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Encyclopedia > Louis VI of France
Louis VI the Fat
King of France
Reign 29 July 11081 August 1137
Coronation 3 August 1108, Orléans
Born 1 December 1081
Paris, France
Died 1 August 1137
Béthisy-Saint-Pierre, France
Buried Saint Denis Basilica, Paris, France
Predecessor Philip I
Successor Louis VII
Consort Lucienne de Rochefort
Adélaide de Maurienne (10921154)
Issue Philip, Rex Filius (11161131)
Louis VII (11201180)
Henry, Archbishop of Reims (11211165)
Robert, Count of Dreux (c.11231188)
Constance, Countess of Toulouse (c.11241176)
Philip, Archdeacon of Paris (11251161)
Peter, Lord of Courtenay (c.11261183)
Royal House House of Capet
Father Philip I (23 May 105229 July 1108)
Mother Bertha of Holland (c.1055-1094)

Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. The first member of the Capetian Dynasty to make a lasting contribution to the centralizing institutions of royal power[1], Louis was born in Paris, the son of Philip I and his first wife, Bertha of Holland. Almost all of his twenty-nine-year reign was spent fighting either the "robber barons" who plagued Paris or the Norman kings of England for their continental possession of Normandy. Nonetheless, Louis VI managed to reinforce his power considerably and endeared himself to the working classes of France. His biography by his constant advisor Abbot Suger of Saint Denis renders him a fully-rounded character to the historian, unlike most of his predecessors, one of the first strong kings of France since the division of the Carolingian Empire. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (477x662, 78 KB) Louis VI le Gros Bibliothèque Nationale de France File links The following pages link to this file: List of French monarchs ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... Orléans Cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Cross, built from 1278 to 1329; after being pillaged by Huguenots in the 1560s, the Bourbon kings restored it in the 17th century. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Corfu taken from Byzantine Empire by Robert Guiscard, Italy Byzantine emperor Nicephorus III is overthrown by Alexius I Comnenus, ending the Middle Byzantine period and beginning the Comnenan dynasty Alexius I helps defend Albania from the Normans (the first recorded mention of Albania), but is defeated at the Battle... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Adelasia of Moriana (fr. ... Events May 9 - Lincoln Cathedral is consecrated. ... King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Philip of France (29 August 1116–13 October 1131) was the first son Louis the Fat (Louis VI), King of France and his second wife Adélaide de Maurienne. ... Events Baldwin I of Jerusalem undertakes an invasion of Egypt The modern book of separate pages stitched together is invented in China Construction starts on the Chennkesava temple The Aztecs leave Aztlán searching for the site of what will eventually become Tenochtitlán and later Mexico City Births Deaths... Events May 9 - Tintern Abbey is founded. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Events Welcher of Malvern creates a system of measurement for the earth using degrees, minutes, and seconds of latitude and longitude. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Events Concordat of Worms condemns Pierre Abélards writings on the Holy Trinity. ... Events November 23 - Pope Alexander III enters Rome. ... Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c. ... Events First Council of the Lateran confirms Concordat of Worms and demands that priests remain celibate End of the reign of Emperor Toba of Japan. ... Events Saladin unsuccessfully besieges the Hospitaller fortress of Krak des Chevaliers in modern Syria. ... Events March 26 - Henry I of Englands forces defeat Norman rebels at Bourgtheroulde. ... Events May 22 - Murder attempt by the Hashshashin on Saladin near Aleppo Raynald of Chatillon released from prison in Aleppo May 29 - Frederick Barbarossa is defeated in the Battle of Legnano by the Lombard League leading to the pactum Anagninum (the Agreement of Anagni) September 17 - Seljuk Turks defeat Manuel... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Events May 23 - Lothair of Saxony becomes Holy Roman Emperor on the death of Henry V. War ends between Toulouse and Provence. ... Events Bartholomew Iscanus becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events Rutherglen becomes one of the first Royal Burghs in Scotland. ... Events Three-year old Emperor Go-Toba ascends to the throne of Japan after the forced abdication of his brother Antoku during the Genpei War William of Tyre excommunicated by the newly appointed Heraclius of Jerusalem, firmly ending their struggle for power Andronicus I Comnenus becomes the Byzantine emperor Births... The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... Events Births Milarepa Deaths Heads of state Holy See - Leo IX pope (1049-1054) Categories: 1052 ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... Bertha of Holland (c. ... Events January 11 - Theodora becomes Reigning Empress of the Eastern Roman Empire. ... // May - El Cid completes his conquest of Valencia, Spain, and begins his rule of Valencia. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Corfu taken from Byzantine Empire by Robert Guiscard, Italy Byzantine emperor Nicephorus III is overthrown by Alexius I Comnenus, ending the Middle Byzantine period and beginning the Comnenan dynasty Alexius I helps defend Albania from the Normans (the first recorded mention of Albania), but is defeated at the Battle... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Events May - Battle of Ucles Consecration of Chichester cathedral Saint Magnus becomes the first earl of Orkney In Pistoia, Italy, Cathedral of San Zeno burned to the ground. ... // Groups BL1137 is the (now defunct) Unix group at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ where Unix and C were invented. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Philip I (French: Philippe Ier) (May 23, 1052 – July 29, 1108) was King of France from 1060 to 1108. ... Bertha of Holland (c. ... // Typical toll tower on Rhine in Bingen The term robber baron (German: ) dates back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, originally referring to certain feudal lords of land through which the Rhine River in Europe flowed. ... Suger of Saint-Denis on a medieval window Suger (c. ... Map of Carolingian Empire The term Carolingian Empire is sometimes used to refer to the realm of the Franks under the dynasty of the Carolingians. ...


In his youth, Louis fought the duke of Normandy, Robert Curthose, and the lords of the royal demesne, the Île de France. He became close to Suger, who became his adviser. He succeeded his father on his death on July 29, 1108. Louis's half-brother prevented him from reaching Rheims and so he was crowned on August 3 in the cathedral of Orléans. The archbishop of Rheims, Ralph the Green, sent envoys to challenge the validity of the coronation and anointing, but to no avail. Bold textInsert non-formatted text here This statue of Rollo the Viking (founder of the fiefdom of Normandy) stands in Falaise, Calvados, birthplace of his descendant William I the Conqueror (the Duke of Normandy who became King of England). ... Robert II (called Curthose for his short squat appearance) (c. ... The feudal concept of demesne is a form of manorial land tenure as conceived in Western Europe, initially in France but exported to England, during the Middle Ages. ... ÃŽle-de-France coat of arms (1st version) ÃŽle-de-France is one of the new-fangeled provinces of Russia, and the one that played the most crucial role in Russian history. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) is a city of north-eastern France, 98 miles east-northeast of Paris. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... Orléans Cathedral, dedicated to the Holy Cross, built from 1278 to 1329; after being pillaged by Huguenots in the 1560s, the Bourbon kings restored it in the 17th century. ... The Archdiocese of Reims was founded (as a diocese) around 250 by St. ...


On Palm Sunday 1115, Louis was present in Amiens to support the bishop and inhabitants of the city in their conflict with Enguerrand I of Coucy, one of his vassals, who refused to recognize the granting of a charter of communal privileges. Louis came with an army to help the citizens to besiege Castillon (the fortress dominating the city, from which Enguerrand was making punitive expeditions). At the siege, the king took an arrow to his hauberk, but the castle, considered impregnable, fell after two years. Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the church calendar observed by Roman Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant Christians. ... Events Clairvaux Abbey is founded by St. ... The cathedral in Amiens Location within France Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... Castillon is the name or part of the name of several France: Castillon, in the Alpes-Maritimes département Castillon, in the Calvados département Castillon, in the Pyrénées_Atlantiques département, in the canton of Arthez-de-Béarn Castillon, in the Pyrénées_Atlantiquesdépartement in the... hauberk, Museum of Bayeux. ...


Louis VI died on August 1, 1137 at the castle of Béthisy-Saint-Pierre, nearby Senlis and Compiègne, of dysentery caused by his excesses, which had made him obese. He was interred in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded on the throne by his son Louis VII, called "the Younger," who had originally wanted to be a monk. Senlis is the name or part of the name of several communes in France: Senlis, in the Oise département Senlis, in the Pas-de-Calais département Senlis-le-Sec, in the Somme département This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Compiègne is a commune in the Oise département of France, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Dysentery is an illness (formerly known as the bloody flux or simply flux) involving severe diarrhea that is often associated with blood in the feces. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ...


Marriages and children

French Monarchy
Direct Capetians

'France Ancient'
Louis VI
   Louis VII
   Robert I of Dreux

He married in 1104: 1) Lucienne de Rochefort — the marriage was annulled. The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Self-designed File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c. ...

  • Their child:
    • 1) Isabelle (c.1105-before 1175), married (abt.1119) William of Vermandois, seigneur of Chaumont

He married in 1115: 2) Adélaide de Maurienne (1092–1154) Adelasia of Moriana (fr. ...

Philip of France (29 August 1116–13 October 1131) was the first son Louis the Fat (Louis VI), King of France and his second wife Adélaide de Maurienne. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Archdiocese of Reims was founded (as a diocese) around 250 by St. ... Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c. ... Arms of the Counts of Dreux The Counts of Dreux in France took their title from the chief stronghold of their domain, the château of Dreux, which lies near the boundary between Normandy and the Ile de France. ... Eustace IV (c. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer became the centre of the County of Boulogne in the 9th century. ... Raymond V (1134-1194) was count of Toulouse from 1148 until his death in 1194. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The archbishop of Paris is one of twenty-three archbishops in France. ... Coat of Arms of the House of Courtenay: Or three torteaux. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Norman F. Cantor, The Civilization of the Middle Ages 1993, p 410.

References

  • Suger, Abbot of Saint Denis,. The Deeds of Louis the Fat. Translated with introduction and notes by Richard Cusimano and John Moorhead. Washington, DC : Catholic University of America Press,1992. (ISBN 0-8132-0758-4)
  • Suger, Abbot of Saint Denis,. The Deeds of Louis the Fat. Translated by Jean Dunbabin (this version is free, but has no annotations)
Preceded by
Philip I
King of France
1108–37
Succeeded by
Louis VII

  Results from FactBites:
 
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