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Encyclopedia > Louis Philippe I of France
King Louis-Philippe
'King of the French'
Reign 9 August 1830-24 February 1848
Born 6 October 1773
Died 26 August 1850
Predecessor Charles X
Successor Kingdom abolished
Consort Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies
Issue Prince Ferdinand-Philippe of France
Louise-Marie of Orléans
Marie of Orléans
Louis, Duke of Nemours
Francisca of Orléans
Clementine of Orleans
François d'Orléans, prince de Joinville
Charles, Duke of Penthièvre
Henri d'Orléans, duc d'Aumale
Antoine, Duke of Montpensier
Royal House House of Orleans
Father Louis Philippe Joseph, duc de Chartres
Mother Louise Marie Adélaïde de Bourbon-Penthièvre
French Monarchy
House of Orleans

Louis-Philippe
Children
   Ferdinand-Philippe, Crown Prince of France
   Louise-Marie of France
   Marie of Orléans
   Louis, Duke of Nemours
   Francisca of Orléans
   Clementine of Orleans
   François, Prince of Joinville
   Charles, Duke of Penthièvre
   Henri, Duke of Aumale
   Antoine, Duke of Montpensier
Grandchildren
   Philippe (VII), Count of Paris
   Robert, Duke of Chartres
   Gaston, Count of Eu
   Ferdinand Philippe Marie, Duke of Alençon
   Margaret of Orléans
   Blanche of Orléans
   Marie-Francoise de Bourbon-Orleans de Joinville
   Louis Philippe Marie Léopold, Prince de Condé
   François Louis d'Orléans, Duc de Guise
Great Grandchildren
   Amélie of Orléans
   Philip VIII, Duc d'Orléans
   Hélène of Orléans
   Charles of Orléans
   Isabelle of Orléans
   Jacques of Orléans
   Louise of Orléans
   Ferdinand of Orléans, Duke de Montpensier
   Marie of Orléans
   Robert of Orleans
   Henri of Orleans
   Marguerite of Orleans
   Jean d'Orléans, duc de Guise
   Louise of Orleans
   Philippe Emmanuel, duc de Vendome and Alencon
Great Great Grandchildren
   Isabelle of Orleans
   Francoise of Orleans
   Anne of Orleans
   Henri (VI), Count of Paris
Great Great Great Grandchildren
   Isabella of Orleans
   Henri (VII), Count of Paris
   Helene of Orleans
   Francois, duc de Orleans
   Anne of Orleans
   Diane of Orleans
   Michael, comte de Evreux
   Jaques, duc de Orleans
   Claude of Orleans
   Chantal of Orleans
   Thibaut, Comte de la Marche
   Marie Louise of Orleans
   Sophie Joséphine of Orleans
   Geneviève Marie of Orleans
   Charles Philippe, duc de Nemours
Great Great Great Great Grandchildren
   Marie of Orleans
   François, comte de Clermont
   Blanche of Orleans
   Jean, duc de Vendome
   Eudes Thibaut, duc de Angouleme
   Clothilde of Orleans
   Adélaïde of Orleans
   Charles Philippe of Orleans
   François of Orleans
   Diane Marie of Orleans
   Charles-Louis Henri, duc de Chartres
   Foulques Thibaut, duc de Aumale and comte de Eu

Louis-Philippe, King of the French (October 6, 1773August 26, 1850) reigned as the "Orléanist" king of the French from 1830 to 1848. Born in Paris, Louis-Philippe was the son of Louis Philippe Joseph, duc d'Orléans (known as "Philippe Égalité"), and a descendant of King Louis XIV. He was, to date, the last king ever to rule France. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1522x2201, 857 KB) Beschrijving no rights high resolution; better quality Painted by Winterhalter in 1841 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): List of French monarchs Louis... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles X, King of France Navarre Charles X, King of France and of Navarre (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) was born at the Palace of Versailles. ... Maria Amelia Teresa of the Two Sicilies (26 April 1782-24 March 1866) was the wife of Louis Philippe, King of the French. ... Ferdinand-Philippe The Duchess Helene Louise Prince Ferdinand-Philippe (September 3, 1810 - July 13, 1842) was Prince Royal of France. ... Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle dOrléans, fille de France, and Queen of the Belgians as the wife of King Leopold I. Born in Palermo, Sicily on April 3, 1812, she was the eldest daughter of the future King Louis-Phillippe of the French and his wife... Louis, Duke of Nemours Louis Charles Philippe Raphael, duc de Nemours (October 25, 1814 – June 26, 1896) was the second son of the duke of Orleans, afterwards King Louis-Philippe of France, and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Clémentine of Orléans, Princess of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, was the daughter of King Louis-Philippe of France, the last King of France, and mother of Tsar Ferdinand I of Bulgaria. ... François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie dOrléans, prince de Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900) was the third son of Louis Philippe, duc dOrléans, afterwards king of the French and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Henri Eugène Philippe Louis dOrléans, duc dAumale (January 16, 1822 - May 7, 1897) was the fifth, and second youngest, son of Louis-Philippe, King of the French and Duc dOrléans and Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Maria Amalia, 1842 (roughly age 60) by Franz Xaver Winterhalter. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Orleanist. ... Louis-Philippe-Joseph dOrléans, by Antoine-François Callet. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Orleanist. ... Image File history File links This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Ferdinand-Philippe Prince Ferdinand-Philippe (September 3, 1810 - July 13, 1842) was Prince Royal of France. ... Queen Louise-Marie of Belgium painted by Winterhalter Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle dOrléans, fille de France, and Queen of the Belgians as the wife of King Leopold I. Born in Palermo, Sicily on April 3, 1812, she was the eldest daughter of the future King... Louis, Duke of Nemours Louis Charles Philippe Raphael, duc de Nemours (October 25, 1814 – June 26, 1896) was the second son of the duke of Orleans, afterwards King Louis-Philippe of France, and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Clémentine of Orléans, Princess of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, was the daughter of King Louis-Philippe of France, the last King of France, and mother of Tsar Ferdinand I of Bulgaria. ... François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie dOrléans, prince de Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900) was the third son of Louis Philippe, duc dOrléans, afterwards king of the French and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Henri Eugène Philippe Louis dOrléans, duc dAumale (January 16, 1822 - May 7, 1897) was the fifth, and second youngest, son of Louis-Philippe, King of the French and Duc dOrléans and Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... Maria Amalia, 1842 (roughly age 60) by Franz Xaver Winterhalter. ... Louis-Philippe Albert dOrléans, Comte de Paris Louis-Philippe Albert dOrléans, Comte de Paris (August 24, 1838 – September 8, 1894) was the grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ... Louis Philippe Marie Ferdinand Gaston dOrléans, comte dEu (1842-1922) was the son of Louis Charles Philippe Raphael, duc de Nemours. ... Sophie Charlotte Augustine was Duchess of Alencon and born Duchess in Bavaria (February 23, 1847–May 4, 1897). ... Carlos I (pron. ... Louis-Philippe Robert Duc dOrléans (August 24, 1869 - March 28, 1926) was the son of Philippe, Comte de Paris, Orleanist claimant to the throne of France. ... In the mid-13th century the Hohenstaufen Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II made the County of Aosta (the Valle dAosta) a duchy, and its arms were carried in the Savoia arms until the reunification of Italy, 1870. ... Jean Pierre Clément Marie dOrléans, Duc de Guise (September 4, 1874 - August 25, 1940) was the son of Robert, Duke of Chartres (1840-1910), grandson of Prince Ferdinand-Philippe and great-grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ... Jean Pierre Clément Marie dOrléans, Duc de Guise (September 4, 1874-August 25, 1940) was the son of Robert, Duke of Chartres (1840-1910), grandson of Prince Ferdinand-Philippe and great-grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ... Henri Robert Ferdinand Marie Louis Philippe dOrléans, also known as Henri, comte de Paris (5 July 1908-19 June 1999) was the Orleanist pretender to the French throne from 1940 until his death. ... Henri Philippe Pierre Marie dOrléans, Comte de Paris, Duc de France is the Orleanist pretender to the French throne. ... Marie Louise of Orléans (March 27, 1662- February 12, 1689) became Queen Consort of Spain. ... François Henri Louis Marie, Comte de Clermont and Dauphin de France (born 1960), is the eldest son and heir of the Orleanist pretender to the French throne, Henri, Comte de Paris, Duc de France. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Orleanists comprised a French political faction or party which arose out of the Revolution, and ceased to have a separate existence shortly after the establishment of the Third Republic in 1872. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later as emperors, from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... Louis-Philippe-Joseph dOrléans, by Antoine-François Callet. ... Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638 – September 1, 1715) ruled as King of France and of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death just prior to his seventy-seventh birthday. ...

Contents

Before the Revolution

Louis-Philippe was born to Louis Philippe Joseph, duc de Chartres (later known as 'Philippe Égalité') and his wife Louise Marie Adélaïde de Bourbon-Penthièvre. He was the first of three sons and a daughter of the Orléans family, a family that was to have erratic fortunes for the next 60 years. The relationship between the Orléans and the Bourbon elder line was linked through Louis XIII, and ever since the elder line had a deep distrust of the intentions of the family which would succeed to the French throne should the Bourbons die out. Exiled from the Royal Court, the Orléans then confined themselves to studies, involving the literature and sciences emerging from the Enlightenment. Louis-Philippe-Joseph dOrléans, by Antoine-François Callet. ...


In his youth Louis-Philippe was tutored by the comtesse de Genlis, beginning in 1782. The comtesse de Genlis would install in him a fondness for liberal thought; it is probably during this period that Louis-Philippe picked up his slightly Voltairean brand of Catholicism. In 1785, Louis-Philippe followed his father and was created Duc de Chartres. In 1788, with France beginning to destabilize with the Revolution looming, the young Louis-Philippe showed his liberal sympathies when he participated in breaking down a door in a prison cell in Mont Saint-Michel on a visit there with the comtesse de Genlis. During the period of October 1788 to October 1789 the Palais-Royal, which was the home of the Orléans family, would be used as a centre for the Revolutionaries. Stéphanie Félicité Ducrest de St-Aubin, comtesse de Genlis (January 25, 1746 - December 31, 1830), French writer and educator, was born of a noble but impoverished Burgundian family, at Champcéry, near Autun. ... The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Mont Saint-Michel: Sheep graze on the reclaimed pré-salé or salt meadow (2004). ... Gardens of the Palais-Royal: The illustration, from an 1863 guide to Paris, enlarges the apparent scale. ...


During the Revolution

During the early stages of the Revolution, Louis-Philippe strongly supported the reformation of French society as a whole; however, his father's actions during the vote on the execution of King Louis XVI changed the fortunes of the young duc de Chartres and his family. As Louis Philippe Joseph (now duc d'Orléans after the death of his father in 1793?) continued his support for the liberal factions of the revolution, the Royal family and members of the royal court became increasingly hostile towards the Orléans family. The duc d'Orléans rapidly became more of a sinecure of liberal reform to the general population of Paris and hundreds of medallions were minted with Orléans' figure framed by the title Père du Peuple (Father of the People) were seen in the streets. The duc d'Orléans' weakness became apparent as he was involved in several scandals in Paris. In October 1789, he went to England on the pretext of negotiating with the British government to set up an independent kingdom in the Southern Netherlands. He returned in July 1790. It becomes therefore easy to understand Mirabeau's assessment of Orléans' political capacity: "if we need some sort of a puppet it might as well be that bastard as anyone else." The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Louis XVI of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Orleanist. ... A sinecure (from Latin sine, without, and cura, care) means an office which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labour, or active service. ... Originally the term Netherlands referred to a much larger entity than the current Kingdom of the Netherlands. ... Portrait of Mirabeau Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, Comte de Mirabeau, (often referred to simply as Mirabeau) (March 9, 1749 - April 2, 1791) was a French writer, popular orator and statesman. ...


The young Louis-Philippe grew up in a period that changed Europe as a whole, and he involved himself completely in those changes (a trait of his which would remain when he later became King). In his diary, he reports that he himself took the initiative to join the Jacobin Club, a move that his father supported. In June 1791, Louis-Philippe had gained his first opportunity to directly become involved in the affairs of France. In 1785, he was given the hereditary appointment of Colonel of the 14th Regiment of Dragoons (Chartres-Dragons), and when war appeared to be on the horizon in 1791, all proprietary colonels were ordered to join their Regiments. In the beginning, Louis-Philippe made himself out to be a model officer, and he demonstrated his personal bravery in two famous instances. First, three days after Louis XVI's flight to Varennes, an incident between two local priests and one of the new "constitutional" vicars became heated, and a crowd surrounded the inn where they were staying at the time, demanding blood. The young Colonel broke through the crowd and extricated the two priests, who then fled. At a river crossing on the same day, another crowd threatened to harm the priests, and the young Louis-Philippe put himself between a peasant armed with a carbine and the priests, saving their lives. The next day, Louis-Philippe dived into a river to save a drowning local engineer. For this action, he received a civic crown from the local municipality. His regiment was moved north to Flanders at the end of 1791 after the declaration of Pillnitz. It has been suggested that Jacobin/Sandbox be merged into this article or section. ... The Flight to Varennes (June 20-21, 1791) was a significant episode in the French Revolution during which the French royal family, faced with a decrease in royal authority, attempted unsuccessfully to escape abroad disguised as a Russian aristocratic family. ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... The Declaration of Pillnitz on August 27, 1791, was a statement issued at the Castle of Pillnitz in Saxony (south of Dresden) by Emperor Leopold II and Frederick William II of Prussia. ...


Louis-Philippe served under his father's crony, the Duc de Biron, along with several officers who later gained distinction in Napoleon's Empire and afterwards, including Colonel Berthier and Lieutenant Colonel Alexandre de Beauharnais (husband of Joséphine de Beauharnais, the future Empress Josephine). Louis-Philippe saw the first exchanges of fire of the Revolutionary Wars at Boussu and Quaragnon and a few days later fought at Quiévrain near Jemappes, where he was instrumental in rallying a unit of retreating soldiers. Biron wrote to War Minister de Grave, complimenting and praising the young Colonel, who was then promoted to Brigadier of a Brigade of Cavalry in Lückner's Army of the North. Louis Alexandre Berthier, Marshal of France Louis Alexandre Berthier, prince de Neuchâtel (February 20, 1753 – June 1, 1815), marshal of France, Vice-Constable of France beginning in 1808, and chief of staff under Napoleon, was born at Versailles. ... Alexandre François Marie, Vicomte de Beauharnais (May 28, 1760 _ July 23, 1794) was a French political figure and general. ... Joséphine de Beauharnais, later Empress, painted by François Gerard, 1801 (Hermitage Museum) Joséphine de Beauharnais [1] [2] [3] [4] (June 23, 1763 – May 29, 1814) was the first wife of Napoléon Bonaparte, and became Empress of the French. ... Boussu is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... Quiévrain is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... Brigadier is a rank which is used in different ways by different countries. ...


In the Army of the North, Louis-Philippe served with four Marshals of France in Macdonald, Mortier (who would later be killed in an assassination attempt on Louis-Philippe), Davout and Oudinot. Dumouriez was appointed to command the Army of the North in August 1792, whom Louis-Philippe would serve under in the Valmy campaign as a commander of a Division. At Valmy, Louis-Philippe had been ordered to establish a battery of Artillery on the crest of the hill of Valmy. The battle of Valmy was an inconclusive one, however the Austro-Prussian Army, suffering from a lack of supplies was forced back across the Rhine river. Once again, Louis-Philippe was praised in a letter by Dumouriez after the battle. Louis-Philippe was then recalled to Paris to give an account of the Battle at Valmy to the French Government where he had a rather trying interview with Danton, Minister of Justice, which he later fondly re-told to his children. He was promoted while in Paris to the position of Lieutenant-General and left in October for the Army of the North once more where Dumouriez had begun a march into Belgium. Louis-Philippe commanded a Division once again when Dumouriez chose to attack an Austrian force located in a strong position on the heights of Cuesmes and Jemappes to the west of Mons. Louis-Philippe's Division sustained heavy casualties as it attacked through a wood, retreating in disorder. However, Louis-Philippe rallied a group of units, dubbing them "the battalion of Mons" and pushed forward along with other French units to finally overwhelm the outnumbered Austrians. Etienne-Jacques-Joseph-Alexandre MacDonald Etienne-Jacques-Joseph-Alexandre MacDonald (November 17, 1765 - September 7, 1840), duke of Taranto and marshal of France, was born at Sedan, France. ... Édouard Adolphe Casimir Joseph Mortier, Marshal of France Édouard Adolphe Casimir Joseph Mortier, duc de Trévise (February 13, 1768 – July 28, 1835), marshal of France under Napoléon, was born at Le Cateau-Cambrésis, and entered the army as a sub-lieutenant in 1791. ... Davout, Marshal of France Louis Nicolas dAvout (May 10, 1770 – June 1, 1823), better known as Davout, duc dAuerstädt, prince dEckmühl, and a marshal of France. ... Nicolas Charles Oudinot (April 25, 1767 - September 13, 1847), duke of Reggio, was a marshal of France. ... Charles François Dumouriez Général Dumouriez Charles François Dumouriez (January 25, 1739 – March 14, 1823) was a French general. ... The Battle of Valmy (September 20, 1792) formed a turning point in the wars associated with the French Revolution. ... Loreley At 1,320 kilometres (820 miles) and an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second, the Rhine (Dutch Rijn, French Rhin, German Rhein, Italian: Reno, Romansch: Rein, ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The central square and town hall of Mons Mons (Dutch: Bergen) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut, of which it is the capital. ...


However, events in Paris undermined the budding military career of Louis-Philippe. The incompetence of the new Girondist appointed Jean-Nicolas Pache, virtually denuded Dumouriez' Army of the North of supplies and rapidly thousands of troops were deserting his Army. Louis-Philippe began to feel alienated by the more radical policies of the Republic, and he began to think of leaving France after the vote to execute Louis XVI and the 'yes' vote by his father. Dumouriez and Louis-Philippe met on March 22nd, 1793 where Dumouriez urged his subordinate to be involved in his attempt to work with the Austrians to march his Army on Paris and restore the Constitution of 1791. Louis-Philippe was willing to stay in France to fulfill his duties in the Army, however he had been already implicated in Dumouriez's plot and he decided to leave France to save his life, with the French government slowly falling into the Terror. On April 4th Dumouriez and Louis-Philippe left for the Austrian camp, however they were intercepted by Lieutenant-Colonel Davout, who had served at Jemappes with the duc de Chartres. As Dumouriez ordered the Colonel back to he camp, some of his soldiers cried out against the General, now declared a traitor by the National Convention, shots rang out as they fled towards the Austrian Camp. The next day, Dumouriez made another attempt to rally soldiers against the Convention; however, he found that the Artillery had declared for the Republic, leaving him and Louis-Philippe with no choice but to go into exile. At the age of 19, Louis-Philippe left France; it was some 21 years before he again set foot on French soil. Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins), comprised a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ... Jean-Nicolas Pache (1746 - November 18, 1823), French politician, was born in Paris, of Swiss parentage, the son of the concièrge of the hotel of Marshal de Castries. ... Louis XVI of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... The Reign of Terror (5 September 1793 – 28 July 1794) or simply The Terror (French: la Terreur) was a period in the French Revolution characterized by brutal repression. ... Davout, Marshal of France Louis Nicolas dAvout (May 10, 1770 – June 1, 1823), better known as Davout, duc dAuerstädt, prince dEckmühl, and a marshal of France. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ...


During his Exile

The reaction in Paris to the involvement of Louis-Philippe in the treason of Dumouriez was inevitably going to result in misfortunes for the Orléans family. Philippe Duc d'Orléans, rose in the National Convention condemning his son for his actions, citing that he would not spare his son, much akin to Brutus of old and his son. However, letters from the young Louis-Philippe were discovered in transit to his father and were read out to the Convention, Hiatt was then put under continuous surveillance. Shortly there after, the Girondists moved to arrest Philippe and the two younger brothers of Louis-Philippe, the Dukes of Beaujolais and Montpensier, the latter had been serving in Biron's Army of the North. The three were interned in Fort Saint-Jean. Part of the Paris skyline with from left to right: Montparnasse Tower, Eiffel Tower, and in the background, towers of neighboring La Défense. ... Charles François Dumouriez Général Dumouriez Charles François Dumouriez (January 25, 1739 – March 14, 1823) was a French general. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... The Girondists (in French Girondins, and sometimes Brissotins), comprised a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. ...


While this was occurring, Louis-Philippe was beginning a period of years in which he would be forced to live in the shadows, avoiding both pro-Republican revolutionaries and Legitimist French emigré centers in both the Austrian Army and in various centers throughout Europe. He first moved to Switzerland under an assumed name where he met up with the comptess de Genlis and his sister Adélaïde at Schaffhausen. From there they travelled to Zürich, where they were then told by Swiss authorities that in the interests of Swiss neutrality that the Duc de Chartres would have to leave the city. After being discovered by a group of emigrés in Zug, it became quite apparent that the women of the group, if they had any chance of living a sedentary lifestyle, they would have to separate from the duc de Chartres. Louis-Philippe then left with his faithful valet Baudoin for the heights of the Alpes. From there, travelled to Basel, where he sold all but one of his horses before leaving once again to travel throughout Switzerland. Moving from town to town, he found himself very much exposed to all the distresses of extended travelling, being refused entry to a monastery by a group of monks who believed them to be a group of young vagabonds. Another time, he woke up after spending a night in a barn to find himself at the far end of a musket, confronted by a man attempting to keep away thieves. Throughout the journey, he and Baudoin never stayed in one place for any longer than 48 hours. Finally in October 1793, Louis-Philippe was appointed a teacher of geography, history, mathematics and modern languages at a salary of 1,400 Francs at a boys' boarding school owned by a Monsieur Jost in Reichenau, a village situated at the source of the river Rhine. He taught at the school under the name "M. Chabos" and had been at the school for a month before he heard the dreadful news from Paris. Legitimists are those Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Schaffhausen is a city in northern Switzerland; it has an estimated population of 33,527 as of March 31, 2005. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Alpes are three departments in south-east France Basses-Alpes Hautes-Alpes Alpes Maritimes Categories: Départements of France | France geography stubs ... Monastery of St. ... Muskets and bayonets aboard the frigate Grand Turk. ... For other senses of this word, see history (disambiguation). ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ...


In Paris, on the 1st of November 1793, Philippe was brought to the Palais de Justice where he appeared in front of the Revolutionary Tribunal later on the 5th. The proceedings were a travesty, with the defence of the duke being completely ignored. The duke went to the guillotine a day later, proudly and calmly. In Reichenau, Louis-Philippe was devastated, feeling in part responsible for his father's death because his letters to his father were the main incriminating evidence against him. With the Revolution spiralling out of control, Louis-Philippe began to loathe his Jacobinical past, finding himself very much alone, with few friends to count on and great hostility in Europe toward the Orléans family. In early 1794, Louis-Philippe began to feel the need for companionship, courting the cook of M. Jost in Reichenau, Marianne Banzori. After deciding to end his academic career in late 1794, M. Jost discovered that his Marianne was pregnant. Upset with Louis-Philippe, Jost sent Marianne to Milan where the child was born in December 1794, afterwards abandoning the child to an orphanage after birth. After leaving Reichenau, he was able to remove the now sixteen-year old Adélaïde from the comtesse de Genlis, who had had a falling out with Louis-Philippe (now Duc d'Orléans after the death of his father). Adélaïde then went to live with her great-aunt the Princesse de Conti at Fribourg, moving then to Bavaria and finally to Hungary. She would afterwards move to join her mother who was living at the time in Spain. The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... The Free State of Bavaria  (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ...


Travelling extensively, he visited Scandinavia in 1795 where he stayed in Muonio (Torne Valley) for approximately one year. There he was living in a rectory as a guest under the name Müller and met another woman, (Beata Caisa Wahlbom) the sister of the priest's wife who was a housekeeper in the rectory. Not long after Louis-Philippe had left Scandinavia, Beata Caisa Wahlbom gave birth to a son, whom she named Erik. Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe named after the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... Muonio is a municipality of Finland. ...


Louis-Philippe also visited the United States for four years, staying in Philadelphia, New York City, and Boston, where he taught French for a time and lived in lodgings over what is now the Union Oyster House, Boston's oldest restaurant. During his time in the United States, Louis-Philippe met several times with various American politicians and people of high society, having met Governor Clinton, Judge Jay and Colonel Hamilton, but also President Washington. Washington is said to have had a good opinion of the exiled Duc and his brothers. His visit to Cape Cod in 1797 coincided with the separation of the town of Eastham into two towns, one of which took the name of Orleans, possibly in his honour. During their exile, the Orléans Princes travelled throughout the country, visiting as far south as Nashville and as far north as Maine. The brothers were even held in Philadelphia briefly during an outbreak of Yellow Fever. He is also thought to have known Isaac Snow of Orleans, Massachusetts, who escaped to France from a British prison hulk during the American Revolution. His only sister, Princess Louise Marie Adelaide Eugènie d'Orléans, married in the U.S. In 1839, while reflecting on his visit to the United States, Louis-Philippe explained in a letter to Guizot that his three years there had a large influence on his later political beliefs and judgements when he became King in France. Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... Nickname: Big Apple Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ... Ye Olde Union Oyster House is perhaps the oldest living restaurant in the United States of America having been open to diners since 1826. ... Cape Cod and Cape Cod Bay from space. ... Louise Marie Adelaide Eugènie dOrléans (August 23, 1777 - December 31, 1847) was the daughter of Louis Philip II, Duke of Orléans, and the sister of King Louis-Philippe of France. ...


In Boston, Louis-Philippe would learn of the coup of 18 Fructidor and the exile of his mother to Spain. It was then that he along with his brothers decided to return to Europe, travelling south to New Orleans and hoping to move by ship to Havana and from their to Spain. This however was a troubled journey as Britain and Spain by this time were at war, and when he was finally able to board an American corvette for Havana, the ship was stopped in the Gulf of Mexico by an British ship, which so happened to be commanded by the sailor who'd eventually become known as Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane, Earl of Dundonald. The three brothers were ordered to the British Ship and were moved to Havana with little trouble. Unable to gain transport from there to Europe, the three brothers spent a year in Cuba before they were unexpectedly expelled from the island colony by the Spanish Authorities. Sailing to the Bahamas and from there on to Nova Scotia, Louis-Philippe and his two brothers were recieved in Nova Scotia by Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, one of King George III's sons and later father of Queen Victoria. Louis-Philippe struck up a lasting friendship with the British Royal. Eventually, Louis-Philippe would become able to obtain transport back to New York and eventually in the first month of 1800, they would arrive in England.


In 1809 Louis-Philippe married Princess Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies (1782–1866), daughter of King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies and Marie Caroline of Austria. They had the following ten children: Maria Amelia Teresa of the Two Sicilies (26 April 1782-24 March 1866) was the wife of Louis Philippe, King of France. ... King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies (January 12, 1751 - January 4, 1825). ... The Two Sicilies The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was the new name that the Bourbon King Ferdinand IV of Naples bestowed upon his domain (including Southern Italy and the island of Sicily) after the end of the Napoleonic Era and the full restoration of his power in 1816. ... HM Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily Her Majesty Queen Marie Caroline of Naples and Sicily née Her Imperial & Royal Highness Archduchess Marie Caroline of Austria (13 August 1752- 8 September 1814) was queen consort and de facto ruler of Naples from 1768 to 1799 and from 1799...

  1. Ferdinand-Philippe, Duke of Orléans (b. 3 September 1810–d.1842)
  2. Louise-Marie of Orléans (b. 3 April 1812–d.1850) married Leopold I of Belgium.
  3. Marie of Orléans (b. 12 April 1813–d.1839) married Duke Alexander of Württemberg (b.1804–d.1881)
  4. Louis Charles, duc de Nemours (b. 25 October 1814–d.1896) married Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Kohary (b.1822–d.1857).
  5. Francisca of Orléans (b. 28 March 1816–d.1818).
  6. Clémentine of Orléans (b. 3 June 1817–d.1907) married August of Saxe-Coburg-Kohary (b.1818–d.1881).
  7. François d'Orléans, Prince de Joinville (b. 14 August 1818–d.1900) married Francisca of Brazil (b.1824–d.1898), daughter of Pedro I of Brazil.
  8. Charles, Duke of Penthièvre (b. 1 January 1820–d.1828)
  9. Henri d'Orleans Duke of Aumale (b. 16 June 1822–d.1897) married Maria Carolina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (b.1822–d.1869)
  10. Prince Antoine, Duke of Montpensier (b.31 July 1824–d.1890), married Luisa Fernanda of Spain (b.1832–d.1897) daughter of Ferdinand VII of Spain and became a prince of Spain.

After the abdication of Napoleon, and the restoration of the monarchy under his cousin King Louis XVIII Louis-Philippe returned to live in France, claiming sympathy with the liberated citizens of the country. He openly sided with the liberal opposition; under Louis XVIII and then even more so under the reign of Louis's brother, King Charles X, the popularity of Louis-Philippe grew. Ferdinand-Philippe The Duchess Helene Louise Prince Ferdinand-Philippe (September 3, 1810 - July 13, 1842) was Prince Royal of France. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle dOrléans, fille de France, and Queen of the Belgians as the wife of King Leopold I. Born in Palermo, Sicily on April 3, 1812, she was the eldest daughter of the future King Louis-Phillippe of the French and his wife... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This page has been invaded by General Scratcher! ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Louis Charles Philippe Raphael, duc de Nemours (October 25, 1814 - June 26, 1896) was the second son of the duke of Orleans, afterwards King Louis Philippe. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Kohary (February 14, 1822, Vienna - December 10, 1867) was the daughter of Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and Princess Antonie de Kohary. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in leap years). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Clémentine of Orléans, Princess of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (March 6, 1817 - February 16, 1907) was the daughter of King Louis-Philippe of France, the last King of France and of his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... August Ludwig Viktor of Saxe-Coburg-Kohary (b. ... François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie dOrléans, prince de Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900) was the third son of Louis Philippe, duc dOrléans, afterwards king of the French and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Francisca Carolina of Bragança (pron. ... Pedro I of Brazil (pron. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Henri Eugène Philippe Louis dOrléans, duc dAumale (January 16, 1822 - May 7, 1897) was the fifth, and second youngest, son of Louis-Philippe, King of the French and Duc dOrléans and Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Ferdinand VII (October 14, 1784 - September 29, 1833) was King of Spain from 1813 to 1833. ... Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Charles X, King of France Navarre Charles X, King of France and of Navarre (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) was born at the Palace of Versailles. ...


King of the French

Monarchical Styles of
King Louis-Philippe I of The French
Reference style His Majesty
Spoken style Your Majesty
Alternative style Sir

In 1830, the July Revolution overthrew the repressive régime of Charles X. Charles abdicated in favour of Henri, comte de Chambord, whom monarchists regarded as the legitimate Bourbon king and called "Henry V". (Supporters of this grandson, the Bourbon pretender, were called Legitimists. Chambord was offered the throne again in the 1870s but declined over a dispute over the French tricolour.) Due to Louis-Philippe's Republican policies and his popularity with the masses, the Chamber of Deputies ignored the wishes of the Legitimists that Charles's grandson be accepted as king and instead proclaimed Louis-Philippe, who for eleven days had been acting as regent, as the new French king. The new monarch took the style of "King of the French", a constitutional innovation known as popular monarchy which linked the monarch's title to a people, not to a state, as the previous King of France's designation did. Louis-Philippe repudiated the legitimist theory of the divine right of kings. Image File history File links This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution The French Revolution of 1830, also known as the July Revolution, was a revolt by the middle class against Bourbon King Charles X which forced him out of office and replaced him with the Orleanist King Louis-Philippe... Henri, comte de Chambord Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) was technically King Henri V of France from July 30th to August 9, 1830. ... This article or section should include material from France: Wars of Religion _ Bourbon Dynasty The House of Bourbon dates from at least the beginning of the 13th century, when the estate of Bourbon was ruled by a Lord, vassal of France. ... A Pretender is a claimant to an abolished or already occupied throne. ... Legitimists are Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Flag Ratio: 2:3 The national flag of France (Vexillological symbol: , known in French as drapeau tricolore, drapeau bleu-blanc-rouge, drapeau français, rarely, le tricolore and, in military parlance, les couleurs) is a tricolour featuring three vertical bands coloured blue (hoist side), white, and red. ... A Style is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the office itself. ... Popular Monarchy is a system of monarchical governance in which the monarchs title is linked with the people rather than a unitary state. ... The Divine Right of Kings is a European political and religious doctrine of political absolutism. ...


In 1832, his daughter, Princess Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle (1812–1850), became the first queen of Belgium, when she married King Leopold I. Interestingly, Leopold I was titled "King of the Belgians" and not King of Belgium, which followed the popular monarchy sentiment of the time. Thus, Louis-Philippe's daughter, Princess Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle, held the very similar title of "Queen of the Belgians", just as her father was "King of the French." This page has been invaded by General Scratcher! ...


Louis-Phillippe ruled in an unpretentious fashion, avoiding the arrogance, pomp and lavish spending of his predecessors. Despite this outward appearance of simplicity, his support came from the wealthy middle classes. At first, he was much loved and called the "Citizen King" and the "bourgeois monarch," but his popularity suffered as his government was perceived as increasingly conservative and monarchical. Under his management the conditions of the working classes deteriorated, and the income gap widened considerably. An economic crisis in 1847 led to the citizens of France revolting against their king once again.

Arms of Louis-Philippe
Enlarge
Arms of Louis-Philippe

Image File history File links This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Image File history File links This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

Abdication

On 24 February 1848, to general surprise, King Louis-Philippe abdicated in favour of his young grandson (his son and heir, Prince Ferdinand, having been killed in an accident some years earlier). Fearful of what had happened to Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, he quickly disguised himself and fled Paris. Riding in an ordinary cab under the name of "Mr Smith", he escaped to England. The Times of 6 March 1848 reported that he was received at Newhaven, East Sussex by the rector (Rev. Theyre Smith), the curate (Rev. Frederick Spurrell) and the principal landowner (William Elphick), while his wife was attended by Lydia Elphick and Frances Gray (both daughters of John Gray of the Gray and Dacre Brewery, West Ham, Essex), before travelling by train to London. February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louis XVI of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... Location within the British Isles Newhaven is a town in the county of East Sussex in England. ... Born on 2 August 1824, Frederick Spurrell was the second son, and seventh of eight children, of Charles Spurrell and Hannah Shears. ... The Gray and Dacre Brewery was established in West Ham, Essex, in the first half of the 19th century. ...


The National Assembly initially planned to accept his grandson as king. However, pulled along by the tide of public opinion, they accepted the Second Republic proclaimed in controversial circumstances at Paris City Hall. Prince Louis Napoleon Bonaparte was elected President, but carried out a coup d'état on December 2, 1851. He declared himself president for life and within a year was Emperor Napoleon III. The French Second Republic (often simply Second Republic) was the republican regime of France from February 25, 1848 to December 2, 1852. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... President for Life is a title assumed by some dictators to ensure that their authority, legitimacy, and term is never questioned or disputed. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808 - January 9, 1873) was the son of King Louis Bonaparte and Queen Hortense de Beauharnais; both monarchs of the French puppet state, the Kingdom of Holland. ...


Louis-Philippe and his family lived in England until his death on 26 August 1850, in Claremont, Surrey. He is buried with his wife Amelia (26 April 178224 March 1866) at the Chapelle Royale, the family necropolis he had built in 1816, in Dreux, France. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Claremont is an 18th-century Palladian mansion situated less than a mile south of Esher in Surrey, United Kingdom. ... Surrey is a county in southern England, part of the South East England region and one of the Home Counties. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in leap years). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Dreux is a town and commune in northwest France, in the Eure-et-Loir département. ...


By his ordinance, soon after his accession to the throne, of August 13, 1830, it was decided that the king's sister and his children would continue to bear the arms of Orléans, that Louis-Philippe's eldest son, as Prince Royal, would bear the title of duc d'Orléans, that the younger sons would continue to have their existing titles, and that the sister and daughters of the king would only be styled "princesses d'Orléans", not those "of France".


The Clash of the Pretenders

The clashes of 1830 and 1848 between the Legitimists and the Orleanists over who was the valid monarch had its epilogue in the 1870s when, after the fall of the Empire, the National Assembly with the support of public opinion offered a reconstituted throne to the Legitimist pretender, "Henry V", the Comte de Chambord. As he was childless, the heir to his claim was (except in the view of the most extreme Legitimists) Louis-Phillippe's grandson, now called the Comte de Paris. So Chambord's death would unite the House of Bourbon and House of Orleans. Legitimists are Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Orleanists comprised a French political faction or party which arose out of the Revolution, and ceased to have a separate existence shortly after the establishment of the Third Republic in 1872. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonne, Comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 - August 24, 1883) was the grandson of King Charles X of France, the posthumous son of Charless younger son Charles, Duc de Berry, who had been assassinated several months before Henris birth. ... Comte de Paris, or Count of Paris is a title used by three claimants to the French throne: Louis-Philippe, Comte de Paris (1838-1894): French Orleanist monarchists referred to him as Louis-Philippe II, and then later when Henri, comte de Chambord died, he was recognized as the royalist...


However Chambord, with infamous stubbornness, refused to accept the throne unless France abandoned the flag of the revolution, the Tricolore, and replace it with the fleur de lis, the flag of pre-revolutionary France. This the National Assembly was unwilling to do. A temporary Third Republic was established; many intended it to be disestablished and replaced by a constitutional monarchy when Chambord died and the more moderate Comte de Paris became the agreed claimant. However, Chambord lived longer than expected. By the time of his death in 1883 support for the monarchy had declined, with most people accepting the Third Republic as the form of government that "divides us least", in Adolphe Thiers's words. Some suggested a monarchical restoration under a later comte de Paris after the fall of the Vichy regime, even though the royalists had supported Vichy, but in fact France's monarchical tradition was at an end. Instead, the Third Republic was briefly resurrected before being replaced by the Fourth Republic in 1946. Flag Ratio: 2:3 The national flag of France (Vexillological symbol: , known in French as drapeau tricolore, drapeau bleu-blanc-rouge, drapeau français, rarely, le tricolore and, in military parlance, les couleurs) is a tricolour featuring three vertical bands coloured blue (hoist side), white, and red. ... For other uses, see Fleur-de-lis (disambiguation). ... Comte de Paris, or Count of Paris is a title used by three claimants to the French throne: Louis-Philippe, Comte de Paris (1838-1894): French Orleanist monarchists referred to him as Louis-Philippe II, and then later when Henri, comte de Chambord died, he was recognized as the royalist... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ... A caricature of Adolphe Thiers charging on the Paris Commune, published in Le Père Duchêne illustré Louis Adolphe Thiers (April 16, 1797–September 3, 1877) was a French statesman and historian. ... Vichy France (French: now called Régime de Vichy or Vichy; called itself at the time État Français, or French State) was the French state of 1940-1944 which was a puppet government under Nazi influence, as opposed to the Free French Forces, based first in London and later... The Fourth Republic existed in France between 1946 and 1958. ...


Most French monarchists regard the descendants of Louis Philippe's grandson, who hold the title comte de Paris, as the rightful pretender to the French throne. A small minority of Legitimists however insist on a nobleman of Spanish birth, Don Luis-Alfonso de Borbon, Duke of Anjou (to his supporters, "Louis XX") as being the true Legitimist pretender; he is representative in the male line of Philippe, Duke of Anjou, the second grandson of Louis XIV, who renounced his right to the throne of France on becoming King of Spain. Comte de Paris, or Count of Paris is a title used by three claimants to the French throne: Louis-Philippe, Comte de Paris (1838-1894): French Orleanist monarchists referred to him as Louis-Philippe II, and then later when Henri, comte de Chambord died, he was recognized as the royalist... A Pretender is a claimant to an abolished or already occupied throne. ... Legitimists are Royalists in France who believe that the King of France and Navarre must be chosen according to the simple application of the Salic Law. ... Don Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Manuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú is considered to be the head of the French Royal House by royalists who consider the renunciation of Felipe V of Spain as invalid. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou, grandson of the French monarch Louis XIV, was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638 – September 1, 1715) ruled as King of France and of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death just prior to his seventy-seventh birthday. ...


Both sides even challenged each other in the French Republic's law courts, in 1897 and again almost a century later, in the latter case, with Henri, comte de Paris (d. 1999) challenging the right of the Spanish-born "pretender" to use the French royal title duc d'Anjou. The French courts threw out his claim, since they believed that the courts had no jurisdiction over such a matter. Henri Philippe Pierre Marie dOrléans, Comte de Paris, Duc de France is the Orleanist pretender to the French throne. ...


See also

This is a list of non-ruling members of the French royal family. ...

Sources

  • T.E.B. Howarth. Citizen-King: The Life of Louis-Philippe, King of the French. 2nd ed. Eyre & Spottiswoode Ltd, 1962.
House of Capet
Cadet Branch of the House of Orleans
Born: 6 October 1773; Died: 26 August 1850
Regnal Titles:Titles of Nobility
Preceded by:
Charles X
as King of France
King of the French
9 August 183024 February 1848
Second French Republic
Preceded by:
Charles X as King of France
French Head of State
9 August, 1830–24 February, 1848
Succeeded by:
Jacques-Charles Dupont de l'Eure
Titles of Nobility
Preceded by:
Louis Philippe II
Duke of Orleans
1793–1830
Absorbed into state
Titles in pretence
Preceded by:
None
* NOT REIGNING *
King of France
Orleanist claimants to the throne of France

(1848-1850)
Succeeded by:
Philip VII

The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Orleanists comprised a French political faction or party which arose out of the Revolution, and ceased to have a separate existence shortly after the establishment of the Third Republic in 1872. ... Charles X, King of France Navarre Charles X, King of France and of Navarre (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) was born at the Palace of Versailles. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The French Second Republic (often simply Second Republic) was the republican regime of France from February 25, 1848 to December 2, 1852. ... Charles X, King of France Navarre Charles X, King of France and of Navarre (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) was born at the Palace of Versailles. ... French Head of State was a trasitional title for the head of the French government from August 1840 tp February [1848]]. The title was held by Louis-Philippe of France, who was King of France. ... Jacques-Charles Dupont de lEure, French statesman Jacques-Charles Dupont de lEure (February 27, 1767 - 1855) was a French lawyer and statesman. ... Louis-Philippe-Joseph dOrléans, by Antoine-François Callet. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... A Pretender is a claimant to an abolished or already occupied throne. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Orleanists comprised a French political faction or party which arose out of the Revolution, and ceased to have a separate existence shortly after the establishment of the Third Republic in 1872. ... Louis-Philippe Albert dOrléans, Comte de Paris (August 24, 1838 - September 8, 1894) was the grandson of Louis Philippe I, King of the French. ...

External links

  • Caricatures of Louis-Philippe published in La Caricature 1830-1835
  • Caricature of Louis-Philippe by Honoré Daumier

 
 

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