-elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Maria Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor Silver coin of Leopold I, 3 Kreuzers, dated 1670. ... Joseph I. Joseph I (July 26, 1678 – April 17, 1711), Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia, Archduke of Austria, was the elder son of the emperor Leopold I and his third wife, Eleanora, Countess Palatine, daughter of Philip William of Neuburg, Elector Palatine. ... Eleonore-Magdalena of Neuburg or Eleonore of Pfalz-Neuburg (January 6, 1655, Düsseldorf - January 19, 1720, Vienna) was empress of Austria as wife of Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria, Queen of Poland. ... John Frederick (German: Johann Friedrich; 25 April 1625, Herzberg am Harz – 18 December 1679, Augsburg) was duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and ruled over the Calenberg subdivision of the duchy from 1665 until his death. ... Wilhelmina Amalia (21 April 1673 - 10 April 1742) was the daughter of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Benedicta-Henrietta of Simmern. ...

See also

Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ...

Further reading

  • Mansel, Philip. Louis XVIII. Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK: Sutton Publishing, 1999 (paperback, ISBN 0-7509-2217-6).
Louis XVIII of France
Cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty
Born: November 17 1755 Died: September 16 1824
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Napoléon I
as Emperor of the French
King of France and Navarre
6 April 1814 – 20 March 1815
Succeeded by
Napoléon I
as Emperor of the French
Preceded by
Napoléon II
as Emperor of the French
King of France and Navarre
8 July 1815 – 16 September 1824
Succeeded by
Charles X
French nobility
Vacant
Title last held by
Philippe, duc d'Anjou
Duke of Anjou
1771 – 1790
Vacant
Title next held by
Jacques
Titles in pretence
Preceded by
Louis XVII
— TITULAR —
King of France and Navarre
8 June 1795 – 6 April 1814
* Reason for succession failure *
French Revolution (1789 – 1799) 
Became king
Chronology of French monarchs from 987 to 1870
Medieval France
House of Capet

Hugues (987-996) • Robert II (996-1031) • Henri I (1031-1060) • Philippe I (1060-1108) • Louis VI (1108-1137) • Louis VII (1137-1180) • Philippe II (1180-1223) • Louis VIII (1223-1226) • Louis IX (1226-1270) • Philippe III (1270-1285) • Philippe IV (1285-1314) • Louis X (1314-1316) • Jean I (1316) • Philippe V (1316-1322) • Charles IV (1322-1328) • Philippe VI (1328-1350) • Jean II (1350-1364) • Charles V (1364-1380) • Charles VI (1380-1422) • Charles VII (1422-1461) • Louis XI (1461-1483) • Charles VIII (1483-1498) Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Navarre since 1212. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832) was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Navarre since 1212. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... The nobility (la noblesse) in France in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period had specific legal and financial rights and prerogatives (the first official list of these prerogatives was established relatively late, under Louis XI of France after 1440), including exemption from paying the taille (except for non... // Ingelger (870–898) Fulk I the Red (898–941), son of Fulk II the Good (941–958), son of Geoffrey I Greymantle (958–987), son of Fulk III the Black (987–1040), son of Geoffrey II Martel (1040–1060) Geoffrey III the Bearded (1060–1067) Fulk IV the Ill-Tempered... Jaime, Duke of Madrid and Anjou Jaime de Borbón y de Borbón-Parma, called Duke of Madrid and known in France as Jacques de Bourbon, Duke of Anjou (27 June 1870 – 2 October 1931) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain and the Legitimist claimant to... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Navarre since 1212. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Hugh Capet[1] (c. ... Events Hugh Capet, Count of Paris, crowned King of France Kukulcan conquers Chichen Itza Births Deaths May 21 King Louis V of France Categories: 987 ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Events March/April - Pope John XV dies before being being able to coronate Otto III, King of Germany as Holy Roman Emperor. ... Events Collapse of the Moorish Caliphate of Córdoba. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Events Collapse of the Moorish Caliphate of Córdoba. ... May — The Norman leader Robert Guiscard conquers Taranto. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... May — The Norman leader Robert Guiscard conquers Taranto. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... // Events August 6 - Louis VIII is crowned King of France. ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births June 21 - King Boleslaus V of Poland (died 1279) Abul-Faraj, Syriac scholar (died 1286) Bar-Hebraeus, Syriac historian and bishop (died 1286) Deaths March 7 - William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, English... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Events Carmelite Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II calls Imperial Diet of Cremona Births June 21 - King Boleslaus V of Poland (died 1279) Abul-Faraj, Syriac scholar (died 1286) Bar-Hebraeus, Syriac historian and bishop (died 1286) Deaths March 7 - William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, English... The cathedral atop the Rock of Cashel in Ireland was completed in 1270. ... Philip III the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... The cathedral atop the Rock of Cashel in Ireland was completed in 1270. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... “Philip the Fair” redirects here. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 – November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... Philip V (17 November 1293 – 3 January 1322), called the Tall (French: le Long), was King of France and Navarre (as Philip II) and Count of Champagne from 1316 to his death, and the second to last of the House of Capet. ... Events Pope John XXII elected to the papacy. ... Events September 27/September 28 - Battle of Ampfing, often called the last battle of knights, in which Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor defeats Frederick I of Austria Births January 11 - Emperor Komyo of Japan (died 1380) Deaths January 3 - King Philip V of France (born 1293) March 16 - Humphrey de... Charles IV of France, also Charles I of Navarre, called the Fair (French: le Bel) (11 December 1294 – 1 February 1328), was the King of France and Navarre and Count of Champagne from 1322 to his death: the last French king of the senior Capetian lineage. ... Events September 27/September 28 - Battle of Ampfing, often called the last battle of knights, in which Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor defeats Frederick I of Austria Births January 11 - Emperor Komyo of Japan (died 1380) Deaths January 3 - King Philip V of France (born 1293) March 16 - Humphrey de... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Philip VI of France Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293 – August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death, and Count of Anjou, Maine, and Valois 1325–1328. ... Events Augustiner brew Munich May 1 - Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton - England recognises Scotland as an independent nation after the Wars of Scottish Independence May 12 - Nicholas V is consecrated at St Peters Basilica in Rome by the bishop of Venice. ... Events 29 August - An English fleet personally commanded by King Edward III defeats a Spanish fleet in the battle of Les Espagnols sur Mer. ... John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France 1350–1364, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou and Maine 1332–1350, Count of Poitiers 1344–1350, and Duke of Guienne 1345–1350. ... Events 29 August - An English fleet personally commanded by King Edward III defeats a Spanish fleet in the battle of Les Espagnols sur Mer. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Charles V becomes King of France. ... Charles V the Wise (French: Charles V le Sage) (January 21, 1338 – September 16, 1380) was king of France from 1364 to 1380 and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Charles V becomes King of France. ... September 8 - Battle of Kulikovo - Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitri Donskoi of Moscow resist a large invasion by the Blue Horde, Lithuania and Ryazan, stopping their advance at Kulikovo. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... September 8 - Battle of Kulikovo - Russian forces under Grand Prince Dmitri Donskoi of Moscow resist a large invasion by the Blue Horde, Lithuania and Ryazan, stopping their advance at Kulikovo. ... Events January 10 - Battle of Nemecky Brod during the Hussite Wars. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Events January 10 - Battle of Nemecky Brod during the Hussite Wars. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Louis XI (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), called the Prudent (French: ) and the Universal Spider (Old French: luniverselle aragne) or the Spider King, was the King of France from 1461−83. ... Events February 2 - Battle of Mortimers Cross - Yorkist troops led by Edward, Duke of York defeat Lancastrians under Owen Tudor and his son Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke in Wales. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... Charles VIII the Affable (French: Charles VIII lAffable) (June 30, 1470 – April 7, 1498) was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Early Modern France
House of Valois

Louis XII (1498-1515) • François I (1515-1547) • Henri II (1547-1559) • François II (1559-1560) • Charles IX (1560-1574) • Henri III (1574-1589) For the administrative and social structures of early modern France, see Ancien Régime in France. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Louis XII (b. ... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry III of France (September 19, 1551 – August 2, 1589), also Henry of Poland (also called Henry of Valois, Henryk Walezy), born Alexandre-Édouard of France, was a member of the House of Valois. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ...

Early Modern France
House of Bourbon

Henri IV (1589-1610) • Louis XIII (1610-1643) • Louis XIV (1643-1715) • Louis XV (1715-1774) • Louis XVI (1774-1792) For the administrative and social structures of early modern France, see Ancien Régime in France. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... “Louis XIV” redirects here. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XV, called the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé) (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

First Republic
First Empire
House of Bonaparte

Napoléon I (1804-1814) Motto: (Liberty, equality, brotherhood, or death!) Anthem: La Marseillaise (unofficial) Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Republic Various  - 1792-1795 National Convention (rule by legislature)  - 1794-1799 Directory  - 1799-1804 First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte Legislature National Convention French Directory French Consulate History  - Storming of the Bastille/French Revolution 14 July... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era Napoleonic... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Bourbon Restoration I
House of Bourbon

Louis XVIII (1814-1815) Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...

Hundred Days
House of Bonaparte

Napoléon I (1815) • Napoléon II (1815) The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly refers to the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 8 July 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832) was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...

Bourbon Restoration II
House of Bourbon

Louis XVIII (1815-1824) • Charles X (1824-1830) • Louis XIX (1830) • Henri V (1830) Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) technically reigned as Henry V, King of France and Navarre from August 2 to August 9, 1830. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

July Monarchy
House of Orléans

Louis-Philippe (1830-1848) The July Monarchy was established in France with the reign of Louis Philippe of France. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... Louis-Philippe of France (6 October 1773 – 26 August 1850) was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 in what was known as the July Monarchy. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Second Republic
Second Empire
House of Bonaparte

Napoléon III (1852-1870) This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Map of the French Second Empire Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1852-1870 Napoleon III Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif History  - French coup of 1851 December 2 1851  - Established 1852  - Disestablished September 4, 1870 Currency French Franc The Second French Empire or... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Third, Fourth and Fifth Republic
List of French monarchsList of Queens and Empresses of France — History of France
Pretenders to the French throne since 1792
Legitimist pretenders
House of Bourbon
Orléanist pretenders
House of Orléans
Bonapartist pretenders
House of Bonaparte
Louis XVI (1792-1793)
Louis XVII (1793-1795)
Louis XVIII (1795-1814)
First Empire
1804-1814
Bourbon Restoration I
1814-1815
Napoléon I (1814-1815)
Louis XVIII (1815)
Reign of the Hundred Days
1815
Bourbon Restoration II
1815-1830
Napoléon II (1815-1832)
Joseph (1832-1844)
Louis (1844-1846)
Napoléon III (1846-1852)
Charles X (1830-1836)
Louis XIX (1836-1844)
Henri V (1844-1883)
Jean III (1883-1887)
Charles XI (1887-1909)
Jacques I (1909-1931)
Alphonse I (1931-1936)
Alphonse II (1936-1941)
Jacques II (1941-1975)
Alphonse III (1975-1989)
Louis XX (1989-)
July Monarchy
1830-1848
Louis-Philippe I (1848-1850)
Philippe VII (1850-1894)
Philippe VIII (1894-1926)
Jean III (1926-1940)
Henri VI (1940-1999)
Henri VII (1999-)
Second Empire
1852-1870
Napoléon III (1870-1873)
Napoléon IV Eugène (1873-1879)
Napoléon V Victor (1879-1926)
Napoléon VI Louis (1926-1997)
Napoléon VII Charles (1997-)
List of French monarchsList of Queens and Empresses of France • History of France
Royal coat of Arms of France (House of Bourbon)
Legitimist Pretenders
to the French throne
since 1792
French Revolution

Louis XVI (1792-1793)
Louis XVII (1793-1795)
Louis XVIII (1795-1814) The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of the women who have been Queens consort or Empresses consort of the realm of France. ... The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Legitimists are Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... The Orléanists were a French political faction or party which arose out of the French Revolution, and ceased to have a separate existence shortly after the establishment of the Third Republic in 1870. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... // In French political history, Bonapartists were monarchists who desired a French Empire under the House of Bonaparte, the Corsican family of Napoleon Bonaparte (Napoleon I of France) and his nephew Louis (Napoleon III of France). ... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era Napoleonic... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... The Hundred Days (French Cent-Jours) or the Waterloo Campaign commonly refers to the period between 20 March 1815, the date on which Napoleon Bonaparte arrived in Paris after his return from Elba, and 8 July 1815, the date of the restoration of King Louis XVIII. The phrase Cent jours... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832) was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Joseph Bonaparte Coat of arms of Joseph Bonaparte as King of Spain (1808-1813). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jan. ... Louis I Napoleon Bonaparte, King of Holland, Grand Duke of Berg and Cleves, Count of Saint-Leu (Lodewijk Napoleon in Dutch) (September 2, 1778 – July 25, 1846) was the fifth surviving child and fourth surviving son of Carlo Buonaparte and Letizia Ramolino. ... Jan. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jan. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) technically reigned as Henry V, King of France and Navarre from August 2 to August 9, 1830. ... Jan. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Don Juan Carlos Maria Isidro de Borbón, Count of Montizón (French: Jean Charles Marie Isidore de Bourbon, comte de Montizón) (May 15, 1822 – November 21, 1887) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain from 1860 to 1887, and the Legitimist claimant to the throne of... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Carlos de Bourbon, Duke of Madrid (1848 - 1909) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain, and later the Legitimist claimant to the throne of France. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jaime, Duke of Madrid and Anjou Jaime de Borbón y de Borbón-Parma, called Duke of Madrid and known in France as Jacques de Bourbon, Duke of Anjou (27 June 1870 – 2 October 1931) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain and the Legitimist claimant to... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfonso Carlos of Bourbon, Duke of San Jaime Alfonso Carlos de Bourbon, Duke of San Jaime (London 12 September 1849-Vienna 29 September 1936) was the Legitimist claimant to the throne of France and the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alfonso XIII (May 17, 1886 – February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Jaime Luitpold Isabelino Enrique de Borbón y Battenberg, Infante of Spain, Duke of Segovia (June 23, 1908- March 20, 1975), was the second son of King Alfonso XIII of Spain and his wife Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfonso de Borbón y de Dampierre (French citizen as Alphonse de Bourbon) (1936–1989), also known as the Duke of Cádiz (as he was mostly called in Spain) and Duke of Anjou, was a pretender to the French throne. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... HRH Louis Alphonse de Bourbon, duc dAnjou (on his French National Identity Card; full name: Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Emanuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú, Duke of Anjou, born Madrid, April 25, 1974) is considered to be the head of the French Royal House by... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The July Monarchy was established in France with the reign of Louis Philippe of France. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis-Philippe of France (6 October 1773 – 26 August 1850) was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 in what was known as the July Monarchy. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Louis-Philippe Albert dOrléans, Comte de Paris Louis-Philippe Albert dOrléans, Comte de Paris (August 24, 1838 – September 8, 1894) was the grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Louis-Philippe Robert, Duke of Orléans (August 24, 1869 - March 28, 1926) was the son of Philippe, Count of Paris, Orléanist claimant to the throne of France. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean Pierre Clément Marie dOrléans, Duc de Guise (September 4, 1874-August 25, 1940) was the son of Robert, Duke of Chartres (1840-1910), grandson of Prince Ferdinand-Philippe and great-grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Henri Robert Ferdinand Marie Louis Philippe dOrléans, also known as Henri, comte de Paris (5 July 1908-19 June 1999) was the Orleanist pretender to the French throne from 1940 until his death. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Prince Henri Philippe Pierre Marie dOrléans, comte de Paris, duc de France (born June 14, 1933) is a claimant to the French throne. ... This article is about the year. ... Map of the French Second Empire Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1852-1870 Napoleon III Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif History  - French coup of 1851 December 2 1851  - Established 1852  - Disestablished September 4, 1870 Currency French Franc The Second French Empire or... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Napoléon Eugène Louis John Joseph, called Napoleon IV, (March 16, 1856 – June 1, 1879), Prince Imperial, Fils de France, was the only child of Emperor Napoleon III of France and his Empress consort Eugénie de Montijo. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... NapolÄ—on-Victor Bonaparte (about 1905) Napoléon Victor Jérôme Frédéric Bonaparte (July 18, 1862 - May 3, 1926) was the son of Prince Napoleon and Marie Clothilde of Sardinia, daughter of Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis Napoléon, born as Louis Jerome Victor Emmanuel Leopold Marie Bonaparte, (23 January 1914 - 3 May 1997) was claimant to the Imperial throne of France in the Prince Napoléon pretentious line from 1926 until his death. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Napoléon VII, Prince Imperial (Charles Marie Jérôme Victor Napoléon) (born 19 October 1950) is a French politician, and claims to be the current head of the Imperial House of France as heir male to the rights and legacy established by his great-great-granduncle, Emperor Napol... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... This is a list of the women who have been Queens consort or Empresses consort of the realm of France. ... The History of France has been divided into a series of separate historical articles navigable through the list to the right. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (580x840, 192 KB) Royal Arms of France Drawn by Theo van der Zalm I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Legitimists are Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Bourbon Restoration I

Louis XVIII (1815) Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...

Bourbon Restoration II

Charles X (1830-1836)
Louis XIX (1836-1844)
Henri V (1844-1883)
Jean III (1883-1887)
Charles XI (1887-1909)
Jacques I (1909-1931)
Alphonse I (1931-1936)
Alphonse II (1936-1941)
Jacques II (1941-1975)
Alphonse III (1975-1989)
Louis XX (1989-) Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X Legislature Parliament History  - Bourbon Restoration 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jan. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) technically reigned as Henry V, King of France and Navarre from August 2 to August 9, 1830. ... Jan. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Don Juan Carlos Maria Isidro de Borbón, Count of Montizón (French: Jean Charles Marie Isidore de Bourbon, comte de Montizón) (May 15, 1822 – November 21, 1887) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain from 1860 to 1887, and the Legitimist claimant to the throne of... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Carlos de Bourbon, Duke of Madrid (1848 - 1909) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain, and later the Legitimist claimant to the throne of France. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jaime, Duke of Madrid and Anjou Jaime de Borbón y de Borbón-Parma, called Duke of Madrid and known in France as Jacques de Bourbon, Duke of Anjou (27 June 1870 – 2 October 1931) was the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain and the Legitimist claimant to... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfonso Carlos of Bourbon, Duke of San Jaime Alfonso Carlos de Bourbon, Duke of San Jaime (London 12 September 1849-Vienna 29 September 1936) was the Legitimist claimant to the throne of France and the Carlist claimant to the throne of Spain. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Alfonso XIII (May 17, 1886 – February 28, 1941), King of Spain, posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, was proclaimed King at his birth. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Jaime Luitpold Isabelino Enrique de Borbón y Battenberg, Infante of Spain, Duke of Segovia (June 23, 1908- March 20, 1975), was the second son of King Alfonso XIII of Spain and his wife Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfonso de Borbón y de Dampierre (French citizen as Alphonse de Bourbon) (1936–1989), also known as the Duke of Cádiz (as he was mostly called in Spain) and Duke of Anjou, was a pretender to the French throne. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... HRH Louis Alphonse de Bourbon, duc dAnjou (on his French National Identity Card; full name: Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Emanuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú, Duke of Anjou, born Madrid, April 25, 1974) is considered to be the head of the French Royal House by... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Louis XVIII of France Summary (1447 words)
Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleon's return in the Hundred Days.
Louis-Stanislas-Xavier was born on November 18, 1755 in the Palace of Versailles, Versailles, France, the fourth son of Louis, dauphin de France and Marie-Josèphe of Saxony, and grandson of Louis XV of France and his Queen consort Maria Leszczyńska.
Louis XVIII died on September 16, 1824, and was interred in the Saint Denis Basilica.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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