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Encyclopedia > Los Angeles Times

Front page from October 23, 2006
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet

Owner Tribune Company
Publisher David D. Hiller
Editor Jim O'Shea
Founded December 4, 1881
Headquarters 202 West 1st Street
Los Angeles, California 90012
Flag of United States United States
Circulation 815,723 Daily[1]
1,173,096 Sunday[2]

Website: www.latimes.com

This just IN !!!:paris hilton's new dog...tinkerbell is expected to die in about a week due to cancer in her brain...paris said that she will not give this dog a proper burial and will probably conduct a service to eat the rest of her body which hasnt recieved the cancer. - N.Y Weekly Image File history File links Los_Angeles_Times. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (440x800, 159 KB)Los Angeles Times front page on Monday, October 23, 2006. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Newspaper sizes in August 2005. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State California County Los Angeles County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

 The Los Angeles Times (also known as the LA Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. It is the second-largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States and the third-most widely distributed newspaper in the United States.[3] 

Founded in 1881, the Times has won 37 Pulitzer Prizes through 2004; this includes four in editorial cartooning, and one each in spot news reporting for the 1965 Watts Riots and the 1992 Los Angeles riots. In 2004, the paper won five prizes, which was the second-most by any paper in one year (the first was The New York Times in 2002). Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State California County Los Angeles County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The term Watts Riots refers to a large-scale riot which lasted six days in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, in August 1965. ... The 1992 Los Angeles riots, also known as the Rodney King uprising or the Rodney King riots, were sparked on April 29, 1992 when a predominately white jury acquitted four police officers accused in the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney King, after he fled from police. ... The Pulitzer Prizes for 2004 were announced on April 5, 2004. ... ĐA listing of the Pulitzer Prize award winners for 2002: Journalism Public Service: The New York Times, for A Nation Challenged, a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story...

Contents

History

The paper was first published as the Los Angeles Daily Times on December 4, 1881, but soon went bankrupt. The paper's printer, the Mirror Company, took over the newspaper and installed former Union Army lieutenant colonel Harrison Gray Otis as an editor. Otis made the paper a financial success. In 1884, he bought out the newspaper and printing company to form the Times-Mirror Company. December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... This article is about the publisher. ...


Historian Kevin Starr lists Otis (with Henry E. Huntington and Moses Sherman) as a businessman "capable of manipulating the entire apparatus of politics and public opinion for his own enrichment."[4] Otis's editorial policy was based on civic boosterism, extolling the virtues of Los Angeles and promoting its growth. Towards those ends, the paper supported efforts to expand the city's water supply by acquiring the watershed of the Owens Valley, an effort (highly) fictionalized in the Roman Polanski movie Chinatown which is also covered in California Water Wars. Otis also was staunchly Republican, which was reflected in the paper's editorial and news content. Today, however, the paper has a distinctive liberal/Democratic position.[citation needed] Henry Edwards Huntington (February 27, 1850 - May 23, 1927) was an American railroad pioneer and art collector. ... Moses Hazeltine Sherman (1853-1932) was a land developer who built a streetcar line and owned property in the San Fernando Valley and Hollywood, California, USA. He also served on the Los Angeles Water Board. ... Boosterism is the act of huge boobs or promoting, ones town, city, or organization, with the goal of improving public perception of it. ... Owens Valley is the arid ranching valley of the Owens River in southeastern California in the United States. ... Chinatown is a 1974 film directed by Roman Polanski. ... The California Water Wars was a struggle between Los Angeles, California and people living elsewhere (including the Owens Valley) over water rights. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

Rubble of the Times building after the 1910 bombing.

The efforts of the Times to fight local unions led to the October 1, 1910 bombing of its headquarters and the home of Otis, killing 21 people. Two union leaders, James and Joseph McNamara, were charged with the murders. The American Federation of Labor hired noted trial attorney Clarence Darrow to represent the brothers, who eventually pleaded guilty, although supporters then (and since)[Who?] believed the two men were framed. The paper soon relocated to the Times Building, a Los Angeles landmark. Real photo postcard of rubble of the Los Angeles Times Building after the 1910ish bombing This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Real photo postcard of rubble of the Los Angeles Times Building after the 1910ish bombing This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... James and John McNamara were Irish-American Los Angeles trade unionists. ... The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was one of the first federations of labor unions in the United States. ... Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 Kinsman Township, Trumbull County, Ohio - March 13, 1938 Chicago) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenaged thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks (1924) and...

Chandler era

On Otis's death in 1917, his son-in-law Harry Chandler took over the reins as publisher of the Times. Harry Chandler was succeeded in 1944 by his son, Norman Chandler, who ran the paper during the rapid growth of post-war Los Angeles. Norman's wife, heiress and fellow Stanford alum Dorothy Buffum Chandler, became active in civic affairs and led the effort to build the Los Angeles Music Center, whose main concert hall was named the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in her honor. Family members are buried at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery near Paramount Studios. The site also includes a memorial to the Times building bombing victims. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Norman Chandler (September 14, 1899 - October 20, 1973, both Los Angeles, California) was the publisher of the Los Angeles Times from 1945 to 1960, and is largely responsible for the success of the newspaper. ... This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... Dorothy Buffum Chandler (19 May 1901 - 6 July 1997) was a Los Angeles cultural leader. ... The Los Angeles Music Center (its actual name is the Performing Arts Center of Los Angeles County) is a complex of four entertainment venues located on Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion is one of the halls in the Los Angeles Music Center (which is one of the three largest performing arts centers in the nation). ...


The paper was a founding co-owner of then-CBS turned independent television station KTTV; it became that station's sole owner in 1951 and remained so until it sold it to Metromedia in 1963. Now that station is owned by Fox through Newscorp. CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... KTTV, channel 11, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, based in Los Angeles, California. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1970s logo for WTCN-TV (now KARE) in Minneapolis, which included the corporate logo for Metromedia; this logo was also used by KTTV in Los Angeles Metromedia Producers Corporation logo Metromedia (also often MetroMedia) was a media company that owned radio and television stations in the United States from 1956... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) (NYSE: NWS, NYSE: NWSa, ASX: NWS, LSE: NCRA) is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ...


The fourth generation of family publishers, Otis Chandler, held that position from 1960 to 1980. Otis Chandler sought legitimacy and recognition for his family's paper, often forgotten in the power centers of the Northeastern United States due to its geographic and cultural distance. He sought to remake the paper in the model of the nation's most respected newspapers, notably The New York Times and Washington Post. Believing that the newsroom was "the heartbeat of the business"[5], Otis Chandler increased the size and pay of the reporting staff and expanded its national and international reporting. In 1962, the paper joined with the Washington Post to form the Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service to syndicate articles from both papers for other news organizations. Otis Chandler (November 23, 1927–February 27, 2006) was best known as the publisher of the Los Angeles Times between 1960 and 1980. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... ...


During the 1960s, the paper won four Pulitzer Prizes, more than its previous nine decades combined.


The paper's early history and subsequent transformation was chronicled in a (decidedly) unauthorized history Thinking Big (1977, ISBN 0399117660), and was one of four organizations profiled by David Halberstam in The Powers That Be (1979, ISBN 0394503813; 2000 reprint ISBN 0252069412). It has also been the the whole or partial subject of nearly thirty dissertations in communications or social science in the past four decades.[6] David Halberstam (April 10, 1934 – April 23, 2007) was an American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author known for his early work on the Vietnam War, his work on politics, history, business, media, American culture, and his later sports journalism. ...


Modern era

LA Times building, May 2006, featuring green "125 Years" banners, at 1st and Spring, downtown Los Angeles

The Los Angeles Times paid circulation figures have decreased since the mid-1990s. It has recently been unable to pass the one million mark, a milestone easily surpassed in earlier decades. The circulation drop may be a side effect of a succession of short-lived editors. They were appointed by publisher Mark Willes, who took the paper in controversial directions after Otis Chandler relinquished day-to-day control in 1995.[5] Willes, the former president of General Mills, was criticized for his lack of understanding of the newspaper business, and was derisively referred to by reporters and editors as Captain Crunch. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (972x1296, 242 KB) Summary The LA Times Building, May 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (972x1296, 242 KB) Summary The LA Times Building, May 2006. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ... For information on the phone phreak called Captain Crunch, see John Draper. ...


Other possible reasons for the circulation drop include an increase in the single copy price from 25 cents to 50 cents[7] or the rise in readers preferring to read the online version instead of the hard copy.[8] Editor Jim O'Shea, in an internal memo announcing a May 2007, mostly voluntary reduction in force, characterized the decrease in circulation as an "industry-wide problem" which the paper must counter by "growing rapidly on-line," "break[ing] news on the web and explain[ing] and analyz[ing] it in our newspaper."[9] 2004 Pulitzer Prize winner Nancy Cleeland[10], who took O'Shea's buyout offer, did so because of "frustration with the paper's coverage of working people and organized labor"[11] (the beat that earned her her Pulitzer[10]). She speculated that the paper's revenue shortfall could be reversed by expanding coverage of economic justice topics which she believes are increasingly relevant to Southern California; she cited the paper's attempted hiring of a "celebrity justice reporter" as an example of the wrong approach.[11] The term Reduction in Force is used by various corporate Human Resources departments as a synonym for downsizing. ... Social justice refers to conceptions of a just society, where justice refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ...


In 2000, the Times-Mirror Company was purchased by the Tribune Company of Chicago, Illinois, ending one of the final examples of a family-controlled metropolitan daily newspaper in the U.S. (The New York Times, The Seattle Times, and others remain). John Carroll, former editor of the Baltimore Sun, was brought in to restore the luster of the newspaper. During his reign at the Los Angeles Times he eliminated more than 200 jobs, but it was not enough for parent company Tribune. Despite operating profits of 20 percent the Tribune executives were unsatisfied with returns and by 2005 John Carroll had left the Los Angeles Times. The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The Seattle Times is the leading daily newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... John Carroll may be: John Carroll (bishop) (1735-1815), American bishop John Lee Carroll (1830-1911), American politician - Maryland John Carroll (VC) (1891-1971), Australian Victoria Cross recipient Sir John Carroll (astronomer) (1899-1974), British scientist John Carroll (actor) (1906-1979), American actor John A. Carroll (1901-1983), American jurist... The Baltimore Sun is the major newspaper in Baltimore, Maryland, with a daily press run of about 430,000 copies, and a Sunday run of 540,000 copies. ...


Dean Baquet replaced John Carroll, who refused to impose the additional cutbacks mandated by Tribune. Baquet was the first African American to hold this type of editorial position at a top-tier daily. During Baquet and Carroll's time at the paper it won 13 Pulitzers, more than any other paper but the New York Times.[12]Subsequently, Baquet was himself ousted for not meeting the demands of the Tribune Group- as was publisher Jeffrey Johnson - and replaced by James O'Shea of the Chicago Tribune. Dean P. Baquet (born in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American journalist. ...


The paper's content and design style has been overhauled several times in recent years in attempts to help increase circulation. In 2000, a major change more closely organized the news sections (related news was put closer together) and changed the "Local" section to the "California" section with more extensive coverage. Another major change in 2005 saw the Sunday "Opinion" section retitled the Sunday "Current" section, with a radical change in its presentation and columnists featured. There are regular cross-promotions with co-owned KTLA to bring evening news viewers into the Times fold.


In early 2006, The Times closed its San Fernando Valley printing plant, leaving press operations at the Olympic Plant and Orange County. Also in 2006, the Times announced its circulation at 851,532, down 5.4% from 2005. The Times's loss of circulation is the highest out of the top ten newspapers in the U.S. [13]. Despite this recent circulation decline, many in the media industry have lauded the newspaper's effort to decrease its reliance on 'other-paid' circulation in favor of building its 'individually-paid' circulation base - which showed a marginal increase in the most recent circulation audit. This distinction reflects the difference between, for example, copies distributed to hotel guests free of charge (other-paid) versus subscriptions and single-copy sales (individually-paid). San Fernando Valley from southwestern edge. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On April 2, 2007, the Tribune Company announced their acceptance of Sam Zell's offer to buy the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, and other media assets. Zell reportedly plans to take the company private and sell off the Chicago Cubs after the 2007 season. He will also sell the company's 25 percent interest in Comcast SportsNet Chicago. Up until the time of shareholder approval, Los Angeles billionaires Ron Burkle and Eli Broad may submit a higher bid in which case Zell would receive a $25 million buyout fee. [14] April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ... Samuel Sam Zell (born September 1941) (aka, the grave digger),is a U.S. born billionaire and real-estate entrepreneur. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Comcast SportsNet (or CSN) is a group of four regional sports networks. ... Ronald W. Burkle is a supermarket billionaire from Beverly Hills, with a personal wealth of over $2 billion. ... Eli Broad (born June 6, 1933) a native of Detroit, Michigan is a Jewish American billionaire who lives in Los Angeles, California. ...


Competition and rivalry

The Los Angeles Times building as seen from Grand Ave.
The Los Angeles Times building as seen from Grand Ave.

By the mid-1940s, the Los Angeles Times was the leading newspaper in terms of sales in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. After World War II, it launched The Mirror an afternoon tabloid to compete with Hearst's Herald-Express. The Mirror absorbed The Los Angeles Daily News in 1954 and ceased publication in 1962, when The Herald-Express was merged with the morning Los Angeles Examiner. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1116x818, 1332 KB) Licensing Details Photo taken 7 AM, March 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1116x818, 1332 KB) Licensing Details Photo taken 7 AM, March 2006. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Greater Los Angeles Area, or the Southland, is the agglomeration of urbanized area around the city of Los Angeles, California. ... Los Angeles Daily News is the second largest circulating daily newspaper of Los Angeles, California. ... The Los Angeles Herald Examiner building, located at the southwest corner of Broadway and 11th Streets, was largely designed by San Francisco architect Julia Morgan then associated with Los Angeles architects J. Martyn Haenke and William J. Dodd whose contribution to the design is not yet determined by scholars. ...


In 1989, its last rival for the Los Angeles daily newspaper market, The Los Angeles Herald Examiner, went out of business, making Los Angeles nominally a one-newspaper city. However, in the suburban neighborhoods of the San Fernando Valley, The Times still competed with The Valley News and Greensheet, which later renamed itself The Daily News of Los Angeles to compete with the Times. The L.A. Times has an Orange County edition (with its own printing presses and editorial staff) that competes with the Santa Ana based The Orange County Register. La Opinión, a Spanish language daily newspaper previously owned by The Times for several years in the 1990s, also sells many papers. Categories: Newspaper stubs | Los Angeles history | Defunct United States newspapers | Newspapers of California ... San Fernando Valley from southwestern edge. ... Los Angeles Daily News is the second largest circulating daily newspaper of Los Angeles, California. ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... La Opinión is a Spanish language daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the six counties of Southern California. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Outside of the city of Los Angeles proper, The Times also competes against several smaller daily papers in nearby Southern California cities. Examples include The Long Beach Press-Telegram, The Daily Breeze (South Bay), The Ventura County Star, The San Gabriel Valley Tribune, and The Pasadena Star-News. The Los Angeles Newspaper Group is an umbrella group of local daily newspapers published in the greater Los Angeles area. ... The Daily Breeze is a daily newspaper published in Torrance, California by the Copley Press. ... The South Bay and surrounding regions in Southern California The South Bay is a region in the southwest peninsula of Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... ... The Los Angeles Newspaper Group is an umbrella group of local daily newspapers published in the greater Los Angeles area. ...


In the 1990s, the Los Angeles Times attempted to publish various editions catering to far flung areas. Editions included a Ventura County edition, an Inland Empire edition, a San Diego County edition, and a "National Edition" that was distributed to Washington, D.C. and the San Francisco Bay Area. The National Edition was closed in December 2004. Of these, only the Inland Empire and Ventura County editions remains, although nearby cities such as Bakersfield, Las Vegas, Barstow and Needles still sell the Times in selected newsstands. Ventura County . ... For residents of Southern California, the Inland Empire is a popular, informal, term for the region that is centered on the oldest cities in the region: (in no particular order) Ontario, San Bernardino, Redlands, Upland, and Riverside. ... San Diego County is a county located on the Pacific Ocean in the far southwest of the U.S. state of California, along its border with Mexico. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ...


Some of these editions were folded in to Our Times, a group of community newspapers included in home delivery and newsstand editions of the regular Los Angeles Metro newspaper. Our Times was also founded in Santa Monica, due to the closure of the long time Outlook newspaper. Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ...


Today, remnants of Our Times are the Times Community Newspapers that are inserted on a regular basis in some areas of the Los Angeles Times. Times Community Newspapers are primarily independent local newspapers that were purchased by the Los Angeles Times during its expansion phase, but have a large enough readership and advertiser base to be continued. These include the News-Press in Glendale, the Leader in Burbank (and surrounding areas), the Sun in La Crescenta and surrounding regions, the Daily Pilot in Newport Beach and surrounding cities, and the Independent in Huntington Beach. Nickname: The Jewel City Location of Glendale within Los Angeles County and the State of California. ... Burbank is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... La Crescenta-Montrose is a census-designated place and unincorporated area in Los Angeles County, California, encompassing those parts of the Crescenta Valley not in the cities of Glendale or La Cañada Flintridge. ... Location of Newport Beach within Orange County, California. ... Huntington Beach is a seaside city in Orange County in southern California. ...


Features

Among its current staff is sports columnist Bill Plaschke, who is also a panelist on ESPN's Around the Horn. T.J. Simers also writes for the Times and used to appear on the show. Former Times columnist J.A. Adande remains an ATH panelist. The Times also has Helene Elliott, the first female sportswriter to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, and Robert Hillburn and Randy Lewis, two of the best-known pop music critics in America. William Bill P. Plaschke (born September 6, 1958 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American journalist who has written for the Los Angeles Times since 1987. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Around the Horn (sometimes abbreviated ATH) is a daily, half-hour sports talk program on ESPN filmed in Washington, D.C. It airs at 5:00 pm ET, in a sports talk hour with Pardon the Interruption, with the hour repeated at 6:00 p. ... J.A. Adande is a sports columnist for The Los Angeles Times and a frequent guest on Around The Horn on ESPN. Joshua Ade Adande (born October 25, 1970 in Los Angeles) is a sports columnist for The Los Angeles Times and a panelist for ESPNs Around The Horn. ... Helene Elliott is an American sportswriter for the Los Angeles Times who is a general sports columnist. ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ...


One of the Times' best-known columns is "Column One," a feature that appears daily on the front page to the left-hand side. Established in September 1968, it is a place for the weird and the interesting; in the How Far Can a Piano Fly? (a compilation of Column One stories) introduction, Patt Morrison writes that the column's purpose is to elicit a "Gee, that's interesting, I didn't know that" type of reaction. Patt Morrison is a columnist for the Los Angeles Times and frequent commentator on National Public Radio. ...


The Times also embarks on a number of investigative journalism pieces, researching and dissecting a certain scandal or unfavored part of society. A series in December 2004 on the King-Drew Medical Center led to a Pulitzer Prize and a more thorough coverage of the hospital's troubled history. Most recently, journalist Steve Lopez wrote a five-part series on the civic and humanitarian disgrace of Los Angeles' Skid Row. The term skid row or skid road is used to refer to a rundown or dilapidated urban area. ...


Controversies

The credibility of the Times suffered greatly when it was revealed in 1999 that a revenue-sharing arrangement was in place between the Times and Staples Center in the preparation of a 168-page magazine about the opening of the sports arena. The magazine's editors and writers were not informed of the agreement, which breached the "Chinese wall" that traditionally has separated advertising from journalistic functions at American newspapers. Publisher Mark Willes also had not prevented advertisers from pressuring reporters in other sections of the newspaper to write stories favorable to their point of view.[15] Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Staples Center is a multipurpose sports arena in Downtown Los Angeles, California at the Los Angeles Sports and Entertainment District. ...


Michael Kinsley was hired as the Opinion and Editorial (Op-Ed) Editor in April 2004 to help improve the quality of the opinion pieces. His role was controversial, as he forced writers to take a more decisive stance on issues. In 2005, he created a Wikitorial, the first Wiki by a major news organization. Although it failed, readers could combine forces to produce their own editorial pieces. He resigned later that year. Michael Kinsley (born March 9, 1951 in Detroit, Michigan) is a veteran American political journalist and commentator, currently serving as Editorial and Opinion Editor at the Los Angeles Times (since April 2004) (though he announced in July 2005 that he would assume a reduced, but as-yet-undefined, role). ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... A wikitorial is a term coined by the Los Angeles Times to describe a traditional editorial that can be edited in the fashion of a wiki (computer software that allows users to edit text and make changes to one document). ... Look up Wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


On November 12, 2005, new Op-Ed Editor Andrés Martinez shook things up by announcing the firing of leftist op-ed columnist Robert Scheer and conservative editorial cartoonist Michael Ramirez, replacing the two with a more diversified lineup of regular columnists. The change was not well-received by liberal readers, many of whom accused the newspaper of trying to silence liberal voices and remove controversial writers. November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andrés Martinez (born c. ... Robert Scheer, (b. ... Michael Ramirez is a Pulitzer Prize winning editorial cartoonist with The Los Angeles Times. ...


The Times has also come under controversy for its decision to drop the weekday edition of the Garfield comic strip in 2005, in favor of a hipper comic strip Brevity, while retaining the Sunday edition. Garfield was dropped altogether shortly thereafter.[16] This section has been identified as trivia. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brevity is a single-panel newspaper comic strip created by Guy Endore-Kaiser and Rodd Perry, also the creators of the infamous tubgirl. ... This section has been identified as trivia. ...


Following the GOP's defeat in the 06 mid-term Elections, an Opinion piece published on November 19, 2006 by Joshua Muravchik, a leading neoconservative and a resident scholar at the right-wing American Enterprise Institute, titled BOMB IRAN shocked readers, including over a million Iranian Americans of California, with its hawkish overtures in support of more unilateral action by the United States, this time against Iran.[17] Joshua Muravchik is a Jewish author and a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. ... This article is about Neoconservatism in the United States, for neoconservatism in other regions, see Neoconservatism (disambiguation). ... The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a conservative think tank, founded in 1943, whose stated mission is to defend the principles and improve the institutions of American freedom and democratic capitalism — limited government, private enterprise, individual liberty and responsibility, vigilant and effective defense and foreign policies...


On March 22, 2007, editorial page editor Andrés Martinez resigned following an alleged scandal centering around his girlfriend's professional relationship with a Hollywood producer who had been tapped to guest edit a section in the newspaper.[18] In an open letter penned upon leaving the paper, Grazer blasted the publication for allowing the Chinese Wall between the news and editorial departments to be weakened, accusing news staffers of lobbying the opinion desk.[19] Andrés Martinez (born c. ... In business, Chinese Walls are information barriers implemented within firms to seperate and isolate persons who make investment decisions from persons who are privy to undisclosed material information which may influence those decisions. ...


Also in March 2007 the Times faced rumors that publisher David Hiller suggested and approved former Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, with whom Hiller has close personal and business contacts, for a guest editorial position at the newspaper.[20] Rumsfeld was an influential Iraq war hawk in the George W. Bush administration. Rumsfeld also has strong ties to the Times' parent company, the Tribune Company, where he was a member of the board of directors.[20] Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a U.S. politician and businessman, who was the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975–1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001–2006. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ... The Tribune Company is a large multimedia corporation based in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Los Angeles Times Book Prizes

See List of Los Angeles Times Book Prize winners

Since 1980, the Los Angeles Times has awarded a set of annual book prizes. The Prizes "currently have nine single-title categories: biography, current interest, fiction, first fiction (the Art Seidenbaum Award added in 1991), history, mystery/thriller (category added in 2000), poetry, science and technology (category added in 1989), and young adult fiction (category added in 1998). In addition, the Robert Kirsch Award is presented annually to a living author with a substantial connection to the American West whose contribution to American letters deserves special recognition" [21]. // 2005: Matisse the Master: A Life of Henri Matisse, the Conquest of Colour, 1909-1954 by Hilary Spurling, (Knopf) 2004: de Kooning: An American Master by Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan (Knopf) 2003: American Empire: Roosevelt’s Geographer and the Prelude to Globalization by Neil Smith (University of California Press...


The Book Prize program was founded by Art Seidenbaum, a Los Angeles Times book editor from 1978 to 1985; an award named after him was added a year after his death in 1990. The Robert Kirsch Award is named after the longtime Times book critic who died in 1980. Works are eligible during the year of their first US publication in English, though English does not have to be the original language of the work. The author of each winning book and the Kirsch Award recipient receives a citation and $1,000.


References

General references:

  • Edward Maddin Ainsworth, History of Los Angeles Times, ca. 1940.
  • Robert Gottlieb, Thinking Big, New York: Putnam, 1977.
  • David Halberstam, The Powers That Be, New York: Knopf, 1979.
  • Jack R. Hart, The information empire: The rise of the Los Angeles Times and the Times Mirror Corporation, Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, 1981.

Specific references:

  1. ^ "Circulation at the Top 20 Newspapers", The Associated Press, 2007-04-30. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  2. ^ 2007 Top 100 Daily Newspapers in the U.S. by Circulation (PDF). BurrellesLuce (2007-03-31). Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  3. ^ According to the 2007 World Almanac
  4. ^ Inventing the Dream: California Through the Progressive Era (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985): 228.
  5. ^ a b Dennis McDougal, Privileged son: Otis Chandler and the rise and fall of the L.A. Times dynasty, Cambridge, Mass.: Da Capo, 2002
  6. ^ ProQuest Dissertation Abstracts, accessed June 8, 2007.
  7. ^ Shah, Diane, "The New Los Angeles Times" Columbia Journalism Review 2002, 3.
  8. ^ Rainey, James, "Newspaper Circulation Continues to Fall," Los Angeles Times 1 May 2007: D1.
  9. ^ Editor & Publisher. "California Split: 57 More Job Cuts at L.A. Times". Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  10. ^ a b Editor & Publisher. "Pulitzer Winner Explains Why She Took L.A. Times Buyout". Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
  11. ^ a b Why I'm Leaving The L.A. Times from The Huffington Post
  12. ^ Mother Jones. "Breaking the News".
  13. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2006-05-08-newspaper-circulation_x.htm
  14. ^ Tribune goes to Zell, from the April 3, 2007 edition of the Chicago Sun-Times
  15. ^ Salon. "Meltdown at the L.A. Times", 1999-11-05. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  16. ^ Editor & Publisher. "Garfield no more?". Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  17. ^ Los Angeles Times. "Bomb Iran", 2006-11-19. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  18. ^ Los Angeles Times. "Editor Resigns over Killed Opinion Section", 2007-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  19. ^ Los Angeles Times. "Grazergate, an Epilogue", 2007-03-22. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  20. ^ a b Deadline Hollywood Daily. "LA Times Publisher's Friend and Tribune Co Ex-Director Don Rumsfeld was asked to Guest-Edit after Grazer", 2007-03-25. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  21. ^ http://www.latimes.com/extras/bookprizes/index.html Los Angeles Times Book Prizes home page

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External links


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