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Encyclopedia > Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
First Baseman
Born: June 19, 1903
Died: June 2, 1941 (aged 37)
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 15, 1923
for the New York Yankees
Final game
April 30, 1939
for the New York Yankees
Career statistics
AVG     .340
HR     493
RBI     1,995
Teams
New York Yankees (1923-1939)
Career highlights and awards
All-Time records
Notable achievements
  • AL MVP: 1927, 1936
  • Seven-time MLB All-Star: 1933-1939 (DNP 1939)
  • Led the league in home runs: 1934 (49) & 1936 (49)
  • Led the league in RBIs: 1927 (175), 1928 (142), 1930 (174), 1931 (184) & 1934 (165)
  • Led the league in times on base: 1927 (330), 1930 (324), 1931 (328), 1934 (321), 1936 (342) & 1937 (331)
  • Led the league in batting average (.363), home runs (49), and RBIs (165) in 1934, resulting in a Triple Crown
  • Career batting average: .340 (2,721-for-8,001)
  • Played in 2,130 consecutive games: June 1, 1925 to April 30, 1939
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1939
Vote     Unanimous[1]

Henry Louis "Lou" Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig[2], was an American baseball player in the 1920s and 1930s, who set several Major League records and was popularly called the "The Iron Horse"[2] for his durability. His record for most career grand slam home runs (23) still stands today.[3] Gehrig was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association.[4] A native of New York City, he played for the New York Yankees until his career was cut short by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), now commonly referred to in the United States as Lou Gehrig's Disease.[5] Over a 15-season span between 1925 and 1939, he played in 2,130 consecutive games. The streak ended when Gehrig became disabled with the fatal neuromuscular disease that claimed his life two years later. His streak, long believed to be one of baseball's few unbreakable records, stood for 56 years until finally broken by Cal Ripken, Jr., of the Baltimore Orioles on September 6, 1995. Ripken would go on to play in a total of 2,632 consecutive games before sitting out September 20, 1998, to set the current record. The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... In the sport of baseball, a grand slam (or just slam for short) is a home run hit with all the bases occupied by baserunners, thereby scoring 4 runs - the most possible on a single play. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... In the sport of baseball, a grand slam (or just slam for short) is a home run hit with all the bases occupied by baserunners, thereby scoring 4 runs - the most possible on a single play. ... Homerun redirects here. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrigs Disease, or Maladie de Charcot) is a progressive, usually fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... Listed below are the 15 longest consecutive games played streaks in Major League Baseball history. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1995 throughout the world. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ...


Gehrig accumulated 1,995 RBIs in seventeen seasons with a lifetime batting average of .340, a lifetime on-base percentage of .447, and a lifetime slugging percentage of .632. A seven-time All-Star (the first All-Star game was not until 1933; he did not play in the 1939 game, retiring a week before it was held — at Yankee Stadium[6]), he won the American League's Most Valuable Player award in 1927 and 1936 and was a Triple Crown winner in 1934, leading the American League in batting average, home runs, and RBIs.[7] RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... This page is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ...


His popularity with fans endures to this day, as is evidenced by his being one of the leading vote-getters on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team, chosen in 1999. In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1999 throughout the world. ...

Contents

Early life

Gehrig was born in the Yorkville section of Manhattan, weighing almost 14 pounds (6.4 kg) at birth, the son of poor German immigrants Heinrich Gehrig and Christina Fack.[7] His father was a sheet metal worker by trade, but frequently unemployed due to ill health, so his mother was the breadwinner and disciplinarian.[8] Both parents considered baseball to be a schoolyard game; his domineering mother steered young Lou toward a career in business.[8] A section of Yorkville as seen from a high rise on Second Avenue and 87th Street Yorkville is a neighborhood within the Upper East Side of the borough of Manhattan in the city of New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Immigration is the movement of people into one place from another. ... Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ...


Lou Gehrig went to PS 132 in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan and then to Commerce High School, graduating in 1921.[9][10] Gehrig attended Columbia University (although he did not graduate), where he was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.[11] He could not, at first, play intercollegiate baseball for the Lions because he played baseball for a summer professional league during his freshman year.[11] At the time, he was unaware that doing so jeopardized his eligibility to play any collegiate sport. Gehrig was ruled eligible to play on the Lions' football team and was a standout fullback. He later gained baseball eligibility and joined the Lions on that squad as well. Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... // The Ivy League Columbia University, whose athletic teams go by the name lions, are part of the Ivy League, which includes Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. ... // The Ivy League Columbia University, whose athletic teams go by the name lions, are part of the Ivy League, which includes Columbia, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown and Dartmouth. ...


Gehrig first garnered national attention for his baseball ability while playing in a game at Cubs Park (now Wrigley Field) on June 26, 1920. Gehrig's New York School of Commerce team was playing a team from Chicago's Lane Tech High School. With his team winning 8-6 in the eighth inning, Gehrig hit a grand slam completely out of the Major League ballpark, an unheard-of feat for a 17-year old high school boy.[12] For the former ballpark in Los Angeles, see Wrigley Field (Los Angeles). ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... Lane Technical College Preparatory High School (colloquially known as Lane Tech), is a public four-year magnet high school located on the north side of Chicago and competes with Whitney Young High School for Chicagos talented students enrolling in public school. ...

Gehrig on the Columbia University baseball team
Gehrig on the Columbia University baseball team

On April 18, 1923, when Yankee Stadium opened for the first time, Babe Ruth christened the new stadium with a home run. On the same afternoon at Columbia, pitcher Gehrig struck out seventeen Williams batters for a team record. However, Columbia lost the game. Only a handful of collegians were at South Field that day, but more significant was the presence of Yankee scout Paul Krichell, who had been trailing Gehrig for some time. However, it was not Gehrig’s pitching that particularly impressed him. Instead, it was Gehrig’s powerful left-handed hitting. During the time Krichell had been watching Gehrig, Gehrig had hit some of the longest home runs ever seen on various Eastern campuses, including a 450-foot (137 m) blast on April 28 at Columbia's South Field which landed at 116th Street and Broadway, with Krichell watching.[13] Within two months Gehrig had signed his name to a Yankee contract.[11] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (536 × 688 pixel, file size: 78 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lou Gehrig ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 467 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (536 × 688 pixel, file size: 78 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Lou Gehrig ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... This page is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... This article is about the baseball player. ...


Major League Baseball career

Gehrig joined the Yankees midway through the 1923 season and made his debut on June 15 1923, as a pinch hitter. In his first two seasons, Gehrig saw limited playing time, mostly as a pinch hitter — he played in only 23 games and was not on the Yankees' 1923 World Series roster. In 1925, he batted 437 times for a very respectable .295 batting average with 20 home runs and 68 RBIs.[14] is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... In baseball, a pinch hitter is a common term for a substitute batter. ... The New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ...

Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in exhibition game at West Point, NY (May 6, 1927)
Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in exhibition game at West Point, NY (May 6, 1927)

Gehrig's breakout season came in 1926. He batted .313 with 47 doubles, an American League leading 20 triples, 16 home runs, and 112 RBIs.[14] In the 1926 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, Gehrig hit .348 with two doubles and 4 RBIs. The Cardinals won a seven-game series, winning four games to three.[15] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USMA redirects here. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... In the 1926 World Series, the St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ...


In 1927, Gehrig put up one of the greatest seasons by any batter in history. That year, Gehrig hit .373, with 218 hits: 52 doubles, 18 triples, 47 home runs, 175 runs batted in, and a .765 slugging percentage[14] April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ...


Gehrig established himself as a bona fide star in his own right despite playing in the shadow of Ruth for two-thirds of his career. Gehrig became one of the greatest run producers in baseball history. Gehrig had 509 RBIs during a three-season stretch (1930-32). Only two other players, Jimmie Foxx with 507 and Hank Greenberg with 503, have surpassed 500 RBIs in any three seasons; their totals were non-consecutive. (Babe Ruth had 498.)[16] Gehrig had six seasons where he batted .350 or better (with a high of .379 in 1930), plus a seventh season at .349. He had 8 seasons with 150 or more RBIs, 11 seasons with over 100 walks, 8 seasons with 200 or more hits, and 5 seasons with more than 40 home runs.[17] Gehrig led the American League in runs scored 4 times, home runs 3 times, and RBIs 5 times. His 184 RBIs in 1931 is still an American League record (and second all-time to Hack Wilson's 191 RBIs in 1930). Three of the top six RBI seasons in baseball history were Gehrig's. Lou Gehrig also holds the baseball record for most seasons with 400 total bases or more, accomplishing this feat five times in his career.[17] Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1931 throughout the world. ... // Biography Lewis Robert Hack Wilson (April 26, 1900 – November 23, 1948) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball from 1923 to 1934. ...


During the 10 seasons (1925-1934) in which Gehrig and Ruth were both Yankees and played a majority of games, Gehrig only had more home runs in 1934, when he hit 49 compared to Ruth’s 22. (Ruth played 125 games that year.) They tied at 46 in 1931. Ruth had 424 home runs compared to Gehrig’s 347—22.2% more. Gehrig had more RBIs in 7 years (1925, 1927, 1930-1934) and they tied in 1928. Ruth had 1,316 RBIs compared to Gehrig’s 1,436, with Gehrig having 9.9% more. Gehrig had more hits in 8 years (1925, 1927-28, 1930-34). Gehrig had a higher slugging percentage in 2 years (1933-34). And Gehrig had a higher batting average in 7 years (1925, 1927-28, 1930, 1932-34). For that span, Gehrig had a .343 batting average, compared to .338 for Ruth.[18]

Gehrig and Carl Hubbell on 1936 Time Magazine cover
Gehrig and Carl Hubbell on 1936 Time Magazine cover

On June 3, 1932, Gehrig hit four home runs in a game against the Philadelphia Athletics and narrowly missed another one when he hit a deep fly ball to center field and center fielder Al Simmons made an amazing leaping catch to get him out. After the game, Manager Joe McCarthy told him, "Well, Lou, nobody can take today away from you..." However, on that same day, John McGraw chose to announce his retirement after 30 years of managing the New York Giants, and so McGraw, not Gehrig, got the headlines in the sports sections the next day and Gehrig, as usual, had second-place treatment.[19] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 - November 21, 1988) was a left-handed screwball pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius Szymański in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... John Joseph McGraw (April 7, 1873–February 25, 1934), nicknamed Little Napoleon and Muggsy, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ...


In September 1933, Gehrig married Eleanor Twitchell, the daughter of Chicago Parks Commissioner Frank Twitchell.[14]


In a 1936 World Series cover story about Lou Gehrig and Carl Hubbell, Time magazine proclaimed Gehrig "the game's No. 1 batsman", who "takes boyish pride in banging a baseball as far, and running around the bases as quickly, as possible".[20] The 1936 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the New York Giants, with the Yankees winning in 6 games to earn their fifth championship. ... Carl Owen Hubbell (June 22, 1903 - November 21, 1988) was a left-handed screwball pitcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943. ...


2,130 consecutive games

On June 1 1925, Gehrig was sent in to pinch hit for light-hitting shortstop Paul "Pee Wee" Wanninger. The next day, June 2, Yankee manager Miller Huggins started Gehrig in place of regular first baseman Wally Pipp. Pipp was in a slump, as were the Yankees as a team, so Huggins made several lineup changes to boost their performance. Fourteen years later, Gehrig had played 2,130 consecutive games. In a few instances, Gehrig managed to keep the streak intact through pinch hitting appearances and fortuitous timing; in others, the streak continued despite injuries. Late in life, X-rays disclosed that Gehrig had sustained several fractures during his playing career.[21] For example: is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Wally Pipp Walter Clement Pipp (February 17, 1893 - January 11, 1965) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball, now best remembered as the man who lost his starting role to Lou Gehrig at the beginning of Gehrigs streak of 2,130 consecutive games. ... An X-ray picture (radiograph), taken by Wilhelm Röntgen in 1896, of his wife, Anna Bertha Ludwigs[1] hand X-rays (or Röntgen rays) are a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength in the range of 10 to 0. ...

  • On April 23 1933, Washington Senators pitcher Earl Whitehall beaned Gehrig, knocking him nearly unconscious. Still, Gehrig recovered and was not removed from the game.
  • On June 14 1933, Gehrig was ejected from a game, along with manager Joe McCarthy, but he had already been at bat, so he got credit for playing the game.
  • On July 13 1934, Gehrig suffered a "lumbago attack" and had to be assisted off the field. In the next day's away game, he was listed in the lineup as "shortstop", batting lead-off. In his first and only plate appearance, he singled and was promptly replaced by a pinch runner to rest his throbbing back, never actually taking the field. A&E's Biography speculated that this illness, which he also described as "a cold in his back", might have been the first symptom of his debilitating disease.[22]

Gehrig's record of 2,130 consecutive games played stood until September 6, 1995, when Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken, Jr. played in his 2,131st consecutive game to establish a new record.[23] is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... This article is about the player in baseball. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... Lumbago is a term used to refer to low back pain. ... A pinch runner is a baseball player substituted for the specific purpose of replacing a player on base. ... A&E is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: A&E Network (Arts and Entertainment), an American television network the Accident and Emergency department of a hospital This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1995 throughout the world. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ...


Illness

Plaque in St. Petersburg, Fla., where Gehrig collapsed in 1939 during spring training
Plaque in St. Petersburg, Fla., where Gehrig collapsed in 1939 during spring training

At the midpoint of the 1938 season, Gehrig's performance began to diminish. At the end of that season, he said, "I tired mid season. I don't know why, but I just couldn't get going again." Although his final 1938 stats were respectable (.295 batting average, 114 RBIs, 170 hits, .523 slugging percentage, 758 plate appearances with only 75 strikeouts, and 29 home runs), it was a dramatic drop from his 1937 season (when he batted .351 and slugged .643). In the 1938 post-season his batting average was .286 and all four of his hits were singles (for an unusually low .286 slugging percentage).[24] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 445 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1779 × 2395 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 445 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1779 × 2395 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see St. ... A Grapefruit League game at the LA Dodgers camp in Vero Beach, Florida In Major League Baseball, spring training is a series of exhibition games which precedes the regular season. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1938 throughout the world. ...


When the Yankees began their 1939 spring training in St. Petersburg, Florida, it was obvious that Gehrig no longer possessed his once-formidable power. Even Gehrig's base running was affected, and at one point he collapsed at Al Lang Field, the Yankees' spring training park at the time in St. Petersburg.[25] By the end of spring training, Gehrig had not hit even one home run.[26]Throughout his career, Gehrig was considered an excellent runner on the basepaths, but as the 1939 season got underway, his coordination and speed had deteriorated significantly.[27] == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... A Grapefruit League game at the LA Dodgers camp in Vero Beach, Florida In Major League Baseball, spring training is a series of exhibition games which precedes the regular season. ... For other uses, see St. ... Progress Energy Park (full name Progress Energy Park home of Al Lang Field) is a 7,227 seat baseball stadium located on the downtown St. ...


By the end of April, his statistics were the worst of his career, with just 1 RBI and a .143 batting average. Fans and the press openly speculated on Gehrig's abrupt decline. James Kahn, a reporter who wrote often about Gehrig, said in one article:

I think there is something wrong with him. Physically wrong, I mean. I don't know what it is, but I am satisfied that it goes far beyond his ball-playing. I have seen ballplayers 'go' overnight, as Gehrig seems to have done. But they were simply washed up as ballplayers. It's something deeper than that in this case, though. I have watched him very closely and this is what I have seen: I have seen him time a ball perfectly, swing on it as hard as he can, meet it squarely — and drive a soft, looping fly over the infield. In other words, for some reason that I do not know, his old power isn't there... He is meeting the ball, time after time, and it isn't going anywhere.[28]

He was indeed meeting the ball, with only one strikeout in 28 at-bats. But Joe McCarthy found himself resisting pressure from Yankee management to switch Gehrig to a part-time role. Things came to a head when Gehrig had to struggle to make a routine put-out at first base. The pitcher, Johnny Murphy, had to wait for Gehrig to drag himself over to the bag so he could catch Murphy's throw. Murphy said, "Nice play, Lou."[28] Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... This article is about the player in baseball. ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ...


On April 30, Gehrig went hitless against the weak Washington Senators. Gehrig had just played his 2,130th consecutive Major League game.[18] is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960...


On May 2, the next game after a day off, Gehrig approached McCarthy before the game in Detroit against the Tigers and said, "I'm benching myself, Joe", telling the Yankees' skipper that he was doing so "for the good of the team".[29] McCarthy acquiesced and put Ellsworth "Babe" Dahlgren in at first base, and also said that whenever Gehrig wanted to play again, the position was his. Gehrig himself took the lineup card out to the shocked umpires before the game, ending the 14-year stamina streak. Before the game began, the stadium announcer told the fans, "Ladies and gentlemen, this is the first time Lou Gehrig's name will not appear on the Yankee lineup in 2,130 consecutive games." The Detroit Tigers fans gave Gehrig a standing ovation while he sat on the bench with tears in his eyes.[24] Gehrig stayed with the Yankees as team captain for a few more weeks, but he never played baseball again.[24] is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bengals, The Tigs, Motor City Kitties Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin... Endurance, or stamina, is the act of sustaining prolonged stressful effort. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bengals, The Tigs, Motor City Kitties Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin...


Diagnosis

As Lou Gehrig's debilitation became steadily worse, Eleanor called the famed Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Her call was transferred to Dr. Charles William Mayo, who had been following Gehrig's career and his mysterious loss of strength. Dr. Mayo told Eleanor to bring Gehrig as soon as possible.[24] Main campus in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Olmsted Founded 1854 Government  - Mayor Ardell Brede Area  - Total 39. ...


Eleanor and Gehrig flew to Rochester from Chicago, where the Yankees were playing at the time, arriving at the Mayo Clinic on June 13, 1939. After six days of extensive testing at Mayo Clinic, the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was confirmed on June 19, Gehrig's 36th birthday.[30] The prognosis was grim: rapidly increasing paralysis, difficulty in swallowing and speaking, and a life expectancy of fewer than three years, although there would be no impairment of mental functions. Eleanor Gehrig was told that the cause of ALS was unknown but it was painless, non-contagious and cruel — the central nervous system is destroyed but the mind remains fully aware to the end.[31][32] For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Main campus in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Main campus in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrigs Disease, or Maladie de Charcot) is a progressive, usually fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Prognosis (older Greek πρόγνωσις, modern Greek πρόγνωση - literally fore-knowing, foreseeing) is a medical term denoting the doctors prediction of how a patients disease will progress, and whether there is chance of recovery. ...


Gehrig often wrote letters to Eleanor, and in one such note written shortly afterwards, said (in part):

The bad news is lateral sclerosis, in our language chronic infantile paralysis. There isn't any cure... there are very few of these cases. It is probably caused by some germ...Never heard of transmitting it to mates... There is a 50-50 chance of keeping me as I am. I may need a cane in 10 or 15 years. Playing is out of the question...[33]

Following Gehrig's visit to the Mayo Clinic, he briefly rejoined the Yankees in Washington, DC. As his train pulled into Union Station, he was greeted by a group of Boy Scouts, happily waving and wishing him luck. Gehrig waved back, but he leaned forward to his companion, a reporter, and said, "They're wishing me luck — and I'm dying."[30] Main campus in downtown Rochester, Minnesota. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Polish Boy Scouts fighting in the Warsaw Uprising Boy Scouts originally denoted the organization that developed and rapidly grew up during 1908 in the wake of the publication by Lord Robert Baden-Powell of his book Scouting for Boys. ...


"The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth"

The Yankee duo reunited – Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth (r) on Lou Gehrig Day (July 4, 1939).
The Yankee duo reunited – Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth (r) on Lou Gehrig Day (July 4, 1939).

On June 21, the New York Yankees announced Gehrig's retirement and proclaimed July 4, 1939, "Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day" at Yankee Stadium. Between games of the Independence Day doubleheader against the Washington Senators, the poignant ceremonies were held on the diamond. In its coverage the following day, The New York Times said it was "Perhaps as colorful and dramatic a pageant as ever was enacted on a baseball field [as] 61,808 fans thundered a hail and farewell".[34] Dignitaries extolled the dying slugger and the members of the 1927 Yankees World Championship team, known as "Murderer's Row", attended the ceremonies. New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia called Gehrig "the greatest prototype of good sportsmanship and citizenship" and Postmaster General James Farley concluded his speech by predicting, "For generations to come, boys who play baseball will point with pride to your record."[34] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (532x682, 66 KB) Summary http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (532x682, 66 KB) Summary http://www. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... In the United States, Independence Day (commonly known as the Fourth of July or July Fourth) is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... House Resolution 368, 97th Congress, 2nd Session, March 2 1982 Robert Caro, The Path to Power James (Jim) Aloysius Farley (May 30, 1888–June 9, 1976) was an American politician who served as head of the Democratic National Committee and Postmaster General. ...


Yankees Manager Joe McCarthy, struggling to control his emotions, then spoke of Lou Gehrig, with whom there was a close, almost father and son-like bond. After describing Gehrig as "the finest example of a ballplayer, sportsman, and citizen that baseball has ever known", McCarthy could stand it no longer. Turning tearfully to Gehrig, the manager said, "Lou, what else can I say except that it was a sad day in the life of everybody who knew you when you came into my hotel room that day in Detroit and told me you were quitting as a ballplayer because you felt yourself a hindrance to the team. My God, man, you were never that."[35]


The Yankees retired Gehrig's uniform number "4", making him the first player in Major League Baseball history to be accorded that honor.[36] Gehrig was given many gifts, commemorative plaques, and trophies. Some came from VIPs; others came from the stadium's groundskeepers and janitorial staff. Footage of the ceremonies shows Gehrig being handed various gifts, and immediately setting them down on the ground, because he no longer had the arm strength to hold them.[30] The Yankees gave him a silver trophy with their signatures engraved on it. Inscribed on the front was a special poem written by The New York Times writer John Kieran. The trophy cost only about $5, but it became one of Gehrig's most prized possessions.[1] In 1929, the New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians began using uniform numbers so fans and scorekeepers could tell who was who on the field. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ...


After the presentations and remarks by Babe Ruth, Gehrig addressed the crowd:

"Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about the bad break I got. Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. I have been in ballparks for seventeen years and have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans.

"Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn’t consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure, I’m lucky. Who wouldn’t consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseball’s greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure, I'm lucky. "When the New York Giants, a team you would give your right arm to beat, and vice versa, sends you a gift — that’s something. When everybody down to the groundskeepers and those boys in white coats remember you with trophies — that’s something. When you have a wonderful mother-in-law who takes sides with you in squabbles with her own daughter — that's something. When you have a father and a mother who work all their lives so that you can have an education and build your body — it's a blessing. When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed — that's the finest I know. "So I close in saying that I might have been given a bad break, but I've got an awful lot to live for. Thank you." Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees. ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ...

Lou Gehrig at Yankee Stadium, July 4, 1939 [37]

The crowd stood and applauded for almost two minutes. Gehrig was visibly shaken as he stepped away from the microphone, and wiped the tears away from his face with his handkerchief.[1] Babe Ruth came over and hugged him as a band played "I Love You Truly" and the crowd chanted "We love you, Lou". The New York Times account the following day called it "one of the most touching scenes ever witnessed on a ball field", that made even hard-boiled reporters "swallow hard".[34] is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Later that year, Lou Gehrig was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in a special election. At age 36, he was the youngest player to be so honored.[38] The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related...


Final years

"Don't think I am depressed or pessimistic about my condition at present," Lou Gehrig wrote following his retirement from baseball. Struggling against his ever-worsening physical condition, he added, "I intend to hold on as long as possible and then if the inevitable comes, I will accept it philosophically and hope for the best. That's all we can do."[30]

Gehrig's retired number in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium.

In October 1939, he accepted Mayor LaGuardia's appointment to a ten-year term as a New York City Parole Commissioner and was sworn into office on January 2, 1940.[39] The Parole Commission commended the ex-ballplayer for his "firm belief in parole, properly administered", stating that Gehrig "indicated he accepted the parole post because it represented an opportunity for public service. He had rejected other job offers – including lucrative speaking and guest appearance opportunities – worth far more financially than the $5,700 a year commissionership." Gehrig visited New York City's correctional facilities, but insisted that they not be covered by news media.[40] Gehrig, as always, quietly and efficiently performed his duties. He was often helped by his wife Eleanor, who would guide his hand when he had to sign official documents. About a month before his death, when Gehrig reached the point where his deteriorating physical condition made it impossible for him to continue in the job, he quietly resigned.[41] Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On June 2, 1941, at 10:10 p.m., sixteen years to the day after he replaced Wally Pipp at first base, Henry Louis Gehrig died at his home at 5204 Delafield Avenue, in the Fieldston section of the Bronx, New York.[42] is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Fieldston is the name of a subsection of the Riverdale section of the Bronx in New York City. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ...


Upon hearing the news, Babe Ruth and his wife Claire went to the Gehrig's house to console Eleanor. Mayor LaGuardia ordered flags in New York to be flown at half-staff, and Major League ballparks around the nation did likewise.[43] This does not cite any references or sources. ...


Following the funeral at Christ Episcopal Church of Riverdale, Gehrig's remains were cremated and interred on June 4 at Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York. Lou Gehrig and Ed Barrow are both interred in the same section of Kensico Cemetery, which is next door to Gate of Heaven Cemetery, where the graves of Babe Ruth and Billy Martin are located.[44] is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... Valhalla is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Mount Pleasant in Westchester County, New York, USA. The population was 5,379 at the 2000 census. ... The upper entrance to Gate of Heaven Cemetery The new indoor building of Our Lady Queen of Peace Mausoleum Saint Francis of Assisi Chapel and Garden Mausoleum The Gothic Bridge at Gate of Heaven Cemetery The Gate of Heaven Cemetery, approximately 25 miles north of New York City, was established... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ...

Lou Gehrig's headstone in Kensico Cemetery (the year of his birth was inscribed erroneously as 1905)
Lou Gehrig's headstone in Kensico Cemetery (the year of his birth was inscribed erroneously as 1905)

Eleanor Gehrig never remarried following her husband's passing, dedicating the rest of her life to supporting ALS research.[12] She died on March 6, 1984, on her 80th birthday. They had no children. Image File history File linksMetadata Lou_Gehrig_best_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Lou_Gehrig_best_800. ... Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


The Yankees dedicated a monument to Gehrig in center field at Yankee Stadium on July 6, 1941, the shrine lauding him as, "A man, a gentleman and a great ballplayer whose amazing record of 2,130 consecutive games should stand for all time." Gehrig's monument joined the one placed there in 1932 to Miller Huggins, which would eventually be followed by Babe Ruth's in 1949.[18] is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1941 throughout the world. ...


Gehrig's birthplace in Manhattan, 1994 Second Avenue (near E. 103rd Street), is memorialized with a plaque marking the site. Another early residence on E. 94th Street (near Second Avenue) is noted with a plaque. The Gehrigs' white house at 5204 Delafield Avenue in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, where Lou Gehrig died, still stands today on the east side of the Henry Hudson Parkway and is likewise marked by a plaque.[14]


Accomplishments: records, awards, and distinctions

Major League Baseball (MLB) Records[45]
Accomplishment Record
Grand Slams 23
Runs batted in (RBI) by a First Baseman 1,995
Consecutive seasons, 120+ RBIs 8 (1927–1934
Runs scored by a first baseman 1,888
Highest on-base percentage by a first baseman .447
Most bases on balls by a first baseman 1,508
Highest slugging percentage by a first baseman .632
Most extra base hits by a first baseman 1190
Major League Baseball (MLB) Single Season Records[45]
Accomplishment Record
Runs-batted-in by a first baseman 184 (1931)
Runs scored by a first baseman 167 (1936)
Highest slugging percentage by a first baseman .765 (1927)
Extra Base Hits, by a first baseman 117 (1927)
Most total bases by a first baseman 447 (1927
Major League Baseball (MLB) Single Game Records[45]
Accomplishment Record
Home Runs 4[46]
Major League Baseball (MLB) Single Game Records[45]
Award Year
Inducted into National Baseball Hall of Fame 1939
American League MVP 1927, 1936 (runner-up in 1931 and 1932)
Named to seven All-Star teams (1933–1939); played in six (retired before 1939 All-Star Game)
Named starting first baseman on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team 1999
The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award Unavailable[47]

This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is a award created by the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity to recognize the former Major League Baseball player Lou Gehrig. ...

Other distinctions

  • Triple Crown winner in 1934 (.363 BA, 49 HR, 165 RBI)
  • Only player in history to collect 400 total bases in five seasons (1927, 1930, 1931, 1934, 1936)
  • With Stan Musial, one of two players to collect at least 500 doubles, 150 triples, and 400 home runs in a career
  • One of only six players (Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx, Joe DiMaggio, Stan Musial, and Ted Williams were the others) to end their career with a minimum .320 batting average, 350 home runs, and 1,500 RBI
  • Only player to hit 40 doubles and 40 home runs in the same season non-consecutively (1927, 1930, 1934)
  • Scored game-winning run in 8 World Series games
  • First athlete ever to appear on a box of Wheaties
  • First baseball player to have his uniform number retired
  • July 4, 1939 farewell speech was voted by fans as the fifth greatest moment in Major League Baseball history in 2002
  • A Lou Gehrig 25-cent USA Postage Stamp was issued by the U.S. Postal Service in 1989 (Scott number 2417)
  • Gehrig was mentioned in the poem "Lineup for Yesterday" by Ogden Nash:
Lineup for Yesterday
G is for Gehrig,
The Pride of the Stadium;
His record pure gold,
His courage, pure radium.
Ogden Nash, Sport magazine (January 1949)[48]

In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Early Wheaties Cereal Box Wheaties, a wheat and bran mixture baked into flakes, is a breakfast cereal introduced in 1924 and marketed by the General Mills cereal company of Golden Valley, Minnesota. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... Covers of the 2002 edition featured art on stamps. ... Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ... Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet best known for writing pithy and funny light verse. ... The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...

Film and other media

Lou Gehrig starred in the 1938 20th Century Fox movie Rawhide playing himself in his only feature film appearance.[49] In 2006, researchers presented a paper to the American Academy of Neurology, reporting on an analysis of Rawhide and photographs of Lou Gehrig from the 1937–1939 period, to ascertain when Gehrig began to show visible symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. They concluded that while atrophy of hand muscles could be detected in 1939 photographs of Gehrig, no such abnormality was visible at the time Rawhide was made in January 1938. "Examination of Rawhide showed that Gehrig functioned normally in January 1938", the report concluded.[50] Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is a professional society for neurologists and neuroscientists. ... Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrigs Disease, or Maladie de Charcot) is a progressive, usually fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. ...


In 1942, the life of Lou Gehrig was immortalized in the movie The Pride of the Yankees, starring Gary Cooper as Gehrig and Teresa Wright as his wife Eleanor. It received 11 Academy Award nominations and won in one category, Film Editing. Real-life Yankees Babe Ruth, Bob Meusel, Mark Koenig and Bill Dickey (then still an active player) played themselves, as did sportscaster Bill Stern. See also: 1941 in film 1942 1943 in film 1940s in film years in film film // Events Carole Lombard is killed in a plane crash when returning from a War Bond tour. ... The Pride of the Yankees is a 1942 biographical film directed by Sam Wood about the New York Yankees star baseball player, first baseman Lou Gehrig, who had his Hall-of-Fame career tragically cut short at 36 years of age when he was stricken with the fatal disease amyotrophic... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... Wright in Shadow of a Doubt (1943) Muriel Teresa Wright (October 27, 1918 – March 6, 2005) was an Academy Award-winning American actress, known professionally as Teresa Wright. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Mark Koenig (July 19, 1904 - April 22, 1993) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Bill Stern (July 1, 1907-November 19, 1971), was a radio sports announcer, actor and director from Rochester, New York. ...


Later, in 1978, a TV movie, A Love Affair: The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig Story was released, starring Blythe Danner and Edward Herrmann as Eleanor and Lou Gehrig, respectively. It was based on the 1976 autobiography My Luke and I, written by Eleanor Gehrig and Joseph Durso. The year 1978 in television involved some significant events. ... Blythe Katherine Danner (born February 3, 1943) is a prolific two time Emmy-winning American actress who has appeared in numerous stage, screen, and film roles. ... Edward Herrmann (born July 21, 1943) is an American television and film actor. ...


In an episode of the PBS series Jean Shepherd's America, the Chicago-born storyteller told of how he and his father (Jean Shepherd, Sr.) would watch Chicago White Sox games from the right field upper deck at Comiskey Park in the 1930s. On one occasion, the Sox were playing the Yankees, and Shepherd Sr. had been taunting Gehrig, yelling at him all day. In the top of the ninth, with Sox icon Ted Lyons holding a slim lead, Gehrig came up with a man on base, and Jean Jr.'s "old man" yelled in a voice that echoed around the ballpark, "Hit one up here, ya bum! I dare ya!" Gehrig did exactly that, hitting a screaming liner, practically into the senior Shepherd's lap, for the eventual game-winning home run. Shepherd's father was booed mercilessly, and he never again took junior Jean to a game. He apparently told this story originally when Gehrig's widow was in the audience at a speaking engagement.[51] Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Jean Shepherd posed as Frederick R. Ewing on the back cover of Ballantines I, Libertine (1956). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72 Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) (Chicago) White Stockings (1901-1903 *From 1900 to 1903, the official name did not contain the city name of Chicago... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Theodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was a Major League Baseball starting pitcher and manager. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... This is a list of the top 500 Major League Baseball home run hitters. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 In baseball, a player hits for the cycle when he hits a single, a double, a triple and a home run in the same game, though not necessarily in that order. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... Players denoted in boldface are are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... Players denoted in boldface are still actively contributing to the record noted. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Listed below are the 15 longest consecutive games played streaks in Major League Baseball history. ... Listed below are the 15 occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit four home runs in a single game. ... Listed below are the occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit three home runs in a single game. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c The Day He Retired, S. Kaden, 2003
  2. ^ a b Lou Gehrig. Britannica Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  3. ^ Lou Gehrig Grand Slams. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  4. ^ Frank Graham, Lou Gehrig: A Quiet Hero. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969.
  5. ^ Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  6. ^ All-Star Game History. Baseball Almanac (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-04.
  7. ^ a b White House Dream Team: Lou Gehrig. whitehouse.gov. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  8. ^ a b Robinson, Ray (1990). Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time. New York: W.W. Norton, pp. 30-31. ISBN 0393028577. 
  9. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, p. 44.
  10. ^ P.S. 132 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE. NYC Department of Education. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  11. ^ a b c Robinson, Ray. Lou Gehrig: Columbia Legend and American Hero. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  12. ^ a b William Kashatus, Lou Gehrig: A Biography. Westport CT: Greenwood Press, 2004.
  13. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, pp. 58–59.
  14. ^ a b c d e Lou Gehrig: BIOGRAPHY. lougehrig.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  15. ^ Kashatus, William (2004). Lou Gehrig: A Biography (Baseball's All-Time Greatest Hitters) (Hardcover). Greenwood Press. ISBN 0313328668. 
  16. ^ MVP BAseball Players. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on 2008-04-18.
  17. ^ a b Newman, Mark. Gehrig's shining legacy of courage. MLB.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-18.
  18. ^ a b c Lou Gehrig. The Idea Logical Company, Inc.. Retrieved on 2008-04-18.
  19. ^ Baseball's Unforgettable Games (1960, by Joe Reichler and Ben Olan
  20. ^ "Equinoctial Climax", Time magazine, October 5, 1936. Retrieved on 2007-12-17. 
  21. ^ "Mike Tilden English 15 Gregg Rogers 10/24/2002 September 11 Defines “American Hero”" . Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  22. ^ Davis, J.H. (1988). "[?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=info:tFte_3bGN7AJ:scholar.google.com/&output=viewport Fixing the Standard of Care: Motivated Athletes and Medical Malpractice]". American Journal of Trial Advocacy 12: 215. Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  23. ^ Greenberg, D.A.; Jin, K. (2004). "VEGF and ALS: the luckiest growth factor?". Trends in Molecular Medicine 10 (1): 1-3. doi:10.1016/j.molmed.2003.11.006. 
  24. ^ a b c d Malik, N. (2000). "Lou Gehrig's Disease: A Closer Look at the Genetic Basis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis". Pediatrics 3 (3). Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  25. ^ Bob Chick. "Spring Training In St. Petersburg — The Final Out", The Tampa Tribune, 2008-02-24. 
  26. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, p. 248.
  27. ^ Walling, A.D. (1999). "Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Lou Gehrig's disease.". Am Fam Physician 59 (6): 1489-96. Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  28. ^ a b Quotes about Lou Gehrig. lougehrig.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  29. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, pp. 251–253.
  30. ^ a b c d Eig, Jonathan (2005). Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0743245911. 
  31. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, p. 258.
  32. ^ Cardoso, R.M.F.; Thayer, M.M.; Didonato, M.; Lo, T.P.; Bruns, C.K.; Getzoff, E.D.; Tainer, J.A. (2002). "Insights into Lou Gehrig's Disease from the Structure and Instability of the A4V Mutant of Human Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase". Journal of Molecular Biology 324 (2): 247-256. doi:10.1016/S0022-2836(02)01090-2. 
  33. ^ Kaden, S. (2002). More About His ALS Battle. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  34. ^ a b c John Drebinger, "61,808 Fans Roar Tribute to Gehrig", The New York Times, July 5, 1939.
  35. ^ Belli, R.F.; Schuman, H. (1996). "The complexity of ignorance". Qualitative Sociology 19 (3): 423-430. Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  36. ^ Greenberger, R. (2003). Lou Gehrig. The Rosen Publishing Group. 
  37. ^ FAREWELL SPEECH (lougehrig.com). Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  38. ^ Henry Louis Gehrig. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc.. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc.. Retrieved on 2008-04-18.
  39. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, p. 266.
  40. ^ New York City Parole Commission history In appointing Gehrig as a Parole Commissioner, Mayor LaGuardia said, "I believe he will be not only a capable, intelligent commissioner but that he will be an inspiration and a hope to many of the younger boys who have gotten into trouble. Surely the misfortune of some of the young men will compare as something trivial with what Mr. Gehrig has so cheerfully and courageously faced." Gehrig continued to go regularly to his City Hall office until a month before his death.
  41. ^ Cleveland, D.W.; Rothstein, J.D. (2001). "From Charcot to Lou Gehrig: deciphering selective motor neuron death in ALS". Nat Rev Neurosci 2 (11): 806-19. Retrieved on 2008-04-17. 
  42. ^ "Gehrig, 'Iron Man' of Baseball, Dies at the age of 37", The New York Times, June 3, 1941.
  43. ^ Time magazine, June 16, 1941.
  44. ^ Innes, A.M.; Chudley, A.E. (1999). "Genetic landmarks through philately- Henry Louis'Lou' Gehrig and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis". Clinical Genetics 56 (6): 425-427. doi:10.1034/j.1399-0004.1999.560603.x. 
  45. ^ a b c d Achivements. lougehrig.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.
  46. ^ The record is held with 14 other players
  47. ^ The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award was created by the Phi Delta Theta fraternity in his honor and is given to players who best exemplify Gehrig's character and integrity both on and off the field. Since the award was created in 1955, the name of each winner has been placed on the Lou Gehrig Award plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.
  48. ^ Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
  49. ^ Robinson, Iron Horse: Lou Gehrig in His Time, pp. 231–232.
  50. ^ Lou Gehrig, Rawhide, and 1938. American Academy of Neurology (2006-07-13). Retrieved on 2008-04-22.
  51. ^ Partridge, Ernest. Jean Shepherd -- 1921-1999. Retrieved on 2008-04-16.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TIME redirects here. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tampa Tribune is one of two major newspapers published in the Tampa Bay area. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Listed below are the 15 occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit four home runs in a single game. ... The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is a award created by the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity to recognize the former Major League Baseball player Lou Gehrig. ... Cooperstown redirects here. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is a professional society for neurologists and neuroscientists. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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All-Star teams 19331939 19371940 1985 1999 2002 2007
Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... George Henry Burns (January 31, 1893 - January 7, 1978) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers (1924-1942). ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius SzymaÅ„ski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1930 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1931 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius SzymaÅ„ski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1931 throughout the world. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Edward James Delahanty (1867-1903) Edward James Delahanty (October 30, 1867 - July 2, 1903) was a Hall of Fame Major League Baseball player from 1888 to 1903. ... Listed below are the 15 occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit four home runs in a single game. ... Charles Herbert Klein (October 7, 1904 - March 28, 1958) was a Major League Baseball player who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1928-33, 1936-39, 1940-44), Chicago Cubs (1934-36) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1939). ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1934 throughout the world. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Solomon Buddy Myer (March 16, 1904 - October 31, 1974) was an American 2-time All-Star second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1925 to 1941. ... Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ... This article is about the player in baseball. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... For the Disney animator, see Cy Young (animator). ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent pitchers in Major League history. ... For other uses, see Bob Gibson (disambiguation). ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Warren Edward Spahn (April 23, 1921 – November 24, 2003) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 21 seasons, all in the National League. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Robert Moses Lefty Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... An infielder is a baseball player who plays on the infield, the dirt portion of a baseball diamond between first base and third base. ... Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is a former American baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963 in Pomona, California) is a former professional baseball player who played the majority of his major league career with the Oakland Athletics before finishing his career with the St. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Michael Jack Schmidt (born September 27, 1949 in Dayton, Ohio) is a former American professional baseball player who played his entire career for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... Brooks Calbert Robinson, Jr. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Ernest Ernie Banks (born January 31, 1931 in Dallas, Texas) is an American former Major League baseball player who played his entire career with the Chicago Cubs (1953-1971). ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... George Kenneth Griffey, Jr. ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The Major League Baseball All-Time Team were chosen in 1997 to comprise the top manager and top player in each of thirteen positional categories across Major League Baseball history. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman due to his superb speed and German heritage, was an American Major League Baseball shortstop who played in the NL from 1897 to 1917. ... Michael Jack Schmidt (born September 27, 1949 in Dayton, Ohio) is a former American professional baseball player who played his entire career for the Philadelphia Phillies. ... An infielder is a baseball player who plays on the infield, the dirt portion of a baseball diamond between first base and third base. ... Johnny Lee Bench (born December 7, 1947) is a former American baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds from 1967 to 1983, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest catchers in Major League Baseball history. ... The position of the catcher Catcher is also a general term for a fielder who catches the ball in cricket. ... Reverse side of a Paul Molitor baseball card Paul Leo Molitor (born August 22, 1956 in St. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Willie Howard Mays, Jr. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954 in Oakland, California), nicknamed Eck, was a Major League Baseball player elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004 (his first year of eligibility). ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... New York Yankees manager Joe Torre returning to the dugout (September 2005) In baseball, the head coach of a team is called the manager (or more formally, the field manager); this individual controls matters of team batting order to more closely communicate with baserunners, but most managers delegate this responsibility... The Most Valuable Player Award (commonly known as the MVP award) is an annual award given to one outstanding player in each league of Major League Baseball. ... Robert Moses Lefty Grove (March 6, 1900 - May 22, 1975) was one of the greatest pitchers in Major League Baseball history. ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers (1924-1942). ... Jimmie Foxx on the cover of Time in 1929 James Emory Foxx (October 22, 1907 – July 21, 1967) was an American first baseman in Major League Baseball who was, up until Mark McGwires glory days in the late 1990s, the most prolific right-handed power hitter to ever play... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Henry Benjamin Hank Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed Hammerin Hank, was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Joe Gordon can refer to different people: Joe Gordon, the American baseball player. ... Spurgeon Ferdinand Spud Chandler (September 12, 1907 - January 9, 1990) was an American right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the New York Yankees from 1937 through 1947. ... Harold Newhouser (May 20, 1921 – November 10, 1998) was a professional Major League Baseball pitcher of the 1940s and 1950s. ... Harold Newhouser (May 20, 1921 – November 10, 1998) was a professional Major League Baseball pitcher of the 1940s and 1950s. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Louis Boudreau (July 17, 1917 - August 10, 2001) was a Major League Baseball player and the American League MVP Award winner in 1948. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Robert Clayton Shantz, Morgan and Brads great uncle, (born September 26, 1925 in Pottstown, Pennsylvania) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1949-1954), Kansas City Athletics (1955-1956), New York Yankees (1957-1960), Pittsburgh Pirates (1961), Houston Colt . ... Albert Leonard Rosen (born February 29, 1924, in Spartanburg, South Carolina), nicknamed Al and Flip, was an American major league third baseman and right-handed slugger. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Jack Eugene Jensen (March 9, 1927 - July 14, 1982), born in San Francisco, California, was a Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the New York Yankees (1950-52), Washington Senators (1952-53) and Boston Red Sox (1954-59, 1961). ... Jacob Nelson Nellie Fox (December 25, 1927 – December 1, 1975) was a Major League Baseball second baseman for the Chicago White Sox and is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Brooks Calbert Robinson, Jr. ... Zoilo Casanova Versalles Rodriguez (December 18, 1939 - June 9, 1995) was a Cuban shortstop in Major League Baseball, considered to be a great fielder. ... This article is about the baseball player and manager. ... Carl Yastrzemskis number 8 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1989 Carl Michael Yaz Yastrzemski (pronounced ), i. ... Dennis Dale Denny McLain (born March 29, 1944, in Chicago, Illinois) is a former American professional baseball player. ... Harmon Clayton Killebrew (born June 29, 1936 in Payette, Idaho, United States) is a former Major League Baseball player and member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... John Wesley Powell (born August 17, 1941 in Lakeland, Florida) is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Baltimore Orioles (1961-74), Cleveland Indians (1975-76) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1977). ... Vida Rochelle Blue Jr. ... Dick Allen Richard Anthony Dick Allen (also sometimes known, especially in his earlier years, as Richie Allen, a nickname that he came to despise and attempt to disassociate himself from) (born March 8, 1942 in Wampum, Pennsylvania) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman/third baseman right-handed batter... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Jeffrey Alan (Jeff) Burroughs (born March 7, 1951 in Long Beach, California) is a former player in Major League Baseball. ... Frederic Michael Fred Lynn (born February 3, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who played for the Boston Red Sox (1974-80), California Angels (1981-84), Baltimore Orioles (1985-88), Detroit Tigers (1988-89) and San Diego Padres (1990). ... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Rodney Cline Rod Carew (born October 1, 1945), is a former Major League Baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels from 1967 to 1985. ... James Edward Jim Rice (born March 8, 1953, in Anderson, South Carolina) is a former baseball player who was with the American Leagues Boston, Red Sox from 1974 to 1989. ... Donald Edward Baylor (born June 28, 1949) is a Major League Baseball coach and a former player and manager. ... For the US Army Air Forces general during World War II, see George Brett (military). ... Roland Fingers giving his trademark handlebar moustache a twirl. ... Robin Rachel Yount (born September 16, 1955 in Danville, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the Milwaukee Brewers (1974-1994). ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Hernandez pitching for the Tigers Guillermo Hernandez Villanueva (Willie Hernández) (born November 14, 1954 in Aguada, Puerto Rico) is a former relief pitcher for the Chicago Cubs (1977-1983), Philadelphia Phillies (End of 1983), and the Detroit Tigers (1984-1989). ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent pitchers in Major League history. ... José Canseco y Capas, Jr. ... Robin Rachel Yount (born September 16, 1955 in Danville, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball player who spent his entire career with the Milwaukee Brewers (1974-1994). ... Rickey Henley Henderson (born December 25, 1958 in Chicago, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who is baseballs all-time leader in stolen bases[1] and runs scored. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Dennis Lee Eckersley (born October 3, 1954 in Oakland, California), nicknamed Eck, was a Major League Baseball player elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2004 (his first year of eligibility). ... Frank Edward Thomas (born May 27, 1968) is an American Major League Baseball player for the Toronto Blue Jays. ... Frank Edward Thomas (born May 27, 1968) is an American Major League Baseball player for the Toronto Blue Jays. ... [[:Template:Mlbretired]] Maurice Samuel Mo Vaughn (born December 15, 1967 in Norwalk, Connecticut), nicknamed Hit Dog, (a nickname given to him by his Omega Psi Phi fraternity brothers at Seton Hall University) was a Major League Baseball first baseman from 1991 to 2003. ... George Kenneth Griffey, Jr. ... Iván Rodríguez Torres (born November 30, 1971, in Manatí, Puerto Rico), nicknamed Pudge[1] and I-Rod[2], is a professional baseball player for the Detroit Tigers. ... Jason Gilbert Giambi (born January 8, 1971) is a Major League Baseball player who is the 1st baseman and designated hitter for the New York Yankees. ... Ichiro Suzuki ), often known simply as Ichiro ), (born October 22, 1973, in Toyoyama, Nishikasugai, Aichi Prefecture, Japan) is a Japanese outfielder for the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team. ... Miguel Odalis Tejada (born May 25, 1974 in Baní, Dominican Republic) is currently the shortstop of the Houston Astros Major League Baseball team. ... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Vladimir Alvino Guerrero (born February 9, 1976 in Don Gregorio, Nizao, Dominican Republic), nicknamed Vladdy, Super Vlad,Vlad The Impaler, Bad Vlad, and known in his native Dominican Republic as Miquéas (Spanish for Micah), is a Major League Baseball right fielder who plays for the Los Angeles Angels of... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Justin Ernest George Morneau (born on May 15, 1981 in New Westminster, British Columbia) is a Major League Baseball player. ... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four big games. ... Walter Esau Beall (July 29, 1899-January 28, 1959) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ... Pat Collins (born September 13, 1896-died May 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... Joe Dugan (b. ... Cedric Montgomery Durst (August 23, 1896 - February 16, 1971) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played between 1922 and 1930 for the St. ... Mike Gazella (October 13, 1895-September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... Joseph Oscar Giard (October 7, 1898 - July 10, 1956) was an American major league baseball player. ... John Patrick Grabowski (January 7, 1900 - May 23, 1946), nicknamed Nig, was a Major League Baseball catcher who played 7 seasons for the Chicago White Sox (1924-26), New York Yankees (1927-29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Mark Koenig (July 19, 1904 - April 22, 1993) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... William Wilcy Cy Moore (May 20, 1897 - March 29, 1963) was a former professional baseball player. ... Raymond Anderson Morehart (December 2, 1899 - December 2, 1989) was an American major league baseball player. ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Benjamin Edwin Paschal (October 13, 1895 - November 10, 1974) born in Enterprise, Alabama was an Outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1915), Boston Red Sox (1920) and New York Yankees (1924-29). ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... Walter Henry Ruether (September 29, 1893-May 16, 1970) was an American baseball player who pitched for five different Major League teams. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 - December 31, 1980) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1913 to 1927. ... Urban James Shocker (August 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockor, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. ... Myles Lewis Thomas (October 22, 1897 - December 12, 1963) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Julian Valentine Wera (February 9, 1902 in Winona, Minnesota – December 12, 1975 in Rochester, Minnesota) was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the New York Yankees. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... In the 1928 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the St. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ... George Henry Burns (January 31, 1893 - January 7, 1978) was a first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Pat Collins (born September 13, 1896-died May 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball player in Major League Baseball. ... Stanley Anthony Coveleski (Kowalewski) (July 13, 1889 - March 20, 1984) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1910s and 1920s. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Joe Dugan (b. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Cedric Montgomery Durst (August 23, 1896 - February 16, 1971) was an outfielder in Major League Baseball who played between 1922 and 1930 for the St. ... Mike Gazella (October 13, 1895-September 11, 1978) was an American major league baseball player who played for the New York Yankees on several championship teams in the 1920s. ... John Patrick Grabowski (January 7, 1900 - May 23, 1946), nicknamed Nig, was a Major League Baseball catcher who played 7 seasons for the Chicago White Sox (1924-26), New York Yankees (1927-29) and Detroit Tigers (1931). ... Frederick Amos Heimach (January 27, 1901 - June 1, 1973) born in Camden, New Jersey, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1920-26), Boston Red Sox (1926), New York Yankees (1928-29) and Brooklyn Robins/Brooklyn Dodgers (1930-33). ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Mark Koenig (July 19, 1904 - April 22, 1993) is a former shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... William Wilcy Cy Moore (May 20, 1897 - March 29, 1963) was a former professional baseball player. ... Robert William Bob Meusel (July 19, 1896 – November 28, 1977) was an American Major League Baseball outfielder who played eleven seasons between the years 1920 and 1930, all but one season for the New York Yankees. ... Benjamin Edwin Paschal (October 13, 1895 - November 10, 1974) born in Enterprise, Alabama was an Outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1915), Boston Red Sox (1920) and New York Yankees (1924-29). ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... James Robert Shawkey (December 4, 1890 - December 31, 1980) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and New York Yankees from 1913 to 1927. ... Urban James Shocker (August 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockor, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. ... Myles Lewis Thomas (October 22, 1897 - December 12, 1963) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Jonathan Thompson Walton Zachary (born May 7, 1896 Graham, NC - died January 24, 1969 Burlington, NC) was a pitcher who had a 19 year career from 1918 to 1936. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... Lynford Hobart (Lyn) Lary (January 28, 1906 - January 9, 1973) was a shortstop in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (The Crow) (born October 4, 1910 in San Francisco, CA - died February 11, 2002 in Stockton, CA) was an infielder for the New York Yankees for his entire career. ... William Benjamin Chapman (December 25, 1908, Nashville, Tennessee - July 7, 1993, Hoover, Alabama) was an outfielder, pitcher, manager and coach in American Major League Baseball. ... Otto Hamlin Saltzgaver (January 23, 1903 - February 1, 1978) was a United States Major League Baseball player from 1932 to 1937 for the New York Yankees and again in 1945 for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Card #78 from the 1991 Charles M. Conlon The Sporting News set   Arndt Ludwig (Art) Jorgens (May 18, 1905 - March 1, 1980) was a catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1929-1939). ... Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Edwin Lee Wells (June 7, 1900 - May 1, 1986), nicknamed Satchelfoot [1], was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played 11 seasons in the major leagues with the Detroit Tigers (1923-1927), New York Yankees (1929-1932), and St. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Daniel Knowles (Danny) MacFayden (June 10, 1905 - August 26, 1972) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... John Thomas Allen (September 30, 1905 - March 29, 1959) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, St. ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ... Joseph Wheeler Sewell (October 9, 1898 - March 6, 1990) was a Major League Baseball infielder for the Cleveland Indians and New York Yankees. ... Edward Stephen Farrell (December 26, 1901 - December 20, 1966) was an utility infielder in Major League Baseball, playing mainly as a shortstop between 1925 and 1935 for the New York Giants (1925-1927[start], 1929[end]), Boston Braves (1927[end]-1929[start]), St. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... Samuel Dewey Byrd (October 15, 1906 – May 11, 1981) was an American professional baseball player and professional golfer. ... Joseph Charles (Joe) Glenn (November 19, 1908 - May 6, 1985) was a backup catcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees (1932-33, 1935-38), St. ... Myril Hoag (March 9, 1908 - July 28, 1971) was a major league outfielder for the New York Yankees, along with a few other teams. ... 1933 Tattoo Orbit R305 baseball card Ivy Paul Andrews (May 6, 1907 - November 24, 1970) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Allen Lindsey Cooke (June 23, 1907 - November 21, 1987) was an American outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for three different teams between 1930 and 1938. ... Edward David Phillips (February 17, 1901 - January 26, 1968) born in Worcester, Massachusetts was a Catcher for the Boston Braves (1924), Detroit Tigers (1929), Pittsburgh Pirates (1931), New York Yankees (1932), Washington Senators (1934) and Cleveland Indians (1935). ... Le Roy John Schalk (born November 9, 1908, in Chicago, Illinois; died March 11, 1990, in Gainesville, Texas) was an American major league baseball player. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1936 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the New York Giants, with the Yankees winning in 6 games to earn their fifth championship. ... Roy Cleveland Johnson (February 23, 1903 - September 10, 1973) was a left fielder/right fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Detroit Tigers (1929-32), Boston Red Sox (1932-35), New York Yankees (1936-37) and Boston Bees (1937-38). ... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... George Alexander Selkirk (January 4, 1908 - January 19, 1987) was a Canadian outfielder and front office executive in Major League Baseball. ... Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (The Crow) (born October 4, 1910 in San Francisco, CA - died February 11, 2002 in Stockton, CA) was an infielder for the New York Yankees for his entire career. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... Alvin Jacob Powell (July 15, 1908 - November 4, 1948) born in Silver Spring, Maryland was an outfielder for the Washington Senators (1930, 1934-36 and 1943-45), New York Yankees (1936-40) and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Irving Darius Hadley (July 5, 1904 - February 15, 1963) born in Lynn, Massachusetts is a former professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues for the Washington Senators (1926-31 and 1935), Chicago White Sox (1932), St. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Montgomery Marcellus (Monte) Pearson (September 2, 1908 - January 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians (1932-1935), New York Yankees (1936-1940) and Cincinnati Reds (1941). ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ... Pat Malone also known as Perce Leigh Malone (born September 25, 1902, died May 13, 1943) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1937 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees and the New York Giants in a rematch of the 1936 Series. ... Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (The Crow) (born October 4, 1910 in San Francisco, CA - died February 11, 2002 in Stockton, CA) was an infielder for the New York Yankees for his entire career. ... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... George Alexander Selkirk (January 4, 1908 - January 19, 1987) was a Canadian outfielder and front office executive in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... Alvin Jacob Powell (July 15, 1908 - November 4, 1948) born in Silver Spring, Maryland was an outfielder for the Washington Senators (1930, 1934-36 and 1943-45), New York Yankees (1936-40) and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Myril Hoag (March 9, 1908 - July 28, 1971) was a major league outfielder for the New York Yankees, along with a few other teams. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Irving Darius Hadley (July 5, 1904 - February 15, 1963) born in Lynn, Massachusetts is a former professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues for the Washington Senators (1926-31 and 1935), Chicago White Sox (1932), St. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Montgomery Marcellus (Monte) Pearson (September 2, 1908 - January 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians (1932-1935), New York Yankees (1936-1940) and Cincinnati Reds (1941). ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ... 1933 Tattoo Orbit R305 baseball card Ivy Paul Andrews (May 6, 1907 - November 24, 1970) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Kemp Caswell Wicker (born as Kemp Caswell Whicker August 13, 1906, in Kernersville, North Carolina; died June 11, 1973) was an American major league baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers from 1936-1941. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The 1938 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Chicago Cubs, with the Yankees sweeping the Series in 4 games for their record third straight championship and the 7th in their history. ... Frank Peter Joseph Crosetti (The Crow) (born October 4, 1910 in San Francisco, CA - died February 11, 2002 in Stockton, CA) was an infielder for the New York Yankees for his entire career. ... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... George Alexander Selkirk (January 4, 1908 - January 19, 1987) was a Canadian outfielder and front office executive in Major League Baseball. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Joe Gordon can refer to different people: Joe Gordon, the American baseball player. ... Alvin Jacob Powell (July 15, 1908 - November 4, 1948) born in Silver Spring, Maryland was an outfielder for the Washington Senators (1930, 1934-36 and 1943-45), New York Yankees (1936-40) and Philadelphia Phillies (1945). ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Myril Hoag (March 9, 1908 - July 28, 1971) was a major league outfielder for the New York Yankees, along with a few other teams. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Montgomery Marcellus (Monte) Pearson (September 2, 1908 - January 27, 1978) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians (1932-1935), New York Yankees (1936-1940) and Cincinnati Reds (1941). ... Thomas David (Tommy) Henrich (born February 20, 1913 in Massillon, Ohio) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the New York Yankees (1937-42, 1946-50). ... John Joseph Murphy (July 14, 1908 - January 14, 1970), nicknamed Fordham Johnny and Grandma, was a hugely successful American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball (1932, 1934-43, 1946-47) who later became a front office executive in the game. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Whitey Fords number 16 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1974 Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Pitcher Ron Guidry Ronald Ames Guidry (Louisiana Lightning and Gator) (born August 28, 1950 in Lafayette, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The New York Yankees have a long history filled with many high points, milestones, and championships. ... This is a list of seasons completed by the New York Yankees baseball club of Major League Baseball. ... // Batting Average: Babe Ruth (.349) On-base percentage: Babe Ruth (.484) Slugging Percentage: Babe Ruth (.711) OPS: Babe Ruth (1. ... The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the New York Yankees franchise. ... Owners, executives, and managers of MLBs New York Yankees, with individuals who have been elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame indicated with a β. Current personnel are indicated in bold. ... TV: YES Network and WWOR-TV 9 in New York Radio: WCBS 880AM in New York and the New York Yankees Radio Network // Mel Allen, 1939-1940, 1942, 1946-1964 (WPIX), 1981-1986 (SportsChannel), (Ford Frick Award winner) Red Barber, 1954-1966 (WPIX), (Ford Frick Award winner) Joe E. Brown... Oriole Park at Camden Yards is a Major League Baseball stadium located in Baltimore, Maryland which was constructed to replace the aging Memorial Stadium. ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their... This page is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... This article is about the home of the New York Mets. ... New Yankee Stadium is the new ballpark for the New York Yankees, currently under construction. ... Filip Bondys book on the Bleacher Creatures The Bleacher Creatures are a notorious group of season ticket holders who occupy Section 39 in the right field bleachers at Yankee Stadium. ... Babe Ruth — The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino (1918-2004) was a superstition cited, often jokingly, as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series in the 86 year period from 1918 until 2004. ... The entrance to the monuments and plaques, at the end of the retired numbers display. ... This article is about the New York Yankees and former New York Giants announcer. ... Old-Timers Day (or Old-Timers Game) generally refers to a tradition in Major League Baseball of a team, especially the New York Yankees, devoting the afternoon preceding a weekend afternoon game to celebrate the baseball-related accomplishments of its former players who have since retired. ... Murderers’ Row is also the title of a 1962 novel by Donald Hamilton and a 1966 motion picture, Murderers’ Row, based on the book starring Dean Martin as secret agent Matt Helm. ... Babe Ruths Called Shot refers to the home run hit by Babe Ruth in the fifth inning of game 3 on October 1, 1932. ... Dandy was a shortlived mascot of the New York Yankees. ... The baseball bat used by Kansas City Royals third baseman George Brett in the Pine Tar Incident on July 24, 1983. ... Freddy Cocksucker Schuman, better known as Freddy Sez or Freddy Sez, is a New Yorker and supporter of the New York Yankees, known for his activities in promoting the team and encouraging fan participation. ... Jeffrey (Jeff) Maier (born September 24, 1984) is an intern scout for the Milwaukee Brewers baseball team, but is best known for an incident involving him as a young fan: for deflecting a ball in play during Game 1 of the 1996 American League Championship Series between the New York... George Louis Costanza is a fictional character in the United States-based television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Jason Alexander. ... Here Come the Yankees is the official theme song of the New York Yankees baseball team. ... Theme from New York, New York (or New York, New York) is the theme song from the Martin Scorsese film New York, New York (1977), where it was introduced by Liza Minnelli. ... Haya Doin? was a series of unofficial New York Yankees sports anthems produced and voiced by Carmine Famiglietti and Joseph Summa from 1999 - 2001. ... The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry is one of the longest and the most bitter rivalries in professional sports. ... The Yankees-Mets rivalry is the latest incarnation of the Subway Series, the Major League Baseball competition between the New York City professional baseball crosstown rivals, between the New York Yankees of the American League and the New York Mets of the National League. ... This rivalry began in the 1941 World Series when Dodgers catcher Mickey Owens dropped third strike of a sharply breaking curveball (a suspected spitball) pitched by Hugh Casey in the 9th inning of Game 4. ... The program for the 1936 Subway Series. The Subway Series is a series of Major League Baseball games played between teams based in New York City. ... Jack Chesbro on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees. ... Miller James Huggins (March 27, 1879 – September 25, 1929), nicknamed Mighty Mite, was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Earle Bryan Combs (May 14, 1899 - July 21, 1976) was an American center fielder in Major League Baseball whose whole career was spent playing for the New York Yankees (1924‑1935). ... Anthony Michael Tony Lazzeri (December 6, 1903 — August 6, 1946) was an American Major League Baseball player during the 1920s and 1930s, predominantly with the New York Yankees. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Charles Herbert Red Ruffing (May 3, 1904 - February 17, 1986) was a Major League Baseball pitcher most remembered for his time with the highly successful New York Yankees teams of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... Joseph Vincent McCarthy (April 21, 1887 - January 13, 1978) was an American manager in Major League Baseball, most renowned for his leadership of the Bronx Bombers teams of the New York Yankees from 1931 to 1946. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ... Victor John Angelo Vic Raschi (March 28, 1919-October 14, 1988) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Allie Pierce Reynolds (February 10, 1917 _ December 26, 1994) (known as the Superchief) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Donald James Larsen (born August 7, 1929 in Michigan City, Indiana) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for 14 seasons. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... Whitey Fords number 16 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1974 Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Robert Clinton Richardson (born August 19, 1935, in Sumter, South Carolina) is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees from 1955 through 1966. ... William Joseph Moose Skowron Jr. ... Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Joseph Anthony Pepitone (born October 9, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and outfielder for the New York Yankees (1962-1969), Houston Astros (1970), Chicago Cubs (1970-1973) and the Atlanta Braves (1973). ... Roy Hilton White (born December 27, 1943 in Los Angeles, California, California) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Yankees between 1965 and 1979. ... Bobby Ray Murcer (born May 20, 1946, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) was a professional baseball player for 17 seasons. ... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Graig Nettles (born August 20, 1944, in San Diego, California) (nicknamed Puff) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman and left-handed batter who played for the Minnesota Twins (1967-69), Cleveland Indians (1970-72), New York Yankees (1973-83), San Diego Padres (1984-86), Atlanta Braves (1987) and... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Pitcher Ron Guidry Ronald Ames Guidry (Louisiana Lightning and Gator) (born August 28, 1950 in Lafayette, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ... Willie Larry Randolph (born July 6, 1954, in Holly Hill, South Carolina) is the current manager of the New York Mets and a former Major League Baseball player for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland Athletics, Milwaukee Brewers, and New York Mets. ... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Richard Michael Goose Gossage (born July 5, 1951, in Colorado Springs, Colorado) is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... David Allan Righetti (born November 28, 1958 in San Jose, California), nicknamed Rags, is an American former left-handed pitcher, and current pitching coach, in Major League Baseball. ... David Mark Winfield (born October 3, 1951, in St. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... Bernabé Bernie Williams Figueroa (born September 13, 1968, in San Juan, Puerto Rico) is a Major League Baseball outfielder and a guitar-playing jazz recording artist. ... For other persons named Paul ONeill, see Paul ONeill (disambiguation). ... Andrew Eugene Pettitte (born June 15, 1972 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American left-handed starting pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... David Brian Cone (born January 2, 1963 in Kansas City, Missouri) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball player and the current manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. ... Derek Sanderson Jeter (born June 26, 1974 in Pequannock, New Jersey) is an American Major League Baseball player. ... Mariano Rivera (born November 29, 1969, in Panama City, Panama) is a professional baseball player. ... Constantino Tino Martinez (born December 7, 1967 in Tampa, Florida) is a retired first baseman in Major League Baseball. ... Jorge Rafael Posada Villeta (born August 17, 1971 in Santurce, Puerto Rico) is a switch-hitting catcher and 6-time All Star who plays for the New York Yankees. ... This article is about David Wells, American baseball player. ... Third Baseman Scott Brosius Scott David Brosius (born August 15, 1966 in Hillsboro, OR) was a Major League Baseball third baseman for the Oakland Athletics (1991-1997) and the New York Yankees (1998-2001). ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio), is a starting pitcher for the New York Yankees, and is one of the preeminent pitchers in Major League history. ... Michael Cole (Mike) Mussina (born December 8, 1968 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania), nicknamed Moose, is a Major League starting pitcher, currently with the New York Yankees. ... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Hideki Godzilla Matsui , born June 12, 1974) is a Japanese Major League Baseball left fielder who plays for the New York Yankees. ... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... William Malcolm Dickey (June 6, 1907 - November 12, 1993) was a Major League Baseball player and manager. ... Roger Eugene Maris (September 10, 1934 – December 14, 1985) was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who is primarily remembered for breaking Babe Ruths single-season home run record in 1961, a record that would stand for 37 years. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Whitey Fords number 16 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1974 Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... Donald Arthur Mattingly (nicknamed Donnie Baseball and The Hit Man) (born April 20, 1961) is a retired first baseman who played for the New York Yankees of the American League from 1982-1995. ... Elston Gene Howard (February 23, 1929-December 14, 1980) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Pitcher Ron Guidry Ronald Ames Guidry (Louisiana Lightning and Gator) (born August 28, 1950 in Lafayette, Louisiana) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Brian Cashman is the Senior Vice-President and General Manager of the New York Yankees. ... Joseph Elliot Girardi (born October 14, 1964 in Peoria, Illinois) is a former catcher in Major League Baseball, for the Chicago Cubs, the Colorado Rockies, New York Yankees, and St. ... The New York Yankees beat the New York Giants in 6 games. ... In the 1927 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the Pittsburgh Pirates in four big games. ... In the 1928 World Series, the New York Yankees swept the St. ... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ... The 1936 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the New York Giants, with the Yankees winning in 6 games to earn their fifth championship. ... The 1937 World Series featured the defending champion New York Yankees and the New York Giants in a rematch of the 1936 Series. ... The 1938 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Chicago Cubs, with the Yankees sweeping the Series in 4 games for their record third straight championship and the 7th in their history. ... The 1939 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Cincinnati Reds, who were making their first Series appearance since the scandal-tainted 1919 World Series. ... The 1941 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in five games to capture their fifth title in six years, and their ninth overall. ... The 1943 World Series matched the defending champion St. ... The 1947 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning the Series in 7 games for their first title since 1943, and the 11th championship in team history. ... The 1949 World Series featured the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in five games for their second defeat of the Dodgers in three years, and the 12th championship in team history. ... The 1950 World Series matched the defending champion New York Yankees against the Philadelphia Phillies. ... The 1951 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the New York Giants, who had won the National League pennant in a thrilling three-game playoff with the Brooklyn Dodgers on a legendary home run by Bobby Thomson (the Shot Heard Round the World). ... The 1952 World Series featured the three-time defending champion New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in 7 games for their fourth straight title – tying the mark they set between 1936 and 1939 – and the 15th in their history, and their third defeat of the... The 1953 World Series matched the four-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers in a rematch of the 1952 Series. ... The 1956 World Series of Major League Baseball was played between the New York Yankees (representing the American League) and the defending champion Brooklyn Dodgers (representing the National League) during the month of October 1956. ... In a rematch of the 1957 Series, the 1958 World Series matched the defending champion Milwaukee Braves against the New York Yankees. ... The 1961 World Series of baseball matched the New York Yankees (109-53) against the Cincinnati Reds (93-61), with the Yankees winning in 5 games to earn their 19th championship in the last 39 seasons. ... The 1962 World Series matched the defending champion New York Yankees against the San Francisco Giants, who had won their first NL pennant since moving from New York in 1958, defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in a three-game playoff. ... 1977 World Series Logo The 1977 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first title since 1962, and their 21st overall. ... 1978 World Series Logo The 1978 World Series matched the defending champion New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers in a rematch of the 1977 Series, with the Yankees winning in six games to repeat as champions. ... The 1996 World Series matched the defending champion Atlanta Braves against the New York Yankees, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first championship since 1978, and their 23rd overall. ... Dates October 17, 1998–October 21, 1998 MVP Scott Brosius (New York) Television network FOX Announcers Joe Buck, Tim McCarver, and Bob Brenly Umpires Rich Garcia (AL), Jerry Crawford (NL), Tim Tschida (AL), Dana DeMuth (NL), Dale Scott (AL), Mark Hirschbeck (NL) The 1998 World Series matched the New York... Dates October 23, 1999–October 27, 1999 MVP Mariano Rivera (New York) Television network NBC Announcers Bob Costas and Joe Morgan Umpires Randy Marsh (NL), Derryl Cousins (AL), Gerry Davis (NL), Rocky Roe (AL), Steve Rippley (NL), Jim Joyce (AL) The 1999 World Series matched the defending champion New York... Dates October 21, 2000–October 26, 2000 MVP Derek Jeter (New York Yankees) Television network FOX Announcers Joe Buck, Tim McCarver, and Bob Brenly Umpires Ed Montague, Jerry Crawford, Tim McClelland, Tim Welke, Charlie Reliford, Jeff Kellogg MTA logo for the 2000 Subway Series. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1932 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1938 throughout the world. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1941 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1947 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1950 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1951 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1952 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1953 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1955 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... September 30 Chicago White Sox pitcher Jim Derrington becomes the youngest pitcher in modern history to start a game. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1957 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1958 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1960 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1961 throughout the world. ... The following are the events of the year 1962 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the events of the year 1963 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1964 throughout the world. ... The 1976 American League Championship Series was won by the New York Yankees, who defeated the Kansas City Royals 3-2. ... The 1977 American League Championship Series was a 5-game series played between October 5 and October 9, 1957, at Yankee Stadium (Games 1-2), and Royals Stadium (3-5). ... The 1978 American League Championship Series was held between the New York Yankees and the Kansas City Royals. ... The 1981 American League Championship Series was a best-of-five series between the New York Yankees and the Oakland Athletics. ... The 1996 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 1996 American League playoffs, matched the Eastern Division champion New York Yankees against the Wild Card champion Baltimore Orioles. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The 1999 American League Championship Series was a matchup between the Eastern Division Champion New York Yankees (98-64) and the Wild Card Boston Red Sox (94-68). ... The 2000 American League Championship Series was a matchup between the Eastern Division Champion New York Yankees and the Wild Card Champion Seattle Mariners. ... The 2001 American League Championship Series was a rematch of the 2000 ALCS between the New York Yankees, who had come off a dramatic comeback against the Oakland Athletics in the Division Series after being down two games to zero, and the Seattle Mariners, who won an American League record... The 2003 American League Championship Series was played between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees from October 8 to October 16, 2003. ... The 1901 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 5th in the American League with a record of 68 wins and 65 losses. ... The 1902 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 50 wins and 88 losses. ... The 1903 New York Highlanders season involved the Baltimore Orioles relocating to New York City. ... The 1904 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a record of 92 wins and 59 losses, finishing 2nd in the American League. ... The 1905 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a record of 71 wins and 78 losses, finishing 6th in the American League. ... The 1906 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 90 wins and 61 losses, coming in 2nd in the American League. ... The 1907 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 70 wins and 78 losses, coming in 5th in the American League. ... The 1908 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 51 wins and 103 losses, coming in 8th in the American League. ... The 1909 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 74 wins and 77 losses, coming in 5th in the American League. ... The 1910 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 88 wins and 63 losses, coming in 2nd in the American League. ... The 1911 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 76 wins and 76 losses, coming in 6th in the American League. ... The 1912 New York Highlanders season was the tenth and final season for the Highlanders, before evolving into the New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (Since 1901) None (Since 1969) 1913 Uniform Location Polo Grounds (Since 1913) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1913 Information Owner(s) Manager(s) Frank Chance Local television Local radio The 1913 New York Yankees season saw the conclusion of the New York Highlanders... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... Major league affiliations American League (Since 1901) (none until 1969) (Since [[ in baseball|]]) 1921 Uniform Location Polo Grounds (Since 1913) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1921 Information Owner(s) Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The 1921 New York Yankees season was the twentieth... Major league affiliations American League (Since 1901) 1922 Uniform Location Polo Grounds (Since 1913) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1922 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert and Tillinghast LHommedieu Huston Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The 1922 New York Yankees season was the... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1923 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert and Tillinghast LHommedieu Huston Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The 1923 New York Yankees was the 23rd season for this American League franchise and 21st season... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1924 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1924 season was their 22nd season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1925 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1925 season was their 23rd season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1926 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1926 season was their 24th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1927 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1927 season was their 25th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1928 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1928 season was their 26th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1929 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Miller Huggins and Art Fletcher Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1929 season was their 27th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1930 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Bob Shawkey Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1930 season was their 28th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1931 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1931 season was their 29th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1932 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1932 season was their 30th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1933 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1933 season was their 31st season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1934 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1934 season was their 32nd season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1935 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1935 season was their 33rd season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1936 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1936 season was their 34th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1937 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1937 season was their 35th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1938 Information Owner(s) Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1938 season was their 36th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1939 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1939 season was their 37th season. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1940 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1940 season was the 38th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1941 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1941 season was the 39th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1942 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1942 season was the 40th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1943 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1943 season was the 41st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1944 Information Owner(s) Estate of Jacob Ruppert Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1944 season was the 42nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1945 Information Owner(s) Larry MacPhail, Dan Topping, and Del Webb Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1945 season was the 43rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1946 Information Owner(s) Larry MacPhail, Dan Topping, and Del Webb Manager(s) Joe McCarthy Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1946 season was the 44th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1947 Information Owner(s) Larry MacPhail, Dan Topping, and Del Webb Manager(s) Bucky Harris Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1947 season was the 45th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1948 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Bucky Harris Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1948 season was the 46th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1949 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1949 season was the 47th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1950 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio The New York Yankees 1950 season was the 48th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1951 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1951 season was the 49th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1952 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1952 season was the 50th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1953 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1953 season was the 51st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1954 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1954 season was the 52nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1955 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1955 season was the 53rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1956 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1956 season was the 54th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1957 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1957 season was the 55th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1958 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1958 season was the 56th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1959 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1959 season was the 57th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1960 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Casey Stengel Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1960 season was the 58th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1961 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1961 season was the 59th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1962 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1962 season was the 60th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1963 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1963 season was the 61st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1964 Information Owner(s) Dan Topping and Del Webb Manager(s) Yogi Berra Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1964 season was the 62nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1965 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Johnny Keane Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1965 season was the 63rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1966 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Johnny Keane and Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1966 season was the 64th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1967 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1967 season was the 65th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1968 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1968 season was the 66th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1969 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1969 season was the 67th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1970 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1970 season was the 68th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1971 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1971 season was the 69th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1972 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1972 season was the 70th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1973 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Ralph Houk Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1973 season was the 71st season for the Yankees. ... Location Shea Stadium (Since 1974) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1974 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Bill Virdon Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1974 season was the 72nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Shea Stadium (Since 1974) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1975 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Bill Virdon Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1975 season was the 73rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1976 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Billy Martin Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1976 season was the 74th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1977 Information Owner(s) CBS Manager(s) George Steinbrenner Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1977 season was the 75th season for the Yankees. ... The New York Yankees 1978 season was the 76th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1979 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Bob Lemon and Billy Martin Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1979 season was the 77th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1980 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Dick Howser Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1980 season was the 78th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1981 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Gene Michael and Bob Lemon Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1981 season was the 79th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1982 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Gene Michael and Bob Lemon and Clyde King Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1982 season was the 80th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1983 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Billy Martin Local television none Local radio none The New York Yankees 1983 season was the 81st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1984 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Yogi Berra Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1984 season was the 82nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1985 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Yogi Berra and Billy Martin Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1985 season was the 83rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1986 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Lou Piniella Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1986 season was the 84th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1987 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Lou Piniella Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1987 season was the 85th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1988 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Lou Piniella and Billy Martin Local television WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1988 season was the 86th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1989 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Dallas Green and Bucky Dent Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1989 season was the 87th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1990 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Stump Merrill and Bucky Dent Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1990 season was the 88th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1991 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Stump Merrill Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1991 season was the 89th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1992 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Buck Showalter Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1992 season was the 90th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1993 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Buck Showalter Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio The New York Yankees 1993 season was the 91st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1994 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Buck Showalter Local television MSG Network WPIX Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1994 season was the 92nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1995 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Buck Showalter Local television MSG Network WPIX (WB 11) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1995 season was the 93rd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1996 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WPIX (WB 11) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1996 season was the 94th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1997 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WPIX (WB 11) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1997 season was the 95th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1998 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WPIX (WB 11) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1998 season was the 96th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 1999 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WNYW (Fox) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 1999 season was the 97th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2000 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WNYW (Fox) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 2000 season was the 98th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2001 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television MSG Network WNYW (Fox) Local radio WABC-AM The New York Yankees 2001 season was the 99th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2002 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television YES Network Local radio WCBS (AM) The New York Yankees 2002 season was the 100th season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2003 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television YES Network Local radio WCBS (AM) The New York Yankees 2003 season was the 101st season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2004 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television YES Network Local radio WCBS (AM) The New York Yankees 2004 season was the 102nd season for the Yankees. ... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1976) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2005 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television YES Network Local radio WCBS (AM) The New York Yankees 2005 season was the 103rd season for the Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (Since 1901) Eastern Division (Since 1969) 2006 Uniform Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York City, New York (Since 1903) 2006 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local Television YES Network Local Radio WCBS (AM) The New York Yankees 2006 season involved... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York, New York (Since 1903) 2007 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Torre Local television YES Network WWOR (My 9) Local radio WCBS (AM) WQBU-FM (Spanish) The New York Yankees 2007 season was the Yankees 105th in New York and their... Location Yankee Stadium (Since 1923) New York, New York (Since 1903) 2008 Information Owner(s) George Steinbrenner Manager(s) Joe Girardi Local television YES Network WWOR (My 9) Local radio WCBS (AM) WQBU-FM (Spanish) The 2008 New York Yankees season will be the 106th season for the New York... League International League Division North Year founded 1989 Major League affiliation New York Yankees Home ballpark PNC Field Previous home ballparks City Moosic, Pennsylvania Current uniform colors Navy Blue, Grey, White Previous uniform colors Red, Blue, White Logo design Baseball bat and Uncle Sam hat with the Yankees wordmark centered... Class-Level Double-A (1995-Present) Minor League affiliations Eastern League (1995-Present) Northern Major League affiliations New York Yankees (2003-present) Boston Red Sox (1995-2003) Detroit Tigers (1993-1995) Name Trenton Thunder (1994-present) London Tigers (1989-1993) Ballpark Mercer County Waterfront Park (1994-Present) Labatt Memorial Park... New York Yankees American League AAA Columbus Clippers AA Trenton Thunder A Charleston RiverDogs Tampa Yankees Staten Island Yankees R Gulf Coast Yankees The Tampa Yankees are a minor league baseball team based in Tampa, Florida. ... League South Atlantic League Division South Year founded 1886 Major League affiliation New York Yankees Home ballpark Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... The Staten Island Yankees are a minor league baseball team, located in Staten Island, New York. ... New York Yankees American League AAA Columbus Clippers AA Trenton Thunder A Charleston RiverDogs Tampa Yankees Staten Island Yankees R Gulf Coast Yankees The Gulf Coast Yankees are the R minor league affiliate of the New York Yankees. ... The Yankees Entertainment and Sports (YES) Network is a New York City regional cable TV channel dedicated to broadcasting baseball games of the New York Yankees, and basketball games of the New Jersey Nets. ... Yankee Global Enterprises LLC (Yankee Global) was formed in 1999, and is the owner of the New York Yankees baseball club and the YES Network cable channel. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ... Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... George Sisler Michael Allen Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ... Charles Comiskey baseball card, 1887 Charles Albert Comiskey (August 15, 1859 - October 26, 1931) was a Major League Baseball player, manager and team owner. ... Candy Cummings William Arthur Candy Cummings (October 18, 1848 - May 16, 1924) was a 19th century professional baseball pitcher in the National Association and National League. ... Buck Ewing William Buckingham Buck Ewing (October 17, 1859 - October 20, 1906) was a 19th century Major League Baseball player and manager, and is widely regarded as the best catcher of his era and is often argued to be the best player of the 19th century. ... Charles Radbourn on a 1887-1890 Goodwin & Company baseball card (Old Judge (N172)). Charles Gardner Radbourn (December 11, 1854 - February 5, 1897), nicknamed Old Hoss, was a pitcher in Major League Baseball prior to the turn of the 20th century. ... Al Spaldings sporting goods company made a lasting impact on baseball. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... Robert Abial Red Rolfe (October 17, 1908 – July 8, 1969) was an American third baseman, manager and front-office executive in Major League Baseball. ... Ronald (born August 19, 1960) is a former right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the New York Mets, Oakland Athletics and Montreal Expos. ... Bradley David Ausmus (born April 14, 1969, in New Haven, Connecticut) is an American 3-time Gold Glove Award winning catcher in Major League Baseball with the Houston Astros. ... Michael John Remlinger (born March 23, 1966 in Middletown, New York) is a relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who is currently without a team after being released by th the Boston Red Sox. ... Christopher Ryan Young (born May 25, 1979 in Dallas, Texas, United States)[1] is an American Major League Baseball player who debuted on August 24, 2004 for the Texas Rangers of the American League. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Yale redirects here. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42, Shea Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964-present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league titles World... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bengals, The Tigs, Motor City Kitties Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1940 throughout the world. ... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 7 - Outfielder Lou Brock and knuckleballer Hoyt Wilhelm are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1999 throughout the world. ... This year in baseball: 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 8 - Ozzie Smith is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2007 throughout the world. ...

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Gift Planning - The ALS Association (728 words)
Among ALSA’s most valued supporters, members of The Lou Gehrig Legacy Society have determined that their legacy will be one of hope – hope that a cure for ALS will be found and that those living with ALS across the country will have quick and easy access to vital patient services.
On behalf of the 30,000 Americans living with ALS, it is our privilege to invite you to become a member of The Lou Gehrig Legacy Society, helping to ensure that ALS does not compromise the lives of future generations.
Members of The Lou Gehrig Legacy Society are given an opportunity to publicly honor or memorialize a loved one in published lists.
Education World ® - Books in Education: Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man (1325 words)
Gehrig died in 1941 at the age of 37 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease that attacks the central nervous system.
Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man is written by David A. Adler and illustrated by Terry Widener.
Lou "The Iron Horse" Gehrig "Frank Graham of the New York Sun memorialized Lou Gehrig's first appearance in Yankee Stadium.
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