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Encyclopedia > Lost counties, cities and towns of Virginia

Lost counties, cities and towns of Virginia are those which formerly existed in the English Colony of Virginia or the Commonwealth of Virginia as one of the United States. State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ...


This article will focus on the some of the lost cities counties, and towns (both incorporated and not) once located in Virginia. At least at the local level, most (if not all) are not truly lost, as was North Carolina's Lost Colony from Roanoke Island. For most, it is known with a high degree of certainty (and some secrecy in a few instances) what became of them. Some of these "lost" communities which are now in other states currently exist under their prior names, and surely the citizens of each do not consider them to be "lost" at all. Within Virginia, most records seem to prefer the word "extinct" as opposed to "lost." In this article, the words should be considered to have the same meaning. In the popular imagination lost cities are real, prosperous, well-populated areas of human habitation that have fallen into terminal decline and been lost to history. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley (D) Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... A map of the Roanoke area, by John White Roanoke Island is an island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. ... A map of the Roanoke area, by John White Roanoke Island is an island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. ...


One former Virginia county now forms an entire state. A wave of consolidations of local governments in eastern Virginia in the 20th century (from 1952-1976) eliminated 5 counties, 3 cities, and 1 incorporated town, but did result in creation of 2 brand new cities, and expansion of one city from 2 to 250 square miles (5 to 650 km²). Now, even the Great Dismal Swamp is located in two Virginia cities! The Great Dismal Swamp is located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The stories of the lost counties, cities and towns of Virginia lead to tales of success, failure, great wisdom, honor, tragedy, natural and historic preservation and even national security. They are a combination of fact, fiction, and legend. Although the fictional Mayberry and neighboring Mt. Pilot belong to North Carolina, Virginia can lay claim to television history and a bit of fun with Walton's Mountain, Valleyville, and real places with names like Wash Woods, said to have been built from the wreckage of ships at the False Capes along the Atlantic Ocean. Mayberry is the name of a fictional town in North Carolina which was the setting for the American television show The Andy Griffith Show. ... Mt. ... Waltons Mountain is the name of a fictional town in Virginia which was the setting for the American television show The Waltons and several made-for-television films. ...

Contents


History: 400 years

Local government in Virginia has one of the longer histories of the English-speaking settlements of North America. It all began with the settlement at Jamestown in 1607 (a poorly-sited location later abandoned) and Kecoughtan a better-sited location essentially stolen from Native Americans in 1610 which in the 21st century lays claim to status as the oldest continually-occupied settlement in the British Colonies in what is now the United States. World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere, bounded on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west... Jamestown was a village by the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles (70 kilometers) southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now. ... Events January 20 - Tidal wave swept along the Bristol Channel, killing 2000 people. ... Kecoughtan in Virginia was originally named Kikotan (also spelled Kecoughtan and Kikowtan), presumably a word for the native americans living there when the English colonists arrived in the Hampton Roads area in 1607. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, circa 1908. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ...


For almost 400 years, hundreds of counties, cities, and towns were formed in the Colony of Virginia and later the Commonwealth (State) of Virginia (the Old Dominion). It was generally the tradition of the English during the colonial period to establish large geographic units, and then to subsequently sub-divide them into smaller more manageable units. This two-phase process was conducted in order to establish legal claims to maximum territory. As areas were settled the large territories were subdivided for a variety of reasons.


Counties

The local governmental unit of a "county" came to Virginia following the form of shires (or counties) in England in 1634. The concept as it was brought to North America, was to have an area of size such that legal matter such as recordation of land and property transfers, resolutions of disputes, and other matters could be handled at a "court" within a day's journey of travel from of its all parts. As the population of counties grew, especially into more distant geographic extremities, many counties were subdivided to form additional counties. Having counties comprised of areas of common interests to the citizens became a more important factor as the distance one could travel in a single day increased. Throughout the United States, counties are generally the setting for local courts, and local courts are still the designated places for recording land transactions and resolving civil disputes and criminal matters. Originally, in continental Europe, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count. ... For information on the fictional Shire of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, see Shire (Middle-earth) A shire is an administrative area of Great Britain. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... A court is an official, public forum which a public power establishes by lawful authority to adjudicate disputes, and to dispense civil, labour, administrative and criminal justice under the law. ... Look up Civil in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word Civil is derived from the Latin word civilis, from civis (citizen). Used as an adjective, it may describe several fields, concepts, and people: Civil death Civil defense Civil disobedience Civil engineering Civil law Civil liberties Civil libertarianism Civil marriage Civil... for other uses please see Crime (disambiguation) A crime is an act that violates a political or moral law. ...


Of the 50 states, only in Louisiana and Alaska are no counties found. In Louisiana, parishes are essentially the equivalents of counties. Most of Alaska is divided into boroughs, although much of the state does not fall under any division below the state level. Both Connecticut and Rhode Island are nominally subdivided into counties for census purposes and ease of geographic reference, though neither state actually has any governmental entity operating on the county level. In both states, therefore, the local municipalities are direct subdivisions of the state, and state courts are located primarily in the states' population centers. State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans, officially (currently Baton Rouge due to the evacuation of New Orleans) Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455... State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski (R) Official languages English Area 1,067,653 mi² / 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... A borough is a local government administrative subdivision used in the Canadian province of Quebec, in some states of the United States, and formerly in New Zealand. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell (R) Official languages English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... State nickname: The Ocean State, Little Rhody Other U.S. States Capital Providence Largest city Providence Governor Donald Carcieri (R) Official languages None Area 4,005 km² (50th)  - Land 2,709 km²  - Water 1,296 km² (32. ...


Independent cities

In Virginia, under state constitutional changes after the American Civil War (1861-1865), beginning in 1871, cities became politically independent of the counties. For many practical purposes, an independent city in Virginia since then had been comparable to a county. Many agencies of the U.S. Government consider Virginia's independent cities to be county-equivalents. The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another local government entity. ... A county-equivalent in the United States is a term used by the federal government to describe one of the two following state subdivisions: A unit of local government in certain states which is comparable to a county as found in most states. ...


Incorporated towns

Formally organized towns with an elected central government are incorporated towns. In Virginia, all incorporated towns are located within counties, and do not have their own courts, which are shared with the host county. Most share school systems and provision of other governmental services with their respective county. An incorporated town in the United States is a town which is an incorporated municipality, that is, one with a charter received from the state, similar to a city. ...


Unincorporated towns

In Virginia, unincorporated towns are essentially communities which are not formally organized. They may also be called villages. Virginia does not officially recognize villages or unincorporated towns as a unit of political subdivision of the state, as are all counties, independent cities, and incorporated towns. Township is also an unused term in Virginia. A street in Ynysybwl, Wales, relatively stereotypical of a small town A town is usually an urban area which is not considered to rank as a city. ... A village is a human settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... The term township generally means the district or area associated with a town. ...


Virginia in 2005

As of February 2005, Virginia currently has 95 counties, 39 independent cities, and 43 incorporated towns. There are also hundreds of communities in Virginia with their own identities which may be considered by some to be unincorporated towns.


Some of the older counties still operating under their earliest names (or with only very minor variations) are Charles City County, James City County and Henrico County, each of which is one of the original eight shires (or counties) which were formed by the Virginia House of Burgesses (predecessor to the Virginia General Assembly) and King Charles I of England in 1634. Of these, with a substantial portion of the mostly rural population claiming Native American roots, Charles City County probably has the best claim to being still being in its earlier form in the 21st century. Charles City Shire Charles City County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Richmond Area  - Total  - Water 634 km² (245 mi²) 17 km² (7 mi²) 2. ... The House of Burgesses was the name given to the first elected legislative assembly in the New World. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The name Charles I is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland Charles I of France (also known as Charles the Bald) Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the German Empire) Charles I of Romania Charles I... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement...


While dozens of other localities in Virginia also trace their roots to the 17th century, hundreds more have changed their names, were merged or been annexed by neighbors, are now located in other states,or for many other reasons no longer exist in Virginia.


Areas of Virginia now in other states

In the simplest terms, most or all of four other states (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia) were originally located in Colonial Virginia. It is important to bear in mind that the major highways of travel were waterways in the 17th century. Generally, the earliest border descriptions used were more specific regarding eastern edges and waterways, and much more vague about western extremities, especially in the description of land areas. State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ...


Pennsylvania: 1 lost county

There were many disputes over boundaries in western Virginia and Pennsylvania prior to 1780. Similar conflicts between Maryland and Pennsylvania were resolved by 1767 through the work of two men chosen by the sixth Lord Baltimore (for Maryland) and Thomas Penn and his brother Richard Penn (sons of Thomas Penn, and proprietors of Pennsylvania). Astronomer Charles Mason and surveyor Jeremiah Dixon came from England to do this work. The line they surveyed in 1766 and 1767 has since been known as the Mason and Dixon's Line. However, their authority extended west only as far as Western Maryland, and did not resolve border conflicts in the area known as Yohogania County. Virginia and Pennsylvania disputes there and elsewhere along the Virginia-Pennsylvania border areas continued throughout the remainder of the colonial period. State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admission... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Baron Baltimore is a defunct title in the Peerage of Ireland. ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a scientist whose area of research is astronomy or astrophysics. ... Charles Mason (1730–1787) was an English astronomer. ... Surveying is concerned with the application of mathematics and physics in obtaining accurate measurements for the determination of the position of points on the Earths surface. ... Jeremiah Dixon (July 27, 1733 – January 22, 1779) was an English surveyor and astronomer who is perhaps best known for his work with Charles Mason, from 1763 to 1767, in determining what was later called the Mason-Dixon line. ... The Mason-Dixon Line Literally, the Mason-Dixon Line (or Mason and Dixons Line) demarcated state boundaries between the Province of Pennsylvania, the Province of Maryland, Delaware Colony and parts of Virginia Colony in colonial North America and between their successor-state members of the United States. ... Yohogania County was an area disputed between Virginia and Pennsylvania. ...


After the areas in dispute became part of the newly-formed United States, the new states of Virginia and Pennsylvania (each one of the first thirteen states which formed the union) soon reached an agreement, and most of Yohogania County became part of Pennsylvania in the 1780s under terms agreed of the state legislatures of both Virginia and Pennsylvania. A small remaining portion left in Virginia was too small to form a county, and was annexed to another Virginia counties, Ohio County. It is now Hancock County, West Virginia and part of Brooke County, West Virginia. Ohio County is a county located in the northern panhandle of the state of West Virginia. ... Hancock County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Brooke County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ...


The areas of Yohogania County ceded to Pennsylvania included all of present-day Westmoreland County and parts of the present counties of Allegheny (including most of the city of Pittsburgh, Beaver, Washington, and Fayette Counties. Ohio and Monongalia Counties also lost territory that they claimed to Pennsylvania (Washington, Greene and Fayette) counties in this realignment. Westmoreland County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Allegheny County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... (This article is about the city. ... Beaver County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ... Fayette County is a county located in the state of Pennsylvania. ...


Illinois and Indiana: 1 lost county

By the time the United States was formed late in the 18th century following the American Revolutionary War, the areas which formed Illinois (the Prairie State) and Indiana (the Hoosier State) were all contained in only one Virginia county, which was named Illinois County. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... French settlements and forts in the Illinois Country in 1763, showing U.S. current state boundaries. ...


In 1787, the future states of Indiana and Illinois became part of the original Northwest Territory, part of which was partially carved from land previously in the far western portions of Virginia. The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 passed by the United States Congress allowed for the creation of as many as five states in the northwest portion of the Ohio Valley on lines originally laid out in 1784 by Thomas Jefferson. 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Northwest Territory, also known as the Old Northwest and the Territory North West of the Ohio, was a government and region within the early United States. ... The Northwest Ordinance (formally An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States, North-West of the River Ohio, and also known as the Freedom Ordinance) was an act of the Continental Congress of the United States passed on July 13, 1787 under the Articles of Confederation. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797–1801) Vice President of the United States, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land owner, architect, archaeologist, slaveowner, author, inventor, lawyer and founder of...


Known as the Northwest Territory (not to be confused with the Northwest Territories of Canada), the new federal lands were east of the Mississippi River, and between the Ohio River and the Great Lakes. The region comprised more than 260,000 square miles. The ordinance defined the boundaries of the future states, excluded slavery and required that 60,000 inhabitants be present for statehood. Ultimately, the territory was organized into the present states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin. Motto: None Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Area 1,346,106 km² (3rd) Land 1,183,085 km² Water 163,021 km² (12. ... Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin  Lake Itasca Mouth  Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm (D) Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... State nickname: Badger State State motto: Forward Other U.S. States Capital [[Cheese| OfficialLang = None | LargestCity = Milwaukee | Governor = Michael Jackson (D)| PostalAbbreviation = WI | AreaRank = 23rd | TotalArea = 169,790 | LandArea = 140,787 | WaterArea = 28,006 | PCWater = 17 | PopRank = 18th | 2000Pop =0| DensityRank = 24th | 2000Density = 38. ...


Subdivided from the Northwest Territory, the Indiana Territory came into being in 1800, and included both Indiana and Illinois. In 1816, Indiana became the 19th state. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st state. Indiana Territory was an organized territory of the United States from 1800 to 1816, created by Act of Congress and signed into law by President John Adams on May 7, 1800, effective on July 4. ... 1800 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Kentucky: 10 lost counties

At the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, large numbers of Virginia settlers began migrating through the Cumberland Gap into what is now Kentucky. Kentucky County was formed in Virginia in 1776. Four years later it was divided into the Fayette, Jefferson, and Lincoln counties of Virginia. The State of Kentucky (the Blue Grass state) was formed in its entirety from the State of Virginia, being admitted to the Union as the fifteenth state in 1792. The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... The Cumberland Gap was the chief passageway through the Appalachian Mountains in early American history. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... Kentucky County was formed in Virginia in 1776. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


The ten (10) Virginia counties "lost" in the formation of the new State of Kentucky were (alphabetically):

Many of these names were later reused to name other new Virginia counties. Some of those were "lost" again when the state of West Virginia was formed in 1863. Bourbon County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Fayette County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Kentucky County was formed in Virginia in 1776. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Madison County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Mason County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Mercer County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Nelson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Woodford County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


West Virginia: 50 lost counties

Much as counties were subdivided as the population grew to maintain a government of a size and location both convenient and of citizens with common interests (at least to some degree), as Virginia grew, the portions which remained after the subdivision of Kentucky in 1776 became more populated. For the western areas, problems were the distance from the state seat of government in Richmond and the difference of common economic interests resultant from the tobacco and food crops farming, fishing, and coastal shipping on the Eastern Continental Divide (waters which drain to the Atlantic Ocean) along the Allegheny Mountains, and the interests of the western portion which drained to the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and the Gulf of Mexico. The western area focused it commerce on neighbors to the west, and many citizens felt that the more populous eastern areas were too dominant in the State Legislature and insensitive to their needs. Major crisis in the Virginia state government were adverted during the period before the American Civil War, but the underlying problems were fundamental and never well-resolved. The Eastern Divide or Eastern Continental Divide is a continental divide in the United States that separates the Gulf of Mexico drainage from the watersheds that flow directly into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Allegheny Mountains are a part of the Appalachian mountain range located in the eastern United States. ... Carl D. Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right. ... Length 6,270 km Elevation of the source 450 m Average discharge Saint Louis¹: 5,500 m³/s Vicksburg²: 16,800 m³/s Baton Rouge³: 12,800 m³/s Area watershed 2,980,000 km² Origin  Lake Itasca Mouth  Gulf of Mexico Basin countries United States (98. ... Gulf of Mexico. ... The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...


Although slavery was not the major economic issue for the western counties, which were much less dependent upon large scale labor-intensive farming than their eastern counterparts, states rights were an issue for the majority of Virginians, regardless of geographic location. The American Civil War brought Virginia's internal problems with eastern and western conflicting state governmental needs to resolution. The early occupation of the western lands by Union forces and Virginia's divided loyalties led to the formation of the new State of West Virginia, which was admitted to the Union in 1863. West Virginia is known as the Mountain State. The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin (D) Official languages English Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ...


Although the State of Virginia had lost only ten counties when Kentucky became state in 1776, the number of lost counties (and cities and towns) was much greater when West Virginia was subdivided. Some of these were names which had been reused by Virginia after the State of Kentucky was subdivided in 1776.


Listed alphabetically, the 48 counties of Virginia lost to the formation of West Virginia were:

In 1866, two more counties decided in local referendums that they also wanted to be part of the new state of West Virginia, bringing the total to 50. These last 2 counties were: Barbour County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Boone County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Braxton County is a county located in the central part of the state of West Virginia. ... Brooke County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Cabell County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Calhoun County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Clay County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Doddridge County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Fayette County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Gilmer County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Greenbrier County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Hampshire County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Hancock County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Hardy County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Harrison County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Jackson County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Kanawha County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Lewis County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Logan County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... McDowell County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Marion County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Marshall County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Mason County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Mercer County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Monongalia County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Monroe County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Morgan County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Nicholas County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Ohio County is a county located in the northern panhandle of the state of West Virginia. ... Pendleton County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Pleasants County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Pocahontas County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Preston County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Putnam County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Raleigh County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Randolph County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Ritchie County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Roane County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Taylor County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Tucker County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Tyler County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Upshur County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Wayne County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Webster County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Wetzel County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Wirt County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Wood County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Wyoming County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ...

Also lost to Virginia with the formation of West Virginia were many cities and towns. A partial listing of these (there were many more) are: Berkeley County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ...

Alfred Beckley Beckley is a city located in Raleigh County, West Virginia (Founded Apr. ... Bath (Berkeley Springs) is a town in Morgan County, West Virginia. ... Charles Town is a city located in Jefferson County, West Virginia. ... Charleston, WV Capitol Building Charleston is the capital of West Virginia, a state of the United States of America. ... Clarksburg is a city located in Harrison County, West Virginia. ... Elkins is a city located in Randolph County, West Virginia. ... Fairmont is a city located in Marion County, West Virginia. ... Fayetteville is a town located in Fayette County, West Virginia. ... Franklin is a town located in Pendleton County, West Virginia. ... Grafton is a city located in Taylor County, West Virginia. ... Harpers Ferry is a town located in Jefferson County, West Virginia. ... Harrisville is a town located in Ritchie County, West Virginia. ... Jacksons Mill, owned by Cummins Jackson Cummins Jackson was a paternal uncle of Confederate General Thomas Jonathon Stonewall Jackson (1824-1863). ... Lewisburg is a city located in Greenbrier County, West Virginia. ... Martinsburg is a city located in Berkeley County, West Virginia. ... Moundsville is a city located in Marshall County, West Virginia. ... Morgantown is a city located in Monongalia County, West Virginia on the banks of the Monongahela River. ... New Cumberland is a city located in Hancock County, West Virginia. ... Parkersburg is the county seat of Wood County6. ... Philippi is a city located in Barbour County, West Virginia. ... Point Pleasant is a city located in Mason County, West Virginia. ... Princeton is a city located in Mercer County, West Virginia. ... Ripley is a city located in Jackson County, West Virginia. ... Early 20th Century view of Romney The Old Hampshire County Courthouse (c. ... Shepherdstown is a town located in Jefferson County, West Virginia. ... St. ... Summersville is a town located in Nicholas County, West Virginia. ... Union is a town located in Monroe County, West Virginia. ... Weston is a city located in Lewis County, West Virginia. ... Wheeling is a city located in West Virginia, in the United States. ... White Sulphur Springs is a city located in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, United States. ...

Summary of areas Virginia "lost" to other states

By the time Virginia drafted a new state constitution during Reconstruction, 62 former counties had become located in other states. Of course, many cities and towns were "lost" in those areas as well. In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ...


Areas now in Virginia

Virginia began losing counties, cities, and towns as almost as early as any were formed. The reasons vary widely, from known and very logical to unknown. The very first town, Jamestown, which was first settled in 1607, is probably the best known of all of these.


Jamestown 1607: Where it all started

When Captain Christopher Newport sailed the three tiny ships Susan Constant, Godspeed, and the Discovery up the James River and found the site of Jamestown, the location seemed most ideal from the considerations of defense against other humans. It was a semi-island, technically a narrow peninsula separated from the mainland by a narrow isthmus of land. Christopher Newport (c. ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Godspeed was one of the three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Discovery was a 70-ton fly-boat of the English East India Company, launched before 1602. ... The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 547. ... A peninsula is a geographical formation consisting of an extension of land from a larger body, surrounded by water on three sides. ... Simplified diagram An isthmus is a narrow strip of land, bordered on two sides by water, and connects two larger land masses. ...


The location upstream on the James River from Hampton Roads and the Chesapeake Bay leading to the Atlantic Ocean was relatively safe from the ocean-going navies of the other European non-English countries who were also establishing colonies and periodically at war with England, notably at the time, the Dutch, the French, and especially the Spanish. Hampton Roads, the worlds greatest harbor, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. ...


The site selected for Jamestown was also not on land occupied by Native Americans, whom the settlers called "Indians" (a name apparently derived from the mistaken belief at the time that a favorable trade route to India lay somewhere close by to the west). Unfortunately for the settlers at Jamestown, there were very good reasons why the Native Americans did not consider Jamestown as prime estate to locate a village.


The area at Jamestown was isolated from most hunting game such as deer and bears, who like to forage over much larger areas. The settlers quickly killed off and ate all the large and smaller game which were to be found on the tiny peninsula. The low marshy area was infested with mosquitoes and other air-borne pests. The brackish water of the tidal James River was not a good source of drinking water. Most of the early settlers died of disease and starvation. All might have died had not Chief Powhatan, the local Native American leader, decided to provide some food to them. However, Powhatan limited the rations, and used food as leverage to gain power over the settlers. Subfamilies Capreolinae Cervinae Hydropotinae Muntiacinae Defined strictly, a deer is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Brackish water is water that is saltier than fresh water, but not as salty as sea water. ... This article is about tides in the ocean. ... Chief Powhatan, whose proper name was Wahunsunacock, was the leader of the Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), a very powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in Tenakomakah, what is now Virginia at the time of the first English-Native encounters. ...


By 1611, it seemed that Jamestown was a failure. Virtually every settler died within a few years of arriving in the colony. After four years, no gold or precious gems were discovered. No crops or animals were found that could be exported back to Europe for a profit. However, financial incentives including a promise of more land to the west from King James I to the investors financing the new colony kept the project afloat. By 1617, tobacco exports were starting to generate enough profit to ensure the survival of the colony economically, and the Jamestown settlement became capital of the colony in 1619. Events November 1 - At Whitehall Palace in London, William Shakespeares romantic comedy The Tempest is presented for the first time. ... James VI of Scots and James I of England and Ireland (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) ruled England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. ... Events Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed I (1603-1617) to Mustafa I (1617-1623). ... Species N. glauca N. longiflora N. rustica N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005 Tobacco (, L.) refers to a genus of broad-leafed plants of the nightshade family, indigenous to North and South America, or to the dried and cured leaves. ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ...


When the Capital of the Virginia Colony was relocated to Middle Plantation in 1699 (and renamed Williamsburg), the settlement was finally abandoned shortly thereafter. It soon reverted to its natural state and actually became an island as the isthmus was severed by weather events at a later date which no one seems to have bothered to record. It would be fair to say that the town of Jamestown was "lost" for all the right reasons. Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ...


Apparently, it took earlier generations of Virginians a while to forget about the tough times at Jamestown, and (perhaps like a recent bereavement of a relative) for a long time, no one seemed ready to celebrate what did occur there. However, as the tercentennial of the founding of Jamestown approached early in the 20th century, a celebration of the 300th anniversary was planned. Although there was competition for a site, all of the organizers apparently knew they should hold it somewhere else rather than the original site of the abandoned settlement.


The Jamestown Exposition in 1907 was held at Sewell's Point on Hampton Roads, near Norfolk and visitors came from all over the world. By the 350th anniversary in 1957, new attention had been drawn by the extensive restoration of the nearby capital of Colonial Williamsburg. The National Park Service extended its bucolic Colonial Parkway to reach Jamestown and restored the isthmus to Jamestown Island, making it accessible as a peninsula once again. The state of Virginia relocated the landing for the Jamestown Ferry (which crosses the river to Scotland in Surry County) and built Jamestown Festival Park. Three replica ships of Christopher Newport's fleet were built at Portsmouth and docked nearby. Queen Elizabeth II of England and her consort, Prince Phillip paid a state visit. The Jamestown Exposition was one of the many worlds fairs and expositions that were popular in the United States early part of the 20th century. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Hampton Roads, Virginia 1858 Sewells Point is a peninsula of land in the independent city of Norfolk, Virginia in the United States, located at the mouth of the salt-water port of Hampton Roads. ... Norfolk is a city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States of America. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States Federal Government agency that deals with all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation properties with various designations. ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... Jamestown Ferry (also known as the Jamestown-Scotland Ferry) is an automobile ferry on the James River in Virginia, connecting Jamestown in James City County with Scotland in Surry County. ... Surry County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and her consort Prince Phillip inspect replica of Susan Constant at Jamestown Festival Park in Virginia on October 16, 1957 Jamestown Festival Park was established at Jamestown, Virginia in 1957 to mark the 350th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Settlement. ... Portsmouth (pronounced Port-smith) is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor, born 21 April 1926), styled Her Majesty The Queen, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born 10 June 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ...


Since, 1957, Jamestown has remained as a permanent attraction. Big plans are underway for the 400th anniversary in 2007. The State of Virginia has made a major commitment and has enlisted big corporate sponsors such as Norfolk Southern Corporation, a Fortune 500 company which itself has a rich Virginia railway heritage to support Jamestown 2007. (Norfolk Southern's predecessor railroads, including the Norfolk and Western Railway and the Virginian Railway provided major transportation services for attendees at the 1907 event). 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Jamestown 2007 is the name of the celebration planned for the 400th anniversary of founding of the Jamestown Settlement in 1607. ... Norfolk and Western Railway - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Virginian Railway (AAR reporting mark VGN) was a Class 1 railroad located in Virginia and West Virginia in the United States. ...


Starting in 1994, a major archaeological campaign, conducted by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, has discovered the remains of the 1607 settlement, and greatly increased our knowledge of Jamestown. 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Founded in 1889, the Richmond, Virginia-based Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities was the United States first statewide historic preservation group. ...


Even as Jamestown has been reborn (in a way), normally only the wildlife and perhaps security personnel from the U.S. Park Police regularly spend the night there. As a memorial of the past, representatives of several Native American tribes deliver turkeys and other gifts to the Governor at Richmond, the third capital city of Virginia, late each year. The United States Park Police is the oldest uniformed federal law enforcement agency in the United States. ...


Lost shires: 8

Since there are no "shires" in Virginia, and haven't been since the terminology was changed to "county" within a few years during the 17th century, under a strict interpretation, one might say they were all lost to posterity, at least in name. However, it is worthy of note that, of the eight shires created by the Virginia House of Burgesses (predecessor to the Virginia General Assembly) and King Charles I of England in 1634, although all have lost some areas, aside from name changes, 6 of the original 8 shires are still extant as counties in Virginia in 2005. Some of these local courthouses even contain land records and other documents which predate the shires of 1634, although were heavily damaged during the American Revolutionary War and American Civil War, each of which took a heavy toll on eastern Virginia. The House of Burgesses was the name given to the first elected legislative assembly in the New World. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The name Charles I is used to refer to numerous persons in history: Kings: Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland Charles I of France (also known as Charles the Bald) Charles I of Spain (also known as Charles V of the German Empire) Charles I of Romania Charles I... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... The American Civil War was fought in North America from 1861 until 1865 between the United States of America – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...


The eight shires of Virginia were:

Northampton County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Charles City Shire was formed in 1634 in the Virginia colony. ... Charles City Shire Charles City County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Charles River Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Yorktown Area  - Total  - Water 558 km² (216 mi²) 285 km² (110 mi²) 50. ... Elizabeth City Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Elizabeth City Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... James City Shire was formed in the British colony of Virginia in 1634. ... James City County is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Richmond Area  - Total  - Water 634 km² (245 mi²) 17 km² (7 mi²) 2. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1634 Seat Richmond Area  - Total  - Water 634 km² (245 mi²) 17 km² (7 mi²) 2. ... Warroysoyaoke Shire was formed in 1634 in the Virginia colony. ... Isle of Wight County is a county located in the South Hampton Roads region of state of Virginia in the United States. ... Warwick River Shire was one of eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Warwick County was originally one of the eight shires created in colonial Virginia in 1634. ... Warwick is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1952 until 1958. ...

Lost counties: 18

There were 18 counties located in parts of Virginia which are currently within the state which either no longer exist or radically changed their names.


One of these, Alexandria County (not to be confused with the City of Alexandria) left Virginia for approximately 57 years (1791-1846) to become part of the District of Columbia, then came back. 74 years after returning to Virginia, it changed its name and is now known as Arlington County. At only 26 square miles, it is Virginia's smallest county in land area. Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 9 July 1846 Seat Arlington Area  - Total  - Water 67. ...


Two other current counties in the state re-used the names of older lost counties. These newer counties (one name earlier lost to Kentucky, the other on the following list) are respectively, Madison and Rappahannock. Both the newer counties of that name are located in Virginia's piedmont region.


The extinct counties of Virginia (alphabetically) were:

Dunmore County was a county in Virginia formed in 1772. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... Phoebus was a town located in Elizabeth City County on the Virginia Peninsula in eastern Virginia. ... Hampton is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed Seat Christiansburg Area  - Total  - Water 1,005 km² (388 mi²) 3 km² (1 mi²) 0. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Lower Norfolk County is a long-extinct county which was located in colonial Virginia from 1637 until 1691. ... Norfolk County, Virginia (from 1895 map), existed from 1691-1963, now extinct Norfolk County is an extinct political subdivision in eastern Virginia. ... Princess Anne County (1691-1963), now extinct, from 1895 Virginia map Princess Anne County is an extinct county which was located in colonial Virginia and the State of Virginia in the United States from 1691 until 1963. ... Nansemond County, now extinct, existed in Virginia from 1646 to 1972 (from 1895 map) Nansemond County is an extinct county which was located in colonial Virginia and the State of Virginia in the United States from 1646 until 1972. ... Nansemond is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1972 until 1974. ... New Norfolk County is a long-extinct county which was located in colonial Virginia from 1636 until 1637. ... Upper Norfolk County is an extinct county which was located in colonial Virginia from 1637 until 1646. ... South Norfolk was an independent city in eastern Virginia. ... Chesapeake is an independent city located in the South Hampton Roads region of eastern Virginia in the United States. ... Virginia Beach is an independent city located in the South Hampton Roads area in the Commonwealth of Virginia, on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. ... Essex County is a county located in the Middle Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1692 Seat Warsaw Area  - Total  - Water 560 km² (216 mi²) 65 km² (25 mi²) 11. ... Warwick is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1952 until 1958. ...

Extinct independent cities: 6

There have been 6 cities in Virginia which are now considered to be extinct. These should not be confused with many small developments in the 17th century which were called "cities," but which we would probably call towns in modern terminology.


The "lost" independent cities of Virginia (alphabetically) were:

Clifton Forge is a town in Alleghany County in the state of Virginia. ... Alleghany County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ... This article is about the city in Virginia. ... Nansemond is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1972 until 1974. ... Location in Virginia Founded  -Incorporated 1742 {{{incorporated}}}  County Independent city Mayor Bobby L. Ralph Area  - Total  - Water 1,111. ... South Boston is a town located in Halifax County, Virginia. ... Halifax County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... South Norfolk was an independent city in eastern Virginia. ... Warwick is an extinct independent city which was located in the State of Virginia in the United States from 1952 until 1958. ... Newport News, Hampton, Portsmouth and Norfolk, Virginia from space, July 1996 Newport News is an independent city located in Virginia. ...

Lost incorporated towns: 8

Many of Virginia's incorporated towns grew to become independent cities. In fact, most of Virginia's current independent cities began that way. Examples of towns which became cities of the same name include the current cities of Charlottesville, Danville, Fredericksburg, Norfolk, Poquoson, Portsmouth, Richmond, and Williamsburg, to name only a few. Only two, Hopewell and Newport News, are known to have gone into existence directly as a city without having been previously incorporated as a town or county. The town and then city of Roanoke made its two step transition in only a couple of years, the fast growth earning the nickame "Magic City". Location in Virginia Founded  -Incorporated 1762   County Independent City Mayor David Brown Area  - Total  - Water 177. ... Danville is an independent city located in Virginia, bounded by Pittsylvania County, Virginia and Caswell County, North Carolina. ... Fredericksburg is an independent city in the U.S. Commonwealth of Virginia, 50 miles south of Washington, D.C., and 55 miles north of Richmond, Virginia. ... Poquoson is an independent city located on the Virginia Peninsula, in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia. ...


It is actually rare in Virginia to find a city which had not previously been incorporated as a town (in a few instances, county). Thus, if an incorporated town became a city of the same name, it will not be listed here as extinct or lost.


The lost incorporated towns of Virginia were:

  • Town of Basic City (1890-1923) consolidated with Town and later the independent City of Waynesboro
  • Town of Berkley (unknown-1906) became part of City of Norfolk
  • Town of Big Lick (1874-1882) became Town and later the independent City of Roanoke
  • Town of Central City (1885-1890) became Town, later City of Radford
  • Town of City Point (1826-1923) became part of the independent City of Hopewell
  • Town of Goodson (1856-1890) became the independent City of Bristol
  • Town of Phoebus (1900-1952) agreed to consolidation with Elizabeth City County into City of Hampton in 1952
  • Town of Potomac (1908-1930) became part of City of Alexandria.

Waynesboro, deriving its name from General Anthony Wayne or possibly Waynes family home, is an independent city located within the confines of Augusta County in the state of Virginia. ... panoramic view of Roanoke, Virginia from 1907 Roanoke (The Star City of the South) is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Waterfront at City Point, Virginia (now Hopewell) in 1865 Hopewell is an independent city in the state of Virginia. ... Motto: A Nice Place to Live Nickname: The Birthplace of Country Music Location in Virginia Founded  -Incorporated {{{incorporated}}}  County Independent city Mayor Dr. Douglas R. Weberling Area  - Total  - Water 34. ... Phoebus was a town located in Elizabeth City County on the Virginia Peninsula in eastern Virginia. ... Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...

Lost unincorporated towns

As one might expect, there are currently hundreds of communities in Virginia which could be considered unincorporated towns. The vast majority of these simply lost their identity through name changes or growth and absorption into other entities. However, while many earlier ones have disappeared in name, and are therefore "lost" as defined in this article, some really are entirely gone.


A few of the lost towns of Virginia have very dramatic stories, and, somewhat like the early settlers of Jamestown, the residents experienced more than a little hardship. While natural factors doomed Jamestown, they also literally wiped out Boyd's Ferry, which was virtually entirely destroyed by flooding of the Dan River in Halifax County around 1800. That town was rebuilt across the river in a better location, and grew to become the Town of South Boston, which was even an incorporated independent city for over 25 years before the citizens decided to rejoin Halifax County as an incorporated town again in 1998. The Dan River flows in both North Carolina and Virginia, USA. It arises in the state of Virginia in Patrick County and crosses the state border into Stokes County. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Problems with Native Americans doomed other early Virginia towns. Henricus (also known as "Henricopolis") is now a historic site in Chesterfield County. In the early 17th century, it was a boom town with an emerging school system until the Indian Massacre of 1622. In fairness to the Native Americans, virtually all of their towns and communities were wiped out by the ever-expanding English settlements in the Virginia Colony. The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed May 25, 1749 Seat Chesterfield Area  - Total  - Water 1,132 km² (437 mi²) 29 km² (11 mi²) 2. ... In 1622, the Indians striked back at the colonists in the Jamestown area. ...


Not all the destruction of communities which are simply no longer there occurred in the earlier times. For example, in the creation of Shenandoah National Park and the famous Skyline Drive between 1924 and 1936, a number of families and entire communities were required to vacate portions of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Many residents in the 500 homes in eight affected counties of Virginia were vehemently opposed to losing their homes and communities. Most of the families removed came from Madison County, Page County, and Rappahannock County. U.S. President Herbert Hoover selected a spot on the Rapidan River for what would become a 164 acre (664,000 m²) presidential retreat, Camp Hoover. Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Piedmont region of Virginia. ... Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Piedmont region of Virginia. ... 1924 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Blue Ridge Mountains (NPS) Most of the rocks that form the Blue Ridge Mountains, United States, are ancient granitic and metamorphosed volcanic formations, some exceeding one billion years in age. ... Madison County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Page County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Rappahannock County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) is best known as being the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933). ... The Rapidan River is a river in Virginia that flows from the Blue Ridge Mountains into the Rappahannock River. ... Camp Hoover in the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia was selected by U.S. President Herbert Hoover to become a 164 acre (664,000 m²) presidential retreat. ...


The development of the Park and the Skyline Drive created badly needed jobs for many Virginians during the Great Depression. Nearly 90% of the inhabitants of the land taken by the worked the land for a living. Many worked in the apple orchards in the valley and in areas near the eastern slopes. The work to create the National Park and the Skyline Drive began following a terrible drought in 1930 which destroyed the crops of many families in the area who farmed in the mountainous terrain, as well as many of the apple orchards were they worked picking crops. Nevertheless, it remains a fact that they were displaced, often against their will, and even for a very few who managed to stay, their communities were lost. A little-known fact is that, while some families were removed by force, a few others (who mostly had also become difficult to deal with) were allowed to stay after their properties were acquired, living in the park until nature took its course and they gradually died. The last to die was Annie Lee Bradley Shenk who died in 1979 at age 92. Most of the people displaced left their homes quietly. According to the Virginia Historical Society, eighty-five-year-old Hezekiah Lam explained, "I ain't so crazy about leavin' these hills but I never believed in bein' ag'in the Government. I signed everythin' they asked me." [1] The lost communities and homes were a price paid for one of the country's most beautiful National Parks and scenic roadways. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... The Virginia Historical Society, founded in 1831, is a major repository, research and teaching center for Virginia history. ...


During World War II, the U.S. Navy took over a large area in York County which became known as Camp Peary. All residents of the entire towns of Magruder and Bigler's Mill were removed. Magruder had been named for Civil War Confederate General John B. Magruder, and a civil war field hospital had occupied the site of Bigler's Mill. Camp Peary later became well-known as "The Farm," a training facility for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Although the roads and structures are still there and occupied, access to the base is still restricted. It would be fair to say that the two towns are "lost" to Virginia, albeit for purposes of national defense. World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that engulfed much of the globe... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Camp Peary is a military reservation in York County, Virginia. ... Magruder was a small town in Virginia near Williamsburg in York County which is now extinct. ... Biglers Mill was a small town in Virginia near Williamsburg in York County which is now extinct. ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... John B. Magruder John Bankhead Magruder ( May 1, 1807 – February 19, 1871) was a U.S. Army officer in the Mexican War, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ...


The following is a partial (alphabetically) listing of "lost" unincorporated towns in Virginia, and in some instances, dates and dispositions:

  • Beahm became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Belfield became part of Town and later the independent City of Emporia
  • Belhaven became Town and independent City of Alexandria
  • Bermuda City became Town of City Point (extinct)
  • Big Meadows became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Bigler's Mill in York County was taken into a U.S. Navy reservation during World War II and is now Camp Peary facility
  • Blandford became part of independent City of Petersburg
  • Bonaparte became the independent City of Galax
  • Boyd's Ferry (1796) became Town of South Boston
  • Central Depot became the independent City of Radford
  • Charles City Point became Town of City Point (extinct)
  • Chesapeake City (not to be confused with the independent City of Chesapeake in South Hampton Roads area formed in 1963) became Town of Phoebus in 1901.
  • Denbigh became part of the independent City of Warwick, later part of the independent City of Newport News
  • English Ferry became the independent City of Radford
  • Fairfax in Culpeper County changed its name and became the incorporated Town of Culpeper (The name was quickly reused by the former Town of Providence in Fairfax County)
  • Frederick's Town became the independent City of Winchester
  • Fourway became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Granite became part of the independent City of Richmond
  • Hazel became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Henricus was wiped out by the Indian Massacre of 1622 and not rebuilt.
  • Hicksford, also known as Hick's Ford, became part of Town and later the independent City of Emporia
  • Holland became part of City of Nansemond, later the independent City of Suffolk
  • Ingle's Ferry became the independent City of Radford
  • Isle of Wight Plantation was a town in what is now Isle of Wight County
  • Jerusalem became Town of Courtland
  • Kecoughtan (1610) became part of the Town of Hampton and later independent City of Hampton
  • Liberty became Town and later the independent City of Bedford
  • Lovely Mount became the independent City of Radford
  • Magruder in York County was taken into a U.S. Navy reservation during World War II and is now part of the Camp Peary facility
  • Middle Plantation (1632) became Town and later the independent City of Williamsburg
  • Millwood became the incorporated Town of Phoebus, later part of the independent city of Hampton
  • Ocean View became part of the independent City of Norfolk
  • Old Rag became part of Shenandoah National Park (The Mountain of the same name is still there)
  • Opequon became the independent City of Winchester
  • Penniman in York County became part of Cheatham Annex (military reservation)
  • Peter's Point became part of Town and later the independent City of Petersburg
  • Pocahontas (not to be confused with the current incorporated Town of Pocahontas in Tazewell County) became part of the independent City of Petersburg
  • Prince's Flats became the independent City of Norton
  • Princess Anne became part of the independent City of Virginia Beach
  • Providence changed its name to became the Town of Fairfax and later the independent City of Fairfax
  • Ravenscroft became part of the independent City of Petersburg
  • Rocklin became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Rocky Ridge became Town of and later City of Manchester, now part of City of Richmond
  • Roseland Farms became the incorporated Town of Phoebus, and later part of the independent City of Hampton
  • Skyland Resort (1895), a privately-owned resort which became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Spring Hill became part of the independent City of Manchester, later part of the independent City of Richmond
  • Strawberry Banks became the incorporated Town of Phoebus, later part of the independent city of Hampton
  • Sydney became part of the independent City of Richmond
  • Tightsqueeze was outside Chatham in Pittsylvania County
  • Upper Pocosin became part of Shenandoah National Park
  • Wangle Junction
  • Wash Woods was located at today's False Cape State Park
  • Whaleyville became part of the independent City of Nansemond, later the independent City of Suffolk
  • Williamson Station became Town of Clifton Forge
  • Wolstenholme Towne was wiped out by the Indian Massacre of 1622 and not rebuilt.
  • Yorke was a town in York County which no longer exists.

Emporia is an independent city located within the confines of Greensville County in Virginia. ... Biglers Mill was a small town in Virginia near Williamsburg in York County which is now extinct. ... Camp Peary is a military reservation in York County, Virginia. ... Petersburg is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Galax is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Radford is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Chesapeake City, Virginia was an unincorporated town in Elizabeth City County, Virginia on the north side of Hampton Roads on the Virginia Peninsula from 1871 to 1900. ... South Hampton Roads is a region located in the extreme southeastern portion of Virginia in the United States. ... Phoebus was a town located in Elizabeth City County on the Virginia Peninsula in eastern Virginia. ... Denbigh was a small unincorporated town in Warwick County, Virginia. ... Culpeper County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Culpeper is a town located in Culpeper County, Virginia. ... Location Location of Fairfax County within Virginia. ... Winchester is a city located in the state of Virginia. ... The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... In 1622, the Indians striked back at the colonists in the Jamestown area. ... Courtland is a town located in Southampton County, Virginia. ... Bedford is an independent city located within the confines of Bedford County in the U.S. state of Virginia. ... Magruder was a small town in Virginia near Williamsburg in York County which is now extinct. ... Camp Peary is a military reservation in York County, Virginia. ... Williamsburg is a city located on the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia. ... Ocean View, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Penniman, Virginia was an unincorporated town in northwestern York County, Virginia on the south bank of the York River. ... Naval Weapons Station Yorktown is a United States Navy base in Virginia. ... Pocahontas is a town located in Tazewell County, Virginia. ... Tazewell County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Norton is an independent city within the confines of Wise County in the state of Virginia. ... Fairfax is an independent city located within the confines of Fairfax County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Factories at Manchester, Virginia, looking across James River, circa 1865 Manchester, Virginia was an independent city in Virginia in the United States. ... Skyland Resort was a small privately-owned community in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Page County, Virginia at the top of a mountain which is now extinct. ... Chatham is a town located in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. ... Wolstenholme Towne was a fortified settlement in the Virginia Colony with a population of about 40 settlers of the Virginia Company of London which was located about 9 miles downstream fromJamestown. ... In 1622, the Indians striked back at the colonists in the Jamestown area. ...

Fictional sites

Walton's Mountain

Virginia has also hosted a number of fictional sites. Among these are those used in the family television series The Waltons, created by Virginian Earl Hamner Jr.. The fictional Walton's Mountain was patterned after Hamner's hometown of Schuyler in Albemarle County near Charlottesville, all of which are extant. The Waltons was an American television series about a family living at Waltons Mountain in the Blue Ridge Mountains in the state of Virginia. ... Earl Henry Hamner Jr. ... Schuyler, Virginia is a town in Albemarle County, Virginia, close to Charlottesville. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed Seat Charlottesville Area  - Total  - Water 1,881 km² (726 mi²) 9 km² (4 mi²) 0. ... Location in Virginia Founded  -Incorporated 1762   County Independent City Mayor David Brown Area  - Total  - Water 177. ...


Shunpikers leaving Interstate 64 or U.S. Highway 29 a few miles away will be able to find Schuyler and the Walton's Mountain Museum, however. As far as can be determined, John Boy Walton's alma mater, Boatwright University, is also lost, although it bears a striking resemblance to the University of Richmond. The term shunpiking comes from the word shun, meaning to avoid, and pike, a term referring to turnpikes, which were roads which required payment of a toll to travel on them. ... Interstate 64 is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ... The University of Richmond is a private, independent university located in Richmond, Virginia. ...


Valleyville

Featured on the "Little-known Attractions of Lynchburg and Central Virginia" website is the lost town of Valleyville, Virginia. Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Valleyville is apparently the home of some type of secret governmental facility. It is said to be "Central Virginia's own twist on the legendary 'Area 51.' Like its famous counterpart, Valleyville is an off-limits region whose only access roads are gated and guarded, whose perimeter is electronically sealed and monitored, and whose existence itself is denied by the government." Blue Ridge Mountains (NPS) Most of the rocks that form the Blue Ridge Mountains, United States, are ancient granitic and metamorphosed volcanic formations, some exceeding one billion years in age. ... Satellite view of Area 51 from 1968. ...


The website also features a map. Valleyville and several other "lost" attractions of the parody website have been the subject of considerable searching and apparently sincere letters of inquiry (which may be read by visitors to the website). [2]


See also

Hampton Roads, the worlds greatest harbor, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... South Hampton Roads is a region located in the extreme southeastern portion of Virginia in the United States. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads, and Chesapeake Bay. ... This is a list of U.S. counties that were established by a state, provincial, colonial, or territorial government, which no longer exist, for one reason or another. ...

References

Books

  • Salmon, Emily J., and Campbell, Edward D.C. Jr., Hornbook of Virginia History (1994), Library of Virginia; Richmond
  • Temple, David G. Merger Politics: Local Government Consolidation in Tidewater Virginia (1972), University Press of Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia

Internet


  Results from FactBites:
 
Virginia - Information at Halfvalue.com (6113 words)
Virginia is bordered by West Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia (across the Potomac River) to the north; by Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; by North Carolina and Tennessee to the south; and by Kentucky and West Virginia to the west.
Virginia was given its nickname, "The Old Dominion", by King Charles II of England at the time of The Restoration, because it had remained loyal to the crown during the English Civil War.
Virginia is one of the states that seceded from the Union (on April 17, 1861) and operated independently until it joined the Confederacy during the Civil War when it turned over its military on June 8 and ratified the Constitution of the Confederate States on June 19.
Britain.tv Wikipedia - Virginia (5285 words)
Virginia is a Commonwealth and is bordered by West Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia (across the Potomac River) to the north; by Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean to the east; by North Carolina and Tennessee to the south; and by Kentucky and West Virginia to the west.
Virginia was given its nickname, "The Old Dominion", by King Charles II of England at the time of The Restoration, because it had remained loyal to the crown during the English Civil War.
Virginia is one of the states that seceded from the Union (on April 17, 1861) and operated independently until it joined the Confederacy during the Civil War when it turned over its military on June 8 and ratified the Constitution of the Confederate States on June 19.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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