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Encyclopedia > Lost in Translation
It has been suggested that Lost on Location be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)
This article is about the movie. For the 1999 book of the same name by Nicole Mones, see Lost in Translation (book). For the 1974 poem by James Merrill, see Lost in Translation (poem).
Lost in Translation
Directed by Sofia Coppola
Produced by Ross Katz, Sofia Coppola
Written by Sofia Coppola
Starring Scarlett Johansson
Bill Murray
Music by Brian Reitzell, Kevin Shields
Cinematography Lance Acord
Editing by Sarah Flack
Distributed by Focus Features
Released August 29, 2003
Running time 102 min.
Language English Japanese
Budget $4 million
IMDb profile

Lost in Translation is a (2003) motion picture. It was the second writing and directorial effort of Sofia Coppola, after The Virgin Suicides. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Lost on Location: Behind the Scenes of Lost in Translation is a 30-minute featurette included on the Lost in Translation DVD. It features Sofia Coppola, Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, and others. ... Lost in Translation is a book by Nicole Mones. ... poet James Merrill, age 30, in a 1957 publicity photograph for The Seraglio James Ingram Merrill (March 3, 1926 - February 6, 1995) was a Pulitzer Prize winning American writer, increasingly regarded as one of the most important 20th century poets in the English language. ... James Merrills childhood home was a 50-room mansion called The Orchard, located in Southampton, New York Lost in Translation is a poem by James Merrill, originally published in The New Yorker magazine on April 8, 1974. ... Download high resolution version (457x705, 102 KB)Lost in Translation movie poster. ... Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... Scarlett Johansson on the cover of Esquire (February, 2005) Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American film actress. ... Bill Murray William James Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an American comedian, producer, film director, and actor. ... Kevin Shields (born May 21, 1963) is an Irish rock guitarist and producer who fronted the London-based shoegazer band My Bloody Valentine in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... After studying photography and filmmaking at the San Francisco Arts Institute, Northern California native Lance Acord began his career with photographer/filmmaker Bruce Weber. ... Focus Features is the specialty films division of Universal Pictures, a division of NBC Universal, the U.S.-based film, television and recreation subsidiary of General Electric. ... August 29 is the 241st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (242nd in leap years), with 124 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2003. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... The Virgin Suicides is a 1993 novel by American writer Jeffrey Eugenides. ...


Tagline: Everyone wants to be found.

Contents


Synopsis

On its surface, Lost in Translation is a movie about culture shock between East and West, yet this reveals itself as a metaphor for more important themes of alienation and loneliness, and alternatively companionship. The film explores how these themes combine at certain stages in life, against the background of highly modern Japanese cityscapes. Culture shock is a term used to describe the anxiety and feelings (of surprise, disorientation, confusion, etc. ... Alienation is estrangement or splitting apart. ...

Charlotte (Johansson) and Bob (Murray) share a quiet moment outside a karaoke room.
Charlotte (Johansson) and Bob (Murray) share a quiet moment outside a karaoke room.

Bob Harris (played by Bill Murray), is an American movie star on the downward slope of his career who has come to Tokyo, Japan, to film a Suntory whisky commercial (a reference to real-life Hollywood actors who have done similar deeds[1]). His marriage has cooled off decidedly—his wife contacts him frequently, not to actually talk to him, but to get his opinion on carpet samples or to remind him that he forgot his son's birthday. Harris finds himself in a city and culture beyond his comprehension for reasons that he has trouble remembering. It's only the solace of a big paycheck that has brought him to the foreign land but with the feeling that he's selling himself out for a quick buck instead of acting. Scarlett Johansson is Charlotte, a recent philosophy graduate of Yale University, the wife of a Rolling Stone-type photographer (Giovanni Ribisi) on assignment in Tokyo. As both a hanger-on and a left-behind, she begins to wonder where she is and what she is doing, and who the man that she married really is. Her husband has more time for his work and young starlets (e.g., Anna Faris' Kelly) than for her. Bob and Charlotte, both lonely, lost, and sleepless, happen upon each other in the lounge of the hotel where they are staying (the Park Hyatt Tokyo) and strike up an unusual friendship. Image File history File links Publicity still of Scarlett Johansson and Bill Murray in Lost in Translation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Publicity still of Scarlett Johansson and Bill Murray in Lost in Translation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Bill Murray William James Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an American comedian, producer, film director, and actor. ... Headquarters of Tokyo Metropolitan Government (City Hall) View of Tokyos Shibuya district Tokyo ) (help· info), literally eastern capital, is one of the 47 prefectures of Japan and includes the highly urbanized downtown area formerly known as the city of Tokyo which is the heart of the Greater Tokyo Area. ... Suntory (サントリー) is a Japanese brewing and distilling company. ... Scotch whisky Whisky (or whiskey) (from Irish uisce beatha and/or Scottish Gaelic uisge beatha, both meaning water of life) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually by an identified sponsor. ... ... Scarlett Johansson on the cover of Esquire (February, 2005) Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American film actress. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Rolling Stone logo, designed by Rick Griffin. ... Giovanni Ribisi in Sofia Coppolas Lost in Translation Antonio Giovanni Ribisi (born December 17, 1974 in Los Angeles) is an American actor. ... Anna Kay Faris (born November 29, 1976 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA) is an American actress, best known for her roles in the Scary Movie trilogy. ... Park Hyatt is Hyatts premium brand of hotels and resorts. ...


Drawn together by their mutual dissatisfaction and alienation, the two experience the stranger side of Tokyo nightlife, playfully exploring the foreign city, and finding comfort in relating to each other when nothing else in their lives seems to fit. Against the expected movie stereotype of man meets woman, the friendship is denied the chance to bloom into romance, and yet their fleeting time together makes a strong impression on both characters.


A key moment finds Bob, Charlotte, and some friends in a karaoke bar. They take turns singing various numbers. The scene concludes with Bob singing to Charlotte an uncontrived version of Roxy Music's melancholic hit "More Than This".


In the end, some critics say the film is a delicately nuanced look at the mechanics of verbal and emotional miscommunication, igniting a spark of common humanity and yearning at the intersection between a mid-life and a quarter-life crisis. Slyly appealing to Baby Boomers as much as Generation X-ers, Lost in Translation rapidly earned itself a cult following for its almost uncanny ability to connect on a very personal level with viewers across the spectrum of age and culture. A US postage stamp depicting the increase in birthrate that country experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of males returning to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II in... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


Autobiographical elements

Much has been made of the parallels between the characters in the film and those in Coppola's own social circles. Ribisi's character is similar to Coppola's then-husband Spike Jonze, and claims have been made that Faris' character is based on Cameron Diaz, with whom Jonze had worked on Being John Malkovich (1999). Were this the case, then Johansson's character would represent Coppola. Coppola denied these connections in an Entertainment Weekly interview. Spike Jonze with the Silver Bear award for directing the movie Adaptation at the Berlin Film Festival in 2003. ... Cameron Diaz (right) with Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival. ... Being John Malkovich is a 1999 film written by Charlie Kaufman and directed by Spike Jonze. ... June 17, 2005 cover of Entertainment Weekly, featuring actor Tom Cruise Entertainment Weekly is a magazine published by Time Warner in the United States which is dedicated to the world of celebrity and popular culture. ...


Reaction

Boosted by critical acclaim and audience word-of-mouth, this modest feature film (with only a $4 million budget) became a comparative box office hit. Lost in Translation has been praised not only for Coppola's script and distinctive directing, but especially for Murray, who by most accounts gave the performance of his career. Johansson (only seventeen when the film was made) also received notice for her strong performance. This article is about general United States currency. ...

Bob (Murray) amidst Japanese businessmen.
Bob (Murray) amidst Japanese businessmen.

Some have strongly criticised the movie for being what is perceived to be a stereotyped and unsympathetic portrayal of Japanese culture. Many of the Japanese characters serve as comic relief and much of the humor is at their expense based on common Japanese stereotypes, such as their mispronouncing English or their relatively short stature. This position is not universally held as others have defended the film against these allegations. One Peter Sattler, in a letter to movie critic David Edelstein of Slate, wrote that "the feelings of strangeness are entirely in the American characters. The camera records beauties—cultural and natural—that the 'lost' visitors are unable to register or understand.... In the movie, Japanese culture estranges you from American culture—makes American culture look strange and dubbed, as much as the other way around." However, it should be noted that in reality, Japanese are more accepting of American culture, while most Americans hold the ethnocentric viewpoint that Japanese culture is strange and therefore mock Japanese frequently for comedy. This is particularly true in this film. According to proponents of the film, it should be understood that the "alien" landscape of Tokyo serves largely to illustrate the alienation the main characters experience, a feeling that persists not because they are in a foreign land, but because they are human. Critics say that the alienation could have been done without scenes of stereotypes that mock Japanese culture. Image File history File links Publicity still of Bill Murray in Lost in Translation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Publicity still of Bill Murray in Lost in Translation File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Slate. ... A camera is a device used to take pictures (usually photographs), either singly or in sequence, with or without sound recording, such as with video cameras. ...


On the other hand, many "stereotypes" are real - Japanese are, on average, shorter than Americans; and of course they speak English less well than Americans - one would be even more surprised to find an American speaking any Japanese at all, than to find a Japanese speaking English, even poorly. Also, the rather silly TV presenter is in fact real and many Japanese (and for that matter, Asian) TV shows feature such silly presenters: they are in it for a laugh, and so are the audience, and no one is mocking anyone else's intelligence: it is entertainment. Finally, the Americans are mocked as well, and Bill Murray is specifically laughed at for being "too tall" by Scarlett Johansson. Anna Faris's character is also portrayed as a stereotypical dumb blonde actress.


In attempting to explain the disparity between critics' and others initial acclaim and subsequent reported panning by a few DVD renters, Roger Ebert suggested the difference might be caused because the film is much more impressive when viewed on a theater's big screen. Also, the film is clearly not for everyone: many have felt that it doesn't "say" anything, doesn't really have a conclusion and a message; and doesn't "do" anything, as there are no real action scenes: but such is the nature of the script - gray rather than black and white. It has been suggested that Dual layer recording be merged into this article or section. ... Roger Ebert (right) with Russ Meyer, 1970. ...


Awards

  • The film won an Academy Award for best original screenplay. It was also nominated for best director (the first time an American woman was nominated for this award), picture, and actor.
  • The film won Golden Globes for best musical or comedy motion picture, screenplay, and musical or comedy actor. It was also nominated for best director, and musical or comedy actress.
  • At the BAFTA film awards, the film won the best editing, actor and actress awards. It was also nominated for best film, director, original screenplay, and cinematography.
  • It won four IFP Independent Spirit Awards, for best feature, director, male lead, and screenplay.

Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Writing Original Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best script not based upon previously published material. ... The Academy Award for Directing is an accolade given to the person that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences feels was best director of the past year. ... The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy has been awarded annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture has been awarded annually since 1944 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actors of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actreses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Founded in 1984, the Independent Spirit Awards were originally known as the FINDIE (Friends of Independents) Awards and presented winners with Plexiglas pyramids containing suspended shoestrings representing the paltry budgets of independent films. ...

Trivia

  • The bar featured throughout the film is the New York Grill restaurant, situated on the 52nd floor of the Park Hyatt Tokyo hotel in Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo. The bar features two movie-inspired beverages—the L.I.T and the Sofia—in addition to an open kitchen and floor-to-ceiling windows.
  • One scene illustrates being "lost in translation" quite literally. Bob (played by Bill Murray), a director (played by Yutaka Tadokoro), and an interpreter (Akiko Takeshita) are on a set, filming a whisky commercial. The audience witnesses several exchanges where the director speak several sentences, with passion, followed by a (perhaps too) pithy interpretation. At one point a slightly exasperated Bob asks "Is that everything? It seemed like he said quite a bit more than that." The scene is played without subtitles, so those viewers who don't speak Japanese feel as lost as Bob does. Motoko Rich of The New York Times translated the scene in a 2003 article. One of the exchanges translated by Rich illustrates the scene in general:
Bob: Does he want me to, to turn from the right or turn from the left?
Interpreter (in very formal Japanese to the director): He has prepared and is ready. And he wants to know, when the camera rolls, would you prefer that he turn to the left, or would you prefer that he turn to the right? And that is the kind of thing he would like to know, if you don't mind.
Director (very brusquely, and in much more colloquial Japanese): Either way is fine. That kind of thing doesn't matter. We don't have time, Bob-san, O.K.? You need to hurry. Raise the tension. Look at the camera. Slowly, with passion. It's passion that we want. Do you understand?
Interpreter (In English, to Bob): Right side. And, uh, with intensity.

Diamond Yukai (*Yutaka Tadokoro, 1962) is a rock singer and actor. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. ... In Japan, it is usual to use honorific titles after a persons name. ... Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... Francis Ford Coppola at Cannes 2001 Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American film director, screenwriter, vintner, magazine publisher, and hotelier, most renowned for directing the highly regarded Godfather trilogy. ...

Cast

Bill Murray William James Murray (born September 21, 1950) is an American comedian, producer, film director, and actor. ... Scarlett Johansson on the cover of Esquire (February, 2005) Scarlett Johansson (born November 22, 1984) is an American film actress. ... Giovanni Ribisi in Sofia Coppolas Lost in Translation Antonio Giovanni Ribisi (born December 17, 1974 in Los Angeles) is an American actor. ... Anna Kay Faris (born November 29, 1976 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA) is an American actress, best known for her roles in the Scary Movie trilogy. ... Matthew Minami Matthew Minami (Japanese: マシュー南 or Matthew南; Mashū Minami, born March 10, 1972 in Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan) is a male Japanese comedian who belongs to Yoshimoto Kogyo and popular host of Matthews Best Hit TV on TV Asahi. ... Matthew Minami Matthew Minami (Japanese: マシュー南 or Matthew南; Mashū Minami, born March 10, 1972 in Toyonaka, Osaka, Japan) is a male Japanese comedian who belongs to Yoshimoto Kogyo and popular host of Matthews Best Hit TV on TV Asahi. ...

Ratings

The following is a partial list of the rating assigned to Lost in Translation in various countries. It has been suggested that film certification be merged into this article or section. ...

Graubünden or Grisons (German: Graubünden; Italian: Grigioni; Romansh: Grischun, French: Grisons) is the largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Lost in Translation


Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote logo Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ...

Sofia Coppola

The Virgin Suicides (1999) | Lost in Translation (2003) | Marie-Antoinette (2006) Sofia Coppola Sofia Carmina Coppola (born May 14, 1971 in New York City) is an American Academy Award winning film director, actress, producer, and writer. ... The Virgin Suicides is a 1993 novel by American writer Jeffrey Eugenides. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie-Antoinette is a 2006 film written and directed by Sofia Coppola about the life of Marie Antoinette, the Austrian princess who married into the French royal family in 1770, only to be imprisoned and beheaded when the monarchy was overthrown by a revolution twenty years later. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lost in Translation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1070 words)
On its surface, Lost in Translation is a movie about culture shock between East and West, yet this reveals itself as a metaphor for more important themes of alienation and loneliness, and alternatively companionship.
Bob and Charlotte, both lonely, lost, and sleepless, happen upon each other in the lounge of the hotel where they are staying (the Park Hyatt Tokyo) and strike up an unusual friendship.
Lost in Translation has been praised not only for Coppola's script and distinctive directing, but especially for Murray, who by most accounts gave the performance of his career.
Lost in Translation (poem) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1585 words)
"Lost in Translation" may be classified as an autobiographical narrative or narrative poem, but is better understood as a series of embedded narratives (stories within a story).
In "Lost in Translation," the narrator's puzzle-making companion is his French governess, whom he refers to repeatedly as Mademoiselle.
But the translation turns out not to have been lost, or a figment of the poet's imagination, for it is used to write the poem "Lost In Translation." The German epigraph at the beginning of the poem offers the key clue here.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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