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Encyclopedia > Lost in Space
Lost in Space

Publicity photo (1967) for Lost in Space: shows cast members: Angela Cartwright, Mark Goddard, Marta Kristen, Jonathan Harris, June Lockhart, Guy Williams & Bill Mumy.
Genre Science fiction
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 83
Production
Producer(s) Irwin Allen
Broadcast
Original channel CBS
Original run September 15, 1965March 6, 1968
External links
IMDb profile

Lost in Space is a science fiction TV series created and produced by Irwin Allen. The series was released by Fox Television and broadcast on CBS. The show ran for three seasons, with eighty-three episodes airing between September 15, 1965 and March 6, 1968. Lost in Space was the second of Allen's four science fiction TV series. The show's main theme was space travel adventure. The show's first season was in black and white, but the second and third seasons were in color. Image File history File links Acap. ... Lost in Space can refer to: Lost in Space, a TV series. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England) is an English-born American actress, primarily known for her roles in movies and television. ... Mark Goddard Mark was born in Lowell Massachusetts in 1936 and was the youngest of five children. ... Marta Kristen born Birgit Annalisa Rusanen on February 26, 1945, in Norway is an American actress best known for her role as the character Judy Robinson in the cult television series Lost in Space. ... Jonathan Harris (November 6, 1914 – November 3, 2002), was an American stage and character actor. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... Guy Williams (born Armando Joseph Catalano) (January 14, 1924 - May 7, 1989) was an American actor and former male fashion model, who played swashbuckling action heroes in the 1950s and 1960s, but never quite achieved movie star status[1], despite his appearance (including hazel eyes, 63 height, and 190... Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Irwin Allen (June 12, 1916 – November 2, 1991) was a television and film producer nicknamed The Master of Disaster for his work in the disaster film genre. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Irwin Allen (June 12, 1916 – November 2, 1991) was a television and film producer nicknamed The Master of Disaster for his work in the disaster film genre. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Space exploration is the physical exploration of outer-Earth objects and generally anything that involves the technologies, science, and politics regarding space endeavors. ... Look up adventure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Conceptually the series is a space-age riff on the classic adventure novel Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss. During the first two seasons, the series follows the adventures of an astronaut family that is shipwrecked on an alien world after getting lost trying to reach the Alpha Centauri star system. In the third season they travel to other worlds in their never-resolved search for a way back to Earth. The Swiss Family Robinson is a novel about a Swiss family who are shipwrecked en route for Australia. ... Johann David Wyss (Bern, March 4, 1743 - 1818) was a Swiss author, best remembered for his book The Swiss Family Robinson (1812), based on the Robinson Crusoe adventure by Daniel Defoe. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Following the successful format of Allen's first TV series, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, the emphasis was on creating exciting fantasy-oriented adventure stories. Each week the show delivered a fast-paced visual assault of dazzling special effects, explosions, monstrous aliens, spaceships, and exotic sets and costumes drenched in bright, primary colors. On the other hand, unlike the other space tv show of the day Star Trek, character development, serious issues, dramatic depth, or even maintaining a coherent story were ignored. ("Don't get logical with me!" was Allen's frequent retort to writers who objected to changes to their scripts. Source: Starlog #219)[citation needed] Critics complained that this was the television equivalent of dangling a shiny object to distract the nondiscriminating viewer. However, in spite of criticism, the show still became a success. [citation needed] Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea was a 1960s American Science Fiction television series based on the 1961 film of the same name. ... Ariane 5 lifts off with the Rosetta probe on 2nd of March, 2004. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Starlog is a science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ...


Allen had hit upon a winning formula which he used to create a third fantasy-adventure show, The Time Tunnel (1966-1967), followed by his last and most ambitious series, Land of the Giants (1968-1970), all of which have become cult, if not critical, favorites. The Time Tunnel is a 1966-1967 U.S. color science fiction TV series. ... Land of the Giants was an hour-long American science fiction television program lasting two seasons beginning on September 22, 1968 and ending in March 22, 1970. ... Cult television, like cult figures, cult film and cult radio, attracts a band of aficionados or appreciators, known as a cult following, devoted to a specific television series or fictional universe. ...

Contents

Plot

The year is 1997, and the Earth is suffering from massive overpopulation and depletion of natural resources. Professor John Robinson (played by Zorro alumnus Guy Williams), his wife, Maureen (played by Lassie alumna June Lockhart), their children, Judy (played by Beach Blanket Bingo actress Marta Kristen), Penny (played by Make Room For Daddy alumna Angela Cartwright), Will (played by 11-year-old newcomer Bill Mumy) and their friend and pilot, Maj. Don West (played by The Detectives alumnus Mark Goddard) are chosen to travel on a space vehicle named the Jupiter 2 to the Alpha Centauri star system to find a habitable planet for mankind to colonize. Prior to launch from Alpha Control but after the Robinsons have been placed in suspended animation on the spaceship for the long journey, Dr. Zachary Smith (played by Broadway actor and The Third Man alumnus Jonathan Harris), a foreign agent who was sent to sabotage the family's mission, sneaks aboard the spacecraft. He reprograms the ship's robot to destroy the vehicle shortly after it leaves Earth. In the process, he becomes trapped on the spaceship during the launch. His extra weight throws the Jupiter 2 off course, causing it to encounter a meteor storm shortly after launch. The robot's rampage, which happens after the storm, does not destroy the vehicle but finishes the job of getting the Robinsons completely lost. For other uses, see Zorro (disambiguation). ... Guy Williams (born Armando Joseph Catalano) (January 14, 1924 - May 7, 1989) was an American actor and former male fashion model, who played swashbuckling action heroes in the 1950s and 1960s, but never quite achieved movie star status[1], despite his appearance (including hazel eyes, 63 height, and 190... Lassie filming on location in Florida (photo courtesy State Archive of Florida) Lassie, a female rough collie fictional character has starred in, or been the subject of, many radio shows, movies, TV shows, and books, entertaining generations of children around the world from 1938 to the present. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Marta Kristen born Birgit Annalisa Rusanen on February 26, 1945, in Norway is an American actress best known for her role as the character Judy Robinson in the cult television series Lost in Space. ... The Danny Thomas Show (also known as Make Room for Daddy for the first three seasons) was a comedy television series starring Danny Thomas, Jean Hagen, Rusty Hamer, Sherry Jackson and Louise Beavers. ... Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England) is an English-born American actress, primarily known for her roles in movies and television. ... Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... Mark Goddard Mark was born in Lowell Massachusetts in 1936 and was the youngest of five children. ... Space exploration is the physical exploration of outer-Earth objects and generally anything that involves the technologies, science, and politics regarding space endeavors. ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... A habitable planet is a world on which human beings can subsist without too much life-support equipment. ... Suspended animation is the slowing of life processes by external means without termination. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. ... Jonathan Harris (November 6, 1914 – November 3, 2002), was an American stage and character actor. ... Leonid Meteor Shower From earliest times, humankind has noticed flurries of meteors that seemed to emanate from particular points in the sky at particular times of the year. ...


Despite efforts by Alpha Control to locate the ship, the Robinsons are eventually presumed to be hopelessly lost in space. The series chronicles the adventures of the Robinsons as they try to find their way back home.


Cast

The regular characters of the series were the Robinson family, their pilot, their robot and their unintended passenger, Dr. Smith.

  • Professor John Robinson (Guy Williams) is the commander of the Robinson family expedition. He is an astrophysicist who also specializes in applied planetary geology. He often has a long-running feud with Dr. Smith. Robinson was the first main character of the series.
  • Doctor Maureen Robinson (June Lockhart) is John's wife, and a trained biochemist, who is frequently unworthy of Dr. Smith's missions. She is the mother of their children, Judy, Penny and Will.
  • Major Don West (Mark Goddard) is the handsome pilot of the expedition's spacecraft. Don is romantically interested in Judy Robinson, and is partnered by the distrustful Dr. Smith. In the original pilot film, Don West was also an astrophysicist and expert in interplanetary geology.
  • Judy Robinson (Marta Kristen) is the older Robinson daughter. She was planning on a career in musical theatre on Earth, but agreed to go along with her family on the Alpha Centauri mission.
  • Penny Robinson (Angela Cartwright) is the middle child. She loves animals and classical music, and is occasionally approached by Dr. Smith, when at times, she gets into trouble herself, driving herself and her parents crazy.
  • Will Robinson (Bill Mumy) is a child prodigy in electronics; he is the youngest and brightest, and a particular friend of Dr. Smith and the Robot.
  • Doctor Zachary Smith (Jonathan Harris), ostensibly a specialist in environmental and intergalactic psychology (but in fact an enemy agent for the mysterious "Aeolus 14 Umbra"), he was in charge of medical preparations for the Robinson party. His attempt to sabotage the mission saw him stranded aboard as a "reluctant stowaway," from which the first episode takes its title. The doctor originally began as a rather sinister character, but while he never lost his self-serving quality, he evolved into comic relief. A coward, he frequently traded barbs with the ship's Robot, often referring to it as a "bubble-headed booby.". Smith was the series' second main character.
  • The Robot is a Model B-9 Environmental-Control Robot, which had no given name. The Robot was designed by Robert Kinoshita and performed by Bob May in a suit built by Bob Stewart, with voice by Dick Tufeld, who was also the series' narrator.
  • Debbie is Penny's pet: a creature found on the planet which seemed to continually make "bloop" noises, which were electronic sound effects, portrayed by a chimpanzee wearing a fur hat to represent a pointed head with unusual ears.

Guy Williams (born Armando Joseph Catalano) (January 14, 1924 - May 7, 1989) was an American actor and former male fashion model, who played swashbuckling action heroes in the 1950s and 1960s, but never quite achieved movie star status[1], despite his appearance (including hazel eyes, 63 height, and 190... An astrophysicist is a person whose profession is astrophysics. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... Mark Goddard Mark was born in Lowell Massachusetts in 1936 and was the youngest of five children. ... An astrophysicist is a person whose profession is astrophysics. ... Marta Kristen born Birgit Annalisa Rusanen on February 26, 1945, in Norway is an American actress best known for her role as the character Judy Robinson in the cult television series Lost in Space. ... Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England) is an English-born American actress, primarily known for her roles in movies and television. ... Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... A child prodigy is someone who is a master of one or more skills or arts at an early age. ... Jonathan Harris (November 6, 1914 – November 3, 2002), was an American stage and character actor. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... Robert Kinoshita (February 24, 1914—) is an artist, art director and set and production designer who worked in the American film and television industries from the 1950s through the early 1980s. ... Bob May (born 1939 in New York City) is an American actor best remembered for playing The Robot on the television series Lost in Space. ... Dick Tufeld (pronounced TOO-feld - born 1927) is an American actor best known for being an announcer, narrator and voice actor from the 1950s onward. ...

Series History

Irwin Allen first produced a pilot film for the proposed series, titled No Place to Hide. No Place To Hide is the first single by nu-metal band Korn from their second album, Life Is Peachy. ...


After CBS picked up the series for its 1965 season, the format was changed slightly to add the characters of Dr. Smith and the Robot, neither of whom appeared in the original pilot. The ship was redesigned to feature a second deck, and renamed the Jupiter II. The spaceship had been named the Gemini 12 in the pilot. The original pilot was than greatly edited with scences from it spread across several episodes, and new scenes written and filmed around them. Doing that made economical use of the expensive pilot footage to reduce the cost of making the early episodes of the series.


The first season was filmed in black-&-white and was more serious in tone than subsequent seasons. It chronicled the adventures of a family marooned on a hostile alien world. The show used serious science fiction concepts in order to do this. They included dangerous plants and animals native to the planet that they were on and equally dangerous visitors from other planets. However the space pirates started to show up even then.


The second and third seasons were produced in color, and were more whimsical and fantastic in tone. These two seasons seemed written more for humor then action-adventure, with stories about space cowboys, space hippies, space pirates, and space beauty pageants. The show was aired opposite the Batman (TV series) series, and it's been suggested the lighter, camp tone was adopted in order to compete.There was also a growing ephasis on Dr.Smith,Will and the Robot at the expense of the other characters. In the third season there was some attempt to go back to more adventure-based stories, but episodes like "The Great Vegetable Rebellion"—featuring one of the few intelligent talking carrots in cinematic history—proved that camp was still with the show right to the end. The Great Vegetable Rebellion was an episode of the CBS series Lost in Space, first shown on February 28, 1968, it was the penultimate episode of the final season. ... Intelligence is a general mental capability that involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think abstractly, comprehend ideas and language, and learn. ...


In the first two seasons, each show ended with a cliff-hanger "To be continued next week!" which was not integral to the main plot of the current week's show and could be tacked onto the end of any episode. In the third year, the end of each episode merely showed clips from the next episode.


The show had high enough ratings to ensure a fourth season, but it was abruptly cancelled for budgetary reasons. The series was the most expensive in television broadcast history. Each episode was estimated to cost $400,000, a considerable sum in the mid-sixties. It remained the most expensive series on TV until Space: 1999. The cast members were never told; every member learned that the show had been cancelled by reading about it in the newspapers. Robert Hamner, one of the show's writers, states (in Starlog, #220, November 1995) that Bill Paley, the head of CBS, despised the show so much that this dispute was used as an excuse to terminate the series. Left to right: Barbara Bain, Catherine Schell and Martin Landau from Space:1999s second season. ...


In 1975, Allen returned to the original source material to produce The Swiss Family Robinson (1975 TV series), a short-lived TV series based upon the novel.

Like all Allen's productions, stylistically, the series was of high quality, featuring eye-catching silver, tapered space-suits, laser guns and a number of spectacular props and sets, including the control cabin of the Jupiter 2. Image File history File links Lis-tos-02. ... Image File history File links Lis-tos-02. ... For other uses, see Laser (disambiguation). ...

Ratings & Popularity

Although it retains a cult following, the science-fiction community often points to Lost in Space as an example of TV's bad record at producing science-fiction (perhaps overlooking the series' deliberate fantasy elements), comparing it to its supposed rival, Star Trek. Ironically, Lost In Space was a ratings success, unlike Star Trek, which received poor ratings during its original network TV run. The show's fans tend to split into two groups: those who enjoy the more serious episodes of the first season, and those who enjoy the wild, campy episodes that came later.


The general public now most recognizes Lost In Space via the memorable, oft-repeated lines of the Robot, "Warning! Warning!", "That does not compute.", and, of course, "Danger, Will Robinson!"; although the last sentence was only said once, different variations of it were used. Doctor Smith's endless put-downs of the Robot are also still popular ("You bubble-headed booby!") as his often-repeated whines: "Oh, the pain... the pain of it all!" and "My back is extremely delicate today." Smith would consistently employ the latter excuse when asked to perform manual labor.


Music

Album cover of Lost in Space Original Television Soundtrack, Volume 1 CD, with music by John Williams (ASIN B000001P1R).
Album cover of Lost in Space Original Television Soundtrack, Volume 1 CD, with music by John Williams (ASIN B000001P1R).

The theme music for the opening and closing credits was written by John Williams. Image File history File links TV-Lost-in-Space-Volume-1-music-CD-1997-cover. ... Image File history File links TV-Lost-in-Space-Volume-1-music-CD-1997-cover. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ...


In Season Three, the opening theme was changed (again by Williams) to an exciting faster tempo action theme and featured a pumped-up countdown from seven to one to launch each episode.


Much of the incidental music in the series was written by Williams and other notable film and television composers, including Alexander Courage, who contributed six scores to the series, his most recognizable, "Wild Adventure" included his key theme for "Lorelei", composed for organ, woodwinds, and harp thus cementing this highly recognizable theme with John Williams' own "Chariot" and main theme for the series. Alexander Courage (born December 10, 1919) is a 20th century American composer of music, primarily for television and motion pictures. ... The Rock of Lorelei by the Rhine Lorelei Lorelei Loreley sign on the bank of the Rhine View of the Rhine as seen by Lorelei The Lorelei (originally written as Loreley) is a rock on the eastern bank of the Rhine near St. ...


In the unaired pilot episode "No Place to Hide" the opening theme music, and much of the incidental music was borrowed from the 1951 classic The Day the Earth Stood Still. The Day the Earth Stood Still is a 1951 black-and-white science fiction film that tells the story of a humanoid alien who comes to Earth to warn its leaders not to take their conflicts into space, or they will face devastating consequences. ...


Legal Questions

In 1962 Gold Key comics (formerly Dell Comics), a division of Western Publishing Company, began publishing a series of comic books under the title, Space Family Robinson. The story was largely inspired by "The Swiss Family Robinson" but with a space-age twist. The movie and television rights to the comic book were then purchased by noted television writer Hilda Bohem ("The Cisco Kid"), who created a treatment under the title, "Space Family 3000." Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ... Western Publishing Company is the company that originally produced Outburst, Pictionary, and Solarquest. ... Space Family Robinson was an original science-fiction comic book series published by Gold Key Comics. ...


In July 1964, notable science fiction writer and filmmaker Ib Melchior, began pitching a treatment for a feature film, also under the title, "Space Family Robinson." Ib Jørgen Melchior (born September 17, 1917 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is the auhor of many novels, shortstories and non-fiction books, as well as a producer, director, and screenwriter of low-budget U.S. science fiction movies, most of them released by American International Pictures. ...


There has been some debate as to whether or not Irwin Allen was aware of the Melchior treatment. It is also unknown whether Allen was aware of the comic book or the Hilda Bohem treatment.


As copyright law only protects the actual expression of a work, and not titles, general ideas or concepts, in 1964 Irwin Allen moved forward with his own take on "Space Family Robinson," with characters and situations notably different from either the Bohem or the Melchior treatments. (It is interesting to note that none of these versions contained the characters of Dr. Smith or the Robot.)


Intended as a follow up to his first successful television venture, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (TV series), Allen quickly sold his concept for a television series to CBS. Concerned about confusion with the Gold Key comic book, CBS requested that Allen come up with a new title. Nevertheless, Hilda Bohem filed a claim against Allen, CBS and Fox Television shortly before the series premiered in 1965.


A compromise was struck as part of a legal settlement. In addition to an undisclosed sum of money, Western Publishing would be allowed to change the name of its comic book to "Lost in Space."


There were no other legal challenges to the title until 1995, when New Line Cinema announced their intention to turn Lost in Space into a big budget motion picture. New Line had purchased the screen rights from Prelude Pictures (which had acquired the screen rights from the Irwin Allen Estate in 1993). At that time, Ib Melchior contacted Prelude Pictures and insisted that Lost in Space was directly based upon his 1964 treatment. Melchior was aided in his efforts by Ed Shifres, a fan who had written a book entitled Space Family Robinson: The True Story. (Later reprinted with the title, "Lost in Space: The True Story"). The book attempts to show how Irwin Allen allegedly plagiarized Melchior's concept, with two outlines presented side by side. New Line Cinema, founded in 1967, is one of the major American film studios. ...


To satisfy Melchior, Prelude Pictures hired the 78 year old filmmaker as a consultant on their feature film adaptation. This accommodation was made without the knowledge or consent of the Irwin Allen Estate or Space Productions, the original copyright holder of Lost in Space. Melchior's contract with Prelude also guaranteed him 2% of the producer's gross receipts, a provision that was later the subject of a suit between Melchior and Mark Koch of Prelude Pictures. Although an Appellate Court ruled partly[1] in Melchior's favor, on November 17th, 2004, the Supreme Court of California[2] denied a petition by Melchior to further review the case.


It is significant that no further claim was made and that Space Productions now strongly contends that Irwin Allen was the sole creator of the tv series called Lost in Space.


References in Popular Culture

The animated television series Freakazoid features a character named Professor Jones. The generic name, and the lines given to the character were obvious riffs on Dr. Smith (such as "Weren't you on a TV show with a robot?"), and the character was in fact voiced by Jonathan Harris. Freakazoid! (or Freakazoid) is an animated television show created by Warner Brothers that aired for two seasons in 1995-1997. ...


The song "Blast Off" by the Stray Cats makes reference to both Dr. Smith and the Robot. Blast Off is a vertically-scrolling shoot-em-up arcade game that was released by Namco in 1989. ... The Stray Cats are a rockabilly band formed in 1979 by guitarist/vocalist Brian Setzer (Bloodless Pharaohs/Brian Setzer Orchestra) with school friends Lee Rocker (born Leon Drucker) and Slim Jim Phantom (born James McDonnell) in the Long Island town of Massapequa, New York. ...


In The Simpsons episode Fear of Flying Marge Simpson dreams she is Maureen Robinson and left behind on an alien planet when her father blasts off in the Jupiter 2 without her. In a later episode, Mayored to the Mob, Dr. Smith and the Robot appear at the Bi-Mon-Sci-Fi-Con. Bart Simpson claims he's seen the movie and the actor signing autographs, a parody of Jonathan Harris, is not Dr. Smith. It is implied that Dr. Smith attempts to lure him away to molest him. The Robot prevents this from happening with his alarm, "DANGER! DANGER! BART SIMPSON!" Simpsons redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fear of flying (disambiguation). ... Mayored to the Mob is the ninth episode of The Simpsons tenth season. ...


The Family Guy episode Fore Father refers to Lost in Space in one of their many-known cutaways. John Robinson is parodied as pairing up the characters in ways that match several season 1 and 2 episodes. He is fully aware of how inappropriate this is saying Major West and Judy are to ride around in the chariot all day. Maureen and Penny are to be left at the ship defenseless. Will is left to the mercy of a boy hungry pedophile. Family Guy is an Emmy award winning American animated television series about a nuclear family in the fictional town of Quahog (IPA or ), Rhode Island. ... This article is about the Family Guy episode. ...


The Oink! strip "Pete's Pimple" about a boy with a giant zit once had an episode where he was blasted into space and met the Robinsons, but when he mistakenly used the robot to urinate on, it went crazy and wiped out the entire cast. Oink! was the title of a British comic for children which was published from 3 May 1986-22 October 1988. ...


Lost in Space was parodied during a host segment on the cult TV show Mystery Science Theater 3000 in the episode Time Chasers. Mystery Science Theater 3000, often abbreviated MST3K, is an American cult television comedy series created by Joel Hodgson and produced by Best Brains, Inc. ... Promotional poster for Time Chasers. ...


Myths

Gene Roddenberry—the creator of Star Trek—often claimed that CBS executives listened to his Star-Trek pitch only in order to glean ideas for doing sci-fi on a TV budget. But this is unlikely given that by the time Roddenberry pitched Star Trek, Irwin Allen was already a successful, Emmy award winning producer who already had a science fiction television series television in production: Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (TV series). In addition, CBS already had ordered and picked up the LIS pilot before Roddenberry was pitching "Trek." While some may contend that LIS production values and special effects were of a higher calibre than those of "Trek,"[citation needed] it is hard to suspend disbelief during such sequences as double-exposed shaken mylar "curtains" used as "space storms". Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... An Emmy Award. ...


Another myth is that Lost in Space became campy in response to the serious tone of Star Trek. However, Lost in Space had already gone campy by the start of its second season, the same time Star Trek went on the air. If any show directly influenced a turn towards camp, that show would have been the hit show Batman (TV series), which began airing on the ABC television network in January 1966. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ...


It has been reported that Lost In Space was the favorite TV series of John F. Kennedy, Jr. while growing up in the 1960s. Others who admired the series were Tim Allen, John Laroquette, Candice Bergen, John Lasseter, "Weird" Al Yankovic and also Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who also watched "Dark Shadows!" John F. Kennedy, Jr. ... Tim Allen (born June 13, 1953) is an American comedian, character actor, voice-over artist, and entertainer perhaps best known for his role in the sitcom Home Improvement and his roles in Disney films, such as The Santa Clause and Toy Story. ... John Bernard Larroquette (born November 25, 1947 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an actor in television and the movies. ... Candice Patricia Bergen (born May 9, 1946) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning American actress and former fashion model, primarily for her roles in sitcoms and television. ... John A. Lasseter (born January 12, 1957 in Hollywood, California) is an Academy Award-winning American animator and the chief creative officer at Pixar Animation Studios and Walt Disney Feature Animation. ... Alfred Matthew Weird Al Yankovic (born October 23, 1959) is an American musician, parodist and accordion player. ... “Jacqueline Bouvier” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Equipment

In addition to the Robot, the primary tools used by the Robinsons in their exploration of strange alien worlds included the twin-decked Jupiter II flying saucer spacecraft, a glass-walled tracked exploration vehicle called the "Chariot", and the space "Pod" (a small spacecraft modeled on the Apollo Lunar Module). On occasion, characters (notably John Robinson) used what was then an exciting new invention: the jet pack. UFO redirects here. ... Project Apollo was a series of human spaceflight missions undertaken by the United States of America (NASA) using the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn launch vehicle, conducted during the years 1961 – 1975. ... Description Role: Lunar landing Crew: 2; CDR, LM pilot Dimensions Height: 20. ... For the game, see Jetpack (computer game). ...


The Jupiter II spaceship and its equipment also featured several technological breakthroughs that simplified or did away with mundane tasks. The "washing machine" took seconds and packaged cleaned clothes in plastic bags. The ship had no light bulbs or even compact fluorescent lamps-- in one episode, Maureen says the lights are "transistorized". However, on the other hand, sound and voice recording technologies imply arrested technology -- reel-to-reel tape recorders instead of solid-state digital storage media. Compact fluorescent light bulb A compact fluorescent light bulb (CFL bulb) is a type of fluorescent lamp which screws into a regular light bulb socket, or plugs into a small lighting fixture. ... Photo of transistor types (tape measure marked in centimeters) Transistor in the SMD form factor The transistor is a solid state semiconductor device used for amplification and switching. ... Historical records of events have been made for thousands of years in one form or another. ... Technology (Gr. ... Arrested can refer to: Arrested Development, a sitcom on FOX. A hip-hop group named Arrested Development. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... For the audio technology, see Reel-to-reel audio tape recording Reel to Reel is the debut album by Grand Puba. ... In general, a tape recorder, tape deck, or tape machine is any device that records a fluctuating signal by moving a strip of magnetic tape across a tape head, which is a strong electromagnet. ... Solid state may refer to: In computing: Solid state devices are data storage device components that uses memory chips, such as SDRAMs, to store data. ... A digital system is one that uses discrete values (often electrical voltages), especially those representable as binary numbers, or non-numeric symbols such as letters or icons, for input, processing, transmission, storage, or display, rather than a continuous spectrum of values (ie, as in an analog system). ... The terms storage (U.K.) or memory (U.S.) refer to the parts of a digital computer that retain physical state (data) for some interval of time, possibly even after electrical power to the computer is turned off. ...


One of the key breakthroughs is suspended animation technology that was employed only in the first and third episodes of the series. Suspended animation is the slowing of life processes by external means without termination. ...


A roster of guest stars

During its three year run, many actors guest-starred on the show, among them: Al Lewis, Edy Williams, Arte Johnson, Don Matheson, Kurt Russell, Strother Martin, Francine York, Mercedes McCambridge, Michael J. Pollard, Allan Melvin, Henry Jones, among many others. Future Hill Street Blues stars, Daniel J. Travanti and Michael Conrad also made featured appearances, as well. Al Lewis (30 April 1923 – 3 February 2006) was an American actor best known for his role as Grandpa on the television series The Munsters. ... Edy Williams (born 9 July 1942) is an actress. ... Arte Johnson (born January 20, 1929), full name Arthur Stanton Eric Johnson, is a comedic actor. ... Don Matheson was an American television actor, best known for his continuing role in Irwin Allens series Land of the Giants. ... Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ... Strother Martin, (March 26, 1919 – August 1, 1980) was an American character actor in numerous films and television programs. ... Mercedes Agnes Carlotta McCambridge (March 16, 1916 – March 2, 2004), nicknamed Mercy, was an Academy Award-winning American film actress, also known for her acting in radio dramas. ... Michael J. Pollard (born Michael J. Pollack, May 30, 1939 in Passaic, New Jersey) is an actor. ... Allan Melvin (born February 18, 1922) is an American actor with a long history of sitcom and voice-over work. ... Henry Jones is a fictional character in the movie Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. ... Hill Street Blues was a serial police drama that was first aired on NBC in 1981 and ran for 146 episodes on primetime into 1987. ... Daniel J. Travanti (born March 7, 1940 in Kenosha, Wisconsin) is an actor best known for his starring role in the television drama Hill Street Blues. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Spin-offs

Comics

Bill Mumy scripted an authorized Lost in Space comic book for Innovation Comics. Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... Lost in Space was a comic book published by Innovation Comics, based upon the television series Lost in Space. ... Innovation Publishing was an American comic book company based in Wheeling, West Virginia. ...


Prior to the appearance of the TV series, a comic book named Space Family Robinson was published by Gold Key Comics and written by Gaylord DuBois. Due to a deal worked out with Gold Key, the title of the comic later incorporated the "Lost in Space" sub-title. The comic book is not a spinoff of the TV series but was in print prior to the conception of the show. Also, there is an unlicensed comic in which Will Robinson meets up with Friday the 13th character Jason Voorhees. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Danger, Will Robinson! is a catch phrase derived from Lost in Space which characterizes the relationship between the robot and Will Robinson. ... For the series of slasher films, see Friday the 13th (series). ... Jason Voorhees is a fictional character from the Friday the 13th series of slasher films. ...


Cartoon

In the 1972-73 television season, ABC produced The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie, a weekly collection of 60-minute animated movies, pilots and specials from various production companies, such as Hanna-Barbera, Filmation, and Rankin-Bass -- Hanna-Barbera Productions contributed animated work based on such TV series as Gidget, Yogi Bear, Tabitha, Oliver Twist, Nanny and the Professor, The Banana Splits, and most importantly, Lost in Space. Dr. Smith (voiced by Jonathan Harris) was the only character from the original program to appear in the special, along with the Robot (who was employed in flight control rather than a support activity). The spacecraft was launched vertically by rocket, and Smith was a passenger rather than a saboteur. The pilot for the animated Lost in Space series was not picked up as a series, and only this episode was produced. The ABC Saturday Superstar Movie was a series of one-hour animated TV-movies (some of which also contained live action), broadcast on the ABC television network on Saturday mornings from September 9, 1972, to November 17, 1973. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... The first Filmation logo. ... Rankin-Bass (aka Videocraft International) is an American production company, known for its seasonal television specials. ... The Banana Splits as pictured on the cover for their 45 RPM single Long Live Love. For the dessert, see banana split. ... A hummingbird Female Mallard Duck in midflight A dragonfly in flight Flight is the process by which an object achieves sustained movement either through the air by aerodynamically generating lift or aerostatically using buoyancy, or movement beyond earths atmosphere, in the case of spaceflight. ... This article is about vehicles powered by rocket engines. ...


Feature film

In 1998, New Line Cinema produced a Lost in Space film. It included numerous nods, homages and cameos related to the series, including:

The film's Jupiter II was launched into orbit by a vehicle called the Jupiter I, which closely mimics the series' spacecraft, complete with rotating propulsion lights. Dick Tufeld (pronounced TOO-feld - born 1927) is an American actor best known for being an announcer, narrator and voice actor from the 1950s onward. ... Mark Goddard Mark was born in Lowell Massachusetts in 1936 and was the youngest of five children. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... June Lockhart (born 25 June 1925 in New York City, USA) is an American television and film actress best known for her roles as the mothers on Lassie and Lost in Space. ... Danger, Will Robinson! is a catch phrase derived from Lost in Space which characterizes the relationship between the robot and Will Robinson. ... Angela Margaret Cartwright (born September 9, 1952 in Altrincham, Cheshire, England) is an English-born American actress, primarily known for her roles in movies and television. ... Marta Kristen born Birgit Annalisa Rusanen on February 26, 1945, in Norway is an American actress best known for her role as the character Judy Robinson in the cult television series Lost in Space. ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... This article is about rotation as a movement of a physical body. ... Propulsion method may refer to a number of different articles: For a list of space transport methods, see spacecraft propulsion. ...


Reference is made to the Chariot and Space Pod, both of which are reported wrecked. For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ...


Additional cameo appearances from the original series were considered, but did not make it to the film: Jonathan Harris was offered a cameo appearance (as the Global Sedition businessman who hires, then betrays, Dr. Smith). He turned down the role, and is reported to have said "I play Smith or I don't play". Bill Mumy was at one point considered for a key role in the film, that of an aged Will Robinson who appears in the 'Spider Smith' sequences, but another actor was cast instead. Guy Williams, the remaining original cast member, had died some years earlier. Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... Danger, Will Robinson! is a catch phrase derived from Lost in Space which characterizes the relationship between the robot and Will Robinson. ... Guy Williams (born Armando Joseph Catalano) (January 14, 1924 - May 7, 1989) was an American actor and former male fashion model, who played swashbuckling action heroes in the 1950s and 1960s, but never quite achieved movie star status[1], despite his appearance (including hazel eyes, 63 height, and 190...


Novel

In 1967, a novel based on the series (with significant changes to the personalities of the characters) was published by Pyramid Books. Written by Dave Van Arnam and Ron Archer (as Ted White), the book was three short stories woven together. In one scene, where a character is randomly speaking English to provide data for translation, the book correctly predicted Richard Nixon winning the presidency after Lyndon Johnson (but also predicted a Kennedy (likely Robert F. Kennedy) winning after Nixon). Pyramid Books was a paperback publishing company, founded in 1949 by Alfred R. Plaine and Matthew Huttner. ... This article is about the cricket player. ... Ted White (born 1938) was a science fiction fan who worked as an assistant editor for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction in the 1968s. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Data (disambiguation). ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Second TV series

In late 2003, a new TV series, with a somewhat changed format, was in development in the U.S. It was intended to be originally closer to the original pilot with no Doctor Smith, but included a robot. The pilot (entitled, "The Robinsons: Lost in Space") was commissioned by the The WB Television Network. It was directed by John Woo and produced by Synthesis Entertainment, Irwin Allen Productions, Twentieth Century Fox Television and Regency Television. The Warner Bros. ... In mathematics, a directed set is a set A together with a binary relation ≤ having the following properties: a ≤ a for all a in A (reflexivity) if a ≤ b and b ≤ c, then a ≤ c (transitivity) for any two a and b in A, there... For other uses, see John Woo (disambiguation). ... Regency Television is a joint-venture between Regency Enterprises and Fox Television Studios founded in 1998. ...


The "Jupiter 2" inter-stellar flying-saucer spacecraft of the original series was changed to a non-saucer planet-landing craft, dispensed from a larger inter-stellar mother-ship.


The pilot script featured the characters of John and Maureen, but an elder son, David, was added, as well as Judy, an 'infant' Penny, and ten-year-old Will. There was no Doctor Smith character, but the character of Don West was described as a "dangerous, lone wolf type".


The confirmed cast included Brad Johnson as John Robinson, Jayne Brook as Maureen Robinson, Adrianne Palicki as Judy Robinson, Ryan Malgarini as Will Robinson and Mike Erwin as Don West. Brad Johnson is an American actor and former Marlboro Man. ... Several notable individuals have been named John Robinson: Bishop John Robinson, persons named John Robinson who also happened to be Bishops John Robinson (1576-1625), organized Mayflower voyage John Robinson (1615-1680), English MP John Robinson (1650-1723), English diplomat; later Bishop of Bristol from 1710 and Lord Privy Seal... Jayne Brook (born Jane Anderson on September 16, 1962 in Northbrook, Illinois) is an American actress, best known for her role as Dr. Diane Grad on the medical drama Chicago Hope. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Danger, Will Robinson! is a catch phrase derived from Lost in Space which characterizes the relationship between the robot and Will Robinson. ... Mike Erwin (b. ... Note: For Don West, the television personality, see Don West (sportscaster). ...


It was not among the network's series pick-ups confirmed later that year.


However, the producers of the new Battlestar Galactica show bought the sets. They were redesigned the next year and used for scenes on the Battlestar Pegasus. The Battlestar Galactica science fiction franchise, which began as a 1978 TV series, was reimagined in 2003 into the TV miniseries. ... The Battlestar Pegasus is a fictional spacecraft that appears in the original Battlestar Galactica television series, and its subsequent ongoing re-imagining, in which it first appears in the second season episode, Pegasus. Spoiler warning: // An original series Battlestar The Battlestar Pegasus appears in the original series two-part episode...


DVD Releases

20th Century Fox has released the entire series on DVD in Region 1 for the very first time. 20th Century Fox logo Fox Plaza, the company headquarters. ...

DVD Name Ep # Release Date Additional Information
Season 1 30 January 13, 2004
  • Un-Aired Pilot "No Place To Hide" included (see above)
  • CBS Network Presentation (5.5 minutes)
Season 2 Volume 1 16 September 14, 2004
Season 2 Volume 2 14 November 30, 2004
  • Original 1966 Lost In Space Interviews
  • 17 stills from the Guy Williams and June Lockhart interview
  • 15 stills from the Jonathan Harris interview
Season 3 Volume 1 15 March 1, 2005
  • "Lost in Space" memories - 20 nostalgic video clips with cast members offering a fond look back at favorite episodes and highlights of the show!
Season 3 Volume 2 9 July 19, 2005
  • Next on Lost in Space: Princess of Space, The Time Merchant, The Promised Planet, Fugitives in Space, Space Beauty, The Flaming Planet, The Great Vegetable Rebellion, Junkyard of Space and The Condemned of Space
  • Target Earth Act Break
  • Interstitial Blooper / Bill Mumy
  • Interview Clips (from 1995): Resolving the show, Bob May and The Robot, Thoughts on the cast / Jonathan Harris, Getting the role, Comedic Villain and Motivation for Dr. Zachary Smith

January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Title translated

  • Brazilian Portuguese: Perdidos no Espaço
  • Croatian: Izgubljeni u svemiru
  • French: Perdus dans l'espace
  • Japanese: 宇宙家族ロビンソン (Uchuu Kazoku Robinson = Space Family Robinson)
  • Korean: 우주가족 로빈슨 (Uju Gajok Robinseun = Space Family Robinson)
  • Polish: Zagubieni w kosmosie
  • Spanish: Perdidos en el espacio

Brazilian Portuguese (Português Brasileiro in Portuguese) is the group of dialects of Portuguese written and spoken by virtually all the 190 million inhabitants of Brazil and by a couple million Brazilian immigrants, mainly in the United States, Portugal, Canada, Japan, and Paraguay. ...

Trivia

Dr. Smith from the Lost in Space episode "The Forbidden World."
  • Comedy Series Fast Forward sent-up Lost In Space In Series 1 (1989).
  • Although the Robot had no name, in the third-season episode entitled "The Time Merchant," it was shown in its packing crate, and the crate was labelled "ONE General Utility Non-Theorizing Environmental ROBOT" with the G, U, N, T, E, and all letters in "ROBOT" in red capital letters, while all the other letters were black; some have suggested that this was supposed to convey the acronym "GUNTER".[3]
  • A pilot episode without the robot or the Dr. Smith character was filmed but never broadcast. Most of the footage from the first pilot was used in the second as well as early episodes from the first season.
  • Doctor Smith and the Robot did not appear in the first, unaired pilot episode (which has since been made available on VHS tapes,iTunes and on the DVD release of the entire series). Story editor Anthony Wilson came up with the idea of including a "Long John Silver" type villain to act as a constant irritant to compensate for the lack of conflict within the Robinson family. Writer Shimon Wincelberg fleshed out the character, giving him an exotic foreign-sounding name. Irwin Allen wanted a plain all-American name for the doctor so it was changed to the generic "Smith."[4]
  • According to Lost in Space: The Ultimate Unauthorized Trivia Challenge for the Classic TV Series, by James Hatfield and George "Doc" Burt, the role of Doctor Smith was originally written for Carroll O'Connor (who turned it down). Character actor Jack Elam was also considered before Jonathan Harris was chosen for the role.
  • Smith is blamed, in "The Reluctant Stowaway", for the Jupiter II encountering a meteor swarm shortly after leaving Earth -- his weight caused the autopilot to miscalculate so it could not dodge the swarm. However, as learned in the second-season episode "The Time Merchant", the Robinsons owe Smith an enormous debt because, had he not been aboard, the stable, planned flight path would have caused the ship to collide with an uncharted asteroid six months into its flight.
  • Harris was the last to be cast but chafed at the thought of his name appearing at the end of the opening credits. To enhance his billing status he invented a title for himself: "Special Guest Star."
  • In early episodes Dr. Smith is a purely evil, cold-hearted saboteur who makes repeated attempts to murder the Robinsons. He was even given eye-liner to make him look more sinister and cat-like. Harris hated playing the snarling, unappealing villain and knew his character would soon be killed off unless changes were made. To that end he saved his role—and, many say the series itself—by gradually transforming him into a sympathetic comedic-villain. The revamped Smith was really a composite of previous roles. On The Bill Dana Show Harris played the pompous, irritable manager of a snooty hotel—imperious to his employees and obsequious toward his guests. On The Third Man he played a fussy, cowardly, eager-to-please accountant. Combine the two and add some childlike flaws (lazy, selfish, and deceitful) and you have Smith. In fact, Harris played a variety of Smith-like characters, or characters with one or more of those traits, throughout his long career.
  • Two of the show's stars did not appear in the final episode, supposedly as punishment for being unable to keep from laughing during the filming of "The Great Vegetable Rebellion".
  • The Jupiter 2 was evidently modeled somewhat on the spaceship C-57D from the classic '50s sci-fi film Forbidden Planet
  • The Forbidden Planet character Robby the Robot guest starred in two episodes: War of the Robots, and Condemned of Space.
  • The Robot has inspired a dedicated fan base, many striving to build their own Robot.[5] Since the series conclusion, hobbyists around the world have built at least 15 detailed full-size replicas of the Robot, although the original outfit still exists in deteriorated condition.
  • Jonathan Harris and Mark Goddard are the only actors to appear in every episode of the series. Guy Williams, June Lockhart, Marta Kristen, Bill Mumy and Angela Cartwright appeared in the second highest amount of episodes, appearing in 81 of the 83 episodes.
  • Harris was supposed to reprised his role as Dr. Zachary Smith on a TV movie, Lost In Space: The Journey Home, but was taken ill and died late in 2002, hence, production was scrapped.
  • With the passing of Jonathan Harris on November 3, 2002, Bill Mumy, June Lockhart, Mark Goddard, Marta Kristen and Angela Cartwright are the only surviving members of Lost in Space. On November 27, 2002, just three weeks after Harris' death, the producers of A&E did a biography of Jonathan Harris: Never Fear, Smith Is Here!, where Space co-star Bill Mumy, provided the narration.

Image File history File links Dr-Smith-oxygen-mask-1966. ... Image File history File links Dr-Smith-oxygen-mask-1966. ... John Carroll OConnor (August 2, 1924 – June 21, 2001) was an Irish American actor, most famous for his portrayal of the character Archie Bunker in the television sitcoms All in the Family (1971-1979) and Archie Bunkers Place (1979-1983). ... The Third Man (1949) is a British film noir directed by Carol Reed. ... The Great Vegetable Rebellion was an episode of the CBS series Lost in Space, first shown on February 28, 1968, it was the penultimate episode of the final season. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... This article is about the 1956 film. ... A film poster for Forbidden Planet showing Robby. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... A&E is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: A&E Network (Arts and Entertainment), an American television network the Accident and Emergency department of a hospital This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with... The Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited (Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited; ASX: ANZ, NZX: ANZ, NYSE: ANZ), commonly called ANZ, is the third largest bank in Australia, after the National Australia Bank and the Commonwealth Bank. ... For other uses, see Dalek (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ http://web.archive.org/web/20050504051301/caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/data2/californiastatecases/b153239.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.courtinfo.ca.gov/courts/minutes/documents/SNOV1704.DOC
  3. ^ see these screen shots
  4. ^ Starlog, no. 159, Oct. 1990
  5. ^ B9 Robot Builders Club

Subscript text


External Links


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