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Encyclopedia > Lost Highway
Lost Highway
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Mary Sweeney
Written by David Lynch
Barry Gifford
Starring Bill Pullman
Patricia Arquette
Balthazar Getty
Robert Loggia
Robert Blake
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Cinematography Peter Deming
Editing by Mary Sweeney
Distributed by October Films
Release date(s) Flag of the United States 15 January 1997
Running time 135 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $15,000,000 (estimated)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Lost Highway is a 1997 psychological thriller directed by David Lynch. It is a crime film, arguably an example of contemporary film noir, but with surreal imagery and themes. Lynch co-wrote the screenplay with Barry Gifford, with Angelo Badalamenti composing the score. Lost Highway is also notable for the last film appearances of Richard Pryor, Jack Nance, and (so far) Robert Blake. Japan Tour Edition Lost Highway is the title of the tenth studio album by Bon Jovi. ... Lost Highway can refer to: Lost Highway, a 1997 film by David Lynch Lost Highway (soundtrack), the soundtrack for the Lynch film Lost Highway (album) A 2007 Bon Jovi album Lost Highway, the title track of the Bon Jovi album Lost Highway Records, a country music record label Lost Highway... Download high resolution version (895x1270, 62 KB) This work is copyrighted. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Mary Sweeney is an award-winning American film editor and film producer best known for collaborating with the avant-garde American film director, David Lynch. ... Barry Gifford (1946- ) is an author, poet, and screenwriter known for his distinctive mix of American landscapes, film noir, and beat generation-influenced literary madness. ... William Pullman (born December 17, 1953) is an American film and television actor. ... Patricia T. Arquette (born April 8, 1968) is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actress. ... Paul Balthazar Getty (born 22 January 1975) is an American film actor. ... Robert Loggia (born January 3, 1930) is an American Academy Award and Emmy Award nominated film and television actor who specializes in character parts. ... Robert Blake on the cover of the Baretta Season 1 DVD set. ... Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Peter Deming (born December 13, 1957) is a Lebanese American cinematographer. ... October Films was a independent film production company and distributor founded in 1991 by Bingham Ray and Jeff Lipsky as a means of distributing the 1990 film Life Is Sweet. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The year 1997 in film involved some significant events. ... -1... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... Max Ernst. ... Barry Gifford (1946- ) is an author, poet, and screenwriter known for his distinctive mix of American landscapes, film noir, and beat generation-influenced literary madness. ... Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Marvin John Nance (December 21, 1943 – December 30, 1996), known professionally as Jack Nance and occasionally credited as John Nance, was an American stage and screen actor in offbeat or avant-garde film and theatre. ... Robert Blake on the cover of the Baretta Season 1 DVD set. ...

Contents

Plot summary

Fred Madison (Bill Pullman), a saxophonist, is accused under mysterious circumstances of murdering his wife Renee (Patricia Arquette). On death row, he inexplicably changes into a young man named Pete Dayton (Balthazar Getty), leading a completely different life. When Pete is released, his and Fred's paths begin to cross in a surreal, suspenseful web of intrigue, orchestrated by a shady boss named Dick Laurent (Robert Loggia). William Pullman (born December 17, 1953) is an American film and television actor. ... Patricia T. Arquette (born April 8, 1968) is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actress. ... Paul Balthazar Getty (born 22 January 1975) is an American film actor. ... Robert Loggia (born January 3, 1930) is an American Academy Award and Emmy Award nominated film and television actor who specializes in character parts. ...


Synopsis

Fred Madison answers his intercom to hear the words "Dick Laurent is dead." Fred is a jazz musician who appears to share an extremely tense relationship with his wife Renee, who he suspects may be cheating on him. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...


The Madisons find a package outside their house one morning that contains a videocassette tape showing the outside of their home. The camera zooms in on their door before cutting out. Although they dismiss the tape as "from a real estate agent," the couple finds a second tape the next day. This tape is longer, and shows the camera moving through their living room, and eventually into their bedroom, where both Fred and Renee are clearly visible, asleep. Panicked, Renee contacts the authorities and tells them what has happened thus far. Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...


Two police detectives, named Al and Ed, arrive to investigate, but they are unable to solve the mystery, as there are no signs of entry anywhere in the house. Fred mentions to the officers that they don't own a video camera because he "likes to remember things [his] own way ... not necessarily the way they happened." The Madisons tell the officers that they have disabled their security system due to "false alarms," but they agree to re-arm it. Later, Renee takes Fred to a party hosted by a sleazy man named Andy, with whom it becomes obvious Renee has some sordid history. While Renee enjoys herself at the party, Fred meets a stranger (Robert Blake) whose name is not revealed, although Andy later mentions that he might be a "friend of Dick Laurent's." Fred and the Mystery Man begin an extremely cryptic conversation, in which the Mystery Man tells Fred that they have met before, and that in fact he is at Fred's house at that moment. Fred scoffs in disbelief, but agrees to call the house using the Mystery Man's cell phone as a proof test, only to hear the Mystery Man answer at the other end. Before Fred can learn how it is possible for the Mystery Man to be in two places at once, and how he got into the house, the Mystery Man walks away. There have been several notable individuals with the name Robert Blake: Robert Blake (admiral) (1599 - 1657) Robert Blake, Baron Blake (1916-2003), British historian Robert Blake (actor), (born 1933), of TVs Baretta Robert Blake (management), developed the Managerial Grid Model. ... Cell phone redirects here. ...


Shaken, Fred conducts a search of their house when he and Renee return, but he finds no intruder. While Renee is getting ready for bed, Fred walks through the house and finds himself standing in front of a long vortex-like corridor which he doesn't remember being there before. Fred walks down the long, dark corridor and disappears. Renee walks out of the bedroom looking for Fred, calling out to him as she stands at the foot of the corridor. A minute later, Fred emerges from the dark corridor, followed by a shadow figure. The next morning, Fred finds another tape outside the house. It seems the same as the last one, but as the camera moves into the bedroom, it shows Fred on the floor with the bloody, bisected body of Renee. We next see Fred in a chair at a police station, where he is punched in the face by the same two police detectives, Al and Ed, who now call him a murderer. Fred pleads his innocence, but then immediately becomes confused, and wonders if he truly has killed his wife.


Fred is incarcerated for murdering Renee — a crime he denies — and is sentenced to death by the electric chair. In prison, he suffers from tremendous headaches and begins to break down. During one of his sleepless nights, Fred sees visions of a burning house in the desert, after which he suffers some kind of seizure. In the morning, he has apparently changed into a young mechanic named Pete Dayton. The police are confused, disturbed, and unsettled as to how Fred Madison appears to have escaped a high-security prison, and how Pete Dayton has taken his place. As Pete has committed no crime, he is released and allowed to return home with his mother and father, a scruffy former motorcycle couple who live in the San Fernando Valley. Pete is then followed around 24/7 by two police detectives, named Hank and Lou, to try to figure out why and how he ended up in Fred Madison's prison cell. San Fernando Valley from its southwestern edge. ... 24/7 is an abbreviation which stands for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, usually referring to the availability of a service. ...


The following day, Pete returns to Arnie's (played by Richard Pryor) garage where he works, and he is visited by Mr. Eddy (Robert Loggia), a local gangster. One of the policemen following Pete recognizes Mr. Eddy by another name: Dick Laurent. Mr. Eddy intimidates Pete into taking him out for a ride in his Mercedes vehicle. On a narrow mountain road, Mr. Eddy wave a tailgater on, then rams into the man's car. Pete sees Mr. Eddy and his two cohorts attack and beat up the driver as Mr. Eddy screamingly delivers a lecture about the rudeness of tailgating. Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Robert Loggia (born January 3, 1930) is an American Academy Award and Emmy Award nominated film and television actor who specializes in character parts. ...


The next day, Mr. Eddy returns to the garage for Pete to tune up his Cadillac. With Mr. Eddy is his mistress, the beautiful Alice Wakefield (also played by Arquette), whom Pete falls for immediately. She returns to the garage later that night alone to pick up the car, and the two soon begin an affair.


It becomes obvious that Pete is suffering from a similar level of the mental stress that afflicted Fred; he has no recollection of the incident that led to him being transported to the jail. His parents (Gary Busey and Lucy Butler) clearly do, but they refuse to tell him for some reason that is never explained. He begins cheating on his girlfriend Sheila (Natasha Gregson Wagner) with Alice. One day, Mr. Eddy arrives at garage while Pete is working and Mr. Eddy hints that he suspects that Pete and Alice are sleeping together. Mr. Eddy makes it clear to Pete that if he catches them together, he will kill them. During another of their secret trysts, Alice reveals that Mr. Eddy has involved her in pornography, and hatches a plan with Pete to run away together to escape Mr. Eddy's vengeance. The plan involves robbing Andy, who appeared as Renee's friend earlier in the film, and selling the stolen goods to a fence in the desert in order to start their new life together. William Gareth Jacob Busey Sr. ... Natasha Gregson Wagner (born on 29 September 1970 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is an American actress. ... Porn redirects here. ... In law enforcement, a fence is an individual who knowingly buys stolen property for later resale in a (usually) legitimate market. ...


After a murderous warning from Mr. Eddy via the telephone — which includes a brief, threatening speech from the Mystery Man — Pete goes to Andy's house as planned. Andy dies a gruesome death during a struggle, and Pete and Alice drive away in Andy's car with his valuables (but not before Pete suffers a nightmarish vision that hints that Alice will betray him).


The two drive into the desert, where Alice says the fence will meet them. They reach the same house that Fred envisioned in his prison cell, but no one is there. Alice and Pete make passionate love, but at its climax Alice tells Pete, "You'll never have me," before getting up and walking into the house naked. An orgasm (sexual climax) is the conclusion of the plateau phase of the sexual response cycle, and may be experienced by both males and females. ...


When Pete stands up, he has transformed back into Fred Madison. Fred goes inside the house, where he finds the Mystery Man waiting for him, but Alice has disappeared. Fred asks where Alice is, and the Mystery Man admonishes him and tells him that her name is Renee. The Mystery Man then approaches Fred with a video camera; Fred runs to the car and drives away, frightened.


Fred pulls into the desolate Lost Highway Hotel, where Dick Laurent/Mr. Eddy and Renee/Alice are sharing a room. After Renee/Alice leaves, Fred storms into the room, beats Laurent, and bundles him into the trunk of the car before driving back to the desert. When Fred opens the trunk, Laurent leaps out and looks to have the upper hand in the ensuing fight, before a third person hands the spread-eagled Fred a knife, which Fred uses to slice Laurent's throat.


Fred throws off his attacker, and we see that the third person is the Mystery Man. He hands Laurent a portable television, on which is playing a pornographic film featuring Renee/Alice (as well as Marilyn Manson and Twiggy Ramirez). The Mystery Man then shoots Laurent to death, whispers something to Fred, and then vanishes completely. This article is about the person. ... Twiggy Ramirez, circa Mechanical Animals Jeordie Francis White (born June 20, 1971), better known by his former pseudonym Twiggy Ramirez, was the bassist for Marilyn Manson from 1994 until 2002 (at which point he abandoned the pseudonym). ...


At Andy's house, the police arrive to investigate his murder with all four of the detectives: Al and Ed, and Hank and Lou. The detectives find a photo of Renee with Andy and Dick Laurent which connects her to the men and provides a motive for Fred's murder of Renee. One of the detectives, after finding Pete's fingerprints all over the house and the body, states, "You know what I think? I think there's no such thing as a bad coincidence."


As morning breaks, Fred drives back to his original house, presses the intercom button, and utters the first (and now last) words said in the movie: "Dick Laurent is dead." Descending the steps back to his car, he notices the two detectives, Al and Ed, moving to apprehend him. Fred gets to his car and roars off with the police in pursuit. The film ends with Fred being chased down a highway by a large number of police cars. As it gets dark, Fred continues to drive down the highway which begins to turn into a dark vortex, and he appears to have another seizure similar to the one in the prison when he transformed into Pete, and we get a glimpse of a bestial, blurred image in place of his face before the credits roll. Vortex created by the passage of an aircraft wing, revealed by coloured smoke A vortex (pl. ...


Principal cast

Bill Pullman Fred Madison
Balthazar Getty Peter Raymond Dayton
Patricia Arquette Renee Madison/Alice Wakefield
Robert Blake Mystery Man
Robert Loggia Dick Laurent/Mr. Eddy
Richard Pryor Arnie
Jack Nance Phil
John Roselius Det. Al
Louis Eppolito Det. Ed
Carl Sundstrom Det. Hank
John Solari Det. Lou
Gary Busey William Dayton
Lucy Butler Candace Dayton
Natasha Gregson Wagner Sheila

William Pullman (born December 17, 1953) is an American film and television actor. ... Paul Balthazar Getty (born 22 January 1975) is an American film actor. ... Patricia T. Arquette (born April 8, 1968) is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actress. ... Robert Blake on the cover of the Baretta Season 1 DVD set. ... Robert Loggia (born January 3, 1930) is an American Academy Award and Emmy Award nominated film and television actor who specializes in character parts. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Marvin John Nance (December 21, 1943 – December 30, 1996), known professionally as Jack Nance and occasionally credited as John Nance, was an American stage and screen actor in offbeat or avant-garde film and theatre. ... Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa are two former policemen from New York City. ... William Gareth Jacob Busey Sr. ... Natasha Gregson Wagner (born on 29 September 1970 in Los Angeles, California, USA) is an American actress. ...

Production

David Lynch came across a phrase in Barry Gifford's novel Night People known as "Lost Highway" and mentioned to the writer how much he loved it as a title for a film.[1] Lynch suggested that they write a screenplay together. Gifford agreed and they began to brainstorm. Both men had their own different ideas of what the film should be and they ended up rejecting each other's and also their own.[1] On the very last night of shooting Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, Lynch was driving home and thought of the first third of Lost Highway all the way up to "the fist hitting Fred in the police station - to suddenly being in another place and not knowing how he got there or what is wrong."[1] He told Gifford and they began writing the screenplay. The two men realized early on that a transformation had to occur and another story developed which would have several links to the first story but also differ.[2] While they were writing the script, Lynch came up with an idea of a man and woman at a party and while they are there another man is introduced who is younger than the first and, "out of place, doesn't know anybody there, comes with a younger girl who knows a lot of the people. The girl is actually drawing him into a strange thing, but he doesn't know it. And he start talking to this young guy who says strange things to him, similar to what The Mystery Man says to Fred Madison."[1] Lynch recalls that the character, "came out of a feeling of a man who, whether real or not, gave the impression that he was supernatural."[3] Gifford describes the Mystery Man as "a product of Fred's imagination" and is "the first visible manifestation of Fred's madness."[4] Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ...


According to Lynch, the opening scene of the film where Fred Madison hears the words, "Dick Laurent is dead," over his intercom really happened to him at his home.[1]


During filming, Deborah Wuliger, the unit publicist, came upon the idea of a psychogenic fugue which Lynch and Gifford subsequently incorporated into the film. Lynch recalls, "The person suffering from it creates in their mind a completely new identity, new friends, new home, new everything - they forget their past identity."[5] In addition to being a mental condition, Lynch realized that a fugue was also a musical term: "A fugue starts off one way, takes up on another direction, and then comes back to the original, so it [relates] to the form of the film."[5] Gifford researched psychogenic fugues with a clinical psychologist at Stanford University so that there would be some basis in fact. From that point, he and Lynch began "creating this surreal, fantastic world that Fred Madison lives in when he becomes Peter Dayton."[4] In psychology, a fugue state (aka psychogenic fugue or dissociative fugue) is a state of mind where a person experiences a dissociative break in identity and attempts to run away from some perceived threat, usually something abstract such as the persons identity. ... Stanford redirects here. ...


Actor Robert Blake, who portrayed The Mystery Man in the film, was responsible for the look and style of his character.[4] One day, he decided to cut his hair short, part it in the middle and apply Kabuki white make-up on his face. He then put on a black outfit and approached Lynch who loved what he had done.[4] The oldest Kabuki theatre in Japan: the Minamiza in Kyoto The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ...


The first cut of the film ran just over two-and-a-half hours. After a screening with fifty people, Lynch cut out 25 minutes of footage.[1]


Interpretation

The storyline is thought to be based on Ambrose Bierce's famous story An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, in which a war prisoner is hanged, during which the victim imagines escaping and traveling home.[6][7] The fact that the escape was a dying man's hallucination is however only revealed at the end of the story. A similar construction is thought to be used in Lost Highway, where the protagonist is arguably electrocuted at the end of the movie. Other movies based on the same idea are Jacob's Ladder by Adrian Lyne, an episode of The Twilight Zone based on the aforementioned Bierce story and Terry Gilliam's Brazil. Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842 – 1914?) was an American editorialist, journalist, short-story writer and satirist, today best known for his Devils Dictionary. ... For the Twilight Zone episode of the same name, see An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (film). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Adrian Lyne (born 4 March 1941 in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England) is an English filmmaker and producer. ... “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ...


In his book Catching the Big Fish, Lynch reveals that it was only years later when he realized what inspired the storyline: the O.J. Simpson trial. The O.J. Simpson murder case was a highly publicized U.S. criminal trial in which former football star and actor O.J. Simpson was charged with the murder of one of his ex-wives and her friend. ...


Philosopher Slavoj Žižek interprets the film's bipartite structure as exploiting "the opposition of two horrors: the fantasmatic horror of the nightmarish noir universe of perverse sex, betrayal, and murder, and the (perhaps much more unsettling) despair of our drab, alienated daily life of impotence and distrust".[8] Slavoj Žižek (pronounced: ) (born 21 March 1949) is a Slovenian sociologist, postmodern philosopher, and cultural critic. ...


Soundtrack

For years, Trent Reznor had tried to contact Lynch to see if he would be interested in directing a video for his band Nine Inch Nails, but had no success.[9] After his work on the Natural Born Killers soundtrack, he received a call asking if he would be interested in doing the same thing for Lost Highway. Reznor talked to Lynch on the phone and the filmmaker asked if he would also be interested in composing original music for the film.[9] Reznor agreed and Lynch traveled to New Orleans where the musician was living and together they created music that accompanied the scenes where the Madisons watch the mysterious video tapes, a brand new song called "The Perfect Drug," ten seconds of which are part of the sound mix when Mr. Eddy chases down a tailgater, and "Driver Down," featured at the end of the film when Fred is being chased by the police. Reznor also produced and assembled the soundtrack album.[9] Michael Trent Reznor (born May 17, 1965) is an American musician, singer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... NIN redirects here. ... For the song, see Natural Born Killaz. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The Perfect Drug Versions (also known as Halo 11) is an EP by Nine Inch Nails of remixes for the song The Perfect Drug released in 1997. ... Lost Highway is the soundtrack album for the 1997 David Lynch film of the same name. ...


The band Rammstein based the video for their song "Rammstein" on this film. The majority of the video is made with clips from Lost Highway. For other uses, see Ramstein. ...


The movie soundtrack has one song not included in the album, a cover of Tim Buckley's "Song to the Siren" performed by This Mortal Coil. For other persons named Tim Buckley, see Tim Buckley (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Reception

The film received "two thumbs down" from Siskel and Ebert — though Lynch used this to his advantage by claiming it was "two good reasons to go and see Lost Highway."[10][11] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...


The film received an average score of 52 out of 100, based on critics' reviews on the aggregate site Metacritic, making it one of Lynch's least acclaimed work of all time. [12] Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ...


However, it was ranked among the 1,000 greatest films of all-time, according to "They Shoot Pictures, Don't They?".


DVD releases

Lost Highway has had a poor release history in North America, but the Region 2 and 4 releases have had a 2-disc treatment, with improved audio and visual, as well as a "Making Of" featurette and numerous interviews.


The film made its official U.S. dvd debut on March 25, 2008 through Universal Studios' Focus Features label. The film is presented in anamorphic widescreen in the proper 2.35:1 ratio with Dolby Digital 5.1 audio. Controversy over the release concerns the video transfer, which differs considerably from DVD versions already available in Europe (the new R1 disc has a decidedly darker and redder tone)[13] as well as the mysterious absence of a 10-part multi-angle interview with David Lynch that had been touted as a special feature by Universal prior to the DVD's release.[14] This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... Focus Features (formerly USA Films) is the art house films division of NBC Universals Universal Studios, and acts as both a producer and distributor for its own films and a distributor for foreign films. ...


Opera

Lost Highway was adapted as an opera by Austrian composer Olga Neuwirth with the libretto by 2004 Nobel Prize winner Elfriede Jelinek. For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Olga Neuwirth is a contemporary avant-garde composer. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Elfriede Jelinek (born 20 October 1946) is an Austrian feminist playwright and novelist. ...


The opera was premiered in Graz in 2003 with the live-electronics and sound design realized at the Institute of Electronic Music and Acoustics (IEM) using the open source software pure data. The Grazer Schloßberg Clock Tower Graz [graːts] (Slovenian: Gradec IPA: /gra. ... Pure Data with many patches open (netpd project) Pure Data (or Pd) is a graphical programming language developed by Miller Puckette in the 1990s for the creation of interactive computer music and multimedia works. ...


Its American premiere was at Finney Chapel in Oberlin, Ohio and at the Miller Theater in New York City in February 2007, in a production performed by students from the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Oberlin is a city in Lorain County, Ohio, to the south and west of Cleveland. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Musician entering the Oberlin Conservatory The Oberlin Conservatory of Music, located in Oberlin, Ohio, was founded in 1865 and is the nations oldest continuously operating conservatory. ...


It is scheduled to run in London at the Young Vic as a co-production with English National Opera from April 4–11, 2008. This production is directed by Diane Paulus, with set and costume design by Riccardo Hernandez, video design by Philip Bussmann, lighting design by Mimi Jordan Sherin and sound design by Markus Noisternig. The cast includes Mark Bonnar as Fred Madison, Quirijn de Lang as Pete Dayton, Valérie MacCarthy as Renne/Alice, Christopher Robson as The Mystery Man and David Moss as Mr Eddy/Dick Laurent.[15] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Young Vic is a theatre in the South Bank area of central London, which specialises in giving opportunities to young actors and directors. ... The London Coliseum, home of English National Opera English National Opera (ENO), located at the London Coliseum in St. ... Philip Bussmann has been designing stage video for international dance and theater productions since 1995. ... Mark Bonnar (b. ... David Moss (born December 28, 1981 in Dearborn, Michigan) is a professional ice hockey left winger who currently plays for the Calgary Flames organization. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Lynch, David; Barry Gifford. "Introduction - Funny How Secrets Travel", Lynch on Lynch, Faber & Faber, 1997. 
  2. ^ Henry, Michael. "The Moebius Strip - Conversation with David Lynch", Postif, November 1996. 
  3. ^ Szebin, Frederick; Steve Biodrowski. "David Lynch on Lost Highway", Cinefantastique, April 1997. 
  4. ^ a b c d Biodrowski, Steve. "Lost Highway - Mystery Man", Cinefantastique, April 1997. 
  5. ^ a b Swezey, Stuart. "911 - David Lynch, Phone Home", Filmmaker, Winter 1997. 
  6. ^ Funny How Secrets Travel: David Lynch’s Lost Highway.
  7. ^ Reading Inland Empire - A Mental Toolbox for Interpreting a Lynch Film.
  8. ^ Slavoj Žižek's The Art of the Ridiculous Sublime: On David Lynch's Lost Highway (University of Washington Press, 2000); quoted in Emma Wilson's Alain Resnais (Manchester University Press, 2006, ISBN 0719064066). Page 142.
  9. ^ a b c Blackwell, Mark. "Sharp Electronics", Raygun, February 1997. 
  10. ^ From the Movie Geek Archives: Lost Highway.
  11. ^ Lost Highway promotional pictures.
  12. ^ [[cite web| url=http://www.metacritic.com/video/titles/losthighway?q=lost%20highway| title= Metacritic Review Of Lost Highway}}
  13. ^ Lost Highway - Patricia Arquette
  14. ^ Woodward, Tom. "Lost Highway", DVDActive, December 11, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-12-11. 
  15. ^ Hewett, Ivan. "Lost Highway: into the dark heart of David Lynch", The Daily Telegraph, March 25, 2008. Retrieved on 2008-03-25. 

Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Cinefantastique is a horror, fantasy, and science fiction film magazine started in 1970 by publisher/editor Frederick S. Clarke. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cinefantastique is a horror, fantasy, and science fiction film magazine started in 1970 by publisher/editor Frederick S. Clarke. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • The Art of the Ridiculous Sublime: On David Lynch's Lost Highway, (ISBN 0-295-97925-9) Slavoj Zizek, 2000.
  • Comparison between Lost Highway and Mulholland Dr.
  • Lost Highway Explained
  • Robert Blake - Mystery Man of the Lost Highway
  • David Lynch directs traffic on the Lost Highway

Slavoj Žižek. ... For the street in Los Angeles, see Mulholland Drive. ...

See also

Detour is a 1945 film noir cult classic that stars Tom Neal, Ann Savage, Claudia Drake and Edmund MacDonald. ... Caché (marketed as Hidden in the United Kingdom) is a 2005 French-language film, written and directed by Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... Michael Haneke A feature film is twenty-four lies per second. ...

External links

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Lost Highway
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... This article is about the David Lynch film. ... Wild at Heart is a 1990 American film written for the screen and directed by David Lynch, based on Barry Giffords novel Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula about a young couple from South Carolina who, after Sailors return from prison, decide to go on... Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ... The Straight Story is a motion picture, released in 1999 and directed by David Lynch. ... For the street in Los Angeles, see Mulholland Drive. ... This article is about the film. ... The Short Films of David Lynch (2002) is a DVD collection of the early student and commissioned film work of American filmmaker David Lynch. ... Lumière and Company (1996) was a collaboration between several film directors in which each made a short film using the original Lumière brothers camera. ... Darkened Room is a short film that appeared on www. ... Boat is a short film directed by David Lynch, released in 2007 on the DVD anthology Dynamic:01. ... This article is about the television show. ... American Chronicles was a documentary television program which was run by Fox Broadcasting Company as part of its 1990 fall lineup. ... This article is about the TV series, for the Billy Preston album, see On the Air (album) On the Air (1992) was an ABC sitcom created by David Lynch and Mark Frost. ... Hotel Room was a three episode 1993 HBO TV-Series produced by David Lynch (who directed two of them). ... Industrial Symphony No. ... Rabbits redirects here, for the animal, see Rabbit Rabbits is a 2002 film written and directed by David Lynch. ... Images, first published in 1994 (now out of print), is a book by David Lynch. ... Dumbland is a series of eight crudely animated shorts written, directed, and voiced by director David Lynch in 2002. ... The Angriest Dog in the World is a comic strip created by film director David Lynch. ... David Lynch is known for his constant collaboratios with various of the same actors and crew in his productions. ... BlueBob is an album of music cowritten and performed by David Lynch and John Neff. ... Lynch on Lynch is a book of interviews with David Lynch, conducted, edited, and introduced by Chris Rodley, himself a filmmaker. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lost Highway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1634 words)
Lost Highway is a 1997 film directed by David Lynch.
Lost Highway was adapted as an opera by Austrian composer Olga Neuwirth.
Lost Highway is the title of a 2003 BBC documentary series in 4 episodes on the history of country music, perhaps titled after the Hank Williams song of the same name.
girish: Lost Highway (3622 words)
Lost Highway is a Moebius strip movie—its beginning and ending are tied together, but at their point of meeting, they don’t complete a tidy circle.
There are a lot of good spots in Lost Highway, but my favorite (aside from the creepy phone call, or the creepy un-explosion) is when Arquette's character reaches out and the film cuts to close-up of his face as she touches him.
I saw 'Lost Highway' on the big screen when it came out and left totally confused but my friend reeled off a theory instantly which he was convinced made sense...
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