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Encyclopedia > Louis VII of France
French Monarchy-
Capetian Dynasty
(direct Capetians branch)

Hugh Capet
Children
   Robert II
Robert II
Children
   Henry I
   Robert I, Duke of Burgundy
Henry I
Children
   Philip I
   Hugh, Count of Vermandois
Philip I
Children
   Louis VI
Louis VI
Children
   Louis VII
   Robert I of Dreux
Louis VII
Children
   Mary, Countess of Champagne
   Alix
   Marguerite
   Alys, Countess of the Vexin
   Philip II
   Agnes, Empress of Constantinople
Philip II
(Philip Augustus)
Children
   Louis VIII
Louis VIII
Children
   Louis IX
   Robert I, Count of Artois
   Alphonse, Count of Poitou and Toulouse
   Isabel of France
   Charles I of Anjou and Sicily
Louis IX
Children
   Philip III
   Robert, Count of Clermont
   Agnes, Duchess of Burgundy
Philip III
Children
   Philip IV
   Charles III, Count of Valois
   Louis d'Evreux
   Margaret of France
Philip IV
Children
   Louis X
   Philip V
   Isabella of France
   Charles IV
Louis X
Children
   Joan II of Navarre
   John I
John I
Philip V
Charles IV

Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Self-designed File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Hugh Capet (French: Hugues Capet) (938 – October 24, 996) was King of France from 987 to 996. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 - July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 - July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Robert I Capet (1011 – March 21, 1076) was duke of Burgundy between 1032 to his death. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... Hugh of Vermandois (1053 - October 18, 1101), was son to King Henry I of France and Anne of Kiev, and the younger brother of King Philip I of France. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was king of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was king of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c. ... Marie of France, or Marie Capet, Countess of Champagne (1145 – March 11, 1198), was the elder daughter of Louis VII of France and his first wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Alix of France (1150 – 1197/1198) was the second daughter born to Louis VII of France by his first wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Marguerite of France (1158 - 1197) was the eldest daughter of Louis VII of France by his second wife Constance of Castile. ... Alice, Countess of the Vexin (October 4, 1160 – c. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Agnes of France (1171 - after 1207) was a daughter of Louis VII of France by his third wife Adèle of Champagne. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Louis VIII the Lion (French: Louis VIII le Lion) (September 5, 1187 – November 8, 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Louis VIII the Lion (French: Louis VIII le Lion) (September 5, 1187 – November 8, 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Robert I the Good (1216 – February 8, 1250) was Count of Artois. ... Alphonse, Count of Toulouse and of Poitiers (November 11, 1220 – August 21, 1271). ... Saint Isabel of France (March, 1225 – 23 February 1270) was the daughter of Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile, and brother of Louis IX of France. ... Charles I (March 1227 (or 1226) - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous (or born ten months before fathers death: sources suggest two possible birth years) son of King Louis VIII of France by Blanche of Castile. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Philippe III Philip III the Bold ( French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 – October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... Robert of France (1256 – February 7, 1317) was made Count of Clermont in 1268. ... Agnes of France (c. ... Philippe III Philip III the Bold ( French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 – October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Charles III of Valois (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. ... Louis of France, Count dÉvreux (May, 1276 – May 19, 1319, Paris) was the third son of King Philip III the Bold with his second wife Marie de Brabant, and step-brother of King Philip IV the Fair. ... Marguerite of France (1282 – 14 February 1317) was a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Philip V the Tall (French: Philippe V le Long) (1293 - January 3, 1322) was King of France from 1316 to 1322, a member of the Capetian dynasty. ... Isabella of France (c. ... Charles IV the Fair (French: Charles IV le Bel) (1294 – February 1, 1328), a member of the Capetian Dynasty, reigned as King of France from 1322 to 1328. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Joan II, Juana II, or Jeanne II, Queen of Navarre (1311 - 1349) - was the only daughter of King Louis X of France (Luis I of Navarre) and his first wife, Margaret of Burgundy. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 - November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 - November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... Philip V the Tall (French: Philippe V le Long) (1293 - January 3, 1322) was King of France from 1316 to 1322, a member of the Capetian dynasty. ... Charles IV the Fair (French: Charles IV le Bel) (1294 – February 1, 1328), a member of the Capetian Dynasty, reigned as King of France from 1322 to 1328. ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France The monarchs of France ruled, first kings and later as emperors, from the middle ages to 1848. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ...


Biography

A member of the Capetian Dynasty, Louis VII was born in 1120, the second son of Louis VI of France and Adélaide of Maurienne (c. 11001154). Construction began on Notre-Dame de Paris in Paris during his reign. The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was king of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Adelasia of Moriana (fr. ... Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... This article is about the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris. ...


As a younger son, Louis VII had been raised to follow the ecclesiastical path. He unexpectedly became the heir to the throne of France after the accidental death of his older brother, Philip, in 1131. A well-learned and exceptionally devout man, Louis VII was better suited for life as a priest than that of a monarch.


In the same year he was crowned King of France, Louis VII was married on July 22, 1137 to Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122March 31, 1204), heiress of William X of Aquitaine (1126–37). The pairing of the monkish Louis VII and the high-spirited Eleanor was doomed to failure; she once reportedly declared that she had thought to marry a King, only to find she'd married a monk. Their daughters were: July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122[1] – March 31, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Events Resolution of Investiture Controversy in the Concordat of Worms Pierre Abélard writes Sic et Non Births Ben Lancaster, Gradutate, Dynamite dancer. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... // Events February - Byzantine emperor Alexius IV is overthrown in a revolution, and Alexius V is proclaimed emperor. ... William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. ...

In the first part of Louis VII's reign he was vigorous and jealous of his prerogatives, but after his crusade his piety limited his ability to become an effective statesman. His accession was marked by no disturbances, save the uprisings of the burgesses of Orléans and of Poitiers, who wished to organize communes. But soon he came into violent conflict with Pope Innocent II (1130–43). The archbishopric of Bourges became vacant, and the King supported as candidate the chancellor Cadurc, against the Pope's nominee Pierre de la Chatre, swearing upon relics that so long as he lived Pierre should never enter Bourges. This brought the interdict upon the King's lands. Marie of France, or Marie Capet, Countess of Champagne (1145 – March 11, 1198), was the elder daughter of Louis VII of France and his first wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Events Pope Lucius II is succeeded by Pope Eugene III Nur ad-Din ascends to power in Syria Construction begins on Notre-Dame dChartres in Chartres, France Korean historian Kim Pusik compiled the historical text Samguk Sagi. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Toba of Japan Emperor Tsuchimikado ascends to the throne of Japan January 8 - Pope Innocent III ascends Papal Throne Frederick II, infant son of German King Henry VI, crowned King of Sicily Births August 24 - Alexander II of Scotland (d. ... Henry I of Champagne (d. ... Alix of France (1150 – 1197/1198) was the second daughter born to Louis VII of France by his first wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Events Ghazni is burned by the princes of Ghur Geoffrey of Anjou dies, and succeeded by his son Henry, aged 18. ... Events Amalric II succeeds Henry II of Champagne as king of Jerusalem. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Toba of Japan Emperor Tsuchimikado ascends to the throne of Japan January 8 - Pope Innocent III ascends Papal Throne Frederick II, infant son of German King Henry VI, crowned King of Sicily Births August 24 - Alexander II of Scotland (d. ... Theobald V of Blois (-1191), also known as Theobald the Good (French: Thibaut le Bon), was count of Blois from 1151 to 1191, as well as count of Chartres. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Orléans Cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Cross, built from 1278 to 1329; after being pillaged by Huguenots in the 1560s, the Bourbon kings restored it in the 17th century. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... Pope Innocent II (died September 24, 1143), born Gregorio Papareschi, was Pope from 1130 to 1143, and was probably one of the clergy in personal attendance on the antipope Clement III (Guibert of Ravenna). ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... The vaulted nave of Bourges Cathedral Bourges (pop. ...


Louis VII became involved in a war with Theobald II of Champagne, by permitting Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife, Theobald II's niece, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. Champagne also sided with the Pope in the dispute over Bourges. The war lasted two years (1142–44) and ended with the occupation of Champagne by the royal army. Louis VII was personally involved in the assault and burning of the town of Vitry. More than a thousand people who had sought refuge in the church died in the flames. Overcome with guilt, Louis VII declared on Christmas Day 1145 at Bourges his intention of going on a crusade. Bernard of Clairvaux assured its popularity by his preaching at Vezelay (Easter 1146). Theobald II of Champagne was Count of Champagne from 1125 to 1152. ... Raoul I of Vermandois (French: Raoul Ier le Vaillant) (1085 – 14 October 1152), Count of Vermandois. ... A seneschal was an officer in the houses of important nobles in the Middle Ages. ... Petronilla of Aquitaine, (circa 1125 – 1153) born the daughter of William X of Aquitaine and Aenor of Châtellerault. ... Champagne is one of the traditional provinces of France, a region of France that is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the regions name. ... Vitry is part of the name of several communes in France: Vitry-aux-Loges, in the Loiret département Vitry-en-Artois, in the Pas-de-Calais département Vitry-en-Charollais, in the Saône-et-Loire département Vitry-en-Montagne, in the Haute-Marne département Vitry... Christmas is a Christian holiday held on December 25 which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (Fontaines, near Dijon, 1090 – August 21, 1153 in Clairvaux) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian monastic order. ... Vézelay is a commune in the Yonne département in the Burgundy region of France. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ...


Meanwhile in 1144, Geoffrey the Handsome, Count of Anjou, completed his conquest of Normandy, threatening the royal domains. Louis VII by a clever manoeuvre threw his army on the Norman frontier and gained Gisors, one of the keys of Normandy. Geoffrey V (August 24, 1113 - September 7, 1151), Count of Anjou and Maine (province of France), and later Duke of Normandy, called Geoffrey the Fair or Geoffrey Plantagenet, was the father of King Henry II of England,and thus the forefather of the Plantagenet dynasty of English kings. ... Mont Saint Michel, one of the famous symbols of Normandy. ... Gisors is a commune and the chief-town of a canton of the Eure département, in the Haute-Normandie région, in France. ...


In June 1147 Louis VII and his queen, Eleanor, set out from Metz, Lorraine, on the overland route to Syria. Just beyond Laodicea the French army was ambushed by Turks. The French were bombarded by arrows and heavy stones, the Turks swarmed down from the mountains and the massacre began. The historian Odo of Deuil reported: For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... Lorraine coat of arms location of the Lorraine province Lorraine (French: Lorraine; German: Lothringen) is a historical area in present-day northeast France. ... Roundabout in Latakia Latakia (Arabic: اللاذقية Al-Ladhiqiyah, Greek:Λαοδικεία) is the principal port city of Syria. ... Odo of Deuil was a chronicler and participant of the Second Crusade. ...

"During the fighting the King [Louis] lost his small and famous royal guard, but he remained in good heart and nimbly and courageously scaled the side of the mountain by gripping the tree roots ... The enemy climbed after him, hoping to capture him, and the enemy in the distance continued to fire arrows at him. But God willed that his cuirass should protect him from the arrows, and to prevent himself from being captured he defended the crag with his bloody sword, cutting off many heads and hands."

Louis VII and his army finally reached the Holy Land in 1148. His queen Eleanor supported her uncle, Raymond of Antioch, and prevailed upon Louis to help Antioch against Aleppo. But Louis VII's interest lay in Jerusalem, and so he slipped out of Antioch in secret. He united with Conrad III of Germany (1138–52) and King Baldwin III of Jerusalem (1143–62) to lay siege to Damascus; this ended in disaster and the project was abandoned. Louis VII decided to leave the Holy Land, despite the protests of Eleanor, who still wanted to help her doomed uncle Raymond of Antioch. Louis VII and the French army returned home in 1149. Raymond of Poitiers (c. ... King Conrad III (Miniature, 13th century) Conrad III (1093 - February 15, 1152, Bamberg), the first German king of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was the son of Frederick I, Duke of Swabia and Agnes, a daughter of Emperor Henry IV. Conrad was appointed duke of Franconia by his uncle, emperor Henry V... Baldwin III (1130-1162) was king of Jerusalem from 1143-1162. ... The Siege of Damascus took place over only four days, from July 23 to July 27, 1148, during the Second Crusade. ... Raymond of Poitiers (c. ...


The expedition came to a great cost to the royal treasury and military. It also precipitated a conflict with Eleanor, leading to the annulment of their marriage at the council of Beaugency (March 1152). The pretext of kinship was the basis for annulment. Its reasons had more to do with quarrels between Louis VII and Eleanor, her scandalous behavior during the Crusades, and the decreasing odds that their marriage would produce a male heir to the throne of France. Eleanor subsequently married Henry, Count of Anjou in the following May, which brought him the duchy of Aquitaine. Louis VII led an ineffective war against Henry for having married without the authorization of his suzerain; but in August 1154 gave up his rights over Aquitaine, and contented himself with an indemnity. Beaugency is a town and commune on the right bank of Loire River in the Loiret département, France. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ...


In 1154 Louis VII married Constance of Castile, daughter of Alfonso VII (1126–57), King of Castile. She, too, failed to give him a son and heir, bearing two more daughters: Alfonso VII of Castile (March 1, 1104/5 - August 21, 1157), nicknamed the Emperor, was the king of Castile and Leon since 1126, son of Urraca of Castile and Count Raymond of Burgundy. ...

As part of a peace process with Henry II of England (1154–89), Louis VII imprudently pledged his daughter, Marguerite, in the treaty of Gisors (1158) to Henry, Henry II's eldest son, promising as a dowry the Norman Vexin and Gisors. Marguerite of France (1158 - 1197) was the eldest daughter of Louis VII of France by his second wife Constance of Castile. ... Events January 11 - Vladislav II becomes King of Bohemia End of the formal reign of Emperor Go-Shirakawa of Japan, also the beginning of his cloistered rule, which will last to his death in 1192. ... Events Amalric II succeeds Henry II of Champagne as king of Jerusalem. ... Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Béla III of Hungary (Hungarian , Slovak: Belo III), born in 1148, was King of Kingdom of Hungary circa 1172-1196. ... Alice, Countess of the Vexin (October 4, 1160 – c. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... William III Talvas (1179 – October 4, 1221) was William II (or III), Count of Ponthieu and William IV Talvas (of the house of Belleme/Montgomery). ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Gisors is a commune and the chief-town of a canton of the Eure département, in the Haute-Normandie région, in France. ... Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... The Vexin is a former region in France, divided since the 10th century between the Norman Vexin (Vexin normand) and the French Vexin (Vexin français). ... Gisors is a commune and the chief-town of a canton of the Eure département, in the Haute-Normandie région, in France. ...


Constance died in childbirth on 4 October 1160, and five weeks later Louis VII married Adèle of Champagne. Henry II, to counterbalance the advantage this would give the King of France, had the marriage of their children (Henry "the Young King" and Marguerite) celebrated at once. Louis VII understood the danger of the growing Angevin power, however, through indecision and lack of fiscal and military resources compared to Henry II's, Louis VII failed to oppose Angevin hegemony effectively. One of the few military successes of Louis VII, in 1159, was his expedition in the south to aid Raymond V, Count of Toulouse who had been attacked by Henry II. At the same time the emperor Frederick I (1152–90) in the east was making good the imperial claims on Arles. When the schism broke out, Louis VII took the part of the Pope Alexander III (1159–81), the enemy of Frederick I, and after two comical failures of Frederick I to meet Louis VII at Saint Jean de Losne (on the 29th of August and the 22nd of September 1162), Louis VII definitely gave himself up to the cause of Alexander III, who lived at Sens from 1163 to 1165. Alexander III gave the King, in return for his loyal support, the golden rose. October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Eric IX of Sweden is succeeded by Karl Sverkersson. ... Adèle de Champagne (c. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Raymond V (1134-1194) was count of Toulouse from 1148 until his death in 1194. ... Frederick Barbarossa in a 13th century Chronicle. ... Arles (Arle in Provençal) is a city in the south of France, in the Bouches-du-Rhône département, of which it is a sous-préfecture, in the former province of Provence. ... Alexander III, né Orlando Bandinelli (c. ...


Finally, in 1165 Adèle gave birth to them much longed-for son, along with two daughters a few years later. Louis VII's and Adèle's children were:

Louis VII received Thomas Becket and tried to reconcile him with King Henry II. Louis VII sided with Thomas Becket as a way to weaken Henry II politically. He also supported Henry II's rebellious sons, but the rivalry between Henry II's sons and Louis VII's own indecisiveness contributed to the break up of the coalition (1173–74). Finally in 1177 the Pope intervened to bring the two Kings to terms at Vitry. Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... Events November 23 - Pope Alexander III enters Rome. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Events University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France The Kanem-Bornu Empire was established in northern Africa around the year 1200 Mongol victory over Northern China — 30,000,000 killed Births Al-Abhari, Persian philosopher and mathematician (died 1265) Ulrich von Liechtenstein, German nobleman and poet (died... Agnes of France (1171 - after 1204) was a daughter of Louis VII of France by his third wife Adèle of Champagne. ... Events Saladin abolishes the Fatimid caliphate, restoring Sunni rule in Egypt. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... Alexius II Comnenus (1167-1183), Byzantine emperor (1180-1183), was the son of emperor Manuel I Comnenus and Maria, daughter of Raymund, prince of Antioch, and was born at Constantinople on September 10, 1167. ... Billon trachy (a cup-shaped coin) of Andronicus I Comnenus (1183-1185) Andronicus I Comnenus (c. ... Theodosius Branas or Theodore Branas. ... St Thomas Becket (December 21, 1118 – December 29, 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 to 1170. ... Vitry is part of the name of several communes in France: Vitry-aux-Loges, in the Loiret département Vitry-en-Artois, in the Pas-de-Calais département Vitry-en-Charollais, in the Saône-et-Loire département Vitry-en-Montagne, in the Haute-Marne département Vitry...


His reign was a difficult and unfortunate one, from the point of view of royal territory and military power. Yet the royal authority made progress in the parts of France distant from the royal domains. More direct and more frequent connection was made with distant vassals, a result largely due to the alliance of the clergy with the crown. Louis VII thus reaped the reward for services rendered the church during the least successful portion of his reign. His greater accomplishments lie in the development of agriculture, population, commerce, the building of stone fortresses, as well as an intellectual renaissance. Considering the significant disparity of political leverage and financial resources between Louis VII and his Angevin rival, not to mention Henry II's superior military skills, Louis VII should be credited with preserving the Capetian dynasty.


He was to be succeeded by his son by Adèle, Philip II Augustus and had him crowned at Reims in 1179. However, already stricken with paralysis, King Louis VII himself was not able to be present at the ceremony. Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ...


Louis VII died on September 18, 1180 at the Abbey at Saint-Pont, Allier and is interred in Saint Denis Basilica. West façade of Saint Denis The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ...

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Louis VII of France


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Preceded by:
Louis VI
King of France
1137–80
Succeeded by:
Philip II
Preceded by:
William X
Duke of Aquitaine
with Eleanor

1137–52
Succeeded by:
Henry I and Eleanor
Count of Poitiers
with Eleanor

1137–52

Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was king of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France The monarchs of France ruled, first kings and later as emperors, from the middle ages to 1848. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 – July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... William X of Aquitaine (1099 – April 9, 1137), nicknamed the Saint was Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitiers as William VIII of Poitiers between 1126 and 1137. ... The persons who held the title of Duke of Aquitaine (French: Duc dAquitaine}, which became part of France in 1449 but was an independent duchy before that date, with the years they held it, were: // Kings and Dukes of Aquitaine Edward III claimed the title of King of France... Eleanor of Aquitaine For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122[1] – March 31, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122[1] – March 31, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... Among the men who have borne the title of Count of Poitiers (or Poitou, in what is now France but in the Middle Ages became part of the Aquitaine) are: Guerin (or Warin[us]) (638-677) Renaud (795-843) Bernard I (815-844) Ranulph I (835-875) Ranulph II (855... Eleanor of Aquitaine For other Eleanors of England, see Eleanor of England (disambiguation) Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122[1] – March 31, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Louis VII of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1473 words)
Louis VII became involved in a war with Theobald II of Champagne, by permitting Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife, Theobald II's niece, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France.
Louis VII by a clever manoeuvre threw his army on the Norman frontier and gained Gisors, one of the keys of Normandy.
Louis VII died on September 18, 1180 at the Abbey at Saint-Pont, Allier and is interred in Saint Denis Basilica.
Louis VII of France - definition of Louis VII of France in Encyclopedia (1109 words)
Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 - September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180.
A member of the Capetian Dynasty, Louis VII was born in 1120, the second son of Louis the Fat and Adélaide of Maurienne (c.
Louis became involved in a war with Theobald II of Champagne, by permitting Rodolphe, Count of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife, Theobald's niece, and to marry Petronille of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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