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Encyclopedia > Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong
Louis Armstrong's stage personality matched his flashy trumpet. Armstrong is also known for his raspy singing voice.
Louis Armstrong's stage personality matched his flashy trumpet. Armstrong is also known for his raspy singing voice.
Background information
Birth name Louis Armstrong
Also known as Satchmo, Pops
Born August 4, 1901(1901-08-04)
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
Died July 6, 1971 (aged 69)
Corona, Queens, New York City, NY, U.S.
Genre(s) Jazz
Dixieland
Swing music
Traditional pop
Occupation(s) Trumpeter, Vocalist
Instrument(s) Trumpet, Cornet
Years active c.1919–1971
Associated
acts
Joe "King" Oliver

Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3]July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. Armstrong was a charismatic, innovative performer whose inspired, improvised soloing was the main influence for a fundamental change in jazz, shifting its focus from collective melodic playing, often arranged in one way or another, to the solo player and improvised soloing. One of the most famous jazz musicians of the 20th century, he first achieved fame as a cornet player, later on switching to trumpet, but toward the end of his career he was best known as a vocalist and became one of the most influential jazz singers. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2801x2182, 763 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jazz Louis Armstrong User:Davepape User:Davepape/Images Culture of New Orleans ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Corona, Queens, (zip code 11368) is a neighborhood in the former Township of Flushing in the New York City borough of Queens surrounded by Flushing, Jackson Heights, and Elmhurst. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Dixieland music is a style of jazz. ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... B♭ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument that visually resembles the trumpet. ... Joe King Oliver, (December 19, 1885 – April 10, 1938) was a bandleader and jazz cornet player. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... B♭ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument that visually resembles the trumpet. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Early life

Armstrong often stated in public interviews that he was born on July 04, 1900 (Independence Day in the USA), a date that has been noted in many biographies. Although he died in 1971, it wasn't until the mid-1980s that his true birthdate of August 4th, 1901 was discovered through the examination of baptismal records.[5] This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ...


Armstrong was born into a very poor family in New Orleans, Louisiana. He spent his youth in poverty in a rough neighborhood of uptown New Orleans, as his father, William Armstrong (1881–1922), abandoned the family when Louis was an infant. His mother, Mary Albert Armstrong (1886–1942), then left Louis and his younger sister Beatrice Armstrong Collins (1903–1987) in the care of his grandmother, Josephine Armstrong. NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Uptown is a large area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Armstrong first learned to play the cornet (his first of which was bought with money loaned to him by the Karnofskys, a Russian-Jewish immigrant family) in the band of the New Orleans Home for Colored Waifs, where he had been sent multiple times for general delinquency, most notably for a long term after firing his stepfather's pistol into the air at a New Year's Eve celebration, as police records confirm. To express gratitude towards the Karnofskys, Armstrong wore a Star of David pendant for the rest of his life.[6] Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument that visually resembles the trumpet. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ...


He followed the city's frequent brass band parades and listened to older musicians every chance he got, learning from Bunk Johnson, Buddy Petit, Black Benny and above all, Joe "King" Oliver, who acted as a mentor and father figure to the young musician. Armstrong later played in the brass bands and riverboats of New Orleans, and first started traveling with the well-regarded band of Fate Marable which toured on a steamboat up and down the Mississippi River. He described his time with Marable as "going to the University," since it gave him a much wider experience working with written arrangements. A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... Willie Gary Bunk Johnson ( 1879/1889–July 7, 1949) was a prominent early New Orleans jazz trumpet player in the early years of the 20th century who enjoyed a revived career in the 1940s. ... Buddie Petit or Buddy Petit (c. ... Black Benny Williams (c. ... Joe King Oliver, (December 19, 1885 – April 10, 1938) was a bandleader and jazz cornet player. ... It has been suggested that Maître à penser be merged into this article or section. ... Father Figure was a song written and performed by George Michael and releaed on Epic records in 1988. ... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... Fate Marable (2 December 1890 - 16 January 1947) was a jazz pianist and bandleader. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ...


In 1919, Joe Oliver resigned his position in Kid Ory's band, then regarded as the best hot jazz group in New Orleans, and left town. Armstrong replaced his mentor, playing second trumpet. Louis soon became the best trumpeter in the band and was promoted to first trumpet. Edward Kid Ory (December 25, 1886 – January 23, 1973) was a jazz trombonist and bandleader. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ...


Early career

On March 19, 1918, Louis married Daisy Parker from Gretna, Louisiana. They adopted a 3-year-old boy, Clarence Armstrong, whose mother, Louis's cousin Flora, died soon after giving birth. Clarence Armstrong was mentally retarded (result of a head injury at an early age) and Louis would spend the rest of his life taking care of him.[7] Louis's marriage to Parker failed quickly and they separated. She died shortly after the divorce. Vocalion Records 78 of Muggles by Louis Armstrong, presumed fair use The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... Vocalion Records 78 of Muggles by Louis Armstrong, presumed fair use The copyright status of this vintage image is undetermined; it may still be copyrighted. ... Muggles is the title of a recording by Louis Armstrong and His Orchestra, recorded in Chicago on December 7, 1928. ...


In 1922, Armstrong joined the exodus to Chicago, where he had been invited by his mentor, Joe "King" Oliver, to join his Creole Jazz Band. Oliver's band was the best and most influential hot jazz band in Chicago in the early 1920s, at a time when Chicago was the center of the jazz universe. Armstrong made his first recordings, including taking some solos and breaks, while playing second cornet in Oliver's band in 1923. Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Look up Creole, creole in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ...


Armstrong enjoyed working with Oliver, but Louis' second wife, pianist Lil Hardin Armstrong, urged him to seek more prominent billing. Oliver and he parted amicably in 1924 and Armstrong moved to New York City to play with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, the top African–American band of the day. Armstrong switched to the trumpet to blend in better with the other musicians in his section. His influence upon Henderson's tenor sax soloist, Coleman Hawkins, can be judged by listening to the records made by the band during this period. A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Lil Hardin Armstrong (February 3, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a jazz pianist, composer, arranger, singer, and bandleader, and the second wife of Louis Armstrong with whom she collaborated on many recordings in the 1920s. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax. ... This article is about the musical term solo; for other uses, see solo. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ...


During this time, he also made many recordings on the side arranged by an old friend from New Orleans, pianist Clarence Williams; these included small jazz band sides (some of the best pairing Armstrong with one of Armstrong's few rivals in fiery technique and ideas, Sidney Bechet) and a series of accompaniments for Blues singers. Clarence Williams ( November 8, 1893 - November 6, 1965) was a Jazz pianist, composer, promoter, vocalist, and publisher. ... Sidney Bechet Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer. ... Blues music redirects here. ...

Floyd Levin and Louis Armstrong in 1970; photo courtesy Marc Levin.

Armstrong returned to Chicago in 1925 and began recording under his own name with his famous Hot Five and Hot Seven groups, producing hits such as "Potato Head Blues," "Muggles" (a reference to marijuana, for which Armstrong had a lifelong fondness), and "West End Blues," the music of which set the standard and the agenda for jazz for many years to come. His recordings with pianist Earl "Fatha" Hines (most famously their 1928 "Weatherbird" duet) and Armstrong's trumpet introduction to "West End Blues" remain some of the most famous and influential improvisations in jazz history. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Floyd Levin (born September 24, 1922) is a jazz historian who has been published in many magazines, including Down Beat, Jazz Journal International and American Rag. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hot Five was Louis Armstrongs first jazz recording band led under his own name. ... Louis Armstrong and his Hot Seven was a jazz studio group organized to make a series of recordings for Okeh Records in Chicago, Illinois in May 1927. ... Potato Head Blues is one of Louis Armstrongs finest recordings. ... Muggles is the title of a recording by Louis Armstrong and His Orchestra, recorded in Chicago on December 7, 1928. ... Cannabis, also known as marijuana[1] or ganja,[2] is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ... West End Blues is a multi-strain 12 bar blues composition by Joe King Oliver. ... Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl Fatha Hines, (28 December 1903[1] Duquesne, Pennsylvania – 22 April 1983 in Oakland, California) was one of the most important pianists in the history of jazz. ...


In the late Thirties Armstrong began to experience problems with his fingers and lips, which were aggravated by his unorthodox playing style. As result he branched out, developing his vocal style and making his first theatrical appearances.


Armstrong returned to New York, in 1929, where he played in the pit orchestra of the successful musical Hot Chocolate, an all-black revue written by Andy Razaf and pianist/composer Fats Waller. He also made a cameo appaearance as a vocalist, regularly stealing the show with his rendition of "Ain't Misbehavin'," his version of the song becoming his biggest selling record to date. [8] Andy Razaf (December 16, 1895_1973), (born Andriamanantena Paul Razafinkarefo also Razafkeriefo) African American composer, poet, and lyricist of such well-known songs as Aint Misbehavin and *Honeysuckle Rose. Born in Washington, D.C., the son of Henry Razafkeriefo, a Malagasy nobleman and Jennie (Waller) Razafkeriefo, the daughter of John... Fats Waller (born Thomas Wright Waller on May 21, 1904, died December 15, 1943) was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer and comedic entertainer. ... Aint Misbehavin is a song by Harry Brooks with Fats Waller and lyricist Andy Razaf, dating from 1929. ...


Armstrong had considerable success with vocal recordings, including versions of famous songs composed by his old friend Hoagy Carmichael. His 1930s recordings took full advantage of the new RCA ribbon microphone, introduced in 1931, which imparted a characteristic warmth to vocals and immediately became an intrinsic part of the 'crooning' sound of artists like Bing Crosby. Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... The sensitivity pattern of a bidirectional microphone (red dot) viewed from above. ... A crooner is a singer (usually male) of a certain kind of popular music, often called Standards or American Standards. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


Armstrong's famous interpretation of Hoagy Carmichael's "Stardust" became one of the most successful versions of this song ever recorded, showcasing Armstrong's unique vocal sound and style, and his innovative approach to singing songs that had already become standards. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Armstrong's radical re-working of Sidney Arodin and Carmichael's "Lazy River" (recorded in 1931) encapsulated many features of his groundbreaking approach to melody and phrasing. The song begins with a brief trumpet solo, then the main melody is stated by sobbing horns, which are memorably punctuated by Armstrong's growling interjections at the end of each bar: "Yeah! ..."Uh-huh" ..."Sure" ... "Way down, way down". A Lazy River is a water ride found in many amusement parks or water parks. ...


In the first verse, he ignores the notated melody entirely, and sings as if playing a trumpet solo, pitching most of the first line on a single note and using strongly syncopated phrasing. In the second stanza he breaks into an almost fully improvised melody, which then evolves into a classic passage of Armstrong "scat singing." This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


As with his trumpet playing, Armstrong's vocal innovations served as a foundation stone for the art of jazz vocal interpretation. The uniquely gritty colouration of his voice became a musical archetype that was much imitated and endlessly impersonated. His scat singing style was enriched by his matchless experience as a trumpet soloist. His resonant, velvety lower-register tone and bubbling cadences on sides such as "Lazy River" exerted a huge influence on younger white singers such as Bing Crosby. For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


Armstrong moved to Los Angeles in 1930, then toured Europe. After spending many years on the road, he settled permanently in Queens, New York in 1943 in contentment with his fourth wife, Lucille. Although subject to the vicissitudes of Tin Pan Alley and the gangster-ridden music business, as well as anti-black prejudice, he continued to develop his playing. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... This article is about the state. ... Tin Pan Alley is the name given to the collection of New York City-centered music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late 19th century and early 20th century. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ...


During the subsequent thirty years, Armstrong played more than three hundred gigs a year. Bookings for big bands tapered off during the 1940s due to changes in public tastes: ballrooms closed, and there was competition from television and from other types of music becoming more popular than big band music. It became impossible under such circumstances to support and finance a 16-piece touring band.


The All Stars

Following a highly successful small-group jazz concert at New York Town Hall on May 17, 1947, featuring Armstrong with Jack Teagarden, Armstrong's manager Joe Glaser dissolved the Armstrong big band on August 13, 1947 and established a six-piece small group featuring Armstrong with (initially) Teagarden, Earl Hines and other top swing and dixieland musicians, most of them ex-big band leaders. The new group was announced at the opening of Billy Berg's Supper Club. Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden Trombonist (1905-1964) Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden (August 20, 1905 in Vernon, Texas - January 15, 1964) was an influential jazz trombonist and vocalist. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl Fatha Hines, (28 December 1903[1] Duquesne, Pennsylvania – 22 April 1983 in Oakland, California) was one of the most important pianists in the history of jazz. ...


This group was called the All Stars, and included at various times Earl "Fatha" Hines, Barney Bigard, Edmond Hall, Jack Teagarden, Trummy Young, Arvell Shaw, Billy Kyle, Marty Napoleon, Big Sid Catlett, Cozy Cole, Barrett Deems and the Filipino-American percussionist, Danny Barcelona. During this period, Armstrong made many recordings and appeared in over thirty films. In 1964, he recorded his biggest-selling record, Hello, Dolly!. The song went to #1 on the pop chart, making Armstrong the oldest person to ever accomplish that feat at age 63. In the process, Armstrong dislodged The Beatles from the #1 position they had occupied for 14 consecutive weeks with three different songs.[9] Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl Fatha Hines, (28 December 1903[1] Duquesne, Pennsylvania – 22 April 1983 in Oakland, California) was one of the most important pianists in the history of jazz. ... Albany Leon Barney Bigard (March 3, 1906 _ June 27, 1980) was an American jazz clarinetist. ... Edmond Hall (b. ... Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden Trombonist (1905-1964) Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden (August 20, 1905 in Vernon, Texas - January 15, 1964) was an influential jazz trombonist and vocalist. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... William Osborne Kyle(b. ... Marty Napoleon (born June 2, 1921) is an American jazz pianist born in Brooklyn, New York, perhaps best-known for having replaced Earl Hines in Louis Armstrongs All Stars in 1952. ... Sidney Catlett (born January 17, 1910 in Evansville, Indiana and died March 25, 1951 Chicago, Illinois) was a swinging jazz drummer often referred to as Big Sid Catlett because of his large frame. ... Cozy Cole is a well known jazz drummer who had a #1 hit with the song Topsy part 2. The song was a drum solo, and one of the few drum solo recordings that ever made the popular Billboard top 100 charts. ... Barrett Deems (March 1, 1914–September 15, 1998) was an American swing music jazz drummer born in Springfield, Illinois, probably better known for his work with musicians like Jimmy Dorsey, Louis Armstrong, Red Norvo or Muggsy Spanier, among others. ... The Filipino American (Fil-Am for short) community is the largest Asian American group in the United States and the largest Southeast Asian American group. ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... Danny Barcelona (August 23, 1929 - April 1, 2007) was an international jazz-band drummer for Louis Armstrong’s All-Stars band. ... One of the most famous Broadway showtunes ever written, Hello, Dolly! is the title song of the popular 1964 musical Hello, Dolly!. The music and lyrics were written by Jerry Herman who also wrote the scores for many other popular musicals including Mame and La Cage aux Folles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


Armstrong kept up his busy tour schedule until a few years before his death in 1971. In his later years he would sometimes play some of his numerous gigs by rote, but other times would enliven the most mundane gig with his vigorous playing, often to the astonishment of his band. He also toured Africa, Europe, and Asia under sponsorship of the US State Department with great success, earning the nickname "Ambassador Satch." While failing health restricted his schedule in his last years, within those limitations he continued playing until the day he died. Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Gig in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Gig may be: A slang term for a musical engagement A contraction for gigabyte An archaic term for a type of light carriage A type of spear A similarly designed type of fishing tackle A contraction for Captains Gig, a type... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Department of State redirects here. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ...

Autograph of Satchmo Louis Armstrong on the muretto of Alassio
Autograph of Satchmo Louis Armstrong on the muretto of Alassio

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 674 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2135 × 1898 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 674 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2135 × 1898 pixel, file size: 1. ... Alassio, a town of Liguria, Italy, on the N.W. coast of the Gulf of Genoa, in the province of Savona, 57 m. ...

Personality

The nickname Satchmo or Satch is short for Satchelmouth (describing his embouchure). In 1932, then Melody Maker magazine editor Percy Brooks greeted Armstrong in London with "Hello, Satchmo!" shortening Satchelmouth (some say unintentionally), and it stuck. Satchel Paige Satchel Pooch - fictional character Satchel (band) Satchel (bag) - a carrying bag such as for school books. ... The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ...


Early on he was also known as Dippermouth. This is a reference to the propensity he had for refreshing himself with the dipper (ladle) from a bucket of sugar water which was always present on stage with Joe Oliver's band in Chicago in the early nineteen-twenties.


The damage to his embouchure from his high pressure approach to playing is acutely visible in many pictures of Louis from the mid-twenties. It also led to his emphasizing his singing career because at certain periods, he was unable to play. This did not stop Louis though, because after setting his trumpet aside for a while, he amended his playing style and continued his trumpet career. Friends and fellow musicians usually called him Pops, which is also how Armstrong usually addressed his friends and fellow musicians (except for Pops Foster, whom Armstrong always called "George"). The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ... George Murphy Foster, almost always known as Pops Foster (18 May 1892 (?) - 30 October 1969) was a jazz musician, best known for his vigorous string bass playing. ...

Satchmo's autograph from the 1960s
Satchmo's autograph from the 1960s

He was also criticized for accepting the title of "King of The Zulus" (in the New Orleans African American community, an honored role as head of leading black Carnival Krewe, but bewildering or offensive to outsiders with their traditional costume of grass-skirts and blackface makeup satirizing southern white attitudes) for Mardi Gras 1949. Scan of autograph freely given by Satchmo to a fan in New Zealand in 1960s. ... The Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club (founded 1916) is a New Orleans Carnival Krewe which puts on the Zulu parade each Mardi Gras Day. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... A Krewe (pronounced identically to English crew) is an organization that puts on a parade and or a ball for the Carnival season. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... Revelers, Frenchmen Street, Faubourg Marigny. ...


Whatever the case, where some saw a gregarious and outgoing personality, others saw someone trying too hard to appeal to white audiences and essentially becoming a minstrel caricature. Some musicians criticized Armstrong for playing in front of segregated audiences, and for not taking a strong enough stand in the civil rights movement suggesting that he was an Uncle Tom. Billie Holiday countered, however, "Of course Pops toms, but he toms from the heart." Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ... This article is about the racial term. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later nicknamed Lady Day (see Jazz royalty regarding similar nicknames), was an American jazz singer, a seminal influence on jazz and pop singers, and generally regarded as one of the greatest female jazz vocalists. ...


Armstrong, in fact, was a major financial supporter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and other civil rights activists, but mostly preferred to work quietly behind the scenes, not mixing his politics with his work as an entertainer. The few exceptions made it more effective when he did speak out; Armstrong's criticism of President Eisenhower, calling him "two-faced" and "gutless" because of his inaction during the conflict over school desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957 made national news. As a protest, Armstrong canceled a planned tour of the Soviet Union on behalf of the State Department saying "The way they're treating my people in the South, the government can go to hell" and that he could not represent his government abroad when it was in conflict with its own people.[10] Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Bottom row, left to right: Thelma Mothershed, Minnijean Brown, Elizabeth Eckford, Gloria Ray; Top row, left to right: Jefferson Thomas, Melba Pattillo, Terrence Roberts, Carlotta Walls, Daisy Bates (NAACP President), Ernest Green The Little Rock Nine were a group of African-American students who enrolled in Little Rock Central High... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ... Location in Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates: , Country State County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Government  - Mayor Mark Stodola Area  - City  116. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ...


He was an extremely generous man, who was said to have given away as much money as he kept for himself. Armstrong was also greatly concerned with his health and bodily functions. He made frequent use of laxatives as a means of controlling his weight, a practice he advocated both to personal acquaintances and in the diet plans he published under the title Lose Weight the Satchmo Way. Armstrong's laxative of preference in his younger days was Pluto Water, but he then became an enthusiastic convert when he discovered the herbal remedy Swiss Kriss; he would extol its virtues to anyone who would listen and pass out packets to everyone he encountered, including members of the British Royal Family. (Armstrong also appeared in humorous, albeit risqué, advertisements for Swiss Kriss; the ads bore a picture of him sitting on a toilet — as viewed through a keyhole — with the slogan "Satch says, 'Leave it all behind ya!'")[11] A laxative is a preparation used for the purpose of encouraging defecation, or the elimination of feces. ... Pluto Water was a trademark for a laxative product which was very popular in the United States in the early 20th century. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ...


The concern with his health and weight was balanced by his love of food, reflected in such songs as Big Butter & Egg Man, Cheesecake, Cornet Chop Suey, and, especially, Struttin’ with Some Barbecue.[12] He kept a strong connection throughout his life to the cooking of New Orleans, always signing his letters, "Red beans and ricely yours,".[13] Dishes typical of Creole food Louisiana Creole cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana (centered on the Greater New Orleans area) that blends French, Spanish, French Caribbean, African, and American influences. ...


Music

In his early years, Armstrong was best known for his virtuosity with the cornet and trumpet. The greatest trumpet playing of his early years can be heard on his Hot Five and Hot Seven records. The improvisations which he made on these records of New Orleans jazz standards and popular songs of the day, to the present time stack up brilliantly alongside those of any other later jazz performer. The older generation of New Orleans jazz musicians often referred to their improvisations as "variating the melody"; Armstrong's improvisations were daring and sophisticated for the time while often subtle and melodic. He often essentially re-composed pop-tunes he played, making them more interesting. Armstrong's playing is filled with joyous, inspired original melodies, creative leaps, and subtle relaxed or driving rhythms. The genius of these creative passages is matched by Armstrong's playing technique, honed by constant practice, which extended the range, tone and capabilities of the trumpet. In these records, Armstrong almost single-handedly created the role of the jazz soloist, taking what was essentially a collective folk music and turning it into an art form with tremendous possibilities for individual expression. The Hot Five was Louis Armstrongs first jazz recording band led under his own name. ... Louis Amstrong and his Hot Seven was a jazz group organized to make a series of recordings for Okeh Records. ...


Armstrong's work in the 1920s shows him playing at the outer limits of his abilities. The Hot Five records, especially, often have minor flubs and missed notes, which do little to detract from listening enjoyment since the energy of the spontaneous performance comes through. By the mid 1930s, Armstrong achieved a smooth assurance, knowing exactly what he could do and carrying out his ideas with perfectionism.


As his music progressed and popularity grew, his singing also became important. Armstrong was not the first to record scat singing, but he was masterful at it and helped popularize it. He had a hit with his playing and scat singing on "Heebie Jeebies" when, according to some legends, the sheet music fell on the floor and he simply started singing nonsense syllables. He also sang out "I done forgot the words" in the middle of recording "I'm A Ding Dong Daddy From Dumas". Such records were hits and scat singing became a major part of his performances. Long before this, however, Armstrong was playing around with his vocals, shortening and lengthening phrases, interjecting improvisations, using his voice as creatively as his trumpet. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Heebie Jeebies is the name of more than one melody. ...


During his long career he played and sang with the most important instrumentalists and vocalists; among the many, singing brakeman Jimmie Rodgers, Bing Crosby, Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Bessie Smith, and notably with Ella Fitzgerald. A Santa Fe Railroad brakeman atop a train that has paused at Cajon, California, to cool its brakes after descending Cajon Pass in March 1943. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ...


His influence upon Bing Crosby is particularly important with regard to the subsequent development of popular music: Crosby admired and copied Armstrong, as is evident on many of his early recordings, notably "Just One More Chance" (1931). The 'New Grove Dictionary Of Jazz' describes Crosby's debt to Armstrong in perfect detail, although it does not acknowledge Armstrong by name: "Crosby...was important in introducing into the mainstream of popular singing an Afro-American concept of song as a lyrical extension of speech...His techniques - easing the weight of the breath on the vocal chords, passing into a head voice at a low register, using forward production to aid distinct enunciation, singing on consonants (a practice of black singers), and making discreet use of appoggiaturas, mordents, and slurs to emphasize the text - were emulated by nearly all later popular singers".


Armstrong recorded three albums with Ella Fitzgerald: Ella and Louis, Ella and Louis Again, and Porgy and Bess for Verve Records. His recordings Satch Plays Fats, all Fats Waller tunes, and Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy in the 1950s were perhaps among the last of his great creative recordings, but even oddities like Disney Songs the Satchmo Way are seen to have their musical moments. And, his participation in Dave Brubeck's high-concept jazz musical The Real Ambassadors was critically acclaimed. For the most part, however, his later output was criticized as being overly simplistic or repetitive. Ella and Louis is a 1956 studio album (see 1956 in music) by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong. ... Ella and Louis Again is a 1957 studio album (see 1957 in music) by Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong. ... Jazz vocalists Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald collaborated on this recording of selections from George Gershwins Porgy and Bess. ... Verve Records is an American Jazz record label, founded by Norman Granz in 1956, which absorbed the catalogues of his earlier labels: Norgran Records and Clef Records (founded 1953). ... Fats Waller (born Thomas Wright Waller on May 21, 1904, died December 15, 1943) was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer and comedic entertainer. ... Louis Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy is a 1954 live release by Louis Armstrong and His All Stars, described by All Music as Louis Armstrongs finest record of the 1950s and essential music for all serious jazz collections.[1] Columbia CD released the album on CD in 1986 in... David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... The Real Ambassadors was a jazz musical developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s by Dave and Iola Brubeck, in collaboration with Louis Armstrong and his band. ...


Armstrong had many hit records including "Stardust", "What a Wonderful World", "When The Saints Go Marching In", "Dream a Little Dream of Me", "Ain't Misbehavin'", and "Stompin' at the Savoy". "We Have All the Time in the World" featured on the soundtrack of the James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service, and enjoyed renewed popularity in the UK in 1994 when it featured on a Guinness advert. It reached number 3 in the charts on being re-released. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... What a Wonderful World was written by songwriters Bob Thiele and George David Weiss, first performed by Louis Armstrong, and released as a single in early fall 1967. ... When the Saints Go Marching In, so well-known that it is often referred to merely as The Saints, is a United States gospel hymn that has taken on certain aspects of folk music. ... Dream a Little Dream of Me is a song, with music composed by classical composer Milton Adolphus in 1931, and lyrics by Gus Kahn. ... Aint Misbehavin is a 1929 song written by Fats Waller with Harry Brooks and Andy Razaf. ... We Have All The Time In The World is a James Bond theme and popular song performed by Louis Armstrong. ... 007 redirects here. ... For the Ian Fleming novel, see On Her Majestys Secret Service. ... Guinness logo Guinness is Good for You — Irish language advertisement. ...


In 1964, Armstrong knocked the Beatles off the top of the Billboard Top 100 chart with "Hello, Dolly", which gave the 63-year-old performer a U.S. record as the oldest artist to have a #1 song. In 1968, Armstrong scored one last popular hit in the United Kingdom with the highly sentimental pop song "What a Wonderful World", which topped the British charts for a month; however, the single did not chart at all in America. The song gained greater currency in the popular consciousness when it was used in the 1987 movie Good Morning Vietnam, its subsequent rerelease topping many charts around the world. Armstrong even appeared on the 28 October 1970 Johnny Cash Show, where he sang Nat "King" Cole's hit "Rambling Rose" and joined Cash to re-create his performance backing Jimmie Rodgers on "Blue Yodel # 9."" The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Billboard Hot 100 is the main U.S. singles popularity chart used by Billboard magazine. ... One of the most famous Broadway showtunes ever written, Hello, Dolly! is the title song of the popular 1964 musical of the same name. ... What a Wonderful World was written by songwriters Bob Thiele and George David Weiss, first performed by Louis Armstrong, and released as a single in early fall 1967. ... Good Morning, Vietnam is a 1987 comedy/drama film set in Saigon during the Vietnam War, based on the career of Adrian Cronauer, a disc jockey on Armed Forces Radio Saigon (AFRS), who proves hugely popular with the troops serving in South Vietnam, but infuriates his superiors with what they... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Nat King Cole in The Blue Gardenia (1953) Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a hugely popular American singer and jazz musician. ... Rambling Rose is a popular song. ... Jimmie Rodgers was the name of two singers: Jimmie Rodgers (country singer) Jimmie Rodgers (pop singer) Jimmie Rodgers (SPC Deputy Director General) Note that there was also a Jimmy Rogers (note the spelling), a blues singer born in 1924. ... The Blue Yodel songs are a series of thirteen songs written and recorded by Jimmie Rodgers during the period from 1927 to his death in May 1933. ...


Armstrong enjoyed many types of music, from the most earthy blues to the syrupy sweet arrangements of Guy Lombardo, to Latin American folksongs, to classical symphonies and opera. Armstrong incorporated influences from all these sources into his performances, sometimes to the bewilderment of fans who wanted Armstrong to stay in convenient narrow categories. Armstrong was inducted into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as an early influence. Some of his solos from the 1950s, such as the hard rocking version of "St. Louis Blues" from the WC Handy album, show that the influence went in both directions. Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... St. ...


Death and legacy

Louis Armstrong died of a heart attack on July 6, 1971, at age 69, the night after playing a famous show at the Waldorf Astoria's Empire Room. He was residing in Corona, Queens, New York City, at the time of his passing. He was interred in Flushing Cemetery, Flushing, in Queens, New York City. His honorary pallbearers included Governor Rockefeller, Mayor Lindsay, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Guy Lombardo, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Pearl Bailey, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Ed Sullivan, Earl Wilson, Alan King, Johnny Carson, David Frost, Merv Griffin, Dick Cavett and Bobby Hackett. Heart attack redirects here. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The hotels name with a single hyphen is engraved and gilded over the entrance. ... Corona, Queens, (zip code 11368) is a neighborhood in the former Township of Flushing in the New York City borough of Queens surrounded by Flushing, Jackson Heights, and Elmhurst. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Flushing Cemetery is a cemetery in Flushing in the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... Several landmarks from two New York Worlds Fairs still stand in Flushing Meadows, including the US Steel Unisphere Flushing is an urban neighborhood in the northern part of the borough of Queens in New York City, New York. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 – November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist famous in the United States. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... Pearl Bailey in “St. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ... Harry Haag James (March 15, 1916 – July 5, 1983) was a popular United States musician and band leader, and a well-known trumpet virtuoso. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... For other persons named Edward Sullivan, see Edward Sullivan (disambiguation). ... Robert Earl Wilson (name changed from Earl Lawrence Wilson) (October 2, 1934 - April 23, 2005) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox (1959-60, 1962-66), Detroit Tigers (1966-1970) and San Diego Padres (1970). ... Alan King Alan King (December 26, 1927 – May 9, 2004), born Irwin Alan Kniberg, was an American comedian known for his biting wit and often angry humorous rants. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... David Frost during an interview with Donald Rumsfeld. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... Richard Alva Dick Cavett (born November 19, 1936) is an Emmy-winning American television talk show host known for his conversational style and in-depth discussion of issues. ... Robert Leo (Bobby) Hackett (January 31, 1915 _ June 7, 1976) was an accomplished jazz musician. ...


On December 31, 1999, US President Bill Clinton announced that Armstrong's trumpet was among several items of national memorabilia that were to be interred in a Millennial time capsule to be opened 100 years later.[14] William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Today, the house where Louis Armstrong lived at the time of his death (and which was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1977) is a museum. The Louis Armstrong House & Archives, at 34-56 107th Street (between 34th and 35th Avenues) in Corona, Queens, presents concerts and educational programs, operates as an historic house museum and makes materials in its archives of writings, books, recordings and memorabilia available to the public for research. The museum is operated by the City University of New York's Queens College, following the dictates of Armstrong’s will. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... Queens College is one of the senior colleges of the City University of New York. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ...


The museum was opened to the public on October 15, 2003. In 2005, it was among 406 New York City arts and social service institutions to receive part of a $20 million grant from the Carnegie Corporation, which was made possible through a donation by New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg. [2] [3] is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Carnegie Corporation was founded by the will of Andrew Carnegie in 1911 to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ...


The influence of Armstrong on the development of jazz is virtually immeasurable. Yet, his irrepressible personality both as a performer, and as a public figure later in his career, was so strong that to some it sometimes overshadowed his contributions as a musician and singer.


As a virtuoso trumpet player, Armstrong had a unique tone and an extraordinary talent for melodic improvisation. Through his playing, the trumpet emerged as a solo instrument in jazz and is used widely today. He was a masterful accompanist and ensemble player in addition to his extraordinary skills as a soloist. With his innovations, he raised the bar musically for all who came after him. Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Trumpeter redirects here. ...


Armstrong is considered by some to have essentially invented jazz singing. Ethel Waters precedes his scatting on record in the 1930s according to Gary Giddens and others (See Ken Burns' Jazz CD Set liner notes). He had an extremely distinctive gravelly voice, which he deployed with great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also greatly skilled at scat singing, or wordless vocalizing. Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra are just two singers who were greatly indebted to him. Holiday said that she always wanted Bessie Smith's 'big' sound and Armstrong's feeling in her singing. Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896–September 1, 1977) was an Oscar-nominated American blues vocalist and actress. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later nicknamed Lady Day (see Jazz royalty regarding similar nicknames), was an American jazz singer, a seminal influence on jazz and pop singers, and generally regarded as one of the greatest female jazz vocalists. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


On August 4, 2001, the centennial of Armstrong's birth, New Orleans' airport was renamed Louis Armstrong International Airport in his honor. Louis Armstrong - New Orleans International Airport, formerly Moisant Field, is located in Kenner, Louisiana and serves New Orleans, Louisiana It has the IATA Airport Code MSY. Louis Armstrong - New Orleans International Airport used to be a major hub for Latin American Travel from the United States. ...


Radio, films and TV

Armstrong appeared in more than a dozen Hollywood films, usually playing a band leader or musician. His most notable rôle was as the bandleader cum narrator in the 1956 musical, High Society, in which he sang the title song and performed a duet with Bing Crosby on Now You Has Jazz. He was the first African American to host a nationally broadcast radio show in the 1930s. He was heard on such radio programs as The Story of Swing (1937) and This Is Jazz (1947), and he also made assorted television appearances, especially in the 1950s and 1960s, including appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. This article is about motion pictures. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... High Society is a 1956 musical film made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in VistaVision with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Now You Has Jazz is a song written by Cole Porter for the 1956 film High Society, where it was introduced by Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong [1]. Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong - High Society (1956) Categories: | | | | | ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Louis Armstrong has a record star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on 7601 Hollywood Boulevard. Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ...


Many of Armstrong's recordings remain popular. More than three decades since his passing, a larger number of his recordings from all periods of his career are more widely available than at any time during his lifetime. His songs are broadcast and listened to every day throughout the world, and are honored in various movies, TV series, commercials, and even anime and computer games. "A Kiss to Build a Dream On" was included in the computer game Fallout 2, accompanying the intro cinematic (and the year after in the movie Sleepless in Seattle). His 1923 recordings, with Joe Oliver and his Creole Jazz Band, continue to be listened to as documents of ensemble style New Orleans jazz, but more particularly as ripper jazz records in their own right. All too often, however, Armstrong recorded with stiff, standard orchestras leaving only his sublime trumpet playing as of interest. "Melancholy Blues," performed by Armstrong and his Hot Seven was included on the Voyager Golden Record sent into outer space to represent one of the greatest achievements of humanity. This article is about motion pictures. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... Advert redirects here. ... “Animé” redirects here. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Fallout 2 is a critically-acclaimed computer role-playing game published by Interplay in 1998. ... Sleepless in Seattle is a 1993 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Nora Ephron. ... Dixieland music is a style of jazz. ... The Voyager Golden Record. ...


Argentine writer Julio Cortázar, a self-described Armstrong admirer, asserted that a 1952 Louis Armstrong concert at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris played a significant role in inspiring him to create the fictional creatures called Cronopios that are the subject of a number of Cortázar's short stories. Cortázar once called Louis Armstrong himself "Grandísimo Cronopio" (Most Enormous Cronopio). Julio Cortázar. ... The Théâtre des Champs-Elysées is a Parisian theater, famous for being the place of the scandal related to the first performance of Igor Stravinskys Rite of Spring in 1913. ... A cronopio is a type of fictional person appearing in works by Argentine writer Julio Cortázar (August 26, 1914–February 12, 1984). ...


Armstrong also appears as a minor character in Harry Turtledove's Timeline-191 series. When he and his band escape from a Nazi-like Confederacy, they enhance the insipid mainstream music of the North. Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ... Timeline-191 is a fan name given to a series of Harry Turtledove alternate history novels. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


Louis Armstrong is also referred to in The Trumpet of the Swan along with Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday. Three siblings in the film are named Louie, Billie, and Ella. The main character, Louie, plays a trumpet, an obvious nod to Armstrong. The Trumpet of the Swan is a childrens novel by E.B. White published in 1970. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanora Fagan and later nicknamed Lady Day (see Jazz royalty regarding similar nicknames), was an American jazz singer, a seminal influence on jazz and pop singers, and generally regarded as one of the greatest female jazz vocalists. ...


In the original EB White book, he is referred to by name by a child who hears Louie playing and comments "He sounds just like Louis Armstrong, the famous trumpet player".


Honors and awards

A statue in New Orleans honoring Armstrong
A statue in New Orleans honoring Armstrong

The main airport in New Orleans, Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport is named for Armstrong. In addition, the US Open tennis tournament's former main stadium was named Louis Armstrong Stadium in honor of Armstrong who had lived a few blocks from the site.[15] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 538 pixelsFull resolution (1924 × 1295 pixel, file size: 573 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Louis Armstrong Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 538 pixelsFull resolution (1924 × 1295 pixel, file size: 573 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Louis Armstrong Metadata This file contains... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport (IATA: MSY, ICAO: KMSY), formerly Moisant Field, is located in Kenner, Louisiana and is the primary commercial airport for the New Orleans metropolitan area of southeast Louisiana and the second largest airport on the United States Gulf Coast. ... The U.S. Open is the fourth and final event of the Grand Slam in tennis. ... Louis Armstrong Stadium is the second tennis stadium of the U.S. Open, the last of each years four Grand Slam tournaments. ...


Armstrong was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1972. He will be inducted into the Long Island Music Hall of Fame in 2007. The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... The Long Island Music Hall of Fame is an organization located in Lake Grove, New York. ...


See also

  • Louis Armstrong albums
  • Louis Armstrong songs

Samples

For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ...

Notes

  1. ^ He preferred his given name pronounced as Louie. "It's like Louis Armstrong - he spelled his name Louis, but he liked it to be said as Louie", recalls Louie Bellson [1]. Armstrong was registered as "Lewie" for the 1920 U.S. Census. On various live records he's called as "Louie" on stage, such as on the 1952 "Can Anyone Explain?" from the live album In Scandinavia vol.1. It should also be noted that "Lewie" is the French pronunciation of "Louis" and is commonly used in Louisiana. After his death, the mainstream pronunciation slowly drifted to "Louis". However, when referring to himself in "Hello Dolly!", he pronounces his name as "Lewis" ("Hello, Dolly. This is Lewis, Dolly"), pronouncing the 's'.
  2. ^ Many biographies of Louis Armstrong have claimed his middle name to be "Daniel", but this was denied by Armstrong himself.
  3. ^ Armstrong said he was not sure exactly when he was born, but celebrated his birthday on July 4. He usually gave the year as 1900 when speaking in public (although he used 1901 on his Social Security and other papers filed with the government). Using Roman Catholic Church documents from when his grandmother took him to be baptized, New Orleans music researcher Tad Jones established Armstong’s actual date of birth as August 4, 1901. With various other collaborative evidence, this date is now accepted by Armstrong scholars. See also age fabrication.
  4. ^ For "satchel-mouth".
  5. ^ http://louisarmstronghouse.org/smartfaq/smartfaq.cgi?answer=1137535835
  6. ^ htt20Topics%2fSubjects%2fR%2fReligion%20and%20Belief
  7. ^ "Satchuated" Gary Giddins, Village Voice April 16 - 22, 2003, retrieved 10/17/2007
  8. ^ Louis Armstrong & his Orchestra
  9. ^ Hale, James (editor of Jazzhouse.org), Danny Barcelona (1929-2007), Drums, Armstrong All-Star, The Last Post, 2007, retrieved on: July 4, 2007
  10. ^ "Louis Armstrong, Barring Soviet Tour, Denounces Eisenhower and Gov. Faubus", New York Times, September 19, 1957. Retrieved on 2007-08-30.  See also, from 23 September 2007, *David Margolick, The Day Louis Armstrong Made Noise
  11. ^ Gilstrap, Peter. "Leave It All Behind Ya", Phoenix New Times, February 29, 1996. Retrieved on 2007-08-11. 
  12. ^ Satchmo.net. 'Red Beans and Ricely yours, Louis Armstrong.'
  13. ^ Elie p.327
  14. ^ http://archives.cnn.com/1999/ALLPOLITICS/stories/12/31/clinton.kickoff.02/
  15. ^ http://www.usta.com/nationaltenniscenternews/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=14185

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Tad Jones is a jazz historian and researcher. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Armstrong, Louis. Satchmo: My Life in New Orleans. ISBN 0-306-80276-7
  • Armstrong, Louis and Thomas Brothers. Armstrong, in His Own Words: Selected Writings. ISBN 0-19-514046-X
  • Bergreen, Laurence. "Louis Armstrong: An Extravagant Life". ISBN 0-553-06768-0
  • Brothers, Thomas "Louis Armstrong's New Orleans" ISBN 0-393-06109
  • Jones Max and John Chilton. Louis Armstrong Story. ISBN 0-306-803240
  • Cogswell, Michael. Armstrong: The Offstage Story. ISBN 1-888054-81-6
  • Meckna, Michael. Satchmo: The Louis Armstrong Encyclopedia. ISBN 0-313-30137-9
  • Elie, Lolis Eric. A Letter from New Orleans. Originally printed in Gourmet. Reprinted in Best Food Writing 2006, Edited by Holly Hughes, ISBN 1-56924-287-9

John James Chilton (born: 16 July 1932 in London, England) is a British jazz trumpeter and writer. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Louis Armstrong
Persondata
NAME Armstrong, Louis Daniel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Satchmo
SHORT DESCRIPTION American Jazz trumpeter and singer
DATE OF BIRTH 4 July 1900(1900-07-04)
PLACE OF BIRTH New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
DATE OF DEATH 6 July 1971
PLACE OF DEATH New York City, New York, U.S.

For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Trumpeter redirects here. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Louis Armstrong (1434 words)
Armstrong was greeted as a hero, but racism marred his return when a White radio announcer refused to mention Armstrong on the air and a free concert that Louis was going to give to the cities' African-American population was cancelled at the last minute.
The band was renamed Louis Armstrong and his Orchestra and was one of the most popular acts of the Swing era.
For the next nine years the Louis Armstrong Orchestra continued to tour and release records, but as the 1940s drew to a close the public's taste in Jazz began to shift away from the commercial sounds of the Swing era and big band Jazz.
Louis Armstrong - Music Downloads - Online (1211 words)
Bio: Louis Armstrong was the first important soloist to emerge in jazz, and he became the most influential musician in the music's history.
Armstrong moved to Chicago to join Oliver's band in August 1922 and made his first recordings as a member of the group in the spring of 1923.
Armstrong completed his contract with Decca in 1954, after which his manager made the unusual decision not to sign him to another exclusive contract but instead to have him freelance for different labels.
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