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Encyclopedia > Louie B. Nunn

Louie Broady Nunn, (March 8, 1924-January 29, 2004) a native of Park in Barren County was Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. Nunn was the first and only Republican party elected Governor of Kentucky subsequent from 1943 until Ernie Fletcher's election in 2003. March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Barren County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ...


Born in Park, Kentucky, which is located between Hiseville, Seymour, and Three Springs, near Glasgow, Nunn attended Bowling Green Business College (now part of Western Kentucky University) and served in the United States Army. Following his military duty, Nunn attended the University of Cincinnati and then earned his law degree from the University of Louisville. He was elected county judge of Barren County at the age of 29, the first Republican ever elected to that office in the history of the heavily-Democratic county. Glasgow is a city located in Barren County, Kentucky. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the United States armed forces and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ...


Nunn was married to the former Buelah Roberts. They had two children, Steven and Jennie Lou.


Nunn served as statewide campaign manager for President Dwight D. Eisenhower and U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper. He was the Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky in 1963, but lost in a close race to Democrat Edward T. Breathitt. Breathitt won 449,551 votes (50.7%) to Nunn's 436,496 (49.3%). Nunn was victorious in a second close race for the state's highest office four years later, defeating Democratic nominee Henry Ward with 454,123 votes (51.2%) to Ward's 425,674 (48.0%). Nunn was endorsed in 1967 by former Democratic Governor A.B. "Happy" Chandler. Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... John Sherman Cooper (August 23, 1901 - February 21, 1991) was a Republican United States senator from Kentucky who served a total of 20 years (1946-1949, 1952-1955, 1956-1973). ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... Henry Ward was a Democrat who held posts in Democratic state administrations in Kentucky and was the Democratic nominee for Governor of Kentucky in 1967. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ...


Nunn was not the only member of his family heavily involved in GOP politics. Along with his brother, Lee Nunn (who himself served at times as KY GOP party leader), he was the more visible of the two Nunn brothers who together played a role during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s as dynamic in Kentucky and in national Republican politics as the roles held by the more famous Kennedy brothers of Massachusetts and by the Burton brothers in San Francisco (who were associated with George Moscone of San Francisco) amid Democrat national politics. Lee and Louie were both longtime friends with Governor Ronald Reagan of California. Lee Nunn lived on the old Nunn homeplace at Park, KY, and had a small airstrip built on the farm, so as to be able to commute to and from Washington and to and from Frankfort weekly during the Nixon years in his twin engine private plane. He, along with Louie, served President Nixon regularly, providing guidance and private counsel at Nixon's request on matters to do with farming and rural areas and Kentucky, as well as with preparing political strategies, much as Karl Rove provides President George W. Bush today. As some astute pundits have pointed out, Lee Nunn was the only member of Nixon's inner circle smart enough not to himself be tainted with the crimes of Watergate. Still, the Nixon tapes regularly contain mentions of meetings, phone conversations, and other activities among Louie Nunn, Lee Nunn, and President Nixon, on a regularly recurring basis. [1] Mayor Moscone George Richard Moscone (November 24, 1929 – November 27, 1978) was the mayor of San Francisco, California from January 1976 until his assassination in November 1978. ... Karl Rove Karl Rove (born Karl Christian Rove on December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American businessman and politician, was elected in 2000 as the 43rd President of the United States of America, re-elected in 2004, and is currently serving his second term in that office. ... The Watergate building. ...


As the GOP nominee for Governor himself in 1963, Louie Nunn came within 15,000 votes of victory following a hard-hitting campaign that tied his opponent to the Kennedys. Four years later, with campaign help from his longtime good friend California Gov. Ronald Reagan, Nunn became his state's first Republican Governor since 1943. A sign that times were changing in Kentucky was that Nunn first had to win a highly competitive Republican primary.


As Governor, Nunn oversaw the entry of the University of Louisville into the state's public university system and the transformation of Northern Kentucky University from a community college to a full-fledged member of the state university system. Nunn successfully lobbied the Kentucky General Assembly to increase motor vehicle licensing fees and to increase the state sales tax from 3% to 5%, while eliminating taxes on prescription drugs. Nunn had surprising success with the legislature, given that Democrats held substantial majorities in both houses of the Kentucky General Assembly during his term. Nunn caused controversy when he called out the National Guard to break up protests against the Vietnam War at the University of Kentucky in May 1970. During that incident, one of the university's ROTC buildings was burned to the ground under mysterious circumstances, ostensibly in protest of the war. (A tennis court, covering all signs of the fire, quickly replaced the burned out ROTC building location.) Nunn also sent National Guard troops into Louisville, Kentucky to stop rioting related to civil rights marches in 1968. A popular recurring joke on Kentucky's liberal college campuses at the time was to ask, 'If there are 50 states, why are there only 49 Governors?", to which the refrain would always be, 'Because Kentucky has Nunn.' Nunn's popularity across the rural areas, though, remained, despite the controversy in the urban areas, which in retrospect were afloat in a sea of largely conservative, albeit typically registered Democrat voters living across the rest of the Commonwealth. The University of Louisville (also known as U of L, Louisville, or the Ville) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. It is mandated [1] by the Kentucky General Assembly to be a Preeminent Metropolitan Research University. ... Northern Kentucky University is a state university located in Highland Heights, Kentucky, seven miles (11 km) southeast of Cincinnati. ... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Seal of the National Guard Bureau Seal of the Army National Guard Seal of the Air National Guard Seal of the National Guard Missile Defense The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... The University of Kentucky (also as UK or simply Kentucky) is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Louisville redirects here. ...


Nunn saw disappointment in 1972, losing a bid for the United States Senate to Democrat Walter "Dee" Huddleston of Elizabethtown. Nunn had hoped to capitalize on the popularity of President Richard Nixon, but was harmed by Democratic efforts to blame him for "Nunn's Nickel," as the sales tax increase passed during his term as Governor was nicknamed. Walter Darlington Huddleston (born April 15, 1926) is a retired American politician. ... Elizabethtown is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Nunn's last bid for office came in 1979 when he was once again the GOP nominee for Governor against Democrat John Y. Brown, Jr. Up against a multi-millionaire businessman and his former Miss America wife (Phyllis George), Nunn's blunt, earthy populism proved not enough. He lost, taking 381,278 votes (40.6%) to Brown's 558,008 (59.4%). It would be his last political run. John Y. Brown, Jr. ... Phyllis George (b. ...


Although he never again held public office, Nunn remained a popular, respected, and active elder statesman in many of Kentucky's political and government affairs. He served on the Board of Regents of Morehead State University and Kentucky State University, and campaigned for Republican candidates until his death. Nunn was also mentioned in passing by Hunter S Thompson in his article "The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved" as a "swinish neo-Nazi hack".[2] Hunter S. Thompson Hunter Stockton Thompson (born Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1937) is an American journalist and author. ...



At the age of 74, Nunn again considered a bid for Governor in 1999, prompted by the GOP's failure to run a known candidate. He cited personal and health issues for not making the race, and lived out his last years at the former Pin Oak Farm, his home near Versailles, Kentucky. Nunn frequently entertained there and kept a fairly high profile as a former Governor.


In 2003, Nunn guided the campaign of his son, State Representative Steve Nunn (R-Glasgow). Underfunded, and without the support of the GOP establishment, the junior Nunn was widely admired for his tireless campaigning and candid attention to issues, including the state budget, but ultimately ran third in a four-way race, losing to then-Congressman and now Governor Ernie Fletcher. Steve Nunn is a Republican member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from Glasgow, Kentucky. ... Glasgow is a city located in Barren County, Kentucky. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ...

Louie B. Nunn died on January 29, 2004, only weeks short of his 80th birthday after a heart attack in Versailles, Kentucky. He was buried at the Cosby Methodist Church cemetery east of Horse Cave, near the Governor's beloved homeplace of Park, KY. During Governor Nunn's memorial service in the rotunda of the State Capitol, State Representative Lonnie Napier (R-Lancaster) stated "As long as there is a Kentucky, the spirit of Louie B. Nunn shall never die." Image File history File linksMetadata LouieBNunn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata LouieBNunn. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... The Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway, is a controlled-access highway from Barren County, Kentucky to Somerset, Kentucky. ... Rocky Hill is the name of some places in the United States of America: Rocky Hill, Connecticut Rocky Hill, New Jersey Not to be confused with them are: Rock Hill, Missouri Rock Hill, New York Rock Hill, South Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Versailles is a city located in Woodford County, Kentucky. ... Horse Cave is a city located in Hart County, Kentucky. ... Lancaster is a city located in Garrard County, Kentucky. ...


The Cumberland Parkway, a toll road running through Barren County, was renamed the Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway in 2000; Nunn was instrumental in getting the parkway built in the 1970s. The main lodge at the Barren River Reservoir State Park near Lucas is also named for Nunn. The Louie B. Nunn Cumberland Parkway, is a controlled-access highway from Barren County, Kentucky to Somerset, Kentucky. ...

Preceded by:
Edward T. Breathitt
Governor of Kentucky
1967–1971
Succeeded by:
Wendell H. Ford
Preceded by:
John Sherman Cooper
Republican nominee for United States Senator from Kentucky (Class 2)
1972–1972
Succeeded by:
Louie R. Guenthner, Jr.
Preceded by:
John M. Robsion, Jr.
Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky
1963–1963
Succeeded by:
Louie Nunn
Preceded by:
Louie Nunn
Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky
1967–1967
Succeeded by:
Tom Emberton
Preceded by:
Bob Gable
Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky
1979–1979
Succeeded by:
Jim Bunning
Governors of Kentucky Kentucky State Flag
ShelbyGarrardGreenupScottShelbyMadisonSlaughterAdairDeshaMetcalfeJ. BreathittJ. MoreheadClarkWickliffeLetcherOwsleyCrittendenHelmPowellC. MoreheadMagoffinRobinsonBramletteHelmStevensonLeslieMcCrearyBlackburnKnottBuckner • Brown • BradleyTaylorGoebelBeckhamWillsonMcCrearyStanleyBlackMorrowFieldsSampsonLaffoonChandlerJohnsonWillisClementsWetherbyChandlerCombsE. BreathittNunnFordCarrollBrown Jr.CollinsWilkinsonJonesPattonFletcher

Kentucky also had two Confederate Governors: George W. Johnson and Richard Hawes. Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Wendell Hampton Ford (born September 8, 1924) is an American politician from Kentucky who belongs to the Democratic Party. ... John Sherman Cooper (August 23, 1901 - February 21, 1991) was a Republican United States senator from Kentucky who served a total of 20 years (1946-1949, 1952-1955, 1956-1973). ... Louie R. Guenthner, Jr. ... John Marshall Robsion, Jr. ... 2003 – Ernie Fletcher (Fayette) 1999 – Peppy Martin (Hart) 1995 – Larry Forgy (Fayette) 1991 – Larry Hopkins (Fayette) 1987 – John Harper (Bullitt) 1983 – Jim Bunning (Campbell) 1979 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1975 – Bob Gable (Franklin) 1971 – Tom Emberton (Metcalfe) 1967 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1963 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1959 – John M... Louie Broady Nunn, (March 8, 1924-January 29, 2004) a native of Park in Barren County was Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. ... Louie Broady Nunn, (March 8, 1924-January 29, 2004) a native of Park in Barren County was Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. ... 2003 – Ernie Fletcher (Fayette) 1999 – Peppy Martin (Hart) 1995 – Larry Forgy (Fayette) 1991 – Larry Hopkins (Fayette) 1987 – John Harper (Bullitt) 1983 – Jim Bunning (Campbell) 1979 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1975 – Bob Gable (Franklin) 1971 – Tom Emberton (Metcalfe) 1967 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1963 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1959 – John M... Tom Emberton was the Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky, USA in 1971. ... Robert Gable, a businessman from southern Kentucky, was the Republican nominee for Governor of Kentucky in 1975. ... 2003 – Ernie Fletcher (Fayette) 1999 – Peppy Martin (Hart) 1995 – Larry Forgy (Fayette) 1991 – Larry Hopkins (Fayette) 1987 – John Harper (Bullitt) 1983 – Jim Bunning (Campbell) 1979 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1975 – Bob Gable (Franklin) 1971 – Tom Emberton (Metcalfe) 1967 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1963 – Louie B. Nunn (Barren) 1959 – John M... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: | | ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kentucky. ... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... James Garrard was the Governor of Kentucky from 1796 to 1804. ... Christopher Greenup Christopher Greenup (1750–April 27, 1818) was an American lawyer and politician from Frankfort, Kentucky. ... For the Charles Scott who was British ambassador to Imperial Russia, 1898-1904 see Charles Scott (ambassador). ... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... George Madison was the Governor of Kentucky in 1816. ... Governor Gabriel Slaughter Gabriel Slaughter (1767 Culpepper County Virginia – 19 September 1830 Mercer County, Kentucky) Democratic-Republican party was the 7th governor of Kentucky (19 October 1817 – 7 September 1820). ... John Adair John Adair (January 9, 1757 – May 19, 1840) was an American pioneer, soldier and statesman of Mercer County, Kentucky. ... Joseph Desha (December 9, 1768 – October 12, 1842) was the ninth governor of Kentucky. ... Thomas Metcalfe (March 20, 1780 - August 18, 1855) was a United States politician, serving many different posts throughout his life, including U.S. Representative, Senator, and Governor of Kentucky. ... John Breathitt (1786–1834) was a 19th century politician who served as the Governor of Kentucky from 1832–1834, dying in office. ... James Turner Morehead (May 24, 1797 - December 28, 1854) was a United States Senator from Kentucky. ... James Clark (January 16, 1779 – August 27, 1839) was the thirteenth governor of Kentucky. ... Charles A. Wickliffe Charles Anderson Wickliffe, politician, born in Bardstown, Kentucky, 8 June 1788; died in Ilchester in Howard County, Maryland, 31 October 1869. ... Robert Perkins Letcher (February 10, 1788 – January 24, 1861) was the fifteenth governor of Kentucky. ... William Owsley (1782 – December 1862) was an American politician and jurist. ... John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... Lazarus W. Powell was the Governor of Kentucky from 1851 to 1855, and later a United States Senator from Kentucky. ... Charles Slaughter Morehead (July 7, 1802 – December 21, 1868) was the twentieth governor of Kentucky. ... Beriah Magoffin (April 18, 1815 - February 28, 1885) was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... James Fisher Robinson (October 4, 1800 - October 31, 1882) was the twenty-second Governor of Kentucky. ... Thomas Elliott Bramlette (January 3, 1817 – January 12, 1875) was the twenty-third Governor of Kentucky. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... John White Stevenson (2 May 1812 - 10 August 1886) succeeded Governor John Helm, who died while in office in 1867. ... Preston H. Leslie (8 March 1819 - 7 February 1907) was the governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky from 1871-1875. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Luke p. ... James Proctor Knott (1830 - June 18, 1911) was the Attorney General of Missouri at the outset of the American Civil War and Governor of Kentucky from 1883 to 1887. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr. ... John Young Brown (June 28, 1835-January 11, 1904) was a Representative from Kentucky. ... William OC. Bradley William OConnell Bradley (March 18, 1847 - May 23, 1914) was a U.S. senator from Kentucky. ... William Sylvester Taylor (1853-1928) was the Governor of Kentucky from December 1899 until January 1900. ... William Goebel William J. Goebel (January 4, 1856 – February 3, 1900) was a controversial American politician who served as Governor of Kentucky for a few days in 1900. ... John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (August 5, 1869 - January 9, 1940) served as both Governor of Kentucky and in the United States Senate. ... Augustus Everett Willson (October 13, 1846 – August 24, 1931) was the thirty-sixth governor of Kentucky. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Augustus Owsley Stanley (May 21, 1867 - August 12, 1958) was governor of Kentucky from 1915 to 1918. ... James Dixon Black (September 24, 1849 – August 4, 1938) was governor of Kentucky for part of 1919. ... Edwin Porch Morrow (November 28, 1877 – June 15, 1835) was a Republican Governor of Kentucky from 1919 – 1923. ... William Jason Fields (December 29, 1874 - October 21, 1954) was the governor of Kentucky from 1923 to 1927. ... Flemon Davis Sampson (1873 - 1967) was governor of Kentucky from 1927 through 1931. ... Ruby Laffoon (15th January, 1869 - 01 March 1941) was a Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1931 - 1935. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Keen Johnson (January 12, 1896 - February 7, 1970) served as Governor of Kentucky 1939-1943. ... Simeon Slavens Willis (1 December 1879 - 2 April 1965) was a US lawyer, judge and politician. ... Earle Chester Clements (October 22, 1896 - March 12, 1985) served as Governor of Kentucky and as a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... Lawerence Winchester Wetherby (January 2, 1908 - March 27, 1994) served as Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky and as Governor of Kentucky upon the resignation of Governor Earle C. Clements as Clements went to the United States Senate. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Bert T. Combs (August 13, 1911-December 4, 1991),born in Clay County, Kentucky, was the Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1959 through 1963. ... Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... Wendell Hampton Ford (born September 8, 1924) is an American politician from Kentucky who belongs to the Democratic Party. ... Julian Morton Carroll (born April 16, 1931) was Governor of the U.S. state of Kentucky from 1974 to 1979 as a Democrat. ... John Y. Brown, Jr. ... Martha Layne Collins Martha Layne Collins (born December 7, 1936 in Bagdad, Kentucky) was Governor of the U.S. State of Kentucky from 1983 through 1987; she is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Wallace G. Wilkinson (May 23, 1928–July 5, 2002) was a Kentucky businessman who made a fortune with college bookstores. ... Brereton Jones Brereton Chandler Jones (born June 27, 1939) is an American political figure. ... Paul E. Patton Paul E. Patton (born May 26, 1937) served as Democratic governor of Kentucky from 1995 to 2003. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (April 3–April 10, 1865) Largest city New Orleans... George W. Johnson (born May 27, 1811; died April 8, 1862) was the head of a shadow government of Kentucky formed by secessionists during the American Civil War. ... Kentuckys Provisinal Governor of the Confederates Richard Hawes (1797—1877) He was brother of Albert Gallatin Hawes, nephew of Aylett Hawes, and cousin of Aylett Hawes Buckner), a Representative from Kentucky. ...


 
 

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