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Encyclopedia > Lost city

In the popular imagination lost cities were real, prosperous, well-populated areas of human habitation that fell into terminal decline and whose location was later lost. Most lost cities are found, and have been studied extensively by scientists. Abandoned urban sites of relatively recent origin are generally referred to as ruins.


Lost cities generally fall into three broad categories: those whose disappearance has been so complete that no knowledge of the city existed until the time of its rediscovery and study, those whose location has been lost but whose memory has been retained in the context of myths and legends, and those whose existence and location have always been known, but which are no longer inhabited. The search for such lost cities by European adventurers in the Americas, Africa and in Southeast Asia from the 15th century onwards eventually led to the development of the science of archaeology. World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from Greek: αρχαίος, archaios, combining form in Latin archae-, ancient; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ...

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How are cities lost?

Cities may become lost for a variety of reasons, including geographic, economic, social (e.g. war), others, or some combination of these. Many are lost for reasons that are currently unknown.


An Arabian city named Ubar (Iram of the Pillars) was abandoned after much of the city sank into a sinkhole created by the collapse of an underground cavern, which also destroyed their water supply, and its location was forgotten for some centuries. It was rediscovered in 1992 by satellite photography that revealed the traces of the ancient tradeways. The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Iram of the Pillars. ... Iram of the Pillars (إرَم ذات العماد, Iram dhāt al-`imād), also called Ubar or Wabar or the City of a Thousand Pillars, is a lost city apparently on the Arabian Peninsula. ... An Earth observation satellite, ERS 2 For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ...


Other settlements are lost with few or no clues to guide historians, such as the Colony of Roanoke. In August 1590, John White returned to the former English colony, which had housed 91 men (including White), 17 women (two of them pregnant) and 11 children when he left, to find it completely empty. A map of the Roanoke area, by John White Roanoke Island is an island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. ... A sketch by John White of Indians at Roanoke. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130...


Malden Island, in the central Pacific, was deserted when first visited by Europeans in 1825, but ruined temples and the remains of other structures found on the island indicate that a small population of Polynesians had lived there for perhaps several generations some centuries earlier. Prolonged drought seems the most likely explanation for their demise. The ruins of another city, called Nan Madol, have been found on the Micronesian island of Ponape. In more recent times Port Royal, Jamaica sank into the Caribbean Sea after an earthquake. NASA orbital photo of Malden Island (north at bottom). ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Carving from the ridgepole of a Māori house, ca 1840 Polynesia (from Greek: πολύς many, νῆσος island) is a large grouping of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. ... Nan Madol Nan Madol, consisting of a series of small artificial islands linked by a network of canals, is often called the Venice of the Pacific. ... District center of Pohnpei Map of Pohnpei Pohnpei (also spelled Ponape and earlier Bonabee) is one of the islands in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), and is one of the Senyavin Islands. ... Port-Royal was a Cistercian convent in the Vallée de Chevreuse southwest of Paris that launched a number of culturally important institutions. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean Caribbean Sea from space (top left). ...


Cities have been destroyed by natural disasters and rebuilt again (and again), but the destruction has occasionally been so complete that they were not rebuilt. Classic examples include the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried with many of their inhabitants in a catastrophic flow of volcanic ash after an eruption of Vesuvius. A lesser known example would be Akrotiri, on the island of Thera, where in 1967, under a blanket of ash, the remains of a Minoan city were discovered. The volcanic explosion on Thera was immense, and had disastrous effects on the Minoan civilisation. (It has been suggested that this disaster was the inspiration that Plato used for the story of Atlantis.) Pompeii is a ruined Roman city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio) is a volcano east of Naples, Italy, located at 40°49′N 14°26′ E. It is the only active volcano on the European mainland, although it is not currently erupting. ... Santorini (Greek Σαντορίνη, IPA: ) is a small, circular archipelago of volcanic islands located in southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km south-east from Greeces mainland. ... View from the top of Thira Santorini is a small, circular group of volcanic islands located in the Aegean Sea, 75 km south-east of the Greek mainland, (latitude: 35. ... The Minoan Civilisation was a pre-Hellenic Bronze Age civilization which arose on Crete, a Greek island in the Aegean Sea. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Picture of Platos description of Atlantis Atlantis (Greek: , Island of Atlas) is the name of a legendary island first mentioned in Platos dialogues Timaeus and Critias. ...


Less dramatic examples of the destruction of cities by natural forces are those where the coastline has eroded away. Cities which have sunk into the sea include the one-time centre of the English wool-trade, at Dunwich, England, and the city of Rungholt in Germany which sank into the North Sea in a great stormtide in 1362. This article is about the village and former city of Dunwich in England. ... Likeliest locations of Rungholt Rungholt was a wealthy city in Nordfriesland, northern Germany. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ...


Cities are also often destroyed by wars. This is the case, for instance, with Troy and Carthage, though both of these were subsequently rebuilt, and the Achaemenid capital at Persepolis was accidentally burnt by Alexander the Great. Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... Persepolis aerial view. ... Alexander the Great (Greek: ,[1] Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC–June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), was one of the most successful military commanders in history. ...


Various capitals in the Middle East were abandoned; after Babylon was abandoned Ctesiphon became the capital of the new Parthian Empire, and was in turn passed over in favor of Baghdad (and later Samarra) for the site of the Abbasid capital though all these cities are fairly close together. Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... Ctesiphon, 1932 Ctesiphon (Parthian and Pahlavi: Tyspwn as well as Tisfun, Persian: ‎, also known as in Arabic Madain, Maden or Al-Madain: المدائن) is one of the great cities of ancient Mesopotamia and the capital of the Parthian Empire and its successor, the Sassanid Empire, for more than 800 years... Parthian Empire at its greatest extent, c60 BCE. The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Parthia was the arch-enemy of the Roman Empire in the east and... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ... Map showing Samarra near Baghdad Sāmarrā (سامراء) is a town in Iraq ( ). It stands on the east bank of the Tigris in the Salah ad Din Governorate, 125 km north of Baghdad and, in 2002, had an estimated population of 201,700. ... Abbasid Caliphate (Abbasid Khalifat) and contemporary states and empires in 820. ...


Some of the cities which are considered lost are (or may be) places of legend such as the Arthurian Camelot, Russian Kitezh, Lyonesse and Atlantis. Others, such as Troy and Bjarmaland, having once been considered to be legendary, may actually have existed. A bronze Arthur in plate armour with visor raised and with jousting shield wearing Kastenbrust armour (early 15th century) by Peter Vischer, typical of later anachronistic depictions of Arthur. ... Gustave Doré’s illustration of Camelot from “Idylls of the King”, 1868 Camelot is the most famous fictional castle associated with the legendary King Arthur. ... The Invisible Town of Kitezh (1913) by Konstantin Gorbatov Kitezh (Китеж in Russian) was a legendary town in what is today the Voskresensky District of the Nizhny Novgorod Oblast in Russia. ... Lyonesse, Lyoness, or Lyonnesse is the sunken land believed in legend to lie off the Isles of Scilly, to the south-west of Cornwall. ... Picture of Platos description of Atlantis Atlantis (Greek: , Island of Atlas) is the name of a legendary island first mentioned in Platos dialogues Timaeus and Critias. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Bjarmaland (a. ...


Lost cities by continent

Africa

Amarna (commonly known as el-Amarna) is the name given to an extensive archaeological site that represents the remains of the capital city built by the Pharaoh Akhenaten of the late Eighteenth Dynasty (c. ... Pharaoh was the ancient Egyptian name for the office of kingship. ... Neferkheperre-waenre Beautiful are the Manifestations of Re[2] the one of Re Nomen Akhenaten Servant of the Aten[1] (after Year 4 of his reign) Amenhotep Horus name Kanakht-Meryaten The strong bull, beloved of the Aten Nebty name Wernesytemakhetaten Great of kingship in Akhetaten Golden Horus Wetjesrenenaten Who... Amarna (commonly known as el-Amarna) is the name given to an extensive archaeological site that represents the remains of the capital city built by the Pharaoh Akhenaten of the late Eighteenth Dynasty (c. ... Canopus (also: Canobus) was an Ancient Egyptian coastal town, located in the Nile Delta. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ... Nickname: Alexandria on the map of Egypt Map of Alexandria Coordinates: , Country Egypt Founded 334 BC Government  - Governor Adel Labib Population (2001)  - City 3,500,000 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Twin Cities  - Baltimore  United States  - Cleveland  United States  - ConstanÅ£a  Romania  - Durban  South Africa... Itjtawy is the as yet unidentified location of the royal city founded during the Twelfth dynasty of Egypt. ... Located south of Cairo, Egypt, the area of el-Lisht is the home to several pyramids and associated royal and noble burials. ... Tanis or The ruins of Tanis in 2004 Tanis (Τάνις), the Greek name of ancient Djanet (modern صان الحجر Ṣān al-Ḥaǧar), is a city in the north-eastern Nile delta of Egypt. ... Memphis, coordiates , , was the ancient capital of the first nome of Lower Egypt, and of the Old Kingdom of Egypt from its foundation until around 1300 BC. Its Ancient Egyptian name was Ineb Hedj (The White Walls). The name Memphis is the Greek deformation of the Egyptian name of Pepi... Avaris (Egyptian: , Hatwaret, Greek: αυαρις, Auaris), thought to be located at Tell el-Daba (some still argue for different locations), was the ancient capital of the Hyksos dynasties in Egypt. ... The Hyksos (Egyptian heqa khasewet, foreign rulers; Greek , ) were an Asiatic, likely Semitic or Indo-Aryan people who invaded the eastern Nile Delta, initiating the Second Intermediate Period of ancient Egypt. ... NASA satellite photograph of the Nile Delta (shown in false colour) The Nile Delta (Arabic:دلتا النيل) is the delta formed in Northern Egypt where the Nile River spreads out and drains into the Mediterranean Sea. ... Arch of Septimius Severus Market place Leptis Magna (or Lepcis Magna as it is sometimes spelled), also called Neapolis, was a prominent city of the Roman Empire. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Lucius Septimius Severus (b. ... Dougga Dougga or Thugga is a Roman ruin in northern Tunisia located on a 65 hectare site. ... Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Phoenician sarcophagus found in Cadiz, Spain; now in Archaeological Museum of Cádiz. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire during the 5th century and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Great Zimbabwe is the name given to the remains of stone, sometimes referred to as the Great Zimbabwe Ruins, of an ancient Southern African city, located at in present-day Zimbabwe which was once the centre of a vast empire known as the Munhumutapa Empire (also called Monomotapa or Mwene... The Berbers (also called Amazigh, free men, pl. ... The Ghana Empire in Africa The Empire of Ghana (existed c. ... Mujahideen (Arabic: , ; Turkish: , literally strugglers) is a term for Muslims fighting in a war or involved in any other struggle. ...

Asia

Far East Asia

Yamataikoku (邪馬台国) was an ancient country in Japan, recorded in an old Chinese history book, Gishiwajinden. ... Yonaguni Yonaguni ) is the name of the westernmost island of Japan, as well as the language spoken there (see Yonaguni language). ... Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany Bronze age wedge tomb in the Burren area of Ireland For the record label, see Megalith Records. ... Yonaguni Yonaguni ) is the name of the westernmost island of Japan, as well as the language spoken there (see Yonaguni language). ...

Southeast Asia

The Sukhothai historical park covers the ruins of Sukhothai, the capital of the Sukhothai kingdom from the 14th century, which today is situated in the north of Thailand. ... Ayutthaya (full name Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya, Thai พระนครศรีอยุธยา; also spelled Ayudhya) city is the capital of Ayutthaya province in Thailand. ... Angkor was the site of a series of capital cities that is rk of the Khmer empire for much of the period from the 9th century to the 15th century CE. (The angkor people relyed on the jungle for protection and food. ...

South Asia

Vijayanagara (often written Vijayanagar), in northern Karnataka, is the name of the now ruined capital city of the historic Vijayanagar empire in the Southern part of India. ... Poompuhar is a town in the southern part of India in the state of Tamil Nadu. ... Mohenjo-daro (literally, mound of the dead), like Harappa, was a city of the Indus Valley civilization. ... Harappa (Urdu: ہڑپا) is a city in Punjab, northeast Pakistan, about 35km (22 miles) southwest of Sahiwal. ... Taxila is an important archaelogical site in Pakistan containing the ruins of the Gandhāran city and university of Takshashila (also Takkasila or Taxila) an important Vedic/Hindu[1] and Buddhist[2] centre of learning from the 5th century BCE to the 2nd century CE. In 1980, Taxila was declared... Muziris is a lost port city in the southern Indian state of Kerala which was a major center of trade, especially pepper and other spices, with the Roman Empire from the 1st or 2nd century BCE to probably as late as 6th century CE. Large hordes of coins and innumerable...

Central Asia

Abaskun was a port that existed in the Middle Ages on the southwestern shore of the Caspian Sea in the area of Gorgan. ... The Caspian Sea (Russian: Каспийское море; Kazakh: Каспий теңізі; Turkmen: Hazar deňizi; Azeri: XÉ™zÉ™r dÉ™nizi; Persian: دریای خزر Daryā-ye Khazar) is the largest lake on Earth by area[2], with a surface area of 371,000 square kilometers (143,244 sq mi) and a volume of 78,200 cubic kilometers (18... The walls of Ani showing a defensive tower Ani (Armenian: , Latin: Abnicum[1] ) is a ruined and uninhabited medieval city-site situated in the Turkish province of Kars, beside the border with Armenia. ... Arkaim is an archaeological site situated in the Southern Urals steppe, 8. ... Aryan (/eÉ™rjÉ™n/ or /ɑːrjÉ™n/, Sanskrit: ) is a Sanskrit and Avestan word meaning noble/spiritual one. ... Harappa (Urdu: ہڑپا) is a city in Punjab, northeast Pakistan, about 35km (22 miles) southwest of Sahiwal. ... The Vedic period (or Vedic Age) is the period in the history of India when the sacred Vedic Sanskrit texts such as the Vedas were composed. ... Mohenjo-daro ( Urdu: موئن جودڑو, Sindhi: موئن جو دڙو English: Mound of the dead) was a city of the Indus Valley Civilization built around 2600 BC and is located in the Sindh Province of Pakistan. ... , Dwarka   is a city and a municipality in Jamnagar district in the state of Gujarat, India. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... , Gujarat (Gujarati: , IPA:  ) is a state in the Republic of India. ... Niya is a site on the southern edge of the Tarim Basin, in modern-day Xinjiang, China at which numerous Buddhist scriptures were recovered. ... The Taklamakan is a desert of Central Asia, in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Silk Road Silk Route redirects here. ... A carved wooden beam from Loulan, 3-4th century CE. The patterns show influences from ancient western civilizations. ... Sarira casket from Subashi. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... The Karakorum palace (also Ka-la-kun-lun, Khara-khorin, Kharakhorum, Khara Khorum in Classical Mongolian) was an ancient capital of the Mongol Empire in the 13th century, although for only about 30 years. ... Genghis Khan (Mongolian: Чингис Хаан, Jenghis Khan, Jinghis Khan, Chinghiz Khan, Jinghiz Khan, Chinggis Khan, Changaiz Khan, original name Temüjin, Temuchin, Mongolian: Тэмүүжин) (c. ... Ruins of Muhammad IIs palace in Old Urgench. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      Khwarezm was a series of states centered on the Amu Darya river delta of the former Aral Sea, in modern Uzbekistan, extending across the Ust-Urt plateau and possibly as far west as... Mangazeya was a Northwest Siberian trans-Ural trade colony and later city in the 16-17th centuries. ... It has been suggested that Western Siberia be merged into this article or section. ... The Turquoise Mountain was the greatest indigenous Afghan capital of the middle ages. ...

Western Asia/Middle East

For the Egyptian writer, see Abbas Al-Akkad. ... Babylon (in Arabic: بابل; in Syriac: ܒܒܙܠ in Hebrew:בבל) was an ancient city in Mesopotamia (modern Al Hillah, Iraq), the ruins of which can be found in present-day Babil Province, about 80km south of Baghdad. ... Excavations at the South Area of Çatal Höyük Çatalhöyük (also Çatal Höyük and Çatal Hüyük, or any of the three without diacritics; çatal is Turkish for fork, höyük for mound) was a very large Neolithic and Chalcolithic settlement in southern... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... The Chalcolithic (Greek khalkos + lithos copper stone) period, also known as the Eneolithic (Aeneolithic) or Copper Age period, is a phase in the development of human culture in which the use of early metal tools appeared alongside the use of stone tools. ... Konya (Ottoman Turkish: ; also Koniah, Konieh, Konia, and Qunia; historically also known as Iconium (Latin), Greek: Ikónion) is a city in Turkey, on the central plateau of Anatolia. ... A model of the current Chogha Zanbil ziggurat, showing the other buildings in the vicinity of the main structure. ... Ctesiphon, 1932 Ctesiphon (Parthian and Pahlavi: Tyspwn as well as Tisfun, Persian: ‎, also known as in Arabic Madain, Maden or Al-Madain: المدائن) is one of the great cities of ancient Mesopotamia and the capital of the Parthian Empire and its successor, the Sassanid Empire, for more than 800 years... Iram of the Pillars (إرَم ذات العماد, Iram dhāt al-`imād), also called Ubar or Wabar or the City of a Thousand Pillars, is a lost city apparently on the Arabian Peninsula. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... Location of the empty quarter in Arabia Sand dunes in the Empty Quarter The Empty Quarter (Arabic: Rub al Khali الربع الخالي), is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula, including southern Saudi Arabia, and areas of Oman, the United Arab Emirates... The Lion Gate in the south-west Hattusa (also known as Hattusas or Khattushash) was the capital of the Hittite Empire. ... Hittites is the conventional English-language term for an ancient people who spoke an Indo-European language and established a kingdom centered in Hattusa (the modern village of Boğazköy in todayss north-central Turkey), through most of the second millennium BC. The Hittite kingdom, which at... BoÄŸazkale (formerly known as BoÄŸazköy,Boghazkoy or Hattusas) is a district of Çorum Province, in central Anatolia, Turkey. ... Kish [kish] (Tall al-Uhaymir) was an ancient city of Sumer, now in central Iraq. ... Lagash or Sirpurla was one of the oldest cities of Sumer and later Babylonia. ... , For other uses, see Nineveh (disambiguation). ... Persepolis aerial view. ... Petra (from petra, rock in Greek; Arabic: البتراء, Al-Butrā) is an archaeological site in Jordan, lying in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah (Wadi Araba), the large valley running from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ur (disambiguation). ...

South America

Inca cities

Machu Picchu (IPA pronunciation: [1]) (Quechua: Machu Pikchu Old Peak; sometimes called the Lost City) is a pre-Columbian city created by the Inca Empire. ... Pachacuti as drawn by Guaman Poma Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui (or Pachacutec; Quechua Pachakutiq, literally world-turner, i. ... Last refuge of the Inca Empire, Vilcabamba was founded by Manco Inca in 1539 and fell to the Spaniards in 1572, signalling the end of Inca resistance to Spanish rule. ... Paititi refers to the legendary lost city said to lie east of the Andes, hidden somewhere within the remote rain forests of southeast Peru, northern Bolivia, and southwest Brazil. ... The Daintree Rainforest in Queensland, Australia. ...

Other

Overview of ruins of the Tschudi Complex, Chan Chan The largest Pre-Columbian city in South America, Chan Chan is an archaeological site located in the Peruvian region of La Libertad, just north of Trujillo. ... The Chimú were the residents of Chimor with its capital at the city of Chan Chan in the Moche valley of Peru. ... Motto: La Ciudad de la Eterna Primavera (The City of Eternal Spring) Location in Peru Coordinates: Country Peru Region La Libertad Province Trujillo Province Founded 6 December 1534 Government  - Type Democracy  - Mayor César Acuña Peralta Area  - City 1,768. ... Middle Horizon Tiwanaku (old spelling: Tiahuanaco) is an important Pre-Columbian archeological site in Bolivia. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ... Kawachi may refer to: Kawachi, Tochigi Kawachi District, Tochigi Kawachi Province Kawachi ondo This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Early South American Civilizations Nazca (sometimes spelled Nasca) is the name of a system of valleys on the southern coast of Peru, and the name of the regions largest existing town. ... Editor: The name of the first andean civilization is Caral, and not Norte Chico. Caral civilization was defined for the first time by Ruth Shady in 1997, after the Sacred City of Caral. ... The Norte Chico civilization (also Caral or Caral-Supe civilization) was a complex Pre-Columbian society that included as many as 30 major population centers in what is now the Norte Chico region of north-central coastal Peru. ... The City of the Caesares (Spanish Ciudad de los Césares), also variously known as City of the Patagonia, Wandering City, Trapalanda or Trapananda, Lin Lin or Elelín, is a mythical city of South America, said to have been founded by survivors from the shipwreck of a Spanish ship... Patagonia, as most commonly defined (in orange). ... The Americas is an alternative name in the English language for the continent of America, to distinguish it from the United States of America, which is often just called America. ... Darien may refer to: In or associated with the Panama/Colombia area: Darién Province, Panama Santa María la Antigua del Darién, the town founded by Vasco Núñez de Balboa in Panama in 1510 Darién scheme, a disastrous campaign by the Company of Scotland to found... Vasco Núñez de Balboa Balboa setting his dogs upon Indian practitioners of male love; (1594); New York Public Library Vasco Núñez de Balboa (c. ... The Lost City of Z is the name given by Col. ...

North America

Maya cities

incomplete list – for further information, see Maya civilization The Maya civilization is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its spectacular art, monumental architecture, and sophisticated mathematical and astronomical systems. ...

  • Chichen Itza – This ancient place of pilgrimage is still the most visitied Maya ruin.
  • Copán – In modern Honduras.
  • Calakmul – One of two "superpowers" in the classic Maya period.
  • Coba
  • Naachtun – Rediscovered in 1922, it remains one of the most remote and least visited Maya sites. Located 44 km (27 miles) south-south-east of Calakmul, and 65 km (40 miles) north of Tikal, it is believed to have had strategic importance to, and been vulnerable to military attacks by, both neighbours. Its ancient name was identified in the mid-1990s as Masuul.
  • Palenque — in Chiapas, Mexico, known for its beautiful art and architecture
  • Tikal — One of two "superpowers" in the classic Maya period.

Temple of the Warriors Chichen Itza is the largest of the Pre-Columbian archaeological sites in Yucat n, Mexico. ... Location of Copán The Pre-Columbian city now known as Copán is a locale in extreme western Honduras, in the Copán Department, near to the Guatemalan border. ... Calakmul is the name of both a municipality and a major archeological site in the Mexican state of Campeche, in the central part of the Yucatán Peninsula. ... Coba (Cobá in the Spanish language) is a large ruined city of the Pre-Columbian Maya civilization, located in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Palace, Ruins of Palenque Palenque is a Maya archeological site near the Usumacinta River in the Mexican state of Chiapas, located at about 130 km south of Ciudad del Carmen (see map). ... Other Mexican States Capital Tuxtla Gutiérrez Other major cities San Cristóbal Tapachula list of municipalities Area 74,211 km² Ranked 8th Population (2000 census) 3,920,500 Ranked 8th Governor (2000-06) Pablo Salazar Mendiguchía (alliance of PRD, PAN, & others) Federal Deputies (12) PRI = 11 PAN = 1... Tikal (or Tik’al, according to the more current orthography) is the largest of the ancient ruined cities of the Maya civilization. ...

Olmec cities

The Grandmother, La Venta (reproduction) La Venta is the name of a Pre-Columbian archaeological site of the Olmec civilization. ... San Lorenzo is Italian and Spanish for Saint Lawrence. ... Veracruz is the name of a city and a state in Mexico. ...

Lost cities in the United States

Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Ancient Pueblo People, or Ancestral Puebloans is the preferred term for the group of peoples often known as Anasazi who are the ancestors of the modern Pueblo peoples. ... The Four Corners region is in the red area on this map The Four Corners Monument, placed by the Interior Department at the exact point. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... Chacoan corner doorway in Pueblo Bonito. ... Mesa Verde National Park is a United States National Park, located in southwest Colorado. ... Lost counties, cities and towns of Virginia are those which formerly existed in the English Colony of Virginia or the Commonwealth of Virginia after it became a state. ... Pueblo Grande de Nevada, a complex of villages, is located near Overton, Nevada and are listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places. ... Overton is an unincorporated town located in Clark County, Nevada. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Kane is a town that once existed near the Big Horn River in Big Horn County, Wyoming. ...

Lost cities in Canada

Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows Viking colonisation site at LAnse-aux-Meadows LAnse aux Meadows (from the French LAnse-aux-Méduses (Jellyfish Cove)) is a site on the northernmost tip of the island of Newfoundland, in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, where the remains...

Other

The seven caves of Chicomoztoc, from Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca Aztlán (, from Nahuatl Aztlan ) is the legendary ancestral home of the Nahua peoples, one of the main cultural groups in Mesoamerica. ... // Overview Izapa was a very large pre-Columbian site located in Chiapas, Mexico, often placed in the Late Formative period. ... // Overview Izapa was a very large pre-Columbian site located in Chiapas, Mexico, often placed in the Late Formative period. ... Chiapas is a state in the southeast of Mexico. ... Teotihuacan was the largest Pre-Columbian known city in the Americas, and the name Teotihuacan is used to refer to the civilization this city dominated, which at its greatest extent included most of Mesoamerica. ...

Europe

Atil, also spelled Itil (literally meaning Big River), was the capital of Khazaria from the middle of the 8th century until the end of the 10th century. ... Hermonassa and other Greek colonies along the north coast of the Black Sea in the 5th century BCE. Tmutarakan (Russian: Тмутаракань) is an ancient city that controlled the Cimmerian Bosporus, the passage from the Black Sea to the Sea of Azov. ... Sarai Batu (Old Sarai, Sarai-al-Maqrus) was a capital city of the Golden Horde. ... Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Mongolian and Turkic people mentioned in European history. ... For other uses, see Attila (disambiguation). ... Location in Sweden During the Viking Age, Birka or Birca  , on the island of Björkö (also Bierkø, literally: Birch Island) in Sweden, was an important trading center which handled goods from Scandinavia as well as Central and Eastern Europe and the Orient. ... Chryse was a small island in the Aegean Sea mentioned by Sophocles and Pausanias. ... Ammersee with German Alps Ammersee (Lake Ammer) is a lake in upper Bavaria, Germany located in the southwest of Munich between the towns of Herrsching and Diessen. ... Dunwich (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Suffolk in England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Severe soil erosion in a wheat field near Washington State University, USA. For erosion as an operation of Mathematical morphology, see Erosion (morphology) Erosion is displacement of solids (soil, mud, rock and other particles) by the agents of ocean currents, wind, water, or ice by downward or down-slope movement... Hedeby (Haithabu in Old Norse; Heidiba in Latin; in Germany the name Haithabu is frequently used) was a Danish settlement and trading centre on the southern Baltic Sea coast of the Jutland Peninsula at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet, the Schlei (Danish: Slien) in the province of Schleswig... Helike (Greek: pron. ... Greece and the Peloponnese The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... An earthquake is the result from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Kaupang is the name of a town with roots from the Viking Age, situated in Vestfold county in Norway. ... County Vestfold District Municipality NO-0709 Administrative centre Larvik Mayor (2003) Øyvind Riise Jenssen (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 199 535 km² 501 km² 0. ... The term Viking commonly denotes the ship-borne warriors and traders of Norsemen (literally, men from the north) who originated in Scandinavia and raided the coasts of Britain, Ireland and mainland Europe as far east as the Volga River in Russia from the late 8th–11th century. ... The Invisible Town of Kitezh (1913) by Konstantin Gorbatov Kitezh (Китеж in Russian) was a legendary town in what is today the Voskresensky District of the Nizhny Novgorod Oblast in Russia. ... Likeliest locations of Rungholt Rungholt was a wealthy city in Nordfriesland, northern Germany. ... Ny Varberg (New Varberg) was a city founded sometime between 1429 and 1434 about five kilometers north of present-day Varberg. ... Woodcut of Old Sarum as it was during its height Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury, England, with evidence of human habitation as early as 3000 BC. It sits on a hill about two miles (3km) north of modern Salisbury on the west side of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Salisbury (IPA: , or — moving from RP to local dialect) is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Woodcut of Old Sarum as it was during its height Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury, England, with evidence of human habitation as early as 3000 BC. It sits on a hill about two miles (3km) north of modern Salisbury on the west side of... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Pitt could refer to: William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham; Prime Minister of Great Britain 1766-1768; often known as William Pitt the Elder William Pitt the Younger; his son; Prime Minister of Great Britain (1783-1801) and (1804-1806) William Pitt, Comptroller of the Household to King James... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ... Pompeii is a ruined Roman city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. ... Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano. ... Mount Vesuvius (Italian: Monte Vesuvio) is a volcano east of Naples, Italy, located at 40°49′N 14°26′ E. It is the only active volcano on the European mainland, although it is not currently erupting. ... This article is about the year 79. ... Likeliest locations of Rungholt Rungholt was a wealthy city in Nordfriesland, northern Germany. ... Satellite image of the southwestern part of the Wadden Sea. ... Saeftinghe was a place in eastern Zeeuws-Vlaanderen near Nieuw-Namen. ... Santorini (Greek Σαντορίνη, IPA: ) is a small, circular archipelago of volcanic islands located in southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km south-east from Greeces mainland. ... View from the top of Thira Santorini is a small, circular group of volcanic islands located in the Aegean Sea, 75 km south-east of the Greek mainland, (latitude: 35. ... Selsey is an English seaside town, about 7 miles (11 kilometres) south of Chichester, West Sussex. ... Skara Brae is a large stone-built Neolithic settlement, located in the Bay of Skaill on the west coast of mainland Orkney, Scotland. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe and the United Kingdom Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic and Scots1 Government Constitutional monarchy... Tartessos (also Tartessus) was a harbor city on the south coast of the Iberian peninsula (in modern Andalusia, Spain), at the mouth of the Guadalquivir river. ... Trellech is a village in Monmouthshire, Wales at grid reference SO500054, and the location of an archaeological site. ... UppÃ¥kra is a village located five kilometres south of Lund in Scania in southernmost Sweden. ... Vineta or Wineta is an ancient and possibly legendary town believed to have been on the German or Polish coast of the Baltic Sea. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 20°E to 26°E longitude. ... Flight of King Gradlon, by E. V. Luminais, 1884 (Musée des Beaux-Arts, Quimper) Ys (also spelled Is or Ker-Ys in Breton) is a mythical city built in the Douarnenez bay in Brittany by Gradlon, King of Cornouaille, for his daughter Dahut. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Lost City (2916 words)
New York City has such a wide array of local traditions, rituals and festivals that one can live in the town for 20 years and fail to attend some of the major annual events.
According to a flurry of recent articles, the contretemps over who owns the right to call the contents of their brine-filled barrels Guss's Pickles continues to rage, with no conclusion in sight.
In her corner on Orchard Street, Patricia Fairhurst, who took over Guss's LES location—the place where most New Yorkers are used to finding the City's most famous kosher sours and half-sours—says she is the rightful possessor of Guss's good name.
Lost city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1195 words)
Cities have been destroyed by natural disasters and rebuilt, again and again, but the destruction has occasionally been so complete that they were not rebuilt: the classic examples are the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum, buried with many of their inhabitants in a catastrophic flow of volcanic ash from an eruption of Vesuvius.
Cities which have sunk into the sea include the one-time centre of the English wool-trade, at Dunwich, England, and the city of Rungholt in Germany which sunk into the North Sea in a great stormtide in 1362.
The capital city of the Hyskos in the Nile Delta.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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